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UBC Reports Mar 21, 1996

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 THE   UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
T TBC REPORTS
Budget spells
changes for
universities
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
The March 6 federal budget held good
news and bad news for the country's
universities.
Further cuts to several major sources
of research funding to be implemented in
1998/99 mean university researchers will
be forced to struggle harder to gain funding. The creation of a new health services
research fund, however, will allow Canadian universities to benefit society through
funding of health services research
projects in a variety of areas, including
the social sciences.
As part ofthe health services research
initiative, the government will commit
$65 million over the next five years to
fund research on what works, and what
doesn't, in Canada's health care system.
"The health research fund is new
money that will definitely provide new
and exciting opportunities for people in
many disciplines." said Bernard Bressler,
UBC vice-president. Research. "The opportunities will appear in a range of
areas including the social sciences, nurs-
See BUDGET Page 4
TRIUMF photo
UBC's TRIUMF cyclotron is the location of Canada's only proton therapy facility used to treat eye melanoma.
Patients' heads are immobilized with a mesh mask and bite-block while a fast-moving beam of subatomic particles
(protons) are directed at the tumour in 90-second doses.
World-class physicist
receives Killam Prize
Physicist William Unruh celebrates
his 20th anniversary at UBC this year
with one of Canada's most distinguished
academic awards—the Killam Prize for
the Natural Sciences.
Three $50,000 Killam prizes are presented annually by the
Canada Council in recognition of world-class
achievements by Canadians in the natural sciences, health sciences,
and engineering.
Unruh, 50, is recognized for research on
gravity and theoretical
cosmology—the study of
the origin and evolution
ofthe universe.
Unruh joined UBC's
Physics Dept. in 1976. A
decade later he became director oftheCosmology Program at the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research (CIAR). The private, nonprofit organization has created a series of
Canadian-based international research
networks to foster creative approaches to
the study of complex problems.
Unruh's expertise lies in the combined effects of gravity and quantum
mechanics—the theoretical science
which looks at the behaviour of all
matter. The combination is important
both for understanding the first moments ofthe universe and in developing
a complete theory of matter and gravity.
Unruh is noted for pioneering work
on quantum field theory as it applies to
black holes. These holes are pockets of
space believed to be created when stars
collapse in on themselves leaving behind a gravitational field from which no
Unruh
light can escape.
Unruh's discovery of acceleration radiation is of particular significance. He
found that by accelerating an object in a
vacuum (now known as the Unruh
vacuum) where no matter or radiation is
thought to exist, the object
heats up and acts as
though it were surrounded
by radiation. The object's
temperature (the Unruh
temperature), rises in proportion to acceleration.
The formula for acceleration radiation, together with
Stephen Hawking's discovery that black holes are hot,
revealed unsuspected connections between quantum
theory, gravity and thermodynamics.
"So it turns out that
our notion of a particle is
a relative concept which depends on
your state of motion," said Unruh. "If
you accelerate, you can see particles
which you wouldn't see if you were
sitting still."
John Wheeler, Unruh's mentor from
Princeton University and the man who
gave black holes their name, called
Unruh's formula one ofthe most important discoveries in fundamental physics in the last 20 years.
More recently, Unruh has been investigating the idea of quantum computers that are theoretically capable of
factoring huge numbers hundreds of
digits long. Among the practical applications of such computers, were they to
exist, is their ability to encrypt messages within massive digits.
See UNRUH Page 2
TRIUMF takes steady
shot at eye cancer
by Charles Ker
Staff writer
When UBC Prof. Alan Hannam was
informed of the malignant tumour in his
left eye last year his initial response was,
"when am I going to lose it?"
Surgical removal of the eye was the
standard treatment for eye melanoma for
many years. Today, precision proton beam
therapy is the treatment of choice for
some tumours.
Hannam was treated at Harvard University in Boston, one of three U.S. sites
offering the therapy. The Harvard cyclotron has helped about 1,500 melanoma
patients with its proton beams over the
last 20 years.
Six months ago, UBC became the only
Canadian site to offer the painless therapy
for those with malignant eye melanoma.
Located on campus at the TRIUMF particle accelerator, the proton therapy facil
ity has treated 13 patients since it opened
in August 1995.
The procedure involves diverting a
small fraction of the TRIUMF cyclotron's
proton beam into a small, specially designed chamber. There, the beam passes
through a nozzle at the end of which is a
metal aperture sculpted to the exact dimensions of the patient's tumour. For
approximately 90 seconds, the tumour is
uniformly bombarded by protons at a
rate of 100 million per second.
This brief proton blast, repeated four
times over four consecutive days, is capable of destroying the tumour with millimetre precision.
"Like little cannonballs, the protons
destroy damaged cells and break bonds in
the DNA as they slow down in the eye," said
Ewart Blackmore, head of TRIUMF's accelerator technology division which designed the beam delivery system. "We can
See PROTON Page 4
Inside
Election Equity
A political party stock market gives trading futures a whole new meaning
Bite Buster 5
A new bureau trains dentists to help track down criminals
Able Authors 16-17
UBC honours the many campus authors who made their mark in 1995
Eye Catchers 20
Richard Prince's sculptures flow through the Institute of Asian Research 2 UBC Reports • March 21, 1996
Letters
Discrimination
definition lacks
fairness
Editor:
With probably the best of
intentions, Dr. Sharon Kahn,
associate vice-president,
Equity, suggests that the
Policy on Discrimination and
Harassment be amended to
include a definition of "systemic discrimination" (UBC
Reports, March 7, 1996).
Unfortunately, however. Dr.
Kahn's proposed definition
depreciates the very notion of
fairness without which any
policy on discrimination and
harassment has merely
political, but not moral,
significance.
The suggested definition is
as follows: "Systemic discrimination refers to policies and
practices that may appear fair
and impartial, but contain
barriers that detrimentally
affect the work or study
environment or lead to adverse
job- or study-related consequences for members of groups
protected by the B.C. Human
Rights Act."
The definition is insidious,
first, because the restrictive
clause modifying the presumed
bad policies and practices—
i.e., those "that may appear
fair and impartial"—implies
that apparent fairness and
impartiality are somehow
integral parts of the discrimination which the policy sets
out to oppose. This is to give
fairness and impartiality, the
very things I would hope Dr.
Kahn aims to promote, a bad
name. It perversely leaves
unopposed those policies and
practices which lack the
appearance of fairness and
impartiality!
Secondly, it should be
clearer in the revision whether
the auxilliary "may" governs
only "appear," or both "appear"
and "contain." This seemingly
picky grammatical query is
crucial. For the worry which
T FREDERIC WOOD -|—i
HEATR.h
LETTERS POLICY
UBC Reports welcomes letters to the editor on topics relevant to the
university community. Letters must be signed and include an address
and phone number for verification. Please limit letters, which may be
edited for length, style and clarity, to 300 words. Deadline is 10 days
before publication date. Submit letters in person or by mail to the UBC
Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C.,
V6T 1Z1, by fax to 822-2684 or by e-mail to paula.martin@ubc.ca.
many have about Dr. Kahn's
policy is that, whereas the
appearance of fairness is not
enough to establish one's
innocence, the mere appearance of disadvantaging some
legislatively defined "group" is
enough to establish one's guilt.
Call me naive, but I think the
policy should concern itself
with bad policies and practices
that do, not only may, perpetrate unfairness, etc.
Thirdly, the revision should
avoid the "mushy causality" of
the phrase "lead to" (as in
"lead to adverse ... consequences"). All roads may lead
to Rome; but if a person ends
up in Rome, more than the
roads may be to blame. All
sorts of policies in place at
UBC—from grading students
to hiring and promoting
faculty—involve justifiable
discriminations that may
nevertheless "lead to adverse
... consequences." Ask any
student who fails a course or
any faculty member denied
tenure. But the issue is not
whether the consequences are
adverse or whether the person
suffering those consequences
belongs to some provincially
sanctified group. The issue is,
and ought only to be. whether
the judgements and policies
are fair and impartial.
So again I urge Dr. Kahn
and her equity cohorts to come
clean: If your policies are
about justice and moral
principle, then let words like
"fairness" and "impartiality"
have pride of place in your
document. Don't sneer at
them. And don't be afraid of
categories such as "human
beings." Above all, don't try to
invent a brave new body of
morality constructed upon the
hollow bones of "detrimental
effects," "adverse consequences," and "protected
groups."
Alternatively, if your policy
is not about justice, fairness,
and impartiality, then please
be more open about the
amorally political nature of its
goals and motivation.
Dennis Danielson
Professor of English
East Mall endangers pedestrians
Editor:
The decision to open East
Mall to unrestricted vehicle
traffic was protested by many
people last year, but it has
remained in effect. Over the
months the situation for
pedestrians in the area has
worsened markedly. The
volume of vehicle traffic has
increased considerably, as
more and more drivers find the
East Mall a convenient short
cut or drop-off point.
Crossing the road, especially in rainy weather, has
become increasingly hazardous: despite prominent warning signs, some cars are driven
aggressively and at high
speeds, sometimes weaving to
and fro across the road to
avoid the speed bumps. Other
cars move into areas where
traffic is supposedly completely
forbidden, in front of the
Student Union Building or
between the Main Library and
Buchanan Tower.
The university should
ensure a safe environment for
the large numbers of pedestrians who have to cross this
road frequently to reach the
Student Union Building, the
Aquatic Centre, the residences
and parking facilities, by
banning, or severely and
effectively restricting the
growing vehicle traffic along it.
Graham Good
Professor of English
Unruh
Continued from Page 1
Unruh says investigations into
quantum computers help sharpen
his understanding of what makes
modern quantum mechanics different from more classical thoughts
about the world such as those from
Sir Isaac Newton's time.
"We know there are strange
things in quantum mechanics
and the thought of a computer
which can solve problems that
are hopeless to solve with ordinary computers is really
strange." Unruh said. "What is it
about quantum mechanics that
allows us to do that?"
Bom in Manitoba. Unruh received a BSc from the University of
Manitoba and then went to
Princeton, earning his master's and
doctorate in the same department
where Albert Einstein once worked.
Edwin Jackson
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The USE OF FREE
Essay Contest
$1000 for the best original essay
Subject: The responsible use of freedom
Eligibility:   Open to 3rd and tth year undergraduate and
graduate UBC students
Deadline for submission: May 31.1996
Essays arc to be approximately 3000 words, typewritten,
double-spaced on numbered pages. Please provide 3 copies.
Judges: T. James Hanrahan, CSB, BA, MA, I.MS
Prof. Emeritus Robert M. Clark,  Economics
Dr. Kurt Preinsperg, Philosophy, Langara College
Prof. Emerita Margaret Prang, History
Prof. Paul G. Stanwood, English
Details and application forms: MC. Harrison,
1509-1450 Chestnut St., Vancouver, B.C. V6J 3K3
The committee reserves the right to withhold the prize if no appropriate
essay is received, or to divide it if it proves impossible to Judge between
excellent essays.	
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
• research design • data analysis
• sampling • forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508
Home: (604) 263-5394
Wax - it
Histology Services
Providing Plastic and Wax sections for the research community
George Spun-     RT, RLAT(R)
Daytime (604) 266-7359
Evening (604) 266-2597
E- Mail spurrwax@infomatch.com
Kevin Gibbon    ART FIBMS
Daytime
Evening
(604) 856-7370
(604) 856-7370
This year's Killam Prize is the
latest in a long list of honours
that Unruh, a fellow ofthe Royal
Society of Canada, has received
over the years. His other awards
include: an Alfred P. Sloan Research Fellowship (1978-80): the
Rutherford Medal from the Royal
Society of Canada (1982): the
Herzherg Medal ofthe Canadian
Association of Physicists (1983):
the Steacie Medal (1984); the
Rutherford Lectureship of the
Royal Society of London (1985); a
UBC Killam Research Prize (1990):
the B.C. Science and Engineering
Gold Medal (1990): and Medal of
Achievement from the Canadian
Association of Physics in 1995.
Unruh will be presented with
his Killam Prize at a special dinner in Ottawa on April 16.
BONECRUSHER
SMITH „
TROY ROBERTS
Plus 5 other boxing matches, including
SHANE SUTCLIFFE vs A.J. MOORE
Thurs. Apr. 11, Doors open 7pm UBC War Memorial Gym
TICKETMASTER: 280-4444
T TBC REPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December, June, July and August) for the entire university
community by the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251
Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1. It is
distributed on campus to most campus buildings and to
Vancouver's West Side in the Sunday Courier newspaper.
Associate Director, University Relations: Steve Crombie
(Stephen.crombie@ubc.ca)
Managing Editor: Paula Martin (paula.martin@ubc.ca)
Editor/Production: Janet Ansell (janet.ansell@ubc.ca)
Contributors: Connie Bagshaw (connie.filletti@ubc.ca),
Stephen Forgacs (Stephen.forgacs@ubc.ca)
Charles Ker (charles.ker@ubc.ca),
Gavin Wilson (gavin.wilson@ubc,ca).
Editorial and advertising enquiries: (604) 822-3131 (phone),
(604) 822-2684 (fax).
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in UBC
Reports do not necessarily reflect official university policy.
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996 3
Stock market predicts
upcoming B.C. election
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
The UBC Election Stock Market (ESM)
is coming to life again following the recent
New Democratic Party leadership convention and the controversy surrounding
B.C. Hydro and Premier Glen Clark.
'Trading activity on the markets has
picked up markedly in the last few weeks
as the NDP leadership race
and the possibility of a spring
election seem to have raised
interest levels," said Assoc.
Prof. Tom Ross ofthe Faculty
of Commerce and Business
Administration.
The exchange involves
three markets in each of
which a number of contracts
are traded. The first is the
Seats Market in which six
contracts are traded, one
representing each of the
major parties and one contract covering all others.
The Popular Vote Market also trades
six contracts, while the Majority Government Market trades three—a Liberal
majority, an NDP majority, or neither.
"Prices in the Seats Market for NDP
shares rose as high as 40 cents during
the leadership convention, only to fall
back to 33.3 cents the next week, perhaps in part due to the B.C. Hydro affair."
Ross
Ross said.
"Each party's share price translates
into a prediction about the share of seats
it will win in the Legislative Assembly. For
example, the market currently expects
the Liberals to win 39 per cent of those
seats and the NDP to win 33 per cent."
Ross and faculty colleagues Prof. James
Brander and Prof. Werner Antweiler are
directors of UBC-ESM, with Joyce Berg
and Robert Forsythe from the
University of Iowa.
Following a good start last
October. Ross said market
activity dwindled once the provincial election was postponed.
Now the markets are starting
to move again and Ross expects the number of traders to
increase well beyond the 35
currently active traders.
The market has been gaining national exposure recently,
with a mention in a recent
Maclean's magazine story
about B.C. politics as well as coverage in
the Montreal Gazette and Montreal's La
Presse. The Vancouver Sun will continue
to provide updated information on market activities in the months and weeks
preceding the election.
An information package is available
and can be requested by e-mail at
ubcesm@commerce.ubc.ca or by calling
822-8614.
Hall named in ranks of
America's top doctors
Dr. Judith Hall has been named one
of the 1,000 best doctors in America in
the March issue of American Health
magazine, one of only two Canadian
physicians to make the list.
Hall is professor and head ofthe Dept.
of Pediatrics at UBC and British Columbia's Children's Hospital and a professor of Medical Genetics.
The magazine's report is
based on confidential survey
responses from more than
3.200 of the doctors' peers at
350 leading medical centres
across the United States.
American Health is a mainstream consumer health publication with a readership of
over four million. The guide,
which lists doctors in about 60
adult and pediatric specialties, was completed to help readers find the best possible health care.
Hall is a specialist in genetic counsel-
Hall
ling with a subspecialty  in congenital
anomalies.
Her research interests are human congenital anomalies, the genetics of short
stature, newly recognized mechanisms of
disease such as mosaicism and imprinting,  the natural  history of
genetic disorders and the genetics of connective tissue
disorders.
Born in the U.S., Hall holds
dual citizenship and still performs clinical work at the
University of Washington in
Seattle, where she attended
medical school and helped
develop the clinical genetics
service program.
As a clinical geneticist, she
has been involved in health
care delivery issues, child
advocacy and the application of new genetic technology to patient care. Hall has
also developed links with lay groups interested in specific genetic diseases.
In Memoriam
George Christopher Archibald: 1926-1996
Teacher and colleague
After a long illness, Prof. Emeritus
Chris Archibald died Feb. 27, 1996, in
Appleby-In-Westmoreland, England.
Archibald played a major role in the
development of the UBC Dept. of Economics. He reorganized the graduate
program and was responsible for many
faculty appointments.
Archibald joined the department in
1970 having previously held positions at
the University of Otago in New Zealand,
the London School of Economics and the
University of Essex. He was a fellow ofthe
Econometric Society and the Royal Society of Canada.
His publications made significant con-
tributions     to     macroeconomics.
microeconomics, welfare economics,
methodology, and the history of economic thought.
His last book, Information, Incentives,
and the Economics of Control—published
two years ago—reflected his lifelong concern with the use of market mechanisms in conjunction with government
action to attain efficient and equitable
states of the economy.
"He was a good teacher and colleague,
reading and commenting on the work of
students and faculty alike. His colleagues,
students, and friends will miss him," said
Economics Prof. Charles Blackorby.
He is survived by his wife Daphne
Archibald.
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Green Giant
Stephen Forgacs photo
Alberto Orchansky, a post doctoral student working with Soil Science
Assoc. Prof Michael Novak, stands in a forest clearcut recreated in an
engineering wind tunnel. The wind tunnel and simulated forest are being
used to examine the effects of wind on trees standing at the edge of
clearcut sections. Sensors estimate wind speed and turbulence and stress
on the trees.
Events open doors for
end to discrimination
UBC will mark the International Day
for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination on Mar. 21 with a series of events in
the Student Union Building ballroom.
"This day provides the UBC community with an opportunity to acknowledge the pervasive role played by racism throughout the world, including
our own campus, and discuss ways to
combat it," said Sharon Kahn, associate vice-president. Equity. In 1995,
Kahn added, the Equity Office received
33 complaints related to race and ethnicity.
One of the highlights of the day is
an interactive theatre performance
called Of Roots and Racism: Sharing
our Stories, by the Puente Theatre
society.
Created and performed by immigrant
women, this dynamic and fun event will
help raise awareness about racism and
challenges the audience to find solutions.
The performance has two parts. The
first is a play that shows different aspects
of racism. After each scene the audience
is asked to express their thoughts and
discuss the best solutions to the problems presented.
Following the play, a scene of discrimination in the workplace is presented and
the audience is invited on stage to suggest and act out solutions.
Speaking during the morning session is Hayne Wai, manager of policy
development with Multiculturalism
B.C.
A UBC graduate. Wai has served
on a number of advisory boards and
committees dealing with
multiculturalism and anti-racism issues and worked for the federal Human Rights Commission.
Other events includes video screenings and a panel discussion by graduate students who will present works in
progress on anti-racism and education.
All activities will be held in the SUB
ballroom. Admission is free and all
members of the UBC community are
encouraged to attend. Displays will also
be located in the SUB main concourse.
The day's events are sponsored by the
Equity Office and the Committee for a
Culturally Inclusive Campus, which represents more than a dozen campus units
and groups.
March 21:
Schedule of Events
Place: SUB ballroom.
Admission is free.
• 10-11:30 a.m.
Graduate student panel
Addresses work in progress on anti-
racism and education.
• 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m.
Who Gets In
Video exploring the many questions
raised by Canada's immigration
policy and scrutinizing the economic, social and political priorities
it reflects.
• 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Racism: Tuum Est
A talk by Hayne Wai, manager of
policy development for
Multiculturalism B.C. and formerly
with the federal Human Rights
Commission. Followed by a discussion period.
• 1:30-3:30 p.m.
Of Roots and Racism:
Sharing our Stories
An interactive theatre performance
by the Puente Theatre Society,
created and performed by immigrant
women.
• 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Long Time Coming
Selected videos illustrate issues of
racism and its impact in Canada. 4 UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996
Wei Lu (left) weighs her two-month-old baby Louis Belleville while third-year
nursing student Salima Janmohamed records the information. The Breastfeeding Support Service in the Acadia Park student housing complex has
been helping mothers with concerns or problems relating to breast-feeding
and infant development since January. Held each Tuesday from 1:30 to 3:30
p.m., the service is a joint initiative of UBC's School of Nursing and the
Vancouver Health Board. It is free of charge and open to all.
Budget
Continued from Page 1
ing and rehabilitation sciences as well as
in medicine."
Bressler said the health services research fund will promote interaction between disciplines at UBC as well as between Canadian universities and the private and public sectors.
The Medical Research Council (MRC)
will administer the fund and co-ordinate
the peer review process. As a partner.
MRC will reallocate $2 million per year
from its partnerships envelope over the
next five years. Health Canada will contribute $1 million a year over five years.
Despite the creation of the fund,
Bressler said cuts of 3.5 per cent in
1998/99 to the granting councils will
further hurt university researchers and
have gone beyond the point of increasing
competition for research funding to where
valuable research efforts are being compromised.
"They're cutting the cream from the
cream," he said, quoting a former MRC
official. "It's very hard on new investigators to get established and It's equally
difficult for well-established laboratories to stay funded."
The cuts include a loss of about $6.5
million for the MRC, $ 12.8 million for the
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC), and $2.7 million for the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council (SSHRC). This
means that the budgets of NSERC and
SSHRC will have been reduced by almost
18 per cent over a four-year period (from
1994/95 to 1998/99). while the MRC's
budget has been cut about 13.5 per cent.
Several other areas in the federal budget
affect universities and their students.
The government will provide an additional $80 million a year in tax assistance for
students and their families, to be paid through
reallocations within the tax system. The
education tax credit available to full-time
students will be increased from a base amount
of $80 per month to $ 100 per month for every
month of full-time attendance.
And, the child-care expense deduction
will see eligibility broadened by allowing
single parents who are in full-time attendance at school to claim the deduction
against all types of income. This will also
apply to two-parent families where both
parents are full-time students.
Deep cuts in last year's budget reduced total transfer (cash and tax points)
to the provinces for the support of health,
social programs and post-secondary education to a total of $25.1 billion for 1997/
98. This year the government announced
it will legislate a five-year funding arrangement covering the years 1998/99
to 2002/23.
The arrangement provides for a two-year
freeze in the total transfer ending in 1999/
2000, although the cash portion will continue to decline throughout the period.
Clark Warren, manager of Planned Giving in UBC's Development Office, saidchanges
in the budget that will increase incentives for
charitable donations will not affect UBC.
"We need to be clear that the recent
budget did not add any advantages to
those that are already available to donors
to UBC through its agent of the Crown
foundation." Warren said. "What the
budget has done is taken a major step to
level the playing field between regular
charities and agents of the Crown. It is
business as usual at UBC."
Drop-in service helps
breast-feeding mothers
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
Mothers who have problems or concerns related to breast-feeding can take
advantage of a new support service operated by UBC's School of Nursing.
Faculty members from the School of
Nursing, assisted by third-year nursing
students, have been working with mothers and their infants since January
through the free, drop-in support service
on Tuesday afternoons.
Asst. I^of. Roberta Hewat, a lactation
consultant, said the support service has met
with a strong response. Strategically located
in the Acadia Park residential area, which
houses dozens of young families, the service
has been seeing an average of about five
clients in an afternoon, Hewat said.
The support service is a partnership
between the School of Nursing and the
Vancouver Health Board, through the
West Main Health Unit.
'The response has been excellent."
said Hewat. "It's easy to spend an hour
with one client, so we're very busy."
Hewat or Assoc. Prof. Donelda Ellis are
always present during the support service hours and are assisted by two third-
year nursing students who are taking the
maternity care portion of their degrees.
"We can tell a lot from a child's appearance and activity level," said Hewat, who
observes how mother and child interact.
"Since the late 1970s we have a lot more
women leaving the hospital breast-feeding,"
Hewat said. "But maintaining children on
the breast is often difficult because of the lack
of support services for mothers."
Although resources for breast-feeding
mothers exist in Vancouver, many communities in the province do not have
access to these services. Without readily
available assistance, many mothers give
up on breast-feeding if they experience
problems. Hewat sees the lack of support
services as the biggest obstacle to be
overcome when it comes to promoting
maintenance of breast-feeding.
The support service staff help with a
wide range of breast-feeding-related prob
lems. Hewat said, adding that most of the
mothers who use the service have concerns regarding their baby's growth, sore
breasts, or whether or not they're producing enough milk. Pre-natal counselling is available for women who, because
of breast implants or breast-reduction
surgery, have concerns about their ability to breast-feed.
Research shows the benefits of breastfeeding include ideal nutrition, optimal
brain growth, and the development of
immunological protection against infections while decreasing the risk of juvenile
diabetes and childhood leukemia, Hewat
said. Breast-fed children are also less
likely to develop severe food allergies.
"There is also a very important emotional component." said Hewat. "Breastfeeding is comforting for both mother and
baby."
Mothers who are unable to breast-feed
sometimes require counselling to assure
them that this does not mean they are
failing as a mother, Hewat said. Lactation
aids are used in some circumstances to
help these mothers gain the emotional
bond involved in feeding an infant.
The nursing students involved with the
support service gain practical experience
while fulfilling course requirements that
include hospital and community service.
Weight before feeding at each visit is
taken then plotted on a graph that shows
average growth rates for bottle-fed babies. Studies now underway will eventually provide the same information for
breast-fed children, Hewat said.
Although the students do much of the
work now. Hewat sees the service becoming
more self-directed with mothers taking over
tasks. Faculty and students will continue to
play a supporting and advisory role.
The Breast-feeding Support Service
takes place every Tuesday from 1:30 p.m.
to 3:30 p.m. in the Fireside Lounge ofthe
Acadia Fairview Commons Block, 2707
Tennis Crescent. UBC. Appointments are
not required and parents from any part of
the city are welcome. For more information call Roberta Hewat at 822-7464 or
Donelda Ellis at 822-7467.
Proton
Continued from Page 1
stop the protons exactly where we want
thereby sparing surrounding healthy cells. "
Protons are heavy, positively charged
particles and, when delivered at high speeds
in narrow beams, their weight allows them to
penetrate most tissues. Protons deposit nearly
all their radiation dose in a very narrow band
near the end of their range of penetration,
which, in the case of eye therapy, is a maximum of four centimetres. This band can be
spread out and shaped to correspond precisely with the boundaries of a tumour in
three dimensions.
Dose precision is the primary advantage that proton therapy offers over other
treatment practices.
Apart from eye removal, another conventional method of melanoma treatment
is sewing a radioactive disc onto the eye
wall directly under the tumour and leaving it on for about a week. A drawback of
this method is that in order to kill the
entire tumour, the patch tends to radiate
beyond the damaged area. The dose is
also not uniform.
The novelty of proton therapy lies with
the exacting nature ofthe exercise which
culminates in the four-dose treatment.
The TRIUMF facility, a collaborative
effort among UBC's Dept. of Ophthalmology, the B.C. Cancer Agency and TRIUMF,
was in the process of setting up operations when Hannam was diagnosed. Dr.
Tom Pickles, from the B.C. Cancer Agency,
expects to treat about 30 patients a year
at TRIUMF. For each patient, the drill is
the same.
In a small surgical procedure about
two weeks before the actual dose is ad
ministered, Dr. Kate Paton, clinical assistant professor of ophthalmology, sews
three or four metal markers onto the
outside ofthe eye. Placed at the margins
of the tumour, the tiny clips allow the
tumour to be outlined on X-ray films.
Next, the patient is fitted with a plastic
mesh face-mask and bite-block. These
items, attached to a special chair in the
treatment room, immobilize the head and
upper jaw in a set position. Patients undergo a treatment simulation of one to two
hours allowing a radiation oncologist to
align the markers with the proton beam.
This information, combined with clinical and ultrasound data, is used to create
a complex 3-D computer model of the
tumour and the eye. Data is then manipulated to generate a plan which optimizes
treatment while minimizing damage to
vital structures such as the optic nerve.
A patient's gaze is directed to a specific
spot while the beam is on. The radiation
beam is monitored throughout the treatment so that if the eye moves, the beam is
shut off. A magnifying closed-circuit television focused on the pupil verifies that
the alignment remains true.
Of the patients treated so far, six have
come from B.C.. three each from Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan and one
from Iran.
Blackmore said specialists are looking into using proton therapy for other
types of cancers, specifically those in the
head and neck.
UBCs proton beam chamber was financed through a grant from the Woodward Foundation in consultation with the
B.C. Cancer Agency's Vancouver Clinic. UBC Reports • March 21, 1996 5
Stephen Forgacs photo
Aiding in the identification of missing children and DNA analysis of saliva
are among the pioneering research being conducted in the newly formed
Bureau of Legal Dentistry headed by David Sweet of the Dept. of Oral
Medical and Surgical Sciences. Funded in part by the provincial government,
the bureau will be the first of its kind in Canada.
Grads among stars
on Theatre Row
Five UBC alumni are among the newest inductees to Starwalk, the parade of
stars located on Granville Street which
salutes significant achievement in the
arts.
Entertainer John Gray, television producer Philip
Keatley. patron
Iby Koerner.
humourist Eric
Nicol and conductor Doug
Parker were
honored Mar. 6
at a ceremony
and public unveiling of
plaques recognizing their outstanding contributions to entertainment in the province, across
Canada and internationally.
Inaugurated by the B.C. Entertainment Hall of Fame at the Orpheum in
1994, Starwalk currently includes 60 of
B.C.'s most eminent entertainment personalities.
Gray is an award-winning author,
screenwriter, composer and performer
for stage, television, film and radio. He
is well-known for his musicals including Billy Bishop Goes to War and Rock
and Roll.
A director, producer and broadcasting executive, Keatley is hailed as the
visionary behind a unique regional department at CBC Television in Vancou-
Koerner
ver which specialized in dramatic series. Most notable among his many successes is The Beachcombers which ran
for 20 seasons and is seen in 45 countries.
Koerner was an outstanding patron
ofthe arts who was an influential leader
on the board ofthe Vancouver Festival.
Igor Stravinsky gave his only Canadian
performance at her bequest.
Winner of three Leacock Awards for
humour.  Nicol
i     also served as a
faculty member
at UBC. The renowned journalist and playwright contributed greatly to
Vancouver's
blossoming
theatre   community in the
'60s and '70s.
His    original
production  of
Her Scienceman Lover was performed
every year for 38 years by The Players
Club on campus.
Parker, a Vancouver-born pianist,
arranger and conductor, started his
career in Los Angeles playing with the
big bands of Harry James, Russ Morgan
and Ray Anthony. Returning to B.C. in
1957, he embarked on a long and successful career with the CBC, including
eight years as an arranger/conductor
for The Irish Rovers television show.
Gray
Unique dentistry bureau
to aid crime investigators
The Faculty of Dentistry will be helping police take a BOLD step in the fight
against crime.
The faculty and the provincial government recently announced the creation of the Bureau of Legal Dentistry
(BOLD), Canada's first facility devoted
exclusively to police work, research and
instruction in the use of forensic dentistry for crime investigation and prosecution.
Funding for BOLD was part of a $1.6
million package of anti-crime measures announced by the government.
They will contribute $500,000 to the
project and the faculty will provide
salaries, secure space and administrative support.
The bureau will be headed by David
Sweet, a lecturer in the Dept. of Oral
Medical and Surgical Sciences who also
acts as a forensic odontology consultant for the Provincial Coroner's Service, the RCMP and the Vancouver and
Victoria police departments.
"BOLD will provide a conduit through
which the dental experts on the team
may bring the power of science further
into the realm of the justice system,"
Sweet said.
Sweet predicted that the results of
BOLD research, which will be shared
worldwide with police agencies and experts in a variety of forensic disciplines, will have significant consequences.
"The advances produced in this laboratory will help police solve crimes and
the justice system deal with the persons responsible. More crimes will be
solved and more criminals will be apprehended." he said.
One of BOLD's inaugural research
projects Involves the identification of
missing children. It will build on a pilot
study that combined the talents of UBC
dentists, the RCMP. the Dept. of Computer Science and the Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre (MAGIC).
That study developed a method of
predicting and illustrating the changes
in facial appearance of individuals over
time using digitized animation software.
Another project will study the recovery of DNA evidence from teeth and
saliva. This will give investigators the
ability to gather evidence from previously unconventional sources such as
toothbrushes, dentures or from human skin in the case of a bite mark
injury.
Researchers will also develop 3-D
computer models of bite mark evidence
to study the dynamics of the biting
process and evaluate the use of computers to compare specific teeth to bites
on objects or skin.
Sweet plans to continue his pioneering work in the forensic analysis of
DNA taken from saliva left in bites and
sucks on human skin. He is currently
the only person in the world researching and publishing on this topic.
BOLD will offer training to police
and prosecutors in the new technologies as well as develop new undergraduate courses and graduate research training for forensic experts from
Canada and internationally.
Sculpture finds perfect
place in arts precinct
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
UBC is the new home of a massive
sculpture that once greeted visitors to
Vancouver International Airport.
The piece, Cumbria, was recently
rescued by artist Toni Onley after the
airport authority dismantled it and put
it into storage.
Preparations are being made to install the 18,000-kilogram sculpture
completely rebuilt and with a fresh
coat of intense chrome yellow paint by
the end of April in the courtyard between the Lasserre Building and the
Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery.
Fine Arts Prof. John O'Brian, chair
of the President's Committee on University Art, said he hopes its arrival
heralds a new era of public art on
campus.
"It's a very impressive and important work of modernist sculpture, one
of the major pieces of sculpture from
the '60s in this country. We're very
excited that it's coming here," he said.
Cumbria arrived at UBC by a circuitous route.
Sculpted by Vancouver-born artist
Robert Murray in 1966-67, it was first
shown in Manhattan's Battery Park
and was subsequently exhibited at Toronto's city hall and on the grounds of
the Art Gallery of Ontario.
The Ministry of Transport purchased
it in 1969 for display at Vancouver's
newly opened airport terminal.
At first it was granted a prominent
place on a height of land that gave it a
soaring effect. Later, however, it was
moved to a median beside a gas station
and between busy traffic on the approach to the airport.
"It was a bad location. People didn't
get a chance to view it properly. It be
came a drive-by sculpture," said Onley.
And then last year, the airport authority decided it no longer wanted the
sculpture at all.
When Onley discovered that the work
had been "rudely removed" with the aid
of a backhoe, and without telling the
artist, he was outraged. He called
Murray, whom he has known since
they were students in 1958. at his rural
Pennsylvania home.
"I got him pretty bent out of shape
about it," Onley said.
In the ensuing controversy. Transport Canada agreed to donate the work
to UBC and the airport authority paid
for its restoration, which was overseen
by Murray.
"Bob's really excited about it coming
to UBC and so am I. People will now be
able to see it and appreciate it in an
appropriate setting," Onley said.
O'Brian said the sculpture will send
a clear message to passers-by that they
are in UBC's arts precinct, which includes the art gallery, the Lasserre
Building, the Music Building. Frederic-
Wood Theatre and the Chan Centre for
the Performing Arts.
Also significant is the fact that Cumbria represents the first large-scale public sculpture installed by the university
in nearly 20 years.
O'Brian said he hopes this will encourage other donations of public art
to UBC and build greater recognition
on campus of the benefits such art can
provide the university.
He would like to see the university
adopt a policy that a small percentage
of each new building's budget be set
aside for commissioned works of art.
This is commonly done by municipal
governments in cities throughout Europe and North America, including
Vancouver, he said. 6 UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996
Calendar
March 24 through April 6
Sunday Mar. 24
Green College
Performing Arts Group
UBC Early Music Ensembles.
Green College, Graham House,
2:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Green College
Performing Arts Group
Piano Recital. Brandon Konoval.
Green College, Graham House,
8pm. Call 822-6067.
Monday, Mar. 25
Mechanical Engineering
Seminar
A Robotic Work Cell For Can Filling Automation. Elizabeth Croft,
Mechanical Engineering. CEME
1202, 3:30-4:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-3904.
Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology Seminar
Ribonuclease E And Its Friends.
Stanley Cohen, Stanford U.
IRC#4, 3:45pm. Refreshments at
3:30pm. Call 822-9871.
Zoology Seminar
Central Chemoreceptors: Location And Mechanism. Gene Nattie,
Dartmouth. BioSciences 2449,
4:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-
2310.
Astronomy/Geophysics
Seminar
Inferring Solar Kinematics Using
Helioseismology. Philip Stark,
Berkeley. Geophysics and Astronomy 260, 4pm. Refreshments
from 3:30pm. Call 822-2696/
822-2267.
Green College
Speaker Series
Rural Women And Actually Implemented Strategies For Economic Development In Reform
Era China. Ellen Judd, Anthropology, U of Manitoba. Green
College, Coach House, 8pm. Call
822-6067.
IAM Colloquium (Institute
of Applied Mathematics)
Dinesh Pai. CICSR/CS. CICSR/
CS322, 3:30pm. Call Prof. Brian
Wetton at 822-3784.
Tuesday, Mar. 26
Oceanography Seminar
Processes Controlling Metal
Fluxes Across The Sediment-
Water Interface In A Reservoir
Impacted By Acid Mine Drainage. Laurie Balistrieri. U ofWashington. BioSciences 1465,
3:30pm. Call 822-2821.
Animal Science
Seminar Series
Studies On In-Vitro Embryo Production In Cattle. J. Kurtu, grad
student. MacMillan 160,
12:30pm. Refreshments. Call
822-4593.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
Reduction Of Calcium Affinity Of
Calmodulin Site IV In A D133E
Mutant. Xiaochun Wu. grad student. IRC#3, 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-4645.
Botany and Centre for
Biodiversity Research
Seminar
Ethnobotany At The Interface
Between Human Needs And The
Environment. Tom Johns, Centre for Nutrition and the Environment of Indigenous Peoples.
BioSciences 2000, 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-2133.
Statistics Seminar
MCMC Inference In Model-Based
Cluster Analysis And Regulariza-
tion In Discrimination. Halima
Bensmail, U ofWashington. CSCI
301,4-5:30pm. Refreshments. Call
822-0570.
Green College
Speaker Series
What's That Football Field Doing
Up In The Sky? Canada. Manned
Space Research And The International Space Station. Donald
Brooks, Pathology. Green College,
Coach House, 5:30-6:30pm. Reception in Graham House, 4:45-
5:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Green College
Speaker Series
Getting Your Work Published. Jean
Wilson, senior editor. UBC Press;
Laurie Ricou, editor, CanadianLit-
erature: Richard Ericson, founding co-editor, Canadian Journal of
Sociology and consultant to U of
Toronto Press. Host, Ken Carty,
chair, Publications Committee,
UBC Press. Green College. Coach
House, 7:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Lectures in
Modern Chemistry
Metal Complex Reversible Oxygen
Sorbents For The Separation Of
Air. Guido Pez, Air Products and
Chemicals Inc. Chemistry 250
south wing, lpm. Refreshments
from 12:40pm. Call 822-3266.
MOA Public Talk
Chief Vernon Jacks Of Tsvicum
Village In Saanich, BC, Discusses
The Negotiated Return Of Objects
To His Family From The Museum.
MOA, 7:30pm. Call 822-5950.
Identification Clinic
The Museum's StaffWill Help Identify Your Objects And Provide Conservation Advice. MOA. room 217.
7-8pm. Please call in advance to
indicate what you intend to bring.
Call 822-5087.
UBC Opera Theatre
Paul Hindemith, Hin Und Zuriick;
J.M. Synge, Riders To The Sea; J.
Offenbach, Mr. Choufleuri. Nancy
Hermiston, director. Old Auditorium, 8pm. Adults. $10: student/
seniors, $6. Call 822-3113.
Wednesday, Mar. 27
Respiratory Research
Seminar Series
A Survey Of Physicians Ordering
Thoracic CT Scans: Impact On
Diagnosis And Treatment. Dr.
Mark Turner. Medicine. Vancouver Hospital/HSC, doctors residence, 3rd floor conference room,
2775 HeatherSt.,5~6pm. Call 875-
5653.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
Potential For Exacerbation Of Seizures By Anti-epileptic Drugs. Peter Loewen. Pharm.D student.
VancouverHospital/HSC. Koerner
Pavilion G-279.4:30-5:30pm. Call
822-4645.
Microbiology and
Immunology Seminar Series
Linear Plasmids Of Streptomyces:
Novel Solutions to DNA Replication. Stanley Cohen, Stanford U.
Wesbrook 201, 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-3308.
Ecology Seminar
Dynamic Optimization Model For
Vertical Migration Of Kennedy Lake
Diaptomus. David Ghan, Zoology.
Family/Nutritional Sciences 60,
4:30pm. Refreshments in Hut B-
8, 4:10pm. Call 822-2141.
Centre for Japanese
Research Seminar
History Of Investigation: A Case Of
The Hokkedo Konpon Mandara.
Moritaka Matsumoto, Fine Arts.
CK Choi conference room. 12:30-
2pm. Call 822-2629.
Issues in Post Secondary
Education Seminar
What Are The Choices For The
Funding Of Post-Secondary Education. Jon Kesselman, Economics. Green College. Coach House.
3-5pm. Call 822-6067.
Faculty Financial Planning
Lecture Series
Optimize Your Investments With
Strategic Asset Allocation. Donna
Molby, Scotia McLeod. Hennings
201. 12:30-l:20pm. Call 822-
1433.
Cultural And Media Studies
Interdisciplinary Group
Anglo-American Constructions Of
French Feminism. Christine
Delphy, French feminist and
scholar. Green College, Coach
House, 5:30-6:30pm. Call 822-
6067.
19th Century Colloquium
Series
The Body In Question. Carla
Paterson, History: Lynn
Ruschiensky, Fine Arts; Joy Dixon,
History. Moderator, Charity
Mewburn, Fine Arts. Green College, Coach House, 8- 10pm. Call
822-6067.
Public Reading
Joy Kogawa. Buchanan A-100,
12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-0699.
Surgery Grand Rounds
Lecture
Can Ethics Be Taught? Dr. Vincent Sweeney, prof, emeritus.
Medicine, Dr. Alister Browne, Medicine. GF Strong auditorium. 7am.
Call 875-4136.
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
Traumatic And Post-Traumatic
Abnormalities OfThe Carpus. Dr.
Dirk Sweeney, Radiology. Vancouver Hospital/HSC, Eye Care Centre auditorium, 7am. Call 875-
4272.
UBC Opera Theatre
Paul Hindemith, Hln Und Zuriick;
J.M. Synge, Riders To The Sea: J.
Offenbach, Mr. Choufleuri. Nancy
Hermiston. director. Old Auditorium, 8pm. Adults, $10; student/
seniors, $6. Call 822-3113.
Thursday, Mar. 28
Botany Seminar
Medicinal Plants of Nepal. Robin
Taylor, PhD candidate.
BioSciences 2361, 12:30-1:30pm.
Call 822-2133.
Research Seminar
Analyzing Focus Group Data: Opportunities And Challenges.
Rosalie Starzomski. Nursing. Vancouver Hospital/HSC, UBC Pavil-
ionT-185/86. 12:30-l:30pm. Call
822-7453.
Genetics Graduate Program
Seminar
Conservation Of Animal Genetic
Resources. Kimberly Cheng. Animal Sciences. Wesbrook 201.
4:30pm. Refreshments at 4:15pm.
Call 822-8764.
Physiology Seminar
Interactions Among Inward Rectifier Subunits. J.P. Adelman,
VollumInstitute. Copp2002, lpm.
Call 822-2083.
Critical Issues in Global
Development Seminar
Racism In The Canadian Education System. John Willinsky, Centre for Curriculum and Instruction. Green College, Coach House,
5:30-6:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Invited Speaker
Seminar Series
Scientific Visualization Of Large
And Complex Data Sets. Jane
Wilhelms, U of California, Santa
Cruz. CICSR/CS 208, 4pm. Refreshments. Call 822-3061.
Green College
Speaker Series
Fireside Chat With Cecil And Ida
Green Visiting Professor. Paul
Falkowski. Brookhaven National
Laboratory. Green College, Coach
House, 7:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Architecture Lecture/Slides
A Presentation Of The Work Of
Brit Andersen/Peter O'Gorman,
architects. Lasserre 102, 12:30pm.
Call 822-2779.
Physics Colloquium
Instability Cascades in Droplet
Fission. Sid Nagal, U of Chicago.
Hennings 201, 4pm. Call 822-
3853.
Cecil and Ida Green
Visiting Professor
Coral Symbiosis: Why Junk Food
Can Be Healthy. Paul Falkowski,
Brookhaven National Laboratory.
BioSciences 2000, 12:30pm. Call
822-5675.
Concert
UBC Javanese Gamelan, Music
And Dance. Alan Thrasher, director. Asian Centre auditorium, 2pm.
Call 822-3113.
Friday, Mar. 29
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
Cardiac Lipoprotein Lipase Regulation During Diabetes And Hypertension. Brian Rodrigues, Pharmacology and Toxicology. IRC#3,
12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-4645.
Occupational Hygiene
Program Seminar Series
Health Issues In The Oil And Gas
Industries. Hadrian Evans, former
industrial hygienist. Gulf Canada.
VancouverHospital/HSC, Koerner
Pavilion G-279, 12:30-1:30pm.
Call 822-9595.
Theoretical Chemistry
Seminar
The Snider Equation: Inclusion Of
Density Corrections. G.W. Wei,
Chemistry. Chemistry D402, centre block, 4pm. Call 822-3266.
Centre for Korean Research
Seminar
The Politics Of Haircutting In Modern Korea: A Symbol Of Modernity
And The 'Righteous Army Movement' (1895-96). Sukman Jang,
Asian Studies. CK Choi conference room, 3:30-5pm. Call 822-
2629.
Chemical Engineering
Seminar
Liquid Jets For Determining C02-
Amino Absorption Characteristics. Keith Redford, grad student.
ChemEng 206. 3:30pm. Refreshments in 204 at 3:15pm. Call
822-3238.
Mathematics Colloquium
Some Progress In Banach Space
Theory And Exotic Infinite Dimensional Structures. Bernard
Maurey, U Paris 7. Mathematics
104. 3:35pm. Refreshments at
3:15 Mathematics Annex room
1115. Call 822-2666.
Health Care and
Epidemiology Rounds
Dietary, Family History And
Other Risk Factors For Prostate
Cancer. Dr. Rick Gallagher, epidemiologist. Mather 253, 9-
10am. Call 822-2772.
Paediatrics Grand Rounds
Clinicopathological Conference.
Dr. Paul Sorensen, Pathology;
Dr. Fergall Magee, Pathology; Dr.
Colin Yong, Paediatrics. GF
Strong auditorium, 9am. Call
875-2307.
Intercultural Language
Studies
Intercultural Communication -
A Health Discipline's Approach.
Ralph Masi, Medicine. U of Toronto. Green College, Coach
House. 12:30pm. Call 822-5546/
822-3753.
UBC Opera Theatre
Paul Hindemith, Hin Und Zuriick;
J.M. Synge, Riders To The Sea; J.
Offenbach, Mr. Choufleuri. Nancy
Hermiston, director. Old Auditorium, 8pm. Adults, $10; student/
seniors, $6. Call 822-3113.
Saturday, Mar. 30
Vancouver Institute Lecture
Phytoplankton, Oil Futures And
Global Climate Change. Paul
Falkowski, Brookhaven National
Laboratory. IRC#2, 8:15pm. Call
822-3131 during normal business hours.
Workshop
Going It Alone: A Workshop
About Freelance Opportunities.
Alexandra Bradley, BLS, CRM
and Denise Bonin, MLS. University Golf Club, 9am-4pm.
$150 (lunch included). Call
822-2404.
UBC Opera Theatre
Paul Hindemith, Hin Und Zuriick;
J.M. Synge, Riders To The Sea; J.
Offenbach. Mr. Choufleuri. Nancy
Hermiston, director. Old Auditorium. 8pm. Adults, $10; student/
seniors. $6. Call 822-3113.
UBC REPORTS
CALENDAR POLICY AND DEADLINES
The UBC Reports Calendar lists university-related or
university-sponsored events on campus and off campus within the Lower Mainland.
Calendar items must be submitted on forms available from the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310-6251 Cecil
Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1, Phone:
822-3131. Fax: 822-2684. Please limit to 35 words.
Submissions for the Calendar's Notices section may be
limited due to space.
Deadline for the April 4 issue of UBC Reports—which
covers the period April 7 to April 20 — is noon, March
26. Calendar
UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996 7
March 24 through April 6
Sunday, Mar. 31
Green College
Performing Arts Group
For Whom The Southern Belle
Tolls. Jennifer Covert, Theatre
and Film: Andra Smith, Neuroscience; Brent Whitted, English;
John Oesch. Commerce. Green
College, Graham House, 8pm.
Call 822-6067.
Concert
Collegium Musicum. John Saw-
yer/Morna Edmundson. co-directors. Vancouver School of
Theology. Chapel of the
Epiphany, 8pm. Call 822-3113.
Monday, Apr. 1
Botany Seminar
Molecular Basis Of
Photoacclimation In Unicellular
Algae. Paul Falkowski.
Brookhaven National Lab.
BioSciences 2449, 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-2133.
Zoology Seminar
Acid-Base Balance In Fish And
Mammals. Eric Swenson, Physiology, U of Washington.
BioSciences 2449, 4:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-5709.
Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology Seminar
Protein Determinants Of Redox
Potentials And Thermostability.
The Rubredoxin Paradigm.
Robert A. Scott. U of Georgia.
1RC#3,3:45pm. Refreshments at
3:30pm. Call 822-9871.
Astronomy Seminar
The Luminosity Function Of
Nearby Galaxies. Ron Marzke,
Dominion Astrophysical Observatory. Hennings 318, 4pm.
Refreshments from 3:30pm. Call
822-2696/822-2267.
Archaeology Lecture
The Nikopolis Project: Interdisciplinary Survey And Space-Age
Technologies In Epirus, Greece.
James R.Wiseman, Boston U. MOA
theatre gallery, 8pm. Reception
following. Call 822-2889.
Cecil and Ida Green
Visiting Professor
The Molecular Basis Of
Photoacclimatation In Unicellular
Algae. Paul Falkowski, Brookhaven
National Laboratory. BioSciences
2449, 12:30pm. Call 822-5675.
Tuesday, Apr. 2
Oceanography Seminar
The Molecular Basis Of Iron Limitation Of Phytoplankton Photosynthesis In The Ocean. Paul
Falkowski, Brookhaven National
Lab. BioSciences 1465, 3:30pm.
Call 822-2821.
Botany and Biotechnology
Seminar
The Phenylpropanoid Pathway In
Sickness And In Health. Richard
Dixon, director, Samuel Robert
Noble Foundation. BioSciences
2000. 12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-
2133.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
Pharmacokinetics And Metabolism
Of Diphenhydramine In Pregnant
Sheep. Sanjeev Kumar, grad student. IRC#3. 12:30-4:30pm. Call
822-4645.
Cecil and Ida Green
Visiting Professor
The Molecular Basis Of Iron Limitation Of Phytoplankton Photosynthesis In The Ocean. Paul
Falkowski, Brookhaven National
Laboratory. BioSciences 1465,
3:30pm. Call 822-5675.
Faculty of Education Lecture
In School: Our Kids. Our Teachers. Our Classrooms. Ken Dryden.
Scarfe 100. 12-noon. Call 822-
6239.
Graduate and Faculty
Christian Forum
Postmodern Epistemology: Are We
Stuck With Our Relatives. David
Ley. Geography. Buchanan penthouse. 4:15pm. Refreshments at
4pm. Call 822-2728.
Faculty Women's Club
Is Multiculturalism Working? A Look
At Multiculturalism InThe Future In
Canada. Mobina Jaffer. Cecil Green
Park House, lpm. Refreshments following. Call 228-1116.
Concert
UBC Chinese Ensemble. Alan
Thrasher, director. Asian Centre auditorium. 1:30pm. Call 822-3113.
Wednesday, Apr. 3
Respiratory Research
Seminar Series
Lung Infections In Patients With
Cystic Fibrosis: Novel Approaches To Prevention. Dr.
David Speert. Paediatrics. Vancouver Hospital/HSC, doctors
residence, 3rd floor conference
room, 2775 Heather St., 5-6pm.
Call 875-5653.
IAM Colloquium (Institute of
Applied Mathematics)
A Causal Bifurcation Sequence
Involving Chaotic Structures.
Andrew Foster, Memorial U. Old
Computer Science Bldg., room 301.
3:30pm. Refreshments at 3:15pm.
Call 822-5889.
Lunchtime Lecture
Sleep Thieves. Stanley Coren, Psychology, speaks about his latest
book. UBC Bookstore. 12:30pm.
Call 822-2665.
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
Third World Surgery: Angolan Experience. Dr. Ken Foster, Plastic
Surgery. Vancouver Hospital/
HSC. Eye Care Centre auditorium,
7am. Call 875-4272.
Noon Hour Concert
UBC Symphonic Wind Ensemble
Plays Student Concerto Competition Winners. Old Auditorium.
12:30pm. Call 822-3113.
Centre for India and South
Asia and the UBC Library
Presentation   To   UBC   Of  Dr.
Stephen Forgacs photo
Super Scholars
Seven UBC students were recognized for their outstanding academic achievements Feb.
29 with the presentation of Special Corporate Awards for Canada Scholars. Sponsored by
Canadian corporations, the awards recognize the importance of science, engineering and
technology to Canada's future economic growth and industrial competitiveness. Pictured
above are (front row, l-r) Stelios Azoudis, Merck Frosst Canada Inc.; student award
winners: Julie Lee, Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Mark Wolters, Metals and Materials
Engineering; Nicole Giese, Bio-Resource Engineering; Tara Christie, Geological Engineering;
Elham Fasihy, Pharmacology and Therapeutics, Kwok-Yu Ng, Biochemistry; and Lynda
Mae Duncan, Biochemistry; (back row, l-r) Lori Gau, Glaxo Welcome Inc; Prof. Casey van
Breemen, head, Dept. of Pharmacology and Therapeutics; Prof. George Mackie, head,
Dept. of Biochemistry; Web Teetzel, Dupont Canada Inc.; Frank Thompson, MDS Health
Group Ltd.; Prof. Ian Gartshore, assoc. dean, Applied Science; Bernard Bressler, vice-
president, Research; Prof. Alastair Sinclair, Geological Engineering; Prof. David Holm,
assoc. dean, Science.
Ambedkar's Writings. Guru Ravi
Das Youth Association and guests.
CK Choi 120, 2-5pm. Call 822-
2629
Thursday, Apr. 4
Genetics Graduate Program
Seminar
Mapping, Characterization, And
Cosmid Rescue Of Essential Genes
In The dpy-5-unc-13(I) Region Of
Caenorhabditis Elegans. Jennifer
McDowall, PhD candidate.
Wesbrook201.4:30pm. Refreshments at 4:15pm. Call 822-8764.
Centre for Intercultural
Language Studies
Symposium
Establishing A New Interdisciplinary Graduate Programme InThe
Province? Green College, coach
house, 12:30-2:30pm. Call 822-
5546/822-3753.
Notices
Springtime Food Bank Drive
Now until April 4. Help us feed the
Vancouver Food Bank with a donation of non-perishable food. Bins
located in Bookstore front lobby.
Weekdays 9am-5pm. Saturday
10am-5pm.
Library Workshops
UBC Library offers more than 100
workshops each term on how to
search UBCLIB, the Library's
online catalogue/information system and how to search electronic
periodical indexes and abstracts.
Call or visit individual branches
and divisions for course descriptions and schedules.
Badminton Drop-In
Faculty/Staff/Grad Students are
welcome at the Student Recreation Centre. Mondays, 6:30-8pm.
and Wednesdays, 6:45-8:15pm.
Bring your library card. Check for
cancellations:
ratkay@unix.infoserve.net or call
822-6000.
Volleyball
Faculty. Staff and Grad Student
Volleyball Group. Every Monday
and Wednesday, Osborne Centre,
Gym A, 12:30-1:30pm. No fees.
Drop-ins and regular attendees
welcome for friendlv competitive
games. Call 822-4479 or e-mail:
kdcs@unlxg. ubc.ca.
Morris and Helen Belkin
Art Gallery
Tuesdav- Fridav 10am-5pm: Saturday. "l2-5pm" 1825 Main Mall.
Call 822-2759.
Faculty Development
Would you like to talk with an
experienced faculty member, one
on one. about your teaching concerns? Call the Centre for Faculty Development and Instructional Services at 822-0828 and
ask for the Teaching Support
Group.
Fitness Appraisal
The John M. Buchanan Exercise
Science Laboratory is administering a comprehensive physiological assessment program
available to students, staff, and
the general public. A complete
fitness assessment with an interpretation ofthe results takes
approximately one hour and encompasses detailed training prescription. A fee of $50 for students and $60 for all others is
charged. For additional information or an appointment, please
call 822-4356.
Parents in Long-Term Care
Study
Daughters with a parent in a care
facility are invited to participate.
Study focuses on the challenges
of visiting/providing care and its
effect on well-being. Involves interviews/responses to question
naires. Call Allison. Counselling
Psychology at 946-7803.
Surplus Equipment
Recycling Facility
Weekly sales of furniture, computers, scientific etc. held every
Wednesday, noon-5pm. SERF,
Task Force Building, 2352 Health
Sciences Mall. Call 822-2582 for
information.
Chronic Low Back Pain
Research
The Dept. of Counselling Psychology at the University of
British Columbia is looking for
women with chronic low back
pain to volunteer to participate
in a research project that is
aimed at understanding what
factors help or hinder peoples'
ability to manage pain on a
daily basis. Participants will be
asked to meet with a researcher
for one interview, and then to
complete some questionnaires
at home every day for 30 days.
If you are a woman 19 years of
age or older, have had low back
pain for at least six months,
experience back pain on a daily
basis, have a spouse or partner
living with you. and would be
willing to invest approximately
10 minutes a day for 30 days,
please call 987-3574 for more
information. All information will
be kept strictly confidential.
Garden Hours
Nitobe Memorial Garden. Botanical Garden and the Shop-in-the-
Garden are open 10am-6pm daily
(including weekends) effective
Mar. 9-Oct.l3. 1996. Call 822-
9666 (gardens). 822-4529 (shop).
Guided Tours of
Botanical Garden
By Friends ofthe Garden. Every
Wednesday and Saturday, lpm.
until October 13. 1996. Free with
admission. Call 822-9666.
English Language Institute
Homestay. English-speaking
families are needed to host international students participating
in ELI programs for periods of
two to six weeks. Remuneration
is $22/night. Call 822-1537.
REBEL     WITH
CAUSE
A retired tree surgeon spends time crafting wooden
toys. Every Tuesday and Wednesday he visits a local children's
hospital and hands them out to sick kids.
This event is part of a movement that's helping change
the world. One simple act at a time. 8 UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TO:
FROM:
RE:
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
REVIEW COMMITTEE REPORT — JUNE 1995
positive in its review of the Department. The staff are generally well regarded, both
personally and professionally, particularity by their professional peers outside the
University. There have been major changes in the past 7 years or so and the task
of managing the scale and scope of the University's capital program over that
period in the midst of such change should not be underestimated. On balance the
Department has done a commendable job and with improved communications,
particularity with its "clients", it can do better.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Members of the Campus Planning and Development Review Committee
A. B. Gellatly, Vice- President
Administration and Finance
REVIEW OF THE CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
DEPARTMENT
I have appointed a committee to review the Campus Planning and Development
Department with the Membership and Terms of Reference as noted below:
BACKGROUND:
During 1988 the Department of Physical Planning and Development (later
renamed Campus Planning & Development) was created. The unit began as a
collection of three former groups: two distinct units headed by directors, Facilities
Planning and Design & Construction; and the Space Management unit headed by
a manager who formerly reported to the Director of Budget and Planning. To lead
the amalgamated group, a new director was brought to campus in September
1988 bringing the total staff complement at that time to 26.9 FTE's funded from
both General Purpose Operating and Capital Budget sources.
Between 1988 and 1994, CP&D has grown, changed, and adjusted as it was
positioned and repositioned to fulfill its mandate. Growth and change activities,
as well as procedures and processes development activities, have been occurring simultaneously with implementation of an enormous program of physical
planning and development. In the regard, capital cash flow between 1988/04/
01 and 1994/03/31 has been approximately $320,000,000. In addition, as at
1994/03/31, the anticipated cost of capital projects in the planning stage was
over $200,000,000.
The Department has four distinct functions in its mandate. These are: Campus
Planning, which involves strategic and long range planning of the campus;
Capital Project Management which involves both major and minor capital
projects; Regulatory Services which involve procedures, permits and
inspections of capital projects; Support Services which involves financial
controls, infrastructure and building records.
MEMBERSHIP
• Dr. Brian Tinker, (Chair) former Vice-President, University of Calgary,
Saskatchewan and Regina
• Dr. Donald G. Paterson, Associate Dean, Faculty of Arts
• Dr. Axel Meisen, Dean, Applied Science
• Mr. Sandy Hirshen, Professor, Director of Architecture
• Dr. David Measday, Associate Dean, Faculty of Science
• Ms. Mary Risebrough, Director, Department of Housing and Conferences
• Mr. Stephen Swant, Director, Capital and Space Planning, University of
Washington
TERMS OF REFERENCE
The Review Committee's mandate includes, but is not limited to, the following:
1. To review the mandate, structure and operations, including staffing and
budgetingof the Department of Campus Planning and Development.
2. To evaluate the overall level of effectiveness and accountability.
3. Identify any opportunities the Committee perceives for improving and
changing CP&D's relations with both internal units such as Plant
Operations, Financial  Services, External Affairs, Telecommunications and
external organizations such as the Ministry of Skills, Training and Job
Creation, GVRD and the UEL.
The evaluation should include comparison with similar departments at comparable universities in Canada and the United States.
1. Executive Summary and Introduction
This Committee's Terms of Reference directed it to the following tasks:
• to review the mandate, structure, and operations, including staffing and
budgeting, ofthe Department of Campus Planning and Development.
• to evaluate the overall level of effectiveness and accountability.
• to identify opportunities for improvement.
The functions performed by the Department are a necessary part of the support
structure of a large, research-intensive university. We found no glaring omissions
or redundancies.
We found that the mandate of the Department was not well known to. or if
known, not respected by, many of the participants in the various processes
associated with the management of UBC's capital projects. As a result there is
considerable frustration within the Department and dissatisfaction with its
performance outside.
The University was not well prepared for the major capital construction activity
now underway. The development management function in particular was significantly under-staffed.
Overall the Department is adequately staffed. Re-design of some processes and
procedures can free resources to deal with under-staffing in certain areas.
There are major communication problems to, from, and within the Department. The
report contains several recommendations in this regard and we urge the Vice-
President, Administration and Finance and the Director to address them promptly.
The administration of minor capital projects is the cause for much frustration and
dissatisfaction with the performance ofthe Department. A complete over-haul of
the process is recommended.
While this report concentrates on weaknesses, the Committee found much that is
Introduction
In March 1994 Dr. J. Stefan Dupre of the University of Toronto undertook a review
of theAdministrative Organization and Processes at the University of British Columbia. In his report Dr. Dupre called attention to the "abnormally high level of energy
devoted to the study and review of administrative units," and called for stabilization
by a policy of cyclical reviews at regular intervals. In May 1994 the President's
Advisory Committee on Process Improvement and Development approved a schedule
of reviews of administrative units reporting to several of the Vice-Presidents. Those
reporting to the Vice-President Administration and Finance to be reviewed in 1994-
95 were Campus Planning and Development and Plant Operations.
In October 1994 Dr .A.Bruce Gellatly, Vice-President Administration and Finance
appointed this Committee to review the operation of the Campus Planning and
Development Department. The composition of. and terms of reference for the
committee are contained in a memo from the Vice-President dated November
3,1994 and attached as Appendix 1.
The Committee held its first meeting on Nov. 14,1994 and subsequentiy met on Jan. 13,
27, Feb. 16, 17, Mar. 30, 31, and Apr. 25. In addition several members attended an
informal meeting with members of the Department on December 16.
In order to obtain as wide a range of views as possible notices were placed in UBC
Reports, Campus Times, and The Graduate. A number of individuals known to
have an interest in, or detailed working contact with the department were approached directly. This list included contractors, architects, and engineers
engaged on UBC capital projects in the past several years. Individual memos were
sent to all UBC Heads of Units. As a result of these initiatives 50 written submissions were received and committee interviews were held with 24. Some individuals
were unavailable to meet with the full committee and the Chairman, with the
consent of the Committee, met privately with these.
Two of the members of the Committee are from outside UBC and hence bring with them
some knowledge ofthe way in which the responsibilities ofthe Campus Planning and
Development Department ( henceforth CP&D) are handled at other institutions. In
addition, specific information was solicited from The University of Victoria. Simon Fraser
University, The University of Alberta, and the University of Saskatchewan.
A few comments about the structure of this report are in order. The Committee
chose not to follow precisely the internal organization of the Department in this
report, primarily because the interactions are too intricate to make that separation easy or meaningful. Rather, the Committee has chosen to organize its comments around the principal functions or areas of responsibility in which the
Department is involved. This constitutes the body of the report contained in
Section 3. Section 2 consists of a self-assessment which the committee requested
of Mr Tim Miner, Director of the Department. This self-study also contains
organization charts which describe the internal organization of the Department as
well as its placement within the organization structure of UBC.
Section 4 of the report is a review of the resources of the Department, including
where possible, comparison with the resources available for similar functions at
other institutions.
Section 5 is a summary of the recommendations which are to be found distributed
through Sections 3 and 4. The reader is cautioned to resist the temptation to
concentrate on this section, or even to read it first. It is important that the recommendations be considered in the context of the discussion from which they arose.
The Committee would like to thank all those who took the time to write to and/or
meet with us. Their concern for the University and for this Department was
evident and is greatly appreciated.
Finally, the Committee, and especially the Chairman, would like to thank Dianne
Longson of Dr.Gellatly's office who handled much ofthe Committee's correspondence and organizational details with efficiency and good humor.
2. Campus Planning & Development Unit Review 1994
"The popular image of a government agency is that of a large bureaucratic
machine endlessly processing papers, making decisions, and providing services
mandated by legislative bodies. Behind the popular image, however, are many
highly educated and professional people, working together in departments doing
their best to provide important public services. The context and styles of public
sector work are much different than the private sector. The environment is more
complex, with legislative and executive bodies at all levels constantly issuing
directives, the media and special interest groups monitoring and reacting to
every initiative, and budgets under unremitting pressure. Still, there is plenty of
scope for visionary leadership in the public sector - to leave their mark not just
as competent administrators hut as responsible visionary leaders."
- Burt Nanus. Visionary Leadership
Introduction
In many ways Campus Planning & Development and the staff within the department can be likened to the "Government Agency" and the "Professional People"
noted in the foregoing quotation. The environment within which the department
functions is very complex and the staff work extremely hard at providing services
necessary to the University and the larger community. As the legislative, regulatory
and operational milieu of the University changes, the scope for visionary leadership
relative to physical evolution ofthe Campus, is enhanced. As that same milieu
becomes more stringent, the need for visionary leadership becomes more necessary.
Institutional, Community and Legislative Framework
UBC is not only a large public sector corporation undertaking a variety of Aca- UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996 9
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW COMMITTEE REPORT—June 1995
demic and Educational endeavors but is also a sophisticated, mid-sized city or
municipality. Close to forty thousand students, faculty and staff spend time daily
on this campus. As well, there are thousands of periodic continuing education
students to our academic facilities and visitors to our cultural and other facilities.
The University provides its own infrastructure systems including roads, underground piping, landscaped areas, sewers, power transmission grid, steam production and transmission facilities, telecommunications switching and transmission
system. The University owns and operates approximately 500 buildings from
small wood frame structures to large, highly serviced laboratory buildings.
Physically, the UBC Campus is very large and. in terms of facilities placement,
could be called sprawling. Development in the 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s
appears to have been somewhat uncontrolled. "Repairs" to that development are
now taking place by way of well controlled planning and implementation of new
projects. As a result ofthe campus size a significant infrastructure of roads, and
services exists in various stages of decay. The buildings of UBC. with a few
exceptions, are mainly nondescript and of inexpensive construction (systems,
materials). They are mostly of an age and level of repair which puts them in
chronic need of attention, and hence funds. The sum total of problems embodied
in the campus sprawl, the decaying infrastructure and the aging buildings will
require funding in the hundreds of millions of dollars to address and cure.
Among other factors, the existing culture of UBC appears to have been influenced
strongly by the pre-1983 reporting structure whereby Vice-Presidents, Deans,
plus a host of Presidents Advisory Committees and others reported directly to the
President - a system which seems to have seriously inhibited the open flow of
information and substantially augmented competitiveness among different parts
of the University. This early reporting system may have contributed also to
development of the very wide gulf in understanding and appreciation which
persists between academic and non-academic entities (and consequently individuals) of this University; a situation which seriously impairs team building. While I
believe competitiveness remains strong, even severe, among campus units, the
reporting structure has been substantially revised resulting in significant improvements in the area of information flow and in apparent understanding and
cooperation among academic units. The culture of UBC has yet to mature sufficiently, however, to foster similar understanding and generate bridge building
between academic and non-academic units. Until a final state of mutual appreciation and of cooperation is reached (until a collegial atmosphere is achieved), it is
likely that underachievement rather than overachievement may remain the UBC
norm in its service sector. Surely, underachievement in this sector must unfavourably impact the main enterprise also.
Legislatively, UBC exists in an unorganized territory rather than within a regularly
constituted municipality and, as a result, the Municipal Act has not been applied on
campus. Over the years the University has operated entirely under the University
Act and has evolved as its own Authority Having Jurisdiction so far as physical
planning and development is concerned, in the community sense, however, the
university campus has remained devoid of service amenities common to areas of
similar population density. Recently, with aggressive and diverse building development on University land, community matters have surfaced and jurisdictional and
procedural questions have been raised pertaining to planning and development on
the campus. Discussions at various levels within and beyond UBC are ongoing and
relatively early resolution of some matters is expected. Over the medium and longer
term, therefore, profound changes to the status of the UBC campus area (as a
quasi-municipality vs. an institution) are distinctly possible.
UBC operates under the University Act and, along with all Universities and
colleges in British Columbia, responds to Government via the Ministry of Skills,
Training and Labour. On behalf of the University, Campus Planning & Development relates to the Ministry via the Post Secondary Education Division, Facilities
Branch. All matters of campus planning, facilities inventory, major and minor
capital programs, project implementation procedures and the like, are managed
on behalf of the Ministry by the Facilities Branch. Relative to University buildings
(physical space), either existing or proposed, there are many formalized reporting
procedures and specific, detailed project development regulations mandated by
the Ministry. The particular regulations entitled University, College and Institute
Capital Projects Reference Manual impose a significant burden on the institution
and this Department. CP&D staff are in regular, formal and informal contact with
Branch staff regarding these matters.
The Position of CP&D within the Foregoing Framework
Generous major and minor capital funding from the provincial government coupled
with the incredible success of UBC's World of Opportunity Campaign has thrust the
University into very significant planning and capital construction activity. Total
capital cash flow in the six year period between 1988 04 01 and 1994 03 31 has
been approximately $320 million. As of 1994 03 31 there were five major and many
minor projects in the construction stage with unspent cash flow approaching $100
million. In addition, as of 1994 03 31 there were projects in the active planning or
immediate pre-tender stages carrying unspent values in excess of $300 million.
Proposed projects, not yet in active planning, totaling another $200 million will be
well underway with some completed before the year 2000.
Because UBC does not respond to the Municipal Act nor operate within a constituted municipality. Campus Planning & Development is expected to work under
the broadest possible parameters. Consequently the department performs functions attributable to, or needed by. Municipal/Utility authorities. Owners/
Developers as well as Occupants/Users. Municipal/Utility activities include: (1)
planning and development control (master planning, public processes, development permits, code inspections, land surveys); (2) planning and constructing
municipal infrastructure (roads, walks, lighting, sewer, storm drainage, geological
controls); (3) utility distribution (power, gas, water, steam, communications).
Owner/Developer activities include: (1) Upgrading habitable buildings (building
audits, code compliance, WCB and life safety, property protection, building
envelopes, building systems); (2) establishing and administering standards and
guidelines (space, design, materials, systems); (3) project management for new
buildings (control, coordination). Occupant/User activities include: (1) space
needs assessment (functional planning and analysis, facility programming); (2)
professional services and coordination (project planning and budgeting, design
and documentation, implementation, furnishing acquisition, occupancy coordination). At a point in 1993 the department was spending approximately 30% of its
time on municipal/utility functions, 40% on owner/developer functions and 30%
on Occupant/user functions.
Relative to the physical status of existing campus facilities. CP&D administers a
Ministry program of budgeting which is in place to address the backlog of deficiencies
(deteriorated buildings and decayed infrastructure). This program is relatively new and
quite small compared to the enormous number and value of building and infrastructure
upgrades which have been awaiting attention. The Department has been attending to
crises items only while attempting to establish longer range, methodical programs
complete with projected cost implications; the latter being necessary to demonstrate
internally and to the Ministry the dimensions of an adequate funding program for
continuous facilities upgrading. To date the Department's time and dollar priorities have
been largely devoted to the crises items.
Being a somewhat new Department, both in terms of its comprehensive nature and
in terms of its organization and staffing (three quarters of the staff have been
employed by UBC for less than five years), CP&D has been working primarily within
itself to establish its teams and to create, upgrade and exercise its processes.  Also,
to perpetuate the physical campus in support of the academic and research
enterprise that is the University, the Department has been itemizing and proceeding with as much as possible of the needed planning and implementation work.
These activities have more than exhausted the Department's resources thereby not
allowing for adequate attempts at cultural bridge-building. The gulf between UBC's
academic and non-academic entities has not been narrowed by Department thrusts
and, indeed, may have broadened as a result of the significant level of facilities
development activity currently taking place on the campus.
In order to safeguard the University's future development options, CP&D has seen as
one of its duties the need to position the University within the region at least in terms of
regulatory controls. With the Director's encouragement the University Planner established an unofficial forum for exchange of development activity information among UBC.
its neighbours and the various agencies providing services thereto. Many useful
discussions took place until the forum was suspended while UBC worked on its Public
Process. The Director caused the University to adopt the current British Columbia
Building Code and has established a functioning regulatory agency (akin to any
provincial municipality) and a regulatory appeals committee to administer, enforce and
mediate code matters. While most inter-jurisdictional and agency discussions are
halted, the processes and procedures associated with the regulatory thrusts have been
developing over the past two years.
In terms of Ministerial regulations, the Department has been vocal but unsuccessful to date, in pursuing more autonomy for the University. Currently another
Ministry is exploring alternatives in the area of processes and practices extant in
the public sector which effect planning and delivery of capital projects. The
Department has had good input into this process and, for the first time in six
years, is optimistic enough to believe that change in Government regulations can
be brought about.
Current Mandate/Mission Statement
The earliest University-generated statement which suggest departmental mandate is noted on Page 49 ofthe University's Mission document, "Second to None",
dated June 1989.
"The Department of Campus Planning and Development will be responsible for
the growth and change ofthe physical environment ofthe university." Physical
facility development activity on campus involves 300-400 projects per year, varying
in cost from a few thousand dollars to major new facilities, such as the $16 million
Chemistry-Physics building. The department provides liaison with the architect,
acts as manager of construction after the contract has been awarded and bears
the responsibility for ensuring conformity with national and provincial codes and
regulations.
The following quotations were generated by the department and were last put
forward in the 1992/93 Budget Narrative to indicate the comprehensive nature of
departmental activity.
(1) "As noted in previous budget narratives UBC is not only a large corporation
undertaking a variety of Academic and Educational endeavors but is also a
sophisticated, mid-sized city. The University owns and manages its own infrastructure systems including roads, sewers, power transmission grid, steam production
and transmission system. As well the University owns and operates approximately
500 buildings on the Point Grey campus from small wood frame structures to large,
highly serviced laboratory facilities."
(2) "Whereas the Department of Plant Operations operates and maintains the
status quo of campus facilities. Campus Planning and Development focuses the
planning, design and construction effort required to extend, and/or alter campus
facilities. A unit of this Department also acts as "authority having jurisdiction" to
ensure that new projects as well as all changes and additions to existing campus
buildings and systems conform to applicable codes and regulations thus ensuring
a safe environment within the University. The on-going functions of long range
planning, space management and the keeping of complete and accurate facilities
records round out the major responsibilities of this Department."
The following is a more succinct statement which flows from the original passage
included in "Second to None" and the quotations put forward in 1992:
Supporting and complementing the vision set out in the 1989 Mission document
"Second to None" and recognizing the strategic position of UBC in the Region,
Province and World; Campus Planning & Development aims to provide creative
leadership and teamwork to meet the University's need for specialized professional
and technical services in the areas of comprehensive Physical Planning, Facilities
Resources and Regulations, Major and Minor Project Development
Organization, Evolution since 1988
During 1988 the office of Physical Planning & Development (later renamed
Campus Planning & Development) was created. The office began as a collection
of three former groups: two distinct units headed by directors (Facilities Planning, Design and Construction) plus a Space Management unit headed by a
manager who formerly reported to the Director of Budget and Planning. These
three units were previously housed in distinctly separate quarters. To lead the
amalgamated group, a new Director was brought to campus in September 1988
bringing the total staff complement at that time to 26.9 FTE's funded from both
General Purpose Operating and Capital Budget sources.
Between 1988 and 1994 CP&D has grown, changed, and adjusted as it was 10 UBC Reports • March 21, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW COMMITTEE REPORT—June 1995
positioned and repositioned to fulfill its mandate. The Director and other managers within the unit have found it necessary to "return to basics" and to upgrade or
create from scratch most procedures, processes and tasks needed in order to
address the mandate. The growth and change activities, as well as the procedure
and process development activities, have been occurring simultaneously with
implementing the enormous program of physical planning and development
previously mentioned. Departmental structuring and process development,
although continuing, are slowing in intensity while, in terms of the last six or next
six years, project implementation is probably at its most active today.
Following its basic structuring, the department has been adjusted several times
since 1988. These adjustments have included formation and deletion of major
divisions and movement of units within them.  In 1988 following the new director's arrival Campus Planning & Development was structured into three basic
divisions. Initially three senior positions were created: University Planner responsible for Campus Planning and Space Management; University Architect responsible for management of major capital projects; University Engineer responsible for
campus infrastructure including minor capital projects and facility records.
Initially the Director also operated as University Architect.
Over the six years, units have been created and qualified people have been
engaged to meet specific needs such as financial budgeting and control, accounting and building code enforcement while others have been manipulated to better
use the personnel Involved. Recently, the Engineering group of five individuals,
was transferred out of the Department and into Plant Operations. This was seen
as a move consistent with the best long-term interests of the University.
Today the Department has two major divisions headed by Associate Directors: the
Resources and Regulations Section which encompasses our Facility Records
group including CAD records, a Space Inventory group, Computer/ Network
functionaries. Development Permit people and the Code Enforcement inspectors;
and the Project Development Section which includes management staff for all
major and minor projects, design staff and construction coordination staff associated with minor projects, an urban designer and a person involved in furnishings
provision for specific projects. Staff responding directly to the Director include the
University Planner, the Manager of Space Administration, the Engineering Manager and the Manager of Administration and Finance. An Executive Assistant,
Information Officer, Cost Scheduling Analyst and Secretary are the Directors
immediate support team. A Strategic Physical Planning Group was recently
created to convene as required to enhance team aspects of planning and assist in
reducing response times for resolution of specific issues. It includes a number of
individuals from within the department and is coordinated on behalf of the
Director by his Executive Assistant.
Campus Planning & Development in Comparison
In order to provide a short presentation to the UBC Senate Budget Committee, a
historical review of the Department's development since the tenure of the present
Director was undertaken during early 1993. As well, a comparison of UBC's
facilities and functions with other major North American universities was undertaken. The material was recorded by institutional size, function and staff level
within the data framework from the Association of Physical Plant Administrators
(APPA), an association of higher education facilities officers. Since the APPA
information was silent on municipal matters and light on developer data, this
department was also loosely compared to the Municipality (City) of North Vancouver and to the British Columbia Building Corporation for discussion purposes.
Compared to fourteen other universities, according to APPA information compiled
on a staff per unit area basis, in 1993 UBC had the lowest facilities staff level.
This was down from its much higher 1969 status, which compared closely to
Waterloo's 1993 situation, as having the second highest facilities staff level ofthe
fifteen universities. Also, compared locally to Simon Fraser University and the
University of Victoria, UBC had a much lower facilities staff/ building area ratio of
the other universities.
Compared to the City of North Vancouver, with a population of 36,000, UBC at
approximately 40,000 population is about 1/3 the area ofthe City but in 1992
UBC was processing a greater building permit dollar value with 1/3 the number
of building permit staff. In addition, while UBC has only 1 /3 the extent of North
Vancouver roads, UBC administers electrical, gas and steam distribution systems
for which that city is not responsible.  UBC's civil engineering staff is considerably
smaller than that of North Vancouver.
Compared to BCBC which had a 1992 project value of $400 million with 13
project managers, UBC had a 1992 project value of $270 million with 5 project
managers: approximately 2/3 the project value with 1/3 the management staff.
Relative to Project Management Institute (PMI) standards, the UBC development
managers carried more projects per person and, consequently, the number of
hours available to be apportioned to each project was below the industry standard, sometimes, by as much as half. Finally, UBC's allowable project management
charges were half of PMI Standards and less than half of the actuals of Public
Works Canada, BCBC, the University of Alberta and the University ofWashington
and were just below Syncrude actuals.
Strengths and Weaknesses
The Director has been fortunate to retain and to attract well experienced, professionally and technically trained women and men, including some very visionary
and creative individuals, to assume core staff and leadership positions in the
Department. Close to half of the staff are graduate and/or professionally trained
as engineers, architects, planners, accountants, analysts, interior designers, and
geographers. A further third ofthe staff are trained and/or certified technicians.
Most of the remaining staff have completed one or more diploma courses.
Since the Department's inception in 1988 as basically a collection of individuals,
the organization has been coming together well into teams which are bonding and
maturing with time. In staff numbers we have grown from the original 26.9 FTE's
in 1988 (of whom approximately 10 remain) to in excess of fifty people today.
Establishing teams within the Department and the total Department as a team,
was an early vision which is well along toward reality. This teamwork approach to
our challenge is now becoming a strength.
Although the process of establishing or updating processes continues, each completed
thrust is another strength to the Department in meeting its mandate. As highlighted
below much rationalization of Department functions has taken place since 1988.
Policy and Procedures:
1) established a Policies and Procedures Manual;  2) developed a system of
progressive project approvals ( Project Committees, Space Committee, Board of
Governors approvals);   3) revised and updated the Technical Design Guidelines;  4) initiated a set of project Environmental Design Guidelines;  5) computerized and networked the office, connecting it to the campus telecommunications
"backbone" and upgraded the staff computer literacy level from practically
zero;  6) enhanced public safety by conducting campus-wide asbestos and seismic
reviews and developing campus Safety and Access Audits to assist in prioritizing
project expenditures and rationalizing risk management on campus.
Planning:
1) established a planning department;  2) hired a University Planner;  3) initiated
the Main Campus Plan adopted by the University in 1992;     4) continued work on
the Campus Plan and implemented its policies by developing more detailed plans
such as the Campus Safety Plan, and the Urban Systems Plan to upgrade campus
facilities, plus many faculty/ department plans 5) compiled the Greater Campus
Discussion Paper;  6) submitted comprehensive response to the Spaxman Report
7) convened a Strategic Planning group to comprehensively deal with physical
planning issues.
Space Management and Planning:
1) established a Space Inventory and Analysis System; 2) created a consistent
format for responding to the provincial government; 3) regularized Facility Programming procedures and document format.
Project Development:
1) enhanced and developed a format for the Capital Plan submission to the provincial government:  2) established and enhanced a Project Status reporting format to
ease the project review process by the President, VP's and BOG;   3) developed and
improved Minor Capital program administration format with a project classification
system to facilitate project evaluation; 4) established a priority-setting matrix for
campus physical access projects; 5) developed new forms of consultant agreement
and construction contract specifically suited to the University; 6) re stabilized Prime
consultant appointment procedures, including credentials files; 7) created Development Managers and established current project management process;  8) reorganized and reconstituted the Design Office; 9) established a Furnishings Manager
position 10) established an Urban Designer position
Regulations and Standards:
1) recommended to the University in 1991 adoption the BC Building Code;   2)
appointed a Chief Inspector for the campus to ensure code compliance;   3) established a development permit system to identify and review complex development
issues;   4) appointed an Associate Director. Regulatory Services to oversee all of the
above:    5) created a Regulatory Appeals Committee to ensure consideration and
fairness in the Regulatory process; (6) introduced a Physical Access Advisor.
Resources:
1) hired a qualified architect/librarian to take charge of Facilities Records;   2)
computerized records and drawings by digitizing building floorplans, for example,
so that they can be read as required by various campus users such as Health,
Safety and Environment, Plant Operations, the Fire Department, Telecommunications; 3) Upgraded personnel to improve wide ranging information systems and
facility records to be used as the backbone of UBC's thrust into a Graphic Information System (GIS).
Financial Controls:
1) established a Financial Department; 2) hired a qualified Certified General
Accountant;  3) established a Project Management Accounting, Reporting and
Control System;  4) established full electronic linkage to the Financial Services
Department; 5) engaged a cost/scheduling person to integrate and monitor
costing and scheduling of all projects.
Campus Liaison:
1) hired an Information Officer to communicate CP&D's activities both within and
outside the department;  2) assisted Plant Operations in its role as custodian of
the existing physical facilities;   3) assisted Health, Safety and Environment in its
role of enhancing the well-being of everyone on campus relative to physical
facilities; 4) advised and assisted Financial Services Department in its role as
asset manager in leasing UBC properties; 5) improved connections and liaison
with other agencies, consultants, and planners.
To quote the University Planner, "We are laying track in front of a moving locomotive". His remark was made over four years ago and related to the fact that broad
planning work (let alone finer, more detailed planning) was taking place almost
simultaneously with project implementation work. Although a Main Campus Plan
is now in place, many of the sub-set plans still are not, so, in many senses we are
still just in front ofthe locomotive. Planning is proceeding frantically (as funding
permits) but its incomplete nature is a great weakness to the Department and, I
believe, to the University.
While we make much of the rationalization of functions that has occurred since
1988, many of our procedures, guidelines and documents continue to have flaws
which require early attention. Some functions already visited require further
adjustments. Each flawed function or one which requires further improvement is
a weakness. The recent report of the internal auditor supports our need for
ongoing improvement.
The enormous backlog of campus and building repair work combined with proportionally insignificant capital funding, while not a departmental weakness, is a systemic
problem which forces an apparent weakness upon Campus Planning & Development.
The department's inability to respond to difficulties and to correct facilities problems,
both functions of available resources, establish an image of weakness which we are often
unable to counteract. UBC appears to have a history of poorly funding its facility
Departments, compared to the funding of similar departments at other institutions,
which does not augur well for addressing this weakness.
Finally, the Director has built strength in the Department which is rooted in
professional, technical, and organizational experience gained through successfully
building and leading a similar team-styled department operating in an atmosphere of collegiality at another research university of near-equal size. Building on
that strength the Director and his management group have concentrated prima- UBC Reports • March 21,1996 11
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW COMMITTEE REPORT—June 1995
rily on working within the Department developing a functional facilities team and
rationalizing its functions.
The Director and his management group have probably not been sufficiently
aggressive and outward looking in explaining and advocating the role of the
Department and in defending its position when that position is based on sound
professional judgment within their area of competence. This is regarded as a
weakness and is an area which must be addressed in the future.
3. Issues and Areas of Concern
Overview
It is difficult to find the correct words or phrases to describe the sub-divisions of
this section of the report. In part they represent organizational units within CP&D
and in part they are issues or areas of concern that emerged from the various
written and oral information which the Committee received. The divisions which
emerged from that consideration were:
• Mandate and Core Functions
• Planning
• Internal Relations
• External Relations
• Major Capital Projects
• Minor Capital Projects
• Regulatory Services and Records
3.1 Mandate and Core Functions
The origins of the Department in 1988 and its evolution since then are described
in Section 2. The core functions performed by the Department are similar in most
respects to those performed in comparable departments in other universities.
They are:
• Campus and Master Planning
• Design, tendering, and project management for Minor Capital Projects: generally renovations to existing buildings costing less than $1.5 million.
• Functional programming, design ( and/or architect selection) and project
management for Major Capital Projects.
• Space allocation and maintenance of building records
• Administration of a regulatory process to ensure compliance with appropriate
building codes.
It is in this last respect that CP&D at UBC differs from comparable units in other
institutions. The details of this arrangement and some of the ramifications of it
are discussed in Section 3.7.
The mandate of the Department, as it appears in the University's mission statement published in June 1989 is quoted in Section 2. Also appearing in that
section are some modifications and clarifications of that statement which the
Department itself has advanced in several budget narratives since that time. As
these clarifications have gone unchallenged the Department has operated on the
basis that they represent the departmental mission. However, the mandate seems
to be poorly understood, communicated, and supported within the University
community. As will be discussed in more detail in subsequent sections many of
the reported failures of CP&D to satisfactorily discharge its functions can be
attributed in part to lack of resources, but primarily to a general misunderstanding of the Department's mandate and a lack of delegated authority, both to and
within the Department.
There is no doubt that the University in general, and CP&D in particular, were ill
prepared for the dramatic surge in major capital activity of recent years. Project
management resources in particular were stretched beyond reason. Within the
University there is a lack of clear understanding ofthe terms "owner", "client", and
"user" as they apply to the construction of physical facilities. Clearly, the legal
owner is the University and it must have an agent with the authority to represent
the University's interests in dealings with architects, engineers, and contractors. In
keeping with the "official" mandate, that agent is CP&D. In short, to the outside
world the University is the client and CP&D is its agent. Within the University
context, however, the facility's user or occupant, usually an academic faculty or
department, often feels and acts like the owner and hence wants to be able to act
like the client in relations with design and construction forces. This feeling of
ownership is understandable, necessary, and desirable at the appropriate stages of
the project development process. In order to accommodate it CP&D personnel need
to regard "users" as their "clients" in the process. The need to consult widely in the
programming and design phases of sophisticated academic facilities must be
accommodated. However, there must be a point where consultation gives way to
action in order to avoid costly delays in the detailed design and construction
phases. More will be said about this in a subsequent section of this report.
The recent success of the University's public campaign for capital funds has
added another dimension of complexity to the process. Naturally, major donors,or
their representatives, expect a significant voice in certain planning and design
decisions. If not handled with sensitivity the result can be a clash of priorities and
expectations between internal users and external donors resulting in frustration
and costly delays. The manifestation of this complex situation is often a badly
managed project, which reflects poorly on the reputation of CP&D.
With respect to minor renovation projects, the relationship between these activities, the responsibility of CP&D, and routine repair and maintenance, the responsibility of Plant Operations, is poorly understood within the University community, and to some extent outside the University as well. The mandate of CP&D is
clear on this point but it apparently has not been well communicated.
We have the following recommendations to make with respect to these matters.
R. 1. The Senior Administration should revisit the mandate of CP&D and should
clarify its intent with respect to the roles of owner/ client/ user in major projects
and communicate its objectives and expectations to the broader community.
R.2. The Senior Administration should review and clarify the roles of the various
capital advisory committees, such as the Senate Committee on Academic Building
Needs and the President's Advisory Committee on Space Allocation.
R.3. CP&D should enhance its efforts to inform the University community
about the consultative, planning, and construction processes. In particular.
the Director of CP&D should meet regularly with Vice-Presidents, Deans, and
Department Chairs to exchange perceptions and expectations for the planning
and development process.
The range of core functions performed by CP&D is appropriate for a "full service"
capital planning and development activity. There are no glaring omissions or
organizational redundancies. As noted in Section 3.5 however, there is occasional
loss of continuity in the transition from planning to project implementation. This
is partly the result of high work-loads within CP&D but also results from inadequate definition of roles and authority within the Department and lack of adherence to project parameters and the Campus Master Plan.
The Department suffers from a poor self-image. This is not surprising given the
tone of some of the submissions to this Committee. Most were constructive but a
few were highly inflammatory and sometimes based on profound ignorance of the
role, function, and limitations of CP&D. As a result, morale within the Department is poor and members are inclined to "side" more with architects and contractors than with internal "users" when conflicts arise. Team building efforts are
not fully understood and accepted by some resulting in a lack of clarity about the
vision and philosophy of the Department and the roles and responsibilities of the
respective units within it.
R.4. More definitive descriptions ofthe roles and responsibilities ofthe individual
CP&D units should be established. Responsibilities for project "lead" throughout
the development process should be clearly assigned; delegation of authority and
responsibility for project execution and deviation from approved plans clarified,
communicated, and supported at all levels in the University.
R.5. Staff development and training efforts should be increased to address team-
building/commitment deficiencies, enhance morale, and improve management
techniques.
R.6. The Director needs to devote more time to communication activities, primarily within the UBC community. Whether this is achieved by reducing the number
of people reporting to the Director or delegating more authority to those who do,
is a judgment best left to the incumbent and the appropriate member of the
Senior Administration.
R.7. As a supplement to the proposed cyclical review of this and other
administrative units we believe that CP&D, particularity at this point in its
history, would benefit from the creation of an Advisory Board, composed of
key Deans, Administrators, and Senior Officers to assist in on-going program
review and to establish campus advocates for the Department's activities.
The Board should meet no more than three or four times a year; should not
attempt to "manage" the Department; and should not attempt to assume the
roles of other participants in the decision process, such as the appropriate
standing committee of the Board of Governors. The Advisory Board should
be regarded as a temporary feature and should disband three years after its
creation unless good cause can be shown for its continuation.
3.2 Planning Issues and Recommendations
The planning environment at UBC is unique in that the University is not located
within the boundaries of any municipality and therefore functions entirely autonomously in planning matters. Other universities, even though exempt from
municipal taxation and regulation by their governing statutes, often voluntarily
subject themselves to municipal authority in planning and building code matters.
This arrangement usually results in wide public participation in the planning
process. Until recently UBC made all its planning decisions without the benefit of
traditional planning processes.
However, UBC has a number of significant contacts with its neighboring communities, particularity the University Endowment Lands ( UEL ). The details of these
arrangements are discussed in Section 3.4. In response to the demands of
stakeholders surrounding UBC that they have a voice in the University's plans for
the development of the South Campus the University and the Greater Vancouver
Regional District ( GVRD ), in consultation with AWA Spaxman, have worked out
a cooperative agreement to create an Official Community Plan. If this works for
the resolution of South Campus issues it can become a model for future participatory planning.
In short, UBC's unusual jurisdictional arrangements have set a contentious tone
for the massive planning effort now being carried out. Repairing the damage and
moving on to a more productive cooperative arrangement will involve not only the
technical skills of the University Planner, but also the attention and leadership of
the Senior Administration.
The Main Campus Plan, developed by outside consultants in cooperation with the
University Planner, involved an extensive consultation process that resulted in a
"buy in" by most internal and external stakeholders. However, individual development managers, often with multiple project responsibilities, remain focused on
their specific projects but not with the overall intent of the Plan and Guidelines.
This narrow focus, reinforced by powerful user voices concerned primarily with
functional internal spaces, gets transmitted to design consultants resulting in
insufficient attention being paid to matters of urban design and landscape. Many
organizations and municipalities make use of a Design Review Panel of respected
professionals to review projects at an early stage and to act as an advocate for the
urban design and landscape elements of projects.
R.8 The development process for major projects should be modified to
include a powerful advocate for the Main Campus Plan and its urban design
criteria throughout the design and construction process. A Design Review
panel, along the lines of that of the City of Vancouver or the University of
Washington would serve this function. Consideration should be given to
establishing a specific budget allocation for urban design elements at the
start of the project, in the same way that specific provision is often made
elsewhere for the acquisition of appropriate works of art for new buildings.
Many of the problems attributed to the past planning process ( or lack thereof)
reflect the cyclical nature of planning and building on the campus. At present the
massive infusion of capital funds preceded the creation of an effective organization to deal with the resulting planning and development demands. This highlights the need for creating institutional memory and continuity so that subsequent administrations can continue the planning through the cycles. Creating
institutional memory will allow future administrations to revisit important planning decisions in the light of changing circumstances. The evolution of the South 12 UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT REVIEW COMMITTEE REPORT—June 1995
Campus Plan is a good example of this need.
R.9 The University should make the long-term commitment of funds necessary to support a core CP&D group capable of providing continuity and
institutional planning memory. The University should continue to use a mix
of staff and consultant expertise in the planning function, with an emphasis
on the use of consultants to alleviate the current under-staffing. However,
we believe that a modest increase in resources in support of the planning
and functional programming activities is warranted.
3.3 Internal Relations
Members of the University community who responded to the invitation to submit
comments were generally supportive of individual staff-members but recommended improvements in leadership, organization and processes. Most felt that
the increase in the volume of work in recent years had overwhelmed the Department with the result that its ability to manage both major and minor capital
projects had suffered. There is a perception of a lack of accountability to the
community for budgets, timeliness of projects, and ultimately satisfaction ofthe
needs of building users. These perceptions seem to have been reinforced by what
one respondent called an "arrogant disregard for academic input.".
Submissions were received from faculty and administrators who had been involved in 10 major capital projects and numerous minor renovations or expansions. There was a consensus about the need for a strong client-centred culture in
the Department.The most frequent comments were that CP&D needs to: better
understand the goals and requirements of their "clients" before the consultants
are engaged and to support these building users' goals throughout the project,
improve communication and consultation with project users, and also with other
service departments involved with the completion of projects, such as Plant
Operations, and Computing and Communications, be directly accountable for
project budgets and performance by taking responsibility for cost over-runs and
deficiencies, perhaps through a Departmental contingency fund, improve turnaround time for minor projects, improve the timeliness of charges to clients
accounts. It was evident the CP&D's outreach to the university community, and
recognition of UBC's unique culture, had not met the expectations of many. The
result has been friction and stressed relations between CP&D and users, and low
morale within CP&D. Many ofthe suggestions and recommendations for dealing
with these problems are contained in the relevant sections of this report. There
are, however, a few generic recommendations that can be offered at this point.
R.10 The University needs to clarify the authority, responsibility, and accountability of all participants in capital processes. These guide-lines should
'be made available to contractors and architects along with the designation of
the Development Manager and the clear specification that this is the only
person authorized to issue instructions on behalf of the owner. This latter role
of CP&D staff also needs to be communicated widely on campus.
R.ll. The work-load of development managers should be so arranged that they can
devote full time to a specific major project as and when necessary. This will
involve an appropriate balance of major and minor, complex and simple, projects.
R.12 While there was general support for the mandate of CP&D more visible
leadership, clearer accountability, a service orientation, and increased efficiency
were all seen as matters deserving ofthe attention ofthe Vice-President.
A particularly important internal link is that between CP&D and the academic
plans of the University. This is especially important for the space planning
function, an activity transferred from the the Budget and Planning Office to CP&D
in 1988. The Committee gave careful consideration to whether that transfer
should be reversed. We concluded that, on balance, the current arrangement is
appropriate but that the existing links between Space Planning and the office of
the Vice-President Academic and Provost need to be strengthened.
3.4 External Relations
In the course of discharging its mission the Campus Planning and Development
Department is required to interact with a wide variety of individuals and organizations outside the formal structure of U.B.C. In a very real way the department is
UBC to many.
In addition to the general call for submissions placed in several campus publications, individual requests were directed to architects, engineers, and contractors,
who had been engaged on University projects in the past several years. A total of
50 responses were received and interviews were conducted with 24. The responses were generally positive with respect to the professionalism and dedication
of CP&D staff. However, a number of problem areas were identified.
development managers given responsibility for too many projects, the decisionmaking process is seen to be slow, cumbersome, and politicized. The results are
delays and cost increases. CP&D in general, and the project managers in particular, seem to lack the authority to properly expedite projects, the regulatory
process is seen to be slow and inflexible. That said, most critics acknowledge the
newness of this part of the process and seem to be willing to make allowances, the
Main Campus Plan is generally well regarded. However to some observers not
everyone in CP&D appears to have "bought in" to the plan, interpretations appear
_ inconsistent, resulting in conflicts between the University Planner and development managers. Again, the result is seen to be delays and "looping" while differences are reconciled, communication among and between CP&D, Plant Operations, and Computing and Communications is seen to less effective than it needs
to be in some cases, inadequate documentation of University building standards
is seen as a problem.
In spite of these criticisms the architects, engineers, and contractors, were
generally supportive of the changes that had taken place in CP&D over the past 6
or 7 years. Most problems were attributed to growing pains associated with the
reorganization of the department in the midst of a major construction boom.
Most universities enjoy a love/hate relationship with neighboring residential
areas. UBC is certainly no exception and the situation is more complex than most
for the following reasons: UBC is not subject to any municipal planning or regulatory authority as it is not located within the boundaries of any municipality. The
implications of this are dealt with in more detail elsewhere in this report. The
nearest residential neighbor, the University Endowment Lands (UEL) is also not
part of any organized municipality, a status reconfirmed by the residents in a
referendum on March 4, 1995. The area is administered directly by the provincial
Department of Municipal Affairs. The sewer and water systems of UBC and UEL
are connected, and through this are connected to the utilities ofthe GVRD.Fire
service is currently provided to UBC by UEL. At the technical level relations
between UBC and UEL are reasonably satisfactory. The staff of the fire service
expressed a willingness and desire to be more involved, as consultants on fire
safety equipment and systems, during the design of new construction, renovations, and major repair work. However, it is understood that, during the summer
of 1995 this service will be transferred to the City of Vancouver, with a significant
reduction in staff level. It is likely, therefore, that UBC may not receive the level of
preventive services in the future that it has enjoyed in the past.
We were told that in the past relations at the political/planning level had been far
less satisfactory. In the eyes of its neighbors UBC has not been properly accountable for planning decisions (such as Hampton Place) which are of concern to
them. The creation of a number of Presidential Advisory Committees over the past
5 years and the involvement of residents ofthe UEL in these committees has
somewhat improved relations, even though some of these committees were seen
as tokens of public involvement. The involvement of residents ofthe UEL in
reviewing the draft of the Main Campus Plan was particularity appreciated. The
agreement between UBC and the Greater Vancouver Regional District (GVRD) to
develop an Official Community Plan is seen as a major positive step.
Because of its involvement in developing the Main Campus Plan,and the South
Campus Plan. CP&D has become somewhat of a lightning rod for these community concerns and the Department has tended to receive criticism for matters that
are, in some cases, sins of commission (or omission) of others.
In the past CP&D has had little formal involvement with the GVRD. The decision to
develop an Official Community Plan is. as noted, seen as a major improvement in
community relations.This project will, of necessity, involve the planning staff of CP&D in
a highly sensitive political process. To be successful this process must involve senior
University officers, with the role of CP&D limited to the more technical aspects.
Although the UBC Real Estate Corporation is wholly owned by UBC it operates at
arms-length from CP&D and hence is being treated in this report as an external
organization. The Real Estate Corporation was created to act as a private developer with respect to the University's plans to develop market housing and other
quasi-commercial activities on parts of the campus, as well as to manage some of
the University's off-campus real estate holdings. Its only formal interaction with
CP&D has been with the Regulatory Services, with respect to permits for the
Multi-Tenant facility. The nature of the relationship between the Real Estate
Corporation and CP&D appears to be poorly understood by both the general and
construction communities. The relative simplicity of its organizational structure
allows the Real Estate Corporation to be more responsive and hence to appear
more efficient and effective in dealings with contractors and consultants. To those
who don't understand the structural differences between the University and the
Real Estate Corporation CP&D suffers by comparison.
The UBC Alma Mater Society (AMS) is the principal organization representing
both undergraduate and graduate students at UBC. Interactions with CP&D (and
Plant Operations) are frequent in connection with renovations and maintenance of
facilities operated by the AMS. Initially the reorganization of the functions performed by CP&D, particularly the introduction of a more formal permit process,
was seen as an attack on the autonomy of the AMS. Previously, the AMS had
enjoyed a relatively free hand in modifying its facilities. We were told that over the
past two years relations have improved significantly as both CP&D and the AMS
came to appreciate each other's position. Credit for this improvement should be
shared by the leaders of both organizations.
Relations between CP&D and the Facilities Branch of the Department of Skills,
Training and Labour of the Government of British Columbia appear to be quite
satisfactory, at least from the perspective of the Government Department. In spite
of the apparent formalism implied by the procedures out-lined in the "University,
College and Institute Capital Projects Reference Manual" the Department is
concerned mainly with having projects completed "on time and within budget".
There is virtually no involvement of Government employees in the detailed management of specific projects. The staff of CP&D who interact with this branch of
government seem to be well regarded both personally and professionally. There is
some concern that CP&D may have been understaffed for the tasks which faced it
in the past few years.
In summary, observers in the construction business view CP&D as under-staffed
and lacking the necessary authority for effective project management. This same
view, at least with respect to resources, is shared by the Facilities Branch.The
relationship between CP&D and Plant Operations is unclear to most external (
and many internal) observers.CP&D staff generally under-estimate the public
relations value and importance of their work.
R.13. A senior University official, preferably at the level of a Vice-President,
should assume the lead role in planning discussions with the surrounding
communities, with technical support from CP&D.
R. 14. The Director should ensure that he and his staff develop a heightened
awareness of the public relations significance of their work. They are representatives of the University, with a primary responsibility to represent the
position of the University.
3.5 Major Capital Projects
Based on the submissions received,and the experience of individual members of
this Review Committee, the following issues merit consideration with respect to
the way in which the University plans and manages major capital projects:
performance of CP&D with respect to meeting budget and time schedules,
whether UBC projects are more expensive than those in the private sector, and if
so, why. appropriateness of the process for the selection of prime consultants for
major projects, appropriate size, composition and role of project committees,
consistent with established lines of authority and responsibility, role of the
Planning and Property Committee of the Board of Governors, appropriate level of
internal development management capacity and the use of consultants, communication problems between CP&D and users and within CP&D.
The "mantra" of development managers is generally regarded as "on time and
under budget". It is the perception of many of our internal respondents that the
record of CP&D In this regard is poor. In spite of this we received documents
which tended to show rather good performance with respect to both time and
cost. Part of the discrepancy can be attributed to a lack of agreement between UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996 13
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completion dates seen as feasible by CP&D and those wished for or mandated by
others. It appears that some completion dates were established without sufficient
consideration of their practicality. Cost control performance is also difficult to
track. Project budgets get changed for many reasons during the life of a project
and without a detailed record it is difficult to know which "budget" is the appropriate target for the measurement of management performance. The overall
impression left, however, is that CP&D failed to perform.Whether the failure is one
of performance against a reasonable objective or lack of sound professional
judgment in accepting an unreasonable objective is not material. The responsibility for project management rests with CP&D. We did not seek, nor were we
offered, evidence to show that UBC construction costs were higher than those of
construction counter-parts elsewhere. Indeed, such evidence would be virtually
impossible to obtain since University buildings tend to be highly specialized and
not replicated elsewhere. Nevertheless, the perception that UBC building costs are
abnormally high is pervasive. If those bidding on contracts think that UBC is a
difficult client it is likely that this will be reflected in their bids. The reasons most
often cited for believing that UBC costs are high are: high level of re-design
changes and construction change orders, cost of delays because of complex and
protracted consultation processes and lack of authoritative decision-making.
CP&D bureaucratic regulatory procedures and inflexibility in decisions on code
interpretations.
There are measures which CP&D could initiate to make the process of building at
UBC appear less formidable to the construction community. We believe that the
problem is not that there are more bureaucratic procedures at UBC but, rather, that
all are UBC procedures whereas in the private sector they would be distributed
among client, code consultant, municipal and possibly provincial planning authorities. Because the various components of CP&D are all close to the projects there is
scope for interference as projects progress through the planning and building
phases. It is this, and not the procedures per se which we believe are the problem.
The process by which prime consultants are selected for major projects was also
viewed as problematic by some. The culture of universities is such that members
of the community expect extensive consultation in decisions that effect them.
Carried to an extreme consultation can become obstruction, with attendant cost
over-runs and time delays. We have some recommendations below on the general
topic of appropriate user involvement in various phases of a major capital project,
but at this point suffice it to say that we are of the opinion that the current
practice for architect selection at UBC strikes a reasonable balance between a
committee so small that key stakeholders are disenfranchised and one so large
that meetings become unwieldy and counter-productive and the maintenance of
confidentiality is impossible. We therefore do not recommend any change in the
process by which prime consultants are chosen.
Many respondents addressed the issues of size and composition of project committees. Lack of clarity between the roles and responsibilities of these committees
and those of CP&D is a major cause of the frustration and dissatisfaction that has
accompanied many of UBC's recent major projects. The project committee is
generally co-chaired by the CP&D Development Manager and the Dean or designate ( or representative of other user). All user groups are represented, as are the
Development Office and donors, as appropriate. The committee reports to CP&D
but the various representatives also serve as communication links to their constituencies. The same committee has normally remained in place for all phases of
a project, from programming, through schematic and detailed design, to construction and commissioning. We heard evidence that not all members of these committees were equally committed to the task, nor indeed knowledgeable about their
role and responsibilities. We believe that projects benefit from broad involvement
in the early stages but that there comes a time when the need to" get on with the
job" dictates a smaller group,able to meet and reach decisions quickly.
We offer the following recommendations with regard to project committees:
R.15. The role of members of project committees should be clarified. Each
member should receive not only a letter of appointment from the Vice-
President, but also instructions outlining the role, responsibilities, and
authority of the committee. It should be made clear to whom the member
is accountable for their actions or inactions.
R. 16. For the programming and schematic design phases of a major project we
believe that the current practice of seeking broad user input is appropriate.
However, as a project moves to the detailed design and construction phases
the size of the committee should be substantially reduced and it should be
composed of individuals with the time and commitment to meet on short
notice and the authority and responsibility to make decisions in a timely way.
As the project evolves the necessary technical support will change from
functional programming to development management. Overlap should be
adequate to ensure continuity of concept.
The Board ofGovernors exercises its oversight of CP&D through its Planning and
Property Committee. The Board should, as presently is the case, receive reports
on projects from this committee. The Board approves various stages of projects:
Initial project/program approval.
Initiation of design, including appointment ofthe prime consultant and approval
ofthe budget. Design development approval and initiation of working drawings.
Award of construction contract.
In exercising its functions we believe the Board would benefit from more detailed
information than that which was provided to us. We think it important that the
Board ( or its Committee ) approved the original budget and schedule for a project
and significant change in either. It is the responsibility of CP&D to anticipate the
need for such changes, justify them, and seek appropriate approval.
Boards of Governors often contain individuals highly experienced in certain
business affairs. In such instances some Boards have occasionally been tempted
to engage in "micro-management". We understand that this has not been the style
of the UBC Board and we agree that such a policy is wise. The University's
expertise in construction management should not depend on the current composition ofthe Board. When Board members engage in "micro-management" the
ability of the Board to exercise appropriate over-sight and to hold the managers
accountable is compromised.
This leads us to the following recommendations:
R.17 As part of its accountability to the Board, Senior Administration, and the
University community CP&D should develop performance criteria based on a
regular reporting format that includes, as a minimum, the following information: original schedule and approved changes; original budget and approved
changes; reasons for the changes; and origin of the request for the change.
R.18 Newly-appointed members ofthe Planning and Property Committee
should receive an orientation to the capital processes of the University,
particularily with respect to the Campus Plan and the relative roles of the
Board, its Committee, the Project Committee, and CP&D.
The effectiveness of CP&D's development management capabilities received much
comment from those who responded to the Review Committee. The following
comments should not be regarded as criticism of individual managers. Rather,
they are a reflection of the circumstances that have prevailed during the recent
"construction boom" on campus. In general, the development managers are well
regarded for their competence and hard work. However, there is no doubt that the
University was not ready to handle the sudden growth in the volume of new
construction with the result that individual development managers were stretched
too thinly and were therefore not able to exercise close supervision of certain
projects. The recent use of off-campus consultants as development managers has
improved the situation considerably. The cost of project management is a legitimate charge to a project budget and we believe it is false economy to attempt to
economize on this element. As the volume of new construction in future is likely
to consist of peaks and valleys we suggest that the University will be best served
by the retention of a relatively small cadre of highly skilled development managers, supplemented as necessary by consultants. As noted earlier ( R. 11 ) the workload of all development managers, staff or contract, should contemplate times
when full time attention to a particular project is necessary.
We also believe that effective project management is currendy being compromised
by the lack of a financial reporting system which provides managers and users with
clear, up-to-date information of expenditures and commitments. We were told that
development managers found it necessary to maintain their own private accounting
system in order to be able to exercise effective financial control of their projects.
R.19 The University should proceed expeditiously to develop a financial
reporting system for major projects better suited to the provision of management information.
Finally we wish to offer some comments about the need for clear communication
in the pursuit of major projects. The issue is multi-dimensional and we heard of
problems arising from the lack of clear communication between Senior Administration and CP&D, between CP&D and users, and within CP&D. On the positive
side the senior staff of CP&D are regarded as accessible, sympathetic, and helpful.
However, the objectives and priorities of the Senior Administration have not
always been made sufficiently clear to the other participants in the process
(indeed, have not always come from the same Vice-President), CP&D has not
always provided timely and accurate feed-back to users, and urban design issues
and regulatory matters appear occasionally to have been introduced unexpectedly
and late in the process. This leads us to the following recommendation:
R.20 We recommend that the Vice-President Administration and Finance become
more pro-active in ensuring that the wishes of the Senior Administration are
clearly communicated; and that the Director ensure that timely and accurate
communication with users and within CP&D become matters of high priority.
3.6 Minor Capital Projects
No single aspect of the work of CP&D received more comment from our respondents than did the administration of minor capital projects. In its consideration of
this topic the Review Committee was greatly aided by the work of Mr. Michael
Hartwick and his colleagues of the Internal Audit Department. This group recently
completed an audit of minor capital and freely shared their findings with us. We
found their report, and our meeting with Mr Hartwick and Ms. Tsang to be most
helpful. The focus of the internal audit was:
• accounting, budgetary, and financial reporting practices,
• procedures for the selection of architects and contractors,
• terms and conditions of minor capital projects.
It would be redundant for us to repeat the comments and recommendations with
respect to these matters contained in the internal audit report . Suffice it to say
that our findings, based on our written and oral submissions, would support all
the recommendations and conclusions contained in that report.There are, however, a number of matters specifically not within the terms of reference of the
Internal Auditor on which we would like to comment.
There is no doubt that the minor capital area is the most contentious aspect of
the work of CP&D. The entire process, from the decision ofthe Provincial Government on the global level of funding, through the process for allocating funds
within the campus, to the relationship to repair and maintenance, and finally to
the administration of individual projects is not well understood on the campus.
There are major criticisms with respect to the estimating, design, and execution of
most minor capital projects. Common complaints are:
• lack of timeliness in responding to a request for an estimate.
• poor communication with respect to project status.
• high cost.
• lack of accountability for project delays and/or cost over-runs.
• lack of effective coordination with other departments, such as Plant Operations
and Computing and Communications.
To be fair, the criticisms arise from past projects. The staff of CP&D are aware of
these deficiencies and have recently taken steps to improve the situation. The
practice of allowing up to two hours of free consultation for evaluating the feasibility of projects should reduce the time previously wasted in designing projects
which were subsequently abandoned for a variety of reasons. The objective of
responding to requests for estimates within 1-2 weeks is reasonable and should
be pursued with vigor. We understand that consultations do take place with Plant
Operations in the early stages of a project but that the practice is not regularized.
We believe that it should be. and that the consultation should include Computing
and Communications. Project sponsors (users) should receive regular status
reports from the development manager as the project proceeds and there should
be a formal "sign-off procedure at the end of a project. 14 UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996
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The allocation of cost over-runs is a particularly contentious matter. We understand that the current practice is to require the user to find the funds or agree to
a reduction in scope if a project goes over budget. We believe that this is appropriate if the over-run is clearly caused by decisions or actions of the user after the
budget for the project is set. However, if the cause lies outside the area of responsibility of the user the relevant Department should be held accountable for its
actions. Other resources can then be accessed and it may mean that CP&D
should have a small general contingency established annually, in addition to
individual project contingencies. Requiring the Director to account to the Vice-
President for all expenditures from this general contingency would help prevent it
from becoming merely a "slush fund" for which no one is accountable.
There is considerable support among user departments for greater use of outside
contractors for minor capital projects. We understand that, under current policy. Plant
Operations has what amounts to a "right of first refusal" on such projects. Only if they
are unable to accommodate the work in reasonable time can outside forces be retained.
It is not within our mandate to comment on the wisdom of this policy, however, we
believe that it needs to be better explained to the campus community.
There is also support, particularly in the larger Faculties, for a major decentralization ofthe administration of minor capital projects. Currently some units ( e.g..
Medicine, Housing and Conferences) can and do manage their own projects,
dealing with CP&D only with respect to Regulatory Services. While we understand
the frustrations which lead to this suggestion, we urge caution in proceeding with
it in isolation of a review of the entire minor capital process. There will always be
a need for a centralized planning and development capability to ensure some
uniformity of standards and to provide service to smaller Faculties and Departments. Even within the larger units there will be a tendency not to engage the
appropriate expertise to manage projects, but rather to assign the task to an
existing member of faculty or staff. The result is likely to be an inefficient, and
probably ineffective, use of scarce academic resources.
Some respondents suggested that the entire administration of minor capital
should be transferred to Plant Operations. This would certainly facilitate integration of renovations with repair and maintenance but may make it more difficulty
to adhere to the Government's regulations about allowable capital expenditures.
Again, we would caution against taking this step in isolation of a more complete
review. This leads us to our major recommendation in this area:
R.21 We recommend that the University immediately undertake a complete
review and re-engineering of the process for the administration of minor
capital projects. The objectives for the re-design of the process should be:
_ improved communication with users at all stages; improved liaison with
departments such as Plant Operations and Computing and Communications;
an improved process for prioritizing projects; improved accountability for
cost and schedule variances; a stream-lined design-build process for small,
simple jobs; and finer screening at the feasibility study stage.
3.7 Facilities Resources and Regulatory Services
This unit within CP&D provides both the institutional memory for the buildings
and infrastructure of the campus as well as for ensuring compliance with the
various building codes which apply. With respect to the RESOURCES function, we
received no expressions of dissatisfaction with this service. The "as-built" records
of the University are admittedly not complete but are probably no worse than
those of other universities of similar age. An attempt is being made to computerize
the drawings, thereby simplifying amendments and improving accessibility but
progress is slow and further investment is clearly needed. Easy access to accurate
records is essential for the work of several departments, notably Plant Operations,
Computing and Communications, and CP&D, as well as outside contractors
working on campus projects. To ensure accuracy it is essential that there by a
single agency with responsibility and authority to maintain and up-date the
record, but also that all who discover inaccuracies in the existing record have the
responsibility and a convenient means of reporting the discrepancy.
The Committee did discuss whether this function would be better housed within
Plant Operations. We concluded that its organizational placement is less important than the functional relationships noted in the previous paragraph, however.
we suggest that consideration be given to relocating the function if that would
improve the functional linkages. The Committee did feel that there was a need to
review the safety and security of the space currently tised for the storage of
irreplaceable archival material.
The REGULATORY SERVICES function is much more visible and controversial.
Because ofthe unique political situation described in SECTION 3.2. UBC is the
"Authority Having Jurisdiction" with respect to planning and code-compliance
matters. In order to perform these functions in an apparently arms-length fashion
CP&D chose to create a "municipality" model involving formal permits for the
various stages of the development and construction process. The group was
formed in the fall of 1991 to clarify the function of enforcing the building code.
Before that the development managers played two roles, in an obvious conflict of
interest. Some of the critics of the current process do not seem to have accepted
the rather sensible division of powers. In 1992 the Board ofGovernors. on the
recommendation ofthe Director of CP&D. adopted the B.C. Building Code, rather
than the federal one previously used, as the UBC standard. This has simplified
and clarified interpretations and specifications.
There is no doubt that the University is morally and legally obligated to provide a
safe, accessible, and healthy working and learning environment. There must be
rules and enforcement, but in a regime that is sensitive to the complexities of the
university environment, and especially to the sophistication of most university
buildings. Thus, Regulatory Services must have a clear philosophical mandate,
specific responsibility, and adequate authority. We believe there have been some
failures in this regard.
First, let us address the overall issue of how the code should be enforced and
where the regulatory group should be located administratively. We received many
suggestions and considered several alternatives,such as:
• Turning over the regulatory responsibility to the City of Vancouver ( or GVRD or UEL)
• Using external code consultants.
• Requiring architects to engage Certified Professionals
• Clearly separating the regulatory group from the construction function by attaching it
to another administrative unit ( such as Health, Safety, and the Environment).
• Returning to the old system of combining the code enforcement and construction responsibilities in the development manager.
Any of these alternatives could be made to work. The main issue is that the
responsibility for code enforcement should be sufficiently independent to avoid
pressure for compromise, yet flexible enough to accept reasonable interpretations
of code matters by competent professionals. The main advantage in keeping this
function in reasonably close proximity to the development group is the availability
ofthe expertise at early stages within the design process. In the final analysis we
saw no great advantage to changing the present structure. The existing reporting
structure has the appearance of a slight conflict of interest but no more so than if
a municipality decided to construct a building for its own use on its own land.
The existing mechanism for appealing regulatory decisions received criticism that
the decisions were arbitrary and inflexible and were too supportive of the inspector's decisions. While we make no judgment about the accuracy of these perceptions we do have a recommendation ( R.22, below) which we think will improve
the appeal process.
Finally, we see a need for clarification of what is a code issue and what is a matter
of standardization. The University needs standards for a variety of good reasons
and enforcement of such standards is a responsibility of CP&D in the project
management process. We think it important that decisions about a particular
material or piece of equipment be clearly identified as a legally required code
issue; a mandatory standardization; or a recommended standardization. We
suspect, though cannot prove, that the separation ofthe regulatory process from
the project management process has resulted in some slippage in the enforcement
of non-code standards. In our view the responsibility for maintenance ofthe
University's quality standards rests with the development manager and the prime
consultant, not with Regulatory Services Inspectors. These considerations lead us
to the following.multi-part recommendation:
R.22. With respect to Regulatory Services we recommend that:
• the organizational structure remain as it is but that the mandate of the
code inspectors be more clearly defined and communicated to the University community, especially those who become involved in major capital
projects.
• the Code Appeal Board be supplemented by one or two professional code
consultants with relevant expertise.
• the advice of inspectors be sought as early as possible in the design process.
• decisions about the use of specific materials or equipment be clearly
indicated by category: (a) code, (b) mandatory standardization, or (c)
recommended standardization.
• appeals about mandatory standardization be through the normal administrative processes, not through the Code Appeal Board.
• in those cases where a Certified Professional is employed on a project the
architect should submit all appropriate "Letters of Assurance" and these
should be accepted by CP&D as evidence of code compliance, obviating
the need for internal review.
4. Resources
The mandate of this Committee specifically directs us to review the resources of
CP&D in relation to its mandate and the expectations placed upon it. It is difficult to
be quantitative in this regard since different institutions organize these functions
differently. Appropriate bench-marks in the non-institutional world are also difficult
to identify. For example, in Section 2 CP&D suggests that it is significantly understaffed in comparison with the City of North Vancouver, a comparison chosen on the
basis of similar "population". We do not accept this as a valid comparison for a
number of reasons. First, population, per se, does not generate a demand for the
services provided by CP&D. Second, even though the dollar value of projects at UBC
was greater than that in North Vancouver, the UBC situation likely represents a
much smaller number of projects of much greater complexity. Third, although UBC
administers utility systems for which North Vancouver is not responsible, the
responsibility for that at UBC is shared between CP&D and Plant Operations.
In comparing the UBC situation with that at other universities two important
differences must be kept in mind. First, many universities combine the CP&D and
Plant Operations functions in a single Facilities or Physical Plant department. Thus,
when one seeks to compare institutions on the basis of "facilities" staff ( Section 2)
one should also compare the organization structures. Second. UBC is probably
unique in the way it has chosen to administer the master planning and code
enforcement functions. If one were to compare resources at UBC, Simon Fraser. and
the University of Victoria, (setting aside for the moment differences in size and
complexity) one should ignore some ofthe Regulatory Services staff at UBC. One
cannot ignore all of it since the staff can and does provide advice in addition to
regulation. Other institutions have the same need for advice, without the regulation.
Assuming one could quantitatively correct for these structural differences one is
left with the problem of defining a suitable institutional characteristic to use as a
standard. Building area may be appropriate for measuring custodial and maintenance work loads (with appropriate corrections for age and complexity of buildings ) but is hardly the driver of development activity. In a very rough way dollar
value combines the effects of complexity and size. However, to get a good measure
of work-load this needs to be combined with the number of major and minor
projects underway at any given time, with appropriate account of where given
projects are in the conception-design-construction sequence.
Thus, the committee was left with no alternative than to base its comments about
resources on judgment informed by our own individual experiences and the
perceptions of our respondents. First some facts:
• As of April 1,1995 the staff complement of CP&D at UBC consists of 50 positions, (6 of which are clerical ), 20.5 funded from General Purpose Operating
Funds and 29.5 funded from Capital Funds. Four ofthe professional/technical
positions are devoted to the regulatory function.
• The University of Victoria ( a much smaller and less complex institution )
recently merged its Campus Planning ( similar to CP&D ) with Buildings and
Grounds ( Plant Operations ) to form a Facilities Management Department. The
former Campus Planning Department performed essentially the same functions
as CP&D with the exception of space management, master planning, and UBC Reports • March 21, 1996 15
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regulation, with a total complement of 16 positions ( 3 of which were clerical) ,
approximately 10 of which were funded from the operating budget.
• Simon Fraser University's Facilities Department combines the functions of
CP&D and Plant Operations. The functions corresponding to UBC's CP&D are
performed by approximately 12 professional/technical staff. Simon Fraser is
smaller, less complex, and newer than UBC and does not provide its own
regulatory service function.
• The University of Alberta is comparable in size and complexity with UBC and is
older. As of January 1995 the Planning and Development Department consisted of 32 professional/technical positions, some of which were vacant and
scheduled for closure. Again, the University of Alberta does not provide its own
regulatory services.
• The University of Saskatchewan is approximately the same size as Simon
Fraser but has a degree of complexity in its array of academic programs similar
to the University of Alberta and UBC. although it is probably less "research
intensive" than either of these. It is about the same age as the University of
Alberta. Planning and Engineering ( equivalent to CP&D ) is one of 4 divisions
within the Physical Plant Department, the Executive Director of which reports
directly to the President. Planning and Engineering consists of 24 professional/
technical positions. 13 of which were supported from the operating budget. The
staff is regarded as too small to discharge the group's mandate. Contract
consultants are used to handle peak work loads.
On the face of it CP&D would appear to have adequate staff, in comparison with
other institutions. However, several respondents told us, and we are inclined to
agree, that the development management function, in particular, was over-taxed
by the construction boom recently experienced. As noted earlier, development
management is a legitimate project cost and is not, in our view, a good place to try
to save money. As noted earlier, we also believe that additional staff to supervise
consultants and to support advisory committees are appropriate for the functional
programming area With these exceptions, we cannot conclude that any perceived
inadequacies in the performance of CP&D can be attributed to a shortage of staff
resources. In fact, we believe that additional resources to support these areas can
be found within the existing budgetary complement, by adopting some of the
recommendations contained in this report.
The level and mix of skills and resources necessary in the future is obviously
dependent on the scale and nature of future capital programs. Sooner or later the
major construction phase will pass and renovation and restoration activities will
increase. CP&D needs a staffing plan which anticipates activities, and therefore
needs, 3 to 5 years into the future.
R.23. We recommend that CP&D conduct a detailed self-study of future
campus development needs with the goal of planning the appropriate mix
of CP&D services required. The analysis should be conducted at regular
intervals, probably not exceeding 5 years.
5. Conclusion and Summary of Recommendations
The functions performed within the Campus Planning and Development Department are a necessary part of the support structure of a modern, research-intensive university. This review found no glaring omissions or redundancies. There is
no doubt that some elements of the Department were over-whelmed by the recent
construction boom. Many of the problems which CP&D has experienced in the
past can be rectified by improving communications—with "clients", with the
Senior Administration, with related departments such as Plant Operations and
Computing and Communications, and within CP&D itself. The entire process for
the administration of minor capital projects, from the acquisition and allocation of
funds to the completion and "sign-off on individual projects needs an immediate
and thorough over-haul.
Overall the Department is adequately staffed. Where additional resources appear
called for we believe they can be found by redeployment within the existing
complement, and by the use of outside consultants to handle peak loads.
R. 1. The Senior Administration should revisit the mandate of CP&D and should
clarify its intent with respect to the roles of owner/ client/ user in major projects
and communicate its objectives and expectations to the broader community.
R.2. The Senior Administration should review and clarify the roles ofthe various
capital advisory committees, such as the Senate Committee on Academic Building
Needs and the President's Advisory Committee on Space Allocation.
R.3. CP&D should enhance its efforts to inform the University community about
the consultative, planning, and construction processes. In particular, the Director
of CP&D should meet regularly with Vice-Presidents, Deans, and Department
Chairs to exchange perceptions and expectations for the planning and development process.
R.4. More definitive descriptions ofthe roles and responsibilities ofthe individual
CP&D units should be established. Responsibilities for project "lead" throughout
the development process should be clearly assigned: delegation of authority and
responsibility for project execution and deviation from approved plans clarified,
communicated, and supported at all levels in the University.
R.5. Staff development and training efforts should be increased to address team-
building/commitmenl deficiencies, enhance morale, and improve management
techniques.
R.6. The Director needs to devote more time to communication activities, primarily within the UBC community. Whether this is achieved by reducing the number
of people reporting to the Director or delegating more authority to those who do, is
a judgment best left to the incumbent and the appropriate member of the Senior
Administration.
R.7. As a supplement to the proposed cyclical review of this and other administrative units we believe that CP&D, particularity at this point in its history,
would benefit from the creation of an Advisory Board, composed of key Deans,
Administrators, and Senior Officers to assist in on-going program review and to
establish campus advocates for the Department's activities. The Board should
meet no more than three or four times a year; should not attempt to "manage"
the Department; and should not attempt to assume the roles of other participants in the decision process, such as the appropriate standing committee of the
Board ofGovernors. The Advisory Board should be regarded as a temporary
feature and should disband three years after its creation unless good cause can
be shown for its continuation.
R.8 The development process for major projects should be modified to include a
powerful advocate for the Main Campus Plan and its urban design criteria
throughout the design and construction process. A Design Review panel, along
the lines of that ofthe City of Vancouver or the University ofWashington would
serve this function. Consideration should be given to establishing a specific
budget allocation for urban design elements at the start of the project, in the
same way that specific provision is often made elsewhere for the acquisition of
appropriate works of art for new buildings.
R.9 The University should make the long-term commitment of funds necessary to
support a core CP&D group capable of providing continuity and institutional
planning memory. The University should continue to use a mix of staff and
consultant expertise in the planning function, with an emphasis on the use of
consultants to alleviate the current under-staffing. However, we believe that a
modest increase in resources in support of the planning and functional programming activities is warranted.
R. 10 The University needs to clarify the authority, responsibility, and accountability of all participants in capital processes. These guide-lines should be made
available to contractors and architects along with the designation of the Development Manager and the clear specification that this is the only person authorized
to issue instructions on behalf of the owner. This latter role of CP&D staff also
needs to be communicated widely on campus.
R. 11. The work-load of development managers should be so arranged that they
can devote full time to a specific major project as and when necessary. This will
involve an appropriate balance of major and minor, complex and simple,
projects.
R. 12 While there was general support for the mandate of CP&D more visible
leadership, clearer accountability, a service orientation, and increased efficiency
were all seen as matters deserving of the attention of the Vice-President.
R. 13. A senior University official, preferably at the level of a Vice-President, should
assume the lead role in planning discussions with the surrounding communities,
with technical support from CP&D.
R14. The Director should ensure that he and his staff develop a heightened awareness
of the public relations significance of their work. They are representatives of the University, with a primary responsibility to represent the position of the University.
R. 15. The role of members of project committees should be clarified. Each member
should receive not only a letter of appointment from the Vice-President, but also instructions outlining the role, responsibilities, and authority of the committee. It should be
made clear to whom the member is accountable for their actions or inactions.
R. 16. For the programming and schematic design phases of a major project we
believe that the current practice of seeking broad user input is appropriate.
However, as a project moves to the detailed design and construction phases the
size of the committee should be substantially reduced and it should be composed of individuals with the time and commitment to meet on short notice and
the authority and responsibility to make decisions in a timely way. As the project
evolves the necessary technical support will change from functional programming to development management. Overlap should be adequate to ensure
continuity of concept.
R. 17 As part of its accountability to the Board, Senior Administration, and the
University community CP&D should develop performance criteria based on a
regular reporting format that includes, as a minimum, the following information:
original schedule and approved changes; original budget and approved changes;
reasons for the changes; and origin of the request for the change.
R. 18 Newly-appointed members ofthe Planning and Property Committee should
receive an orientation to the capital processes of the University, particularity with
respect to the Campus Plan and the relative roles ofthe Board, its Committee, the
Project Committee, and CP&D.
R. 19 The University should proceed expeditiously to develop a financial reporting
system for major projects better suited to the provision of management information.
R.20 We recommend that the Vice-President Administration and Finance become
more pro-active in ensuring that the wishes of the Senior Administration are
clearly communicated; and that the Director ensure that timely and accurate
communication with users and within CP&D become matters of high priority.
R.21 We recommend that the University immediately undertake a complete review
and re-engineering of the process for the administration of minor capital projects.
The objectives for the re-design of the process should be: improved communication with users at all stages; improved liaison with departments such as Plant
Operations and Computing and Communications; an improved process for
prioritizing projects; improved accountability for cost and schedule variances; a
stream-lined design-build process for small, simple jobs: and finer screening at
the feasibility study stage.
R.22. With respect to Regulatory Services we recommend that:
• the organizational structure remain as it is but that the mandate of the code
inspectors be more clearly defined and communicated to the University community, especially those who become involved in major capital projects.
• the Code Appeal Board be supplemented by one or two professional code
consultants with relevant expertise.
• the advice of inspectors be sought as early as possible in the design process.
• decisions about the use of specific materials or equipment be clearly indicated
by category: (a) code, (b) mandatory standardization, or (c) recommended
standardization.
• appeals about mandatory standardization be through the normal administrative processes, not through the Code Appeal Board.
• in those cases where a Certified Professional is employed on a project the
architect should submit all appropriate "Letters of Assurance" and these
should be accepted by CP&D as evidence of code compliance, obviating the
need for internal review.
R.23. We recommend that CP&D conduct a detailed self-study of future campus
development needs with the goal of planning the appropriate mix of CP&D services required. The analysis should be conducted at regular intervals, probably not
exceeding 5 years. 16 UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996
1995 UBC authors
by Connie Bagshaw
Staff writer
ADAMS, ROBERT A. Calculus: a complete
course, 3rd ed. (Instructor's Solutions
Manual), Don Mills, Addison-Wesley,
1995. • ADAMS, ROBERT A. Calculus: a
complete course. 3rd ed. (Student Solutions
Manual), Don Mills, Addison-Wesley.
1995. • ADAMS, ROBERTA. Single-variable
calculus. 3rd ed. Don Mills. Addison-Wesley.
1995. • ADAMS, ROBERTA. Single-variable
calculus, 3rd ed.. (Instructor's Solutions
Manual). Don Mills, Addison-Wesley,
1995. • ADAMS, ROBERTA. Single-variable
calculus, 3rd ed., (Student Solutions Manual).
Don Mills, Addison-Wesley. 1995. • ADLER,
ANDREW and JOHN E. COURY. The theory
of numbers: a text and source book of problems. Boston. Jones and Bartlett.
1995. • ALDERSON, SUE ANN and CADDIE
T'KENYE, illustrator. Ten Mondays for lots of
boxes. Vancouver. Ronsdale.
1995. • ALLDRITT, KEITH. The greatest of
friends: Franklin D. Roosevelt and Winston
Churchill, 1941-1945. NewYork. St. Martin's
Press, 1995. • AMUNDSON, NORMAN and
GRAY POEHNELL. Career Pathways. Richmond, Ergon Communications.
1995. • ANDERSON, JAMES and MARILYN
L. CHAPMAN, eds. Thinking globally about
language education. Vancouver, Research and
Development in Global Studies. Centre for
the Study of Curriculum and Instruction.
University of British Columbia. 1995. • BARMAN, JEAN. NEIL SUTHERLAND and J.
DONALD WILSON, eds. Children, teachers.
and schools in the history of British Columbia. Calgary, Detselig Enterprises,
1995. • BARMAN, JEAN and MARIE
BATTISTE. eds. First nations education in
Canada: the circle unfolds. Vancouver. UBC
Press, 1995. • BARNES, TREVOR J. Logics
of dislocation: models, metaphors, and meanings of economic space. New York. Guilford
Press, 1995. • BATES, ANTHONY WILLIAM
Technology, open learning, and distance education. London, Routledge. 1995. • BONGIE,
ELIZABETH BRYSON. translator. The life
and regimen of the blessed and holy teacher
Syncletica.Toronto. Peregrina. 1995. • BOSE,
MANDAKRANTA. The dance vocabulary of
classical India, 2nd rev. ed. Delhi. Sri Satguru.
1995. • BULLOCK, MICHAEL. The invulner
able ovoid aura: stories and poems. 2nd rev.
and enlarged ed. London, Third Eye.
1995. • BULLOCK, MICHAEL. Kaev ja teisi
jutte. [The Well and other stories, translated
by ErkkiSivonen.]Tallinn. Estonia, Loomingu
Raamatukogu, 1995. • BULLOCK,
MICHAEL. Stone and shadow = Shi yu ying.
Translated by Jin Sheng-hua. Beijing, China
Translation and Publishing, 1995. • CAIRNS,
ALAN and DOUGLAS E. WTLLIAMS, ed.
Reconfigurations: Canadian citizenship and
constitutional change. Toronto, McClelland
& Stewart, 1995. • CALNE, DONALD B. and
JOSEPH KING CHING TSUI. eds. Handbook
of dystonia. New York. M. Dekker.
1995. • CHAPMAN, MARILYN L. and JAMES
ANDERSON, eds. Thinking globally about
language education. Vancouver. Research and
Development in Global Studies. Centre for
the Study of Curriculum and Instruction,
University of British Columbia.
1995. • CHATMAN, STEPHEN. Fantasies:
intermediate piano solos. (Musical score).
Oakville, Frederick Harris Music.
1995. • CHATMAN, STEPHEN. Blow. blow.
thou winter wind. (Musical score). London.
Jaymar Music. 1995. • CHONG, DELANO P..
ed. Recent advances in density functional
methods. Singapore, World Scientific.
1995. • COCHRANE, D. DOUGLAS,
MARGARET G. NORMAN. BARBARA C.
MCGILLIVRAY. DAGMAR K. KALOUSEK.
ALAN HILL, KENNETH J. POSKITT Con
genital malformat ions ofthe brain: pathologic,
embryologic, clinical, radiologic, and genetic
aspects. New York, Oxford University Press.
1995. • COCHRANE, MARK. Boy am I. To
ronto, Wolsak and Wynn. 1995. • COOPER,
JOHN XIROS. T. S. Eliot and the ideology of
'Four Quartets'. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1995. • COREN, STANLEY.
The intelligence of dogs: a guide to the
thoughts, emotions, and inner lives or our
canine campanions. New York. Bantam
Books, 1995. (Translated into six
languages.) • COULTHARD, JEAN, com
poser. "Four Irish Songs". Linda Maguire
sings. Linda Maguire, mezzo-soprano: CBC
Vancouver Orchesta: Mario Bernardi,
condutor. (Compact disc) CBC SMCD 5137.
1995. • COULTHARD, JEAN, composer. "So
nata rhapsody". Portrait ofthe viola. Steven
Dann ; Bruce Vogt. (Compact disc) CBC
MVCD1072, 1994. • COURY, JOHN E. and
ANDREW ADLER. The theory of numbers: a
text and source book of problems. Boston.
Jones and Bartlett. 1995. • CRAGG, CECIL.
Two plays for reading: "On the Spot" and
"Foolery on the Pedestal". Braunton, Merlin
Books/ 1995. • DAVIES, BETTY. JOANNE
CHEKRYN-REIMER. PAMELA BROWN and
NOLA MARTENS. Fading away: the experience of transition in families with terminal
illness. Amityville. Bay wood, 1995. • DAVIES,
BETTY and JOANNE CHEKRYN-REIMER.
Finding your way: grieving the death of your
child. Vancouver. Canuck Place - A Hospice
for Children, 1995. • DAVIS, H. CRAIG. Demographic projection techniques for regions
and smaller areas: a primer. Vancouver. UBC
Press. 1995. • DAWSON, ANTHONY B. Hamlet. Manchester. Manchester University Press.
1995. • DENNISON, JOHN D.. ed. Challenge
and opportunity: Canada's community colleges at the crossroads. Vancouver. UBC Press.
1995. • DE SILVA, CLARENCE W. Intelligent
control: fuzzy logic applications. Boca Raton.
CRC Press. 1995. • DRANCE, STEPHEN M..
ed. Optic nerve in glaucoma. Amsterdam.
Kugler Publications. 1995. • ELKINS, DAVID
J. Beyond sovereignty: territory and political
economy in the twenty-first century. Toronto,
University oi'Toronto Press. 1995. • FOSTER,
JOHN WILSON. The achievement of Seamus
Heaney. Dublin. Lilliput Press. 1995. • FOSTER, JOHN WILSON, ed. The idea of the
Union: statements and critiques in support of
the union of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Vancouver. Belcouver Press.
1995. • FRIEDRICHS, CHRISTOPHER R The
early modern city. 1450-1750. London.
Longman. 1995. • FROHBERG, JOBST and
MARY NOMME RUSSELL. Confronting abusive beliefs: group treatment for abusive men.
Thousand Oaks. Sage Publications.
1995. • GRACE, SHERRILL E.. ed. Sursum
corda!: the collected letters of Malcolm Ixiwry.
Volume I. Toronto. University of Toronto Press.
1995. • GUILBAUT, SERGE. Sobrc la
desaparicion de ciertas obras de arte. Mexico
City. Curare / Fonca. 1995. • HAMMELL,
KAREN WHALLEY. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation. London. Chapman & Hall.
1995. • HANNA, DARWIN and MAMIE
HENRY, eds. Our tellings: Interior Salish stories of the Nlha7kapmx people. Vancouver.
UBC Press, 1995. • HEAD, IVAN L. and
TRUDEAU, PIERRE ELLIOT. The Canadian
Way: shaping Canada's foreign policy 1968-
1984. Toronto, McClelland and Stewart,
1995. • HERTZMAN, CLYDE. Environment
and health in central and eastern Europe: a
report for the Environmental Action Programme
for Central and Eastern Europe. Washington,
WorldBank. 1995. • HILL,ALAN,MARGARET
G. NORMAN, BARBARA C. MCGILLIVRAY,
DAGMAR K. KALOUSEK, KENNETH J.
POSKITT, D. DOUGLAS COCHRANE. Con
genital malformations ofthe brain: pathologic,
embryologic. clinical, radiologic, and genetic
aspects. New York. Oxford University Press.
1995. • HODGSON, RICHARD G. Falsehood
disguised: unmasking the truth in La
Rochefoucauld. West Lafayette. Purdue University Press. 1995. • HOWES, JOHN F.. ed.
Nitobe Inazo: Japan's bridge across the Pacific. Boulder, Westview Press. 1995. • HUDSON, NICHOLAS. Writing and European
thought. 1600 1830. Cambridge. Cambridge
University Press. 1994. • IRWIN, RITA L. A
circle of empowerment: women, education,
and leadership. Albany. State University of
New York Press. 1995. • JENNINGS, P.
DEVEREAUX and LARRY F. MOORE, eds
Human resource management on the Pacific
Rim: institutions, practices, and attitudes.
Berlin. W. de Gruvter. 1995. • KALOUSEK,
DAGMAR K., MARGARET G. NORMAN,
BARBARA C. MCGILLIVRAY, ALAN HILL,
KENNETH J. POSKITT and D. DOUGLAS
COCHRANE. Congenital malformations ofthe
brain: pathologic, embryologic, clinical, radiologic, and genetic aspects. New York. Oxford
University Press. 1995. • KAY, FIONA and
JOHN HAGAN. Gender in practice: a study of
lawyers' lives. New York, Oxford University
Press. 1995. • KEMPLE, THOMAS M. Reading Marx writing: melodrama, the market, and
the "Grundrisse". Stanford. Stanford University Press. 1995. • KNOX, GEORGE. Antonio
Pellegrini. 1675-1741. Oxford. Clarendon
Press, 1995. • LEBLOND, PAUL H. and
EDWARD L. BOUSFIELD. Cadborosaurus:
survivor from the deep. Victoria. Horsdal &
Schubart, 1995. • LEE, STEVEN HUGH. Outposts of empire: Korea. Vietnam and the origins of the Cold War in Asia. 1949-1954.
Montreal, McGill-Queen's University Press,
1995. • LEVI, MAURICE D. International finance: the markets and financial management of multinational business. 3rd ed. New
Margaret Prang
Thirty-five years ago Margaret
Prang, now a professor emerita of
history, was asked by a friend of a
friend if she would be interested in
writing a biography of a missionary
she knew.
"Nothing interested me less." Prang
says in the preface to A Heart at
Leisure from Itself: Caroline
Macdonald of Japan, the extraordinary story of a Canadian who devoted
her adull life to working with imprisoned criminals and their families in
Japan.
"My energies were directed toward
establishing an academic career, and
I was already contemplating the biography of a male political figure who
fell within the range of acceptable
academic subjects," she adds.
Prang became interested in
Macdonald after reading about her in
the   memoirs   of   the   late   Hugh
Keenleyside. a Canadian diplomat
who served as first secretary to the
Canadian legation in Tokyo in the
late 1920s.
A past president of the Canadian
Historical Association. Prang had also
developed an interest in women's history, including women missionaries,
which was gaining credibility as a
subject for scholarly study. But only
when she was well into her book,
which she began in 1986, did Prang
realize she was writing the biography
she had quickly rejected in 1963.
"(It's) an arresting coincidence, perhaps an example of serendipity, that
may cast a little light on how much
has changed in the past three decades." Prang writes.
Borrowing a phrase from a 19th-
century hymn, "a heart at leisure
from itself" is how Macdonald described what she required in a life
that engaged all of her abilities and
energies.
A native of Wingham. Ont..
Macdonald studied mathematics and
physics at the University of Toronto,
graduating in 1901. She first travelled to Japan in 1904 to assist in the
establishment of the Young Women's
Christian Association (YWCA).
Later. Macdonald championed
prison reform and feminist causes in
her adopted country, and became a
mentor of labour leaders and social
democratic politicians. She was honoured for her service by the Emperor
of Japan, and she was the first woman
to receive an honorary degree from
her alma mater.
At the end ofthe preface to A Heart
at Leisure from Itself, Prang compensates for what she says was her "lack
of pioneering spirit" 35 years ago.
"If this book enables readers to
share my interest in a woman whose
life I have found endlessly absorbing,
I will be rewarded."
Paul LeBlond
You could say that Paul LeBlond is
immersed in his pet topic.
Since 1968, LeBlond, director of
UBC's Earth and Ocean Sciences Program, has been pursuing some ofthe
world's most elusive creatures. Called
cryptids, they are the undiscovered
animals that tantalize and terrorize
us—beasts like Nessie, Ogopogo and
Champ.
An expert in ocean waves and the
author of numerous scholarly publications. Leblond's Cadborosaurus:
Survivor from the Deep is his first
book about cryptids.
Co-authored by Edward Bousfield,
a retired chief zoologist of the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa,
the book summarizes what is currently known about Cadborosaurus
(also known as Caddy), B.C.'s very
own sea serpent often seen in Victoria's Cadboro Bay.
Although references to a sea serpent abound in west coast native folklore. Caddy didn't become well-known
until the New York Herald Tribune
announced its existence on Oct. 6,
1933. Many Caddy sightings in B.C.
coastal waters have occurred since,
some as recently as two years ago.
Depending on which eyewitness account you read. Caddy could be gun-
metal blue, bright orange-brown or
striped. It either has no teeth, large
teeth or a mouth full of teeth. The
creature also seems capable of barking, snorting and mooing.
Athough the authors find that data
is too sparse to draw conclusions
about the type of animal Caddy might
be, they rank it closely with reptiles
and marine mammals. They suggest
that Caddy is cold-blooded, carnivorous and a strong swimmer.
LeBlond, a founding director ofthe
International Society of Cryptozoology
and president of the B.C.
Cryptozoology Club, says he's not sure
that the creature exists, but he does
believe it's worth investigating.
But, as the book concludes, dear
reader, it is now up to you. UBC Reports • March 21, 1996 17
Authors at work
Spotlight on authors
Mar. 21
The inspiration and creativity of more
than 100 UBC authors will be celebrated
Mar. 21 at the sixth annual Authors'
Reception, hosted by the UBC Library
and the Office ofthe President.
University Librarian Ruth Patrick and
President David Strangway will welcome faculty, students and emeritii to
Cecil Green Park, site of this year's
reception, to salute their publishing
achievements for 1995.
In addition to books on everything
from the memoirs of a pioneer Canadian
neurosurgeon to the dance vocabulary
of classical  India.  UBC authors pro
duced audio compact discs, interactive
CDs for computers, musical scores and
documentary films.
The Intelligence of Dogs, by Psychology Prof. Stanley Coren, was published
in Japanese, Swedish, Spanish, German, Italian and Finnish.
"As in previous years, UBC authors have
written on a wide range of subjects and their
expertise is impressive," Patrick said.
"The reception is a special occasion
where we celebrate the richness of our
library and also, in many instances, our
faculties' use of our extensive collections
to produce new books."
Fiona Kay
If you're a female legal eagle, chances
are you can expect to hit the glass ceiling
a lot sooner than your male counterpart.
"There is ample information to support the widespread perception that
women in the contemporary legal profession are discriminated against," says
Sociology Prof. Fiona Kay who. with John
Hagan, a colleague at the University of
Toronto, has written Gender in Practice: A
Study of Lawyer's Lives.
The book is the culmination of 10
years of studying and analysing the structural changes in contemporary legal practice and their effects on women.
Although the authors find little disparity in opportunities for men and women
when it comes to obtaining articling positions, they see statistical differences
emerging upon entry to practice and partnership, and in salaries, job satisfaction
and stress. They say that the variance in
success is based on constraint.
"Maternity leave, for example, has a
negative impact on women's partnership
opportunities, so we see them delaying
life cycle patterns like child bearing until
they attain partnership," Kay explains.
"For women with children, the lack of
accommodation, flexibility and balance
is another constraint.
"Once they do reach partnership,
women are frustrated by not being accorded the same levels of autonomy, responsibility, decision-making powers or
compensation as their male colleagues.
There is a higher rate of women leaving
the legal profession, largely because of
unsatisfactory working conditions, not
by genuine choice."
In some cases, the authors found that
women in the legal profession earned as
low as one-half the salary of men with
comparable education and skill.
"This isn't an individual problem that
requires minimal response to change,"
Kay says. "More structural developments
are needed in the profession to eliminate
such constraint."
Kay says that although both men and
women are working together toward
change, her research shows that reforms
are more successful when pursued by
men. Sounds like another book.
Dr. George Szasz
"Is it a boy or a girl?"
That's usually the first question asked
by parents at the birth of a new baby. But
for some families, the answer is not clear
or immediate.
Each year in B.C., about 10 to 15
infants are born with ambiguous genitalia, or external sex organs which are not
fully developed, says Dr. George Szasz, a
professor emeritus of psychiatry and past
director of UBC's Sexual Medicine Clinic.
"It's a time of great confusion, fear and
stress for parents," Szasz said. "Some
people are so completely overwhelmed
with grief, anger and guilt that everyday
tasks become difficult to manage."
Szasz and colleague Edna Durbach. director of patient and family education at
B.C.'s Children's Hospital, have produced a
handbook. Becoming a Boy or Girl to help
parents understand ambiguous genitalia,
and what to expect as health professionals
work to determine their child's gender.
Throughout the 73-page handbook,
Szasz and Durbach succeed in turning a
complex maze of information into comprehensible, useful knowledge through
simple dialogue, drawings and charts.
Medical terms are defined in lay language
and diagnosis—including descriptions of
the tests and examinations involved and
their results—are explained.
"It's important for parents to understand so that they can participate in their
child's care and plan for their future in an
informed way." Szasz said.
The authors also provide tips to help
parents cope through the medical crises,
and address common concerns such as
when and how to tell the child about
their condition.
York, McGraw-Hill. 1996. • LEVINE, MARC,
JAMES P. MCCORMACK, GLEN BROWN,
ROBERT RANGNO and JOHN RUEDY, eds.
Drugtherapy decision makingguide. Philadelphia, Saunders, 1995. • LIGHTHALL, LYNNE.
Sears list of subject headings. Canadian companion. 5th ed. New York. H.W. Wilson.
1995 • LOISELLE, ANDRE and BRIAN
MCILROY, eds. Auteur/provocateur: the films
of Denys Arcand. Westport. Greenwood Press,
1995. • MCCORMACK, JAMES P., GLEN
BROWN, MARC LEVINE, ROBERT RANGNO
and JOHN RUEDY. eds. Drug therapy decision making guide. Philadelphia, Saunders.
1995. • MCCORMACK, JAMES P., ROBERT
RANGNO, JEAN GRAY. eds. Therapeutic
choices. Ottawa. Canadian Pharmaceutical
Association. 1995. • MCGILLIVRAY,
BARBARA C, MARGARET G. NORMAN,
DAGMAR K. KALOUSEK, ALAN HILL,
KENNETH J. POSKITT and D. DOUGLAS
COCHRANE. Congenital malformations ofthe
brain: pathologic, embryologic, clinical, radiologic, and genetic aspects. New York. Oxford
University Press, 1995. • MCILROY, BRIAN
and ANDRE LOISELLE. eds. Auteur/provocateur: the films of Denys Arcand. Westport,
Greenwood Press. 1995. • MCTAGGART-
COWAN, IAN and VALERIUS GEIST, eds.
Wildlife conservation policy. Calgary, Detselig
Enterprises. 1995. • MCWHIRTER, GEORGE.
Incubus: the dark side of the light. Ottawa.
Oberon Press, 1995. • MATTESSICH, RICHARD. Critique of accounting: examination of
the foundations and normative structure of an
applied discipline. Westport, Quorum Books,
1995. • MAWANI, AMIN Estate planning:
personal financial planning and personal trust
programs. Montreal, Institute of Canadian
Bankers, 1995. • MISRI. SHAILA. Shouldn't I
be happy: emotional problems of pregnant and
postpartum women. New York, Free Press,
1995. • MOORE, LARRY F. and DEVEREAUX
P. JENNINGS, eds. Human resource management on the Pacific Rim: institutions, practices, and attitudes. Berlin. W. de Gruyter.
1995. • NICHOLLS, WILLIAM MACDONALD
and JEANNIE CORSI. Hikoi: journey with a
purpose. A report to Sal'i'shan Institute Society. Vancouver. William Nicholls and Jeannie
Corsi, 1995. • NORMAN, MARGARET G.,
BARBARA C. MCGHXJVRAY, DAGMAR K.
KALOUSEK, ALAN HILL, KENNETH J.
POSKITT and D. DOUGLAS COCHRANE.
Congenital malformations of the brain:
pathologic, embryologic, clinical, radiologic,
and genetic aspects. New York, Oxford University Press, 1995. • OXEARY, SARA. Wish you
were    here.    Toronto,    Exile    Editions,
1994. • OUM, TAE HOON, JOHN S.
DODGSON, DAVID A. HENSHER, STEVEN A.
MORRISON, CHRISTOPHER A. NASH,
KENNETH A SMALL and W. G. WATERS H.
eds. Transport economics: selected readings.
[Seoul], Korea Research Foundation for the
21st Century. 1995. • PAULY, DANIEL, F.
GAYANILO and P. SPARRE. FAO ICLARM
Stock Assessment Tools (FiSAT) user's guide.
Rome, Food and Agriculture Organization of
the United Nations, 1995.
PAULY. DANIEL and RAINER FROESE.
FishBase: a biological database on fish. Ver. 1.2.
(CD-ROM). Manila. ICLARM. 1995. • PAULY,
DANIEL and RAINER FROESE. FishBase: a
biological database on fish. Ver. 1.2. (Manual).
Manila, ICLARM. 1995. • PETERAT, LINDA
and MARY LEAH DEZWART, eds. An educa
tion for women: the founding of home economics education in Canadian public schools.
Charlottetown, Home Economics Publishing
Collective, 1995. • PETERSEN, KLAUS.
Zensur in der Weimarer Republik. Stuttgart,
Metzler, 1995. • PETRO, PETER. A history of
Slovak literature. Montreal. McGill-Queen's
University Press, 1995. • POSKITT, KENNETH
J., MARGARET G. NORMAN, BARBARA C.
MCGILLIVRAY, DAGMAR K. KALOUSEK,
ALAN HILL, D. DOUGLAS COCHRANE. Con
genital malformations ofthe brain: pathologic,
embryologic, clinical, radiologic, and genetic
aspects. New York. Oxford University Press.
1995. • POTTER, PITMAN B. Foreign business law in China: past progress and future
challenges. South San Francisco. The 1990
Institute. 1995. • PRANG, MARGARET. A
heart at leisure from itself: Caroline Macdonald
of Japan. Vancouver. UBC Press,
1995. • PRATT, GERALDINE and SUSAN
HANSON. Gender, work, and space. London,
Routledge. 1995. • PUE, W. WESLEY. Law
school: the story of legal education in British
Columbia. Vancouver. University of British
Columbia Facidty of Law.
1995. • PULLEYBLANK, EDWIN G. Outline of
classical Chinese grammar. Vancouver, UBC
I'ress, 1995. • RANGNO, ROBERT, JAMES P.
MCCORMACK, GLEN BROWN, MARC
LEVINE and JOHN RUEDY, eds. Drug therapy
decision making guide. Philadelphia.
Saunders. 1995. 'RANGNO, ROBERT.
JAMES P. MCCORMACK, JEAN GRAY. eds.
Therapeutic choices. Ottawa, Canadian Phar-
maceuticalAssociation, 1995. • REVUTSKY,
VALERIAN. V orbiti svitovoho teatru |In the
orbit of world theatre.] NewYork, M.P. Kots,
1995. • ROBINSON, JOHN, ANTHONY
SCOTT and DAVID COHEN, eds. Managing
natural resources in British Columbia: markets, regulations, and sustainable development. Vancouver, UBC Press, 1995. • ROSS,
IAN SIMPSON. The life of Adam Smith. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1995. • RUSSELL,
MARY NOMME and JOBST FROHBERG.
Confronting abusive beliefs: group treatment
lor abusive men. Thousand Oaks. Sage Publications. 1995. • SACKS. STEPHEN L..
STEPHEN E. STRAUS, RICHARD J. WHITLEY and PAUL D. GRDTFITHS, eds. Clinical
management of herpes viruses. Amsterdam,
IOS Press. 1995. • SAINT-JACQ,UES,
BERNARD, ed. Studies in language and culture. Aichi. Institute of Language and Culture. Aichi Shukutoku University.
1995. • SAVITT, STEVEN F. Time's arrows
today: recent physical and philosophical work
on the direction of time. Cambridge. Cambridge University Press, 1995. • SCOTT,
ANTHONY, JOHN ROBINSON and DAVID
COHEN, eds. Managing natural resources in
British Columbia: markets, regulations, and
sustainable development. Vancouver, UBC
Press, 1995. • SELMAN, GORDON. Adult
education in Canada: historical essays. Toronto.  Thompson  Educational  Publishing.
1995. • SHADBOLT, DOUGLAS. Ron Thom:
the shaping of an architect. Vancouver, Douglas & Mclntyre. 1995. • SHAW,
CHRISTOPHER A. Receptor dynamics in
neural development. Boca Raton. CRC Press.
1996. • STANKIEWCZ, W. J. Zaznamy:
myslenky & aforismy = Jottings: thoughts &
aphorisms. Brno, Atlantis Publishers,
1995. • STANWOOD, PAULG., ed. Of poetry
and polities: new essays on Milton and his
world. Binghamton, Medieval & Renaissance
Texts and Studies. 1995. • STULL, ROLAND
B. Meteorology today for scientists and engineers. Minneapolis/St. Paul, West Publishing Company, 1995. • SUTHERLAND, NEIL,
JEAN BARMAN and J. DONALD WILSON.
eds. Children, teachers, and schools in the
history of British Columbia. Calgary. Detselig
Enterprises. 1995. • SUZUKI, DAVID,
DENISE DUNCAN, BILL IVENIUK and THE
EARTHWORM BAND. Amazingjourney: children sing to the beat of the earth. (Compact
disc and cassette tape). Winnipeg, Oak Street
Music, 1995. • SUZUKI, DAVID and
EUGENIE FERNANDES. The backyard time
detectives.Toronto. Stoddart, 1995. • SZASZ,
GEORGE and EDNA DURBACH. Becoming a
boy or girl: handbook for parents of babies
born with ambiguous genitalia. Vancouver.
British Columbia's Children's Hospital,
1995. • TAKASHIMA, KEN-ICHI and
MICHIO MATSUMARU. Kokotsu mojijishaku
soran [Comprehensive guide to interpretation of oracle-bone graphs.] Tokyo. University
ofTokyo Press. 1994. • THOMPSON, PEGGY
and SAEKO USUKAWA. Hard-boiled: great
lines from classic noir films. San Francisco,
Chronicle Books, 1995. • THOMPSON,
PEGGY. Broken Images. (Documentary film).
Vancouver, Day For Night Motion Pictures.
1995. • TSUI, JOSEPH KING CHING and
DONALD B. CALNE. eds. Handbook of dystonia. NewYork. M. Dekker, 1995. • TURNBULL,
FRANK. Operating on the frontier: memoirs of
a pioneer Canadian neurosurgeon. Madeira
Park. Capilano Publishing, 1995. • UPPAL,
RAMAN and SERCU PHCT. International financial markets and the firm. Cincinnati.
South-Western. 1995. • VERMA VIJAY. Organizing projects for success. The human
aspects of project management. Volume One.
Upper Darby. Project Management Institute.
1995. • WATERS H, W. G. and TAE HOON
OUM, JOHN S. DODGSON, DAVID A.
HENSHER, STEVEN A. MORRISON,
CHRISTOPHER A NASH and KENNETH A
SMALL, eds. Transport economics: selected
readings. (Seoul] Korea Research Foundation
for the 21st Century, 1995. • WILSON, J.
DONALD, JEAN BARMAN and NEIL SUTHERLAND, eds. Children, teachers, and schools
in the history of British Columbia. Calgary,
Detselig Enterprises, 1995. • WONG,
RODERICK, ed. Biological perspectives on
motivated activities. Norwood. Ablex Publish-
ingCorporation. 1995. • ZIEMBA W.T..R. A
JARROWandV.MAKSIMOVIC, eds. Finance.
Amsterdam. Elsevier. 1995. 18 UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996
News Digest
UBC's Development Office is the winner of three awards for
publications from the Council for the Advancement and Support of
Education. The awards came in the District VIII competition for
institutions in western Canada and the northwestern U.S.
Gold awards for design and photography went to Investing in
Knowledge, an overview of UBC's faculty fund-raising priorities that
featured a companion piece for each faculty.
Scholarly Pursuits, a newsletter about supporting UBC student
scholarships and bursaries, earned a silver award for design. The
publications were produced by the Donor Relations unit of the
Development Office. Ron Burke, acting manager of Donor Relations.
credited the newsletter with helping to prompt a recent $1 million
gift to the university.
The annual UBC Staff and Faculty Golf Tournament will take
place at the Surrey Golf Club on Thursday. April 25.
The entry fee is $65 and spouses and guests are welcome. The
organizers are still missing some of the trophies from last year's
event and would like them returned as soon as possible. For
information on the event, to line up an entry form, or to return a
trophy, contact Doug Quinville by e-mail at doug.quinville@ubc.ca
or phone 822-6090.
*****
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The classified advertising rate is $15.75 for 35 words or less. Each additional word
is 50 cents. Rate includes GST. Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park Road,
Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1, accompanied by payment in cash, cheque (made out to UBC
Reports) or internal requisition. Advertising enquiries: 822-3131.
The deadline for the April 4, 1996 issue of UBC Reports is noon, March 26.
Services
FACULTY PENSION and RRSP Asset
Allocation Service. Let me
remove the worry and hassle of
making your pension and RRSP
investment decisions! I use
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as low as $35. Electronic filing now
available, refunds possible in 10
working days. Pick up and delivery
from UBC, professionally prepared.
Phone 940-9180 or 940-2800, Len.
Bousing Wanted
ACCOMMODATION  SOUGHT.
Furnished. Parking. Shared or not.
1 May-31 August. In Kitsilano. Dr.
David Heinimann, North West
College (604) 624-6054 ext. 5729.
RESPONSIBLE, MATURE M.D., spouse,
(non-smokers), and cats, require
home near UBC for 1-3 years from
July onward. Unfurnished OK.
References, c.v., etc., available.
Phone collect (604) 633-2644 or fax
(604) 633-2638.
UBC PROFESSOR REQUIRES house/
town house Vancouver West Side
for the month of August for visiting
retired N/S parents. Please call
Reiner atW:875-401 l,H:263-2708.
A VISITING PROFESSOR WITH
FAMILY from Japan at UBC wants
to rent a 2-3 BR, fully furnished
apartment or house in UBC area
from mid-April to mid-July, at a
reasonable price. Contact by e-
mail: hatani@naruto-u.ac.jp or
fax:+81-886-87-3348.
WANTED: SUBLET TWO-BEDROOM
furnished apartment April 1 to
July 30 for responsible grad
student and small family. Prefer
Kits, West End or South Granville -
near bus. Call Chantal or Denise
at 689-7522. 	
House Sitters
LOOKINGFOR AHOUSESITTER? Here
we are! Professional couple (UBC
Alumni) will look after your house
with TLCwhileyouareon sabbatical,
etc. Available: April. Bookings: 2
months or more. Contact Marilyn:
432-7905. Pager: 686-2279.
PROFESSIONAL, NON-SMOKING
COUPLE seeks short/long-term
house-sitting opportunity to
begin September 1 /96 (flexible).
Excellent references. Call 732-
5743. Leave message.
Accommodation
Accommodation
POINT GREY GUEST HOUSE  A
perfect spot to reserve
accommodation for guest
lecturers or other university
members who visit throughout
the year. Close to UBC and other
Vancouver attractions, a tasteful
representation of our city and of
UBC. 4103 W. 10th Ave.,
Vancouver. BC. V6R 2H2. Phone
or fax (604)222-4104.
TINA'S GUEST HOUSE Elegant
accom. in Pt. Grey area. Minutes to
UBC. On main bus routes. Close to
shops and restgurants. Inc. TV, tea
and coffee making, private phone/
fridge. Weekly rates available. Tel:
222-3461. Fax:222-9279.
GREEN COLLEGE GUEST HOUSE
Five suites available for
academic visitors to UBC only.
Guests dine with residents and
enjoy college life. Daily rate $50,
plus $ 13/day for meals Sun .-Thurs.
Call 822-8660 for more
information and availability.
ENGLISH COUNTRY GARDEN bed
and breakfast. Warm hospitality
and full breakfast welcome you
to this central view home. Close
to UBC, downtown and bus
service. Large ensuite rooms with
TV and phone. 3466 West 15th
Avenue. 737-2526.
ONE BR SELF-CONTAINED UNIT
1st and Tolmie, close to UBC,
garden level with mountain and
water view available for 1
person. Fully furnished and
equipped, all inclusive $750/
month. Tel 267-0813.
FULLY FURNISHED HOUSE for rent in
Richmond, 1/2 hour from UBC, 3
bedrooms, 2 1/2 baths, study,
garage, fenced-in backyard .close
shopping, schools. No pets, nonsmoking. Available for 12 months
from June or July 1, 1996. $1,600/
month + utilities. Call 271-0839.
COMFORTABLY  FURNISHED  2
bedroom main floor suite on quiet
street, Oxford/Slocan. Half way
between SFU and UBC. Near
buses. Private home, sunny yard.
No Pets. Adults. Available May-
September/96. Possibly longer.
$1000 including utilities. Phone
251-1425.
HOUSE FOR RENT - DUNBAR AREA,
quiet neighbourhood, close to
UBC, shops, park. Fully furnished,
4 bedroom, 3 1/2 bathrooms,
hardwood floors, skylights, sauna,
fireplace, piano, south deck. Suit
professional couple/adults. No
pets, non-smokers, Rent: $2,000/
month. Available Jan 01 -June 30/
97. Phone Ray Pederson, 604-
822-4224. e-mail:
pederson@unixg, ubc.ca,
House Exchange
FOR  EXCHANGE  OR RENT:  5
bedroom house with garden and
swimming pool. 10 minutes drive
from the Weizman Institute,
Rehovot, Israel. Tel. and fax No.
972-8-8591128. E-mail:
tamiv@mofet.macam98.ac.il
I
Next ad deadline:
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Gerard does not cut your hair right away. First he looks at the shape of your face.
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Gerard uses natural products to leave your hair soft and free of chemicals. He
also specializes in men and women's hair loss using Thymu-Skin and is the only
one in North America using this technique. Gerard was trained in Paris and
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Medicine, dentistry, biosciences, aquaculture
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264 -9918 donald@portal.ca UBC Reports ■ March 21, 1996 19
UBC Archives photo
Cows never grazed in front of Main Library, not even in 1937 when this photograph first
appeared. Made of two images combined together, the picture is one of thousands that can
now be found on the UBC Library's Special Collections and University Archives' World Wide
Web page.
First-of-a-kind conference
for university stciff set for UBC
Employees from universities
and colleges across Canada will
gather at UBC May 9-11 for CAMPUS '96, the first national conference for Canadian university
and college administrative, management and professional staff.
UBC's Association of Administrative and Professional Staff
(AAPS) is hosting the conference
that will involve group discussions and seminars in two distinct streams entitled Working
Together Effectively and Building Your Portfolio.
"The decision to host the conference arose out of a need to
find out more about what organizations like ours are doing
across the country," said Jo
Hinchliffe, chair of AAPS' advo
cacy committee and a member of
the conference committee. The
conference will provide an opportunity to find out what other
similar groups are doing and at
the same time to undertake professional development activities."
Hinchliffe said she expects as
many as 300 people to attend
the conference, with a possible
third of the attendees coming
from universities and colleges
outside of the province.
Jim Harris, a management
consultant and co-author ofthe
national bestseller The 100 Best
Companies to Workfor in Canada,
will open the conference as the
keynote speaker.
Topics for panel and general
discussion include the internal
impact of change, recruiting/
motivating members, building an
ideal agreement, and the new
price of doing business.
Other sessions deal with conflict resolution, managing change
and stress management.
Hinchliffe hopes to see the
conference become an annual
event.
"If we're successful what may
come of this is that another university may decide to do it next
year in their own province with
better representation from that
province."
Conference registration is
$200 for AAPS members and
$250 for non-members. For conference information or registration call 822-1050.
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Archival photos
now on the Web
A special collection of material is wailing for World Wide
Web users at hltp://
unixg. ubc.ca:700 1 /O/provid-
ers/spcoll/welcome, html.
Approximately 6.000 photographic images from the UBC
Library's Special Collections and
LJniversity Archives Division are
now available on-line, with more
of its 400.000 holdings being
added every day.
"The availability of photographic images on-line helps
empower researchers by providing more people with greater
access to more photographs,"
said Chris Hives, acting division
head.
"Web access to these holdings decreases the constraints
associated with both the researcher's physical proximity
to the division and its operating hours. Given the scope of
our holdings, this will undoubt
edly become a very long-term
project."
Although the project is currently limited to UBC-related
photos, net surfers will eventually also find historical provincial photographs, including
Barkerville after the lire of 1868
and the arrival of the first train
through Prince Rupert on Apr.
9. 1914.
The Special Collections and
University Archives Division is
located in the Main Library on
campus. In addition to photographs, its collection of rare
books and Canadiana, historic
maps and architectural drawings is a provincial resource
for the academic community
and the general public.
Photographs on-line are
subject to copyright and permission for their use must be
obtained from the UBC Library.
RETIRING?
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Pension Plan vs. Self-Directed RSP vs. Annuity
Individuals often make the most important decisions
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Flexibility to change
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Liquidity if you need
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How much income is
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Implications to spouse
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Vijay Parmar, C.A.
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665-0920
BIASES 20 UBC Reports ■ March 21,1996
Richard Prince puts the finishing touches on a black-hooded oriole, part of one of many works of art he has created
for the Institute of Asian Research. The various artworks guide visitors on a journey into and through the C.K. Choi
building, celebrating the land shared by Asian cultures.
Artist's varied work for building
reflects Asia's cultural diversity
by Connie Bagshaw
Staff writer
When Richard Prince was commissioned by the Institute of Asian Research
to create a sculpture for the new C.K.
Choi building, he quickly abandoned the
idea of finding one symbol to represent
all Asian civilizations.
"Asia contains cultures as widely different as does any vast continent," Prince
says. "It seemed more sensible to focus
on the land, an element which is shared
by all in Asia.
"The land remains throughout time
and history," he explains. "Its beauty
can provoke a profound response that
carries us beyond our own lives into
realms without borders and cultures,
uniting us through a universality of experience."
Prince started thinking of the sculpture as a journey through the landscape,
represented by the building.
Approaching the C. K. Choi building
from the west on the path adjacent to the
Asian Centre, visitors will find four large
granite boulders arranged in a grid and
inscribed with the Chinese, Japanese,
Korean and Hindi interpretations of the
concept of stone or the earth.
A single large boulder engraved with
the Thai word for granite greets arrivals
in the main entrance of the building.
Engraved zinc images of the ginkgo
tree, an ancient species also known as
the Chinese temple tree, will be found on
a support post next to the central staircase.
On the third floor, the Ganges River is
carved into the concrete surface of the
hallway. Prince designed his map-like
rendering of India's sacred river to be
flush, filling it with an epoxy and bronze
powder mixture.
Crossing the Ganges, visitors can proceed to the reading room where they will
find a brightly coloured yellow and black
bird, the black-hooded oriole, mounted
on the rim of the dome over the lounge
area. Prince chose the bird because its
habitat stretches across southern and
Campus plays part in
nuclear test ban treaty
Canada has joined forces with 11 other
countries to help enforce a global ban on
nuclear testing. UBC is one of five Canadian sites chosen to house a special
atmospheric detection device which will
check the air for radioactive particles.
The UBC station, located on a small
pad in a field near the Totem Park residences, is one of 21 proposed sites in an
international network of monitors.
Prof. Douw Steyn, chair of UBC's
Atmospheric Science Program, says the
770-kilogram machine sucks air into a
Give Someone
a Second Chance.
Discuss organ donation with your
family and sign a donor card today.
The Kidney foundation
of Canada
filter which traps radioactive debris
particles. The filter will be checked
daily with results being stored in the
International Data Centre (IDC) run by
the United Nations.
"There are all kinds of research opportunities which go along with this
device but its prime objective is to
detect the unannounced testing of nuclear bombs," said Steyn.
Test ban treaty negotiations began
within the Conference on Disarmament
in Geneva, Switzerland in January
1993. Negotiators quickly identified the
IDC as a central component of an effective verification policy.
Ottawa, Resolute, Yellowknife and St.
John's are the other Canadian cities in the
monitoring network. Participating countries include Australia, Germany, Finland,
Kuwait, Netherlands, New Zealand, Russia, Sweden, England and the U.S.
Canada's participation is funded by
Health Canada.
eastern Asia.
The black-hooded oriole, which holds
a ring in its bill, is the key to the entire
sculpture, Prince said. He explained that
the bird, and the perch-like sighting
device mounted outside—beyond the
transparent dome—form a sight line directly to Polaris which is in the sky, night
and day.
"My hope is that those who experience
the sculpture will see it as not only a
journey through a building and a sculpture, but also as a mediator which promotes poetic speculation on the relationships between eastern and western cultures," he said.
Prince, who started the project in August 1995, expects the work to be completed next month. The C.K. Choi building is scheduled to officially open Oct. 7,
1996.
Comet's
blaze sight
to behold
The UBC observatory opens its doors
to the public later this month for a peek
at what could potentially be (he brightest comet in 20 years.
"Comets are notoriously unpredictable but this one is coming close enough
and will be visible from our latitude."
said Asst. Prof. Jaymic Matthews. "It
will certainly be more prominent than
the reappearance of Halley's comet 10
years ago."
Named after the Japanese amateur
astronomer who discovered it in January, the Hyakutake (Hyah-koo-tah-kay)
comet will pass Earth at a distance of
15 million kilometres, close enough to
be seen by the naked eye.
Matthews said the comet is expected
to be brightest in late March and may
develop more of a prominent tail
throughout April as it moves closer to
the sun.
The observatory will be open to the public
from 8 p.m. to midnight on four successive
nights starting Saturday. March 23.
Matthews said people will be able to learn
more about comets by using interactive software available during the comet opening.
UBC astronomers hope to show a televised
image of the comet pulled from one of die
observatory's smaller guiding telescopes.
Space watchers who prefer to see the
comet through binoculars at home should
look between the Big and Little Dippers on
Tuesday, March 26 when it is expected to
shine the brightest. Observers will be able
to notice a change in the comet's position
from one night to the next, a change which
Matthews says represents approximately
20 degrees a day.
Matthews said most comets are discovered by amateur astronomers who usually
uncover between 10 and 20 comets each
year.
The last time the observatory was
opened on successive days was in the
summer of 1994 when the Shoemaker-
Levi Comet struck Jupiter. Close to 1,800
observers passed through the facility
over four nights to view the spectacle.
The UBC observatory is located in
the Geophysics and Astronomy Building at 2219 Main Mall. For more information call 822-2267.
Centre for neurological
research gets go-ahead
Senate has approved the creation of
a Brain and Spinal Cord Research Centre based in the faculties of Medicine
and Science and operating in partnership with the Vancouver Hospital and
Health Sciences Centre (VHHSC).
The centre's aim is a unique collaboration that builds on the existing
neuroscience efforts of more than 70
UBC and VHHSC neuroscience research groups and will enhance the
work of five existing endowed chairs
in the neurosciences—the Jack Bell
Chair in Schizophrenia, the Marianne
Koerner Chair in Brain Diseases, the
Louise A. Brown Chair in Neuroscience, the Alcan Chair in
Neurosciences and the Man in Motion Chair in Spinal Cord Research.
The centre will be based at UBC
using existing space in the faculties
and in VHHSC's University Hospital
pavilion, with links to other centres of
neurological study such as the Eye
Care Centre and VHHSC's 12th and
Oak Pavilion.
Initial efforts will focus on six established neuroscience research strengths:
neurodegenerative disorders such as
Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases;
demyelinating diseases, such as multiple sclerosis; neural repair of, for example, spinal cord injuries; schizophrenia; stroke; and vision.
Within the next few decades, neurological disorders are expected to overtake cancer as the second leading cause
of death and disability. Recent advances
in molecular neurobiology and neural
development have opened up opportunities for new interventions and therapies that could prevent or cure these
disorders.
The Faculty of Science has established a spinal cord repair group known
as CORD (Collaboration on Repair Discoveries). CORD will be the focus of
spinal cord research within the centre.
A flagship project of the Medicine
2000 strategic plan for the Faculty of
Medicine the centre will also offer industrial liaison opportunities in pharmaceuticals and biotechnology. It will
also interact with other faculties at
UBC, such as the other health sciences
and Arts.
A director for the centre will be named
at a later date.

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