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UBC Reports Aug 15, 1996

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 THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
T TBC REPORTS
Volume 42, Number 13
August 15, 1996
Getting Physical
D Thomson photo
Children in UBC's inaugural summer physics camp joined retired physics
professor and former Dean of Science Prof. George Volkoff in making ice
cream with liquid nitrogen. See story on Page 2.
Students to benefit
from high-tech deal
UBC and BC TELECOM have entered
into an innovative 10-year relationship
that will increase and improve services
for post-secondary students and other
learners throughout B.C. and beyond.
BC TELECOM will work with the university to design and build a new
broadband, fibre-optic infrastructure,
linking sites throughout UBC's 400-hec-
tare campus.
The Campus Connectivity project will
provide classrooms, laboratories, offices
and student residences with high-speed
access (up to 10 megabytes per second) to
electronic mail and the World Wide Web.
"This alliance is great news for everyone involved, especially our students,"
said UBC President David Strangway.
"Working with BC TELECOM, our university will be a technological leader, able
to provide enhanced education to students in the Dower Mainland and throughout the province."
"In addition, this will allow us to explore and provide educational leadership
through research on the social impact
and policy implications of new information technologies."
The initiative will enable faculty members to prepare course materials for student use on the Web, from posting lecture
notes to creating interactive, multimedia
experiments. Students will also be able to
use the Web to apply for admission, search
library catalogues and even access their
final grades.
Space in overcrowded libraries, meanwhile, will be freed up by services that
allow faculty members to order electronic
versions of scholarly journals.
In the future, students throughout the
province will also be able to take courses
concurrently with students on campus.
Using the Internet, the}' will be able to
complete course work and take part in
discussions through on-line tutorials and
conferencing.
Both partners will also provide distance learning to university students
outside Greater Vancouver, as well as
develop and market multimedia applications for other educational institutions
and companies. For example, the agreement calls for the creation of a training
centre which will instruct teachers on the
effective use of new information technologies in elementary, secondary, post-
secondary and private-sector education.
Under the agreement, BC TELECOM
will become the university's principal telecommunications provider. This is the
first step in formalizing a long-term relationship between the two organizations.
The agreement follows guidelines set
out by the Conference Eioard of Canada
for partnerships between education institutions and the private sector. These
See BC TELECOM Page 2
Provincial cuts
threaten UBC
infrastructure
A deep cut in provincial funds earmarked for upgrading and maintaining
UBC's buildings will have a major and
lasting impact on the campus infrastructure, said UBC President David
Strangway.
The cut, which slashes the 1996/97
minor capital program budget by more
than half — from $15.1 million to $7
million — affects four areas: minor capital, cyclical maintenance, the Safer Campus program and access for the disabled.
"These cuts mean yet further deferred
maintenance on our buildings and that
our classrooms cannot receive much-
needed upgrading. Less maintenance is
equivalent to an increased deficit,"
Strangway said.
It is anticipated that the cut will result
in approximately 20 to 25 staff layoffs.
Cyclical maintenance funds have been
reduced from $6 million to $2.6 million,
while the minor capital program budget
has been reduced from $7.9 to $4.4 million.
Among the projects affected are overhauling heating and ventilation systems
and upgrading of classrooms.
Funds designated to expand the Safer
Campus program and an access program
for people with disabilities have been
completely cut. The province had committed $500,000 to the Safer Campus
program, while $650,000 was destined
for the access program.
The Safer Campus program includes a
safety telephone service and upgrades to
exterior lighting on campus paths. The
access program includes systematic upgrading of buildings, including access
ramps, curb cuts, and audible signals for
the visually impaired.
"UBC has a major space deficit despite
a decade of intensive capital development, which has included a significant
provincial contribution," Strangway said.
"The university has only 90 per cent of
its entitlement and when we take into
consideration buildings that should be
removed such as old huts and trailers, we
really only have 78 per cent of the space
we are entitled to," he said, adding that
many other buildings do not conform to
See FUNDING Page 2
Long-awaited journalism
program comes to UBC
The University of British Columbia
and the Sing Tao Foundation announced
the establishment of a new graduate
school of journalism at UBC during a
ground-breaking ceremony July 24.
The SingTao School of Journalism will
offer an integrated program that combines graduate study in academic disciplines with advanced training in the profession of journalism. It will be the first
graduate school of journalism in Western
Canada and the only one in Canada to
emphasize advanced academic studies.
The founding of the school is made
possible by a donation from the Sing Tao
Foundation, the philanthropic arm of
Sing Tao, a Hong Kong-based media corporation.
"There has been discussion about es
tablishing a school of journalism at UBC
for at least 17 years but. until now,
funding was simply not available," said
UBC President David Strangway.
"The Sing Tao Foundation's gift has
made it possible to establish an important new centre for the training of journalists in Canada," he said.
The school will be housed in the first
phase of the new Creative Arts Building,
to be constructed at the site of the old
Armoury on West Mall between Memorial
and Crescent Roads. First phase construction is scheduled to begin this summer.
The school will seek outstanding applicants from within Canada and from
abroad. About 15 students will be admit-
See SCHOOL Page 2
Inside
Planning Ahead
UBC's Official Community Plan could be in place by November
Balanced Books 3
Spending controls lead to balanced budget, reduced debt for 1996-97
Supporting Research 4
Weyerhaeuser creates chair to delve into mysteries of fluid dynamics
Larkin Remembered 12
Peter Larkin - friend, mentor and champion of common sense 2 UBC Reports • August 15, 1996
BC TELECOM
Continued from Page 1
guidelines were earlier adopted
by UBC's Board of Governors.
"This agreement demonstrates how telecommunications
technology can bridge distances,
improve education and foster
socio-economic growth. This alliance shows the true spirit of
the B.C. Electronic Highway Accord," said BC TELECOM Chairman and Chief Executive Officer
Brian Canfield.
"We view our groundbreaking
relationship with UBC as a model
for other universities and colleges. It brings a wide variety of
current activities and new initiatives into a partnership that will
strengthen and grow as new opportunities and technologies
evolve," Canfield added.
The British Columbia Electronic Highway Accord is an alliance among the provincial government, the telecommunications industry, learning institutions and others to provide universal and affordable access to
the electronic highway and to
develop British Columbia's information technology industry.
Physics
camp
keeps kids
enthralled
The young physicists run into
the classroom and make a bee-
line for a canister of liquid nitrogen.
"No pushing or shoving because this stuff is -200 C," Sarah
Swenson commands.
Swenson, co-ordinator of the
Physics Outreach Program in the
Dept. of Physics and Astronomy,
orders her charges to put on
their protective gloves and stand
back while she pours the frigid
liquid into a bowl of ice cream
ingredients. As Swenson pulls
away from the frothing concoction, eager helpers dive in with
wooden spoons and begin stirring the brew.
"They just can't get enough
science," says a smiling
Swenson.
Throughout the month of
July, Swenson and colleagues
from the Dept. of Physics have
been directing week-long physics camps for children in grades
3 to 8. Optics, electricity, magnetism, flight and sound are
among the topics they investigate. They make simple circuits,
musical instruments, see how
lasers operate, launch rockets
and learn about thermal physics
by making ice cream.
"You name it, we do it," says
Swenson, who directed the dozen
or so participants in each of the
four physics camps. "We even
make slime."
Physics Prof. Chris Waltham,
who set up the Physics Outreach
Program, marvels at the energy
and inquisitiveness ofthe youngsters. He says the big hits were
visits to research labs and talks
by theoretical physicists.
"It's quite incredible really,"
Waltham remarks. "I've never
seen anybody grill research scientists or graduate students like
these kids do."
Physics Outreach can be
reached at 822-9107 or
www.physics.ubc.ca/
-outreach/home. html
School
Continued from Page 1
ted annually. Those who complete the program will receive a
Master of Journalism degree.
The journalism program is
intended for those who already
have a bachelor's degree in an
academic discipline, and either
have extensive journalistic experience or demonstrate superior research and writing ability.
Some ofthe program's credits
would be taken in regular academic courses offered by other
UBC departments. Other credits
will be given within the school
and will be divided evenly between theoretical media studies
and the practical, technical as
pects of journalism. Scholarly
understanding, critical thinking,
and ethical responsibility will be
emphasized.
The newsroom training aspect ofthe program will focus on
achieving the highest standards
in research, writing and editing
in the print media. Other aspects of j ournalism may be added
to the curriculum at a later date,
but excellence in journalistic
research and writing skills and
their application to specialty areas will remain the core of the
program.
Program curriculum will be
approved by the faculties of Arts
and Graduate Studies.
Funding
Continued from Page 1
occupational health and safety
standards and need upgrading.
Strangway said UBC has increased its efficiency and productivity in many areas over the
past few years.
Graduates of UBC have increased by 36 per cent since
1984/85. This 36 per cent increase in output has been accompanied by an eight per cent
increase in provincial grant support in constant dollars. For the
past 10 years, UBC has averaged a reduction of 2.3 per cent
every year in provincial grants
per degrees granted, Strangway
added.
"We are doing more with less,
but cuts such as this recent one
to the minor capital programs
remove our flexibility to operate," he said.
THE UNIVERSITY OS 8IUUSW COtUMBtA
^JBC REPQR
UBC News:
UBC Rtparls ;:
Point and click,
UBC Reports is now available on the Web.
All the articles. Features. Profiles. The Calendar.
Notices. News digest. People. Letters to the Editor.
Look for the latest issue under News at
http://www.ubc.ca
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Gerard does not cut your hair right away. First he looks atthe shape of yourface.
He wants lo know what you want, the time you want to spend on your hair, your
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flourishes into action to leave you feeling great by looking your very best.
Gerard uses natural products to leave your hair soft and free of chemicals. He
also specializes in men and women's hair loss using Edonic from Paris, France,
and is the only one in North America using this technique. Gerard was trained
in Paris and worked for Nexus as a platform artist. Gerard invites you to his
recently opened salon in Kitsilano.
3432 W. Broadway 732-4240
The Sing Tao School of Journalism, to be built at the corner
of West Mall and Crescent Road, is scheduled to open in the
fall of 1997.
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Office: (604) 263-1508
Home: (604) 263-5394
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UBCREPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December, June, July and August) for the entire university
community by the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310-6251
Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1. It is
distributed on campus to most campus buildings and to
Vancouver's West Side in the Sunday Courier newspaper.
Managing Editor: Paula Martin (paula.martin@ubc.ca)
Editor/Production: Janet Ansell (janet.ansell@ubc.ca)
Contributors: Connie Bagshaw (connie.bagshaw@ubc.ca),
Stephen Forgacs (Stephen.forgacs@ubc.ca)
Charles Ker (charles.ker@ubc.ca),
Gavin Wilson (gavin.wilson@ubc.ca).
Editorial and advertising enquiries: (604) 822-3131 (phone),
(604) 822-2684 (fax).
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in UBC
Reports do not necessarily reflect official university policy.
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. UBC Reports August 15, 1996 3
Turn It On
D. Thomson photo
As part of his master's thesis in engineering physics, Mike Donaldson
helped install a sulphur lamp at B.C. Hydro headquarters in Burnaby. The
lamp light is distributed vertically down an atrium space in a new form of
light guide designed in UBC's structured surface physics laboratory. The
giant chandelier is the first to use the unique annular lens guide system.
UBC adopts proposal
to close food outlet
After considerable deliberation, including consultation through a broadly based
sponsor committee and the review of an
extensive business plan, UBC has endorsed proposals to close one of its campus food operations and convert another
in 1997.
The proposals call for Pacific Spirit
Place, located in the Student Union Building, to close in September 1997, after the
summer conference season, and for the
commissary to transfer to Totem Park.
The university would then seek requests
for proposals to redevelop the space with
an anticipated re-opening in January
1998.
Trekkers Restaurant would be converted in March 1997 from a table-service
restaurant into an expanded express service outlet.
"These decisions were reached after
extensive deliberation, study and consultation," said Frank Eastham, associate
vice-president, Human Resources. "Our
overall intent was to achieve a balance
between serving campus and community
needs and our responsibility to have a
sound financial operation.
"It became clear to us that we need to
focus on re-invigorating service in key
areas of our food operations. It was also
clear that in order to achieve that goal we
had to rethink our activities in areas of
significant continuing loss with no credible opportunity of a turnaround."
Up to 50 management and staff positions out of approximately 300 may be
affected, however the university anticipates the number will be lower due to
attrition and a labour adjustment plan.
"A key concern is that UBC staff mem
bers who may experience job loss be
provided with an adjustment program
that values and respects them and provides opportunities for employment at
UBC and elsewhere. We will fully consult
with the CUPE 116 union to create an
adjustment plan in the coming year,"
Eastham said.
A business plan prepared by consultants Ernst and Young, with extensive
input from internal and external staff and
experts, recommended the changes in
order to put UBC Food Services on a solid
financial footing for the future.
Pacific Spirit Place and Trekkers Restaurant had a combined net loss totalling
$712,000 in 1995/96 and financial forecasts anticipated these heavy losses would
continue.
Several factors affected their operations, including competition from other
on- and off-campus food outlets, changes
in the customer base, and changing economic times, the report said.
The report also recommends the amalgamation of Food Services with the university's Housing and Conferences Dept.
The university will review the feasibility of
this recommendation, especially in light
of a similar recommendation from the
departmental review committee of Housing and Conferences.
A UBC sponsor committee endorsed
the overall direction of the report and
accepted its two major recommendations.
The study was made as part of a five-year
business plan that all UBC ancillary operations are now required to make.
Copies of the Ernst and Young report
are available as of Aug. 19 at Food Services in the Ponderosa Building.
Community plan
draft gains GVRD,
Board approval
A proposed Official Community Plan
(OCP) has been approved by the University of British Columbia's Board ofGovernors and given first and second readings
by the Greater Vancouver Regional District's Board of Directors.
The OCP covers parts of Electoral Area
A, including UBC and two foreshore lots
owned by the GVRD which are part of
Pacific Spirit Regional Park.
In September, the GVRD plans to hold
an open house followed by a public hearing on the proposed OCP. UBC will take
additional steps to provide opportunity
for comment and input from the campus
community. It is anticipated that the
OCP will be finalized and in place by
November.
UBC President David Strangway said
UBC's aim is to enrich campus life and
support the university's academic mission.
'The proposed OCP will guide future
decision-making as UBC moves towards
the creation of a unique university community and an endowment which will
support the university's academic programs for British Columbians in the coming decades," Strangway said.
"We are delighted with the progress
the GVRD and UBC have made during
this co-operative process," said GVRD
Board Chair Greg Halsey-Brandt, "And
we look forward to further public input on
the proposed OCP in the fall."
Meanwhile, the UBC and GVRD boards
have approved an Interim Implementation Process which will guide land use
decisions until June, 1998 or until new
governance arrangements are in place.
The Interim Implementation Process
includes the preparation of local area
plans for the campus which will include
non-institutional development such as
market housing, a school, a community
centre and commercial and related services.
A task force composed of UBC Board of
Governors and GVRD Board of Directors
representatives will oversee the process,
which also involves the establishment of
an Advisory Planning Committee to represent university and community interests, as well as opportunities for public
review and comment. The area plans will
be approved by UBC's Board of Governors and reviewed by the GVRD for conformance with the OCP.
At the request ofthe GVRD. with UBC
support, the Ministry of Municipal Affairs
has approved in principle a governance
study for Electoral Area A, which will
review local government options for the
area.
Fiscal year features low
debt, balanced budget
by Connie Bagshaw
Staff writer
UBC's Board of Governors has approved a balanced core operating budget
of $341.6 million for 1996-97 as the
university enters the new fiscal year with
an accumulated operating debt reduced
from $651,000 to $122,000 since the
start of 1995-96.
"We have lived within      ^^^^^^^^b
our means," said UBC
President David
Strangway. "Our only
debt is associated with
the construction of facilities for which we have
a known revenue source      	
to pay the debt."
Salaries and benefits
of $274 million to faculty and staff have
been budgeted in the core general purpose operating budget (GPOF) — approximately $167.9 million for academics,
$10.6 for student assistants and $93
million for staff. Benefits amount to $35.5
million.
With the exception of a pay equity
adjustment, there was no increase in the
provincial operating grant of $272.7 million which accounts for 80 per cent of
core operating income, or roughly a third
of UBC's total income from all sources.
Projected increases due to known salary settlements and other commitments
will be covered by the offices of the vice-
presidents who will each take a reduction
which, in the aggregate, amounts to 0.9
per cent of the core budget.
As in previous years, UBC continues
to curb its spending more than most
Canadian universities on central administrative and general functions, earmarking less than four per cent of its total
expenditures for this purpose.
Despite a tuition freeze for the current
fiscal year, the admission of an additional
"We have lived
within our means.
- David Strangway
1,000 undergraduates and first-year professional students in 1996-97 will generate about $2.3 million more in credit
course fees over last year.
The increased enrolment is necessary
to meet the provincial government's mandate to improve productivity by four per
cent. In total, credit course tuition is
expected to contribute $57 million to the
GPOF, or 15 per cent of
^mmmmmmmmm the core operating revenue.
In addition to the tuition freeze, which will
continue through 1999,
the province has also
rolled back fee increases
  for the Student Financial Aid Fund and for the
Teaching and Learning
Enhancement Fund.
New revenue is expected from all incoming graduate students who, beginning in 1996, will pay an annual fee for
each registered year instead of a program
fee, and, in 1997, from international students paying full tuition.
The university will allocate an additional $2 million in recurring dollars in
1996-97 to the Outstanding Student Initiative Program which provides four-year
scholarships, each worth a potential
$10,000 over the four years, to exceptional high school students.
For the past several years, the GPOF
has been divided into three distinct categories: core GPOF, non-core GPOF and
continuing studies.
Non-core income represents funds
derived either from fee for services or
designated funds. Continuing Studies
activities on campus are not subsidized
from the university's core budget and
Continuing Studies covers all of its direct
expenses as well as its share of the university's administrative infrastructure
costs. 4 UBC Reports • August 15, 1996
Calendar
August 18 through September 7
Tuesday, Aug. 20
Computer Application
Information Series
Networking/ Servers / Plotters.
Bill Fane. CEME, 2206, 1:30-
4:30pm or 6-9pm. $80. Call 822-
3347.
Thursday, Aug. 22
Computer Application
Information Series
Project Management/Scheduling.
Michael Omand. CEME. 2206,
l:30-4:30pm or 6-9pm. $80. Call
822-3347.
Tuesday, Aug. 27
Computer Application
Information Series
Accounting. Dickson Wong.
CEME, 2206, l:30-4:30pm or 6-
9pm. $80. Call 822-3347.   .
Notices
Volleyball
Faculty, Staff and Grad Student
Volleyball Group. Every Monday
and Wednesday, Osborne Centre, Gym A, 12-lpm during August. No fees. Drop-ins and regular attendees welcome for friendly
competitive games. Call 822-
4479 or e-mail:
kdcs@unixg.ubc.ca.
Free Grad Centre Activities
Tai Chi. Mondays from 6-7pm
and Thursdays 12:45-2pm; Meditation Classes. Tuesdays, Penthouse 7:30-8:30pm; Trager
Movement Classes. Wednesdays,
Penthouse, from 6:30-7:30pm.
Join, or drop in anytime. Call
822-3203.
Morris and Helen Belkin Art
Gallery
Tuesday - Friday; 10am-5pm;
Saturday, 12-5pm. 1825 Mam
Mall. Call 822-2759.
Faculty Development
Would you like to talk with an
experienced faculty member, one
on one, about your teaching concerns? Call the Centre for Faculty Development and Instruc
tional Services at 822-0828 and
ask for the Teaching Support
Group.
Clinical Research Support
Group
The Clinical Research Support
Group which operates under the
auspices of the Dept. of Health
Care and Epidemiology provides
methodological, biostatistical,
computational and analytical support for health researchers. For an
appointment please call Laurel
Slaney at 822-4530.
Boomerang Family Research
The Counselling Psychology Department is looking for adults who
have returned home to live. They
and their parents are invited to
participate in a study focusing on
the experience, inter-personal relations and responses to this
change in the family. Involves confidential interviews. Please call
432-1915 for more information.
Garden Hours
Nitobe Memorial Garden, Botanical Garden and the Shop-in-the-
Garden are open 10am-6pm daily
(including weekends) until Oct. 13.
Call 822-9666 (gardens), 822-4529
(shop).
English Language Institute
Homestay. English-speaking families are needed to host international students participating in ELI
programs for periods of two to six
weeks. Remuneration is $22/
night. Call 822-1537.
International Student
Orientation Week
August 26-30, 1996. August 26,
9am. International House. If interested in volunteering contact
Wendy Ma at International House
822-5021. All new international
students welcome.
Centering Pregnancy Drop-in
The Centering Pregnancy Drop-in,
run by UBC Nursing Faculty and
students in collaboration with
West-Main Health Unit, offers support and information about pregnancy and birth to women who are
pregnant or contemplating pregnancy. Wednesdays, 10-11:30am,
Acadia Fairview Commons Block.
For information call 822-7470.
Thursday, Aug. 29
Cross-Cultural Psychiatry
Day
Workshop On The Emerging Role
Of Cross-Cultural Psychiatry.
Prakash Desai, keynote presenter.
IRC#1, 7:45am-5:30pm. $20 includes fee and refreshments. Call
822-7971.
Seminar
Developing A Program Of Research
Using Qualitative Methods: The
Comfort Project. Prof. Janice
Morse, School of Nursing, Pennsylvania State U. Vancouver Hospital/HSC, School of Nursing,
T182, 3:30-5pm. Call 822-7453.
Thursday, Sept. 5
Seminar
A Trip To East Africa. Linda
Verbeek. Plant Science.
MacMillan 318D at 1:30pm. All
welcome. Call 822-0894.
Saturday, Sept. 7
Thrift and Bake Sale
University Hill United Church At
VST Thrift And Bake Sale. For
students of UBC and VST. Auditorium of the Chapel of the
Epiphany, 6050ChancellorBlvd.,
10am-4pm. Ifyou have items for
the sale or wish information call
266-1630.
HUBC REPORTS
CALENDAR POLICY AND DEADLINES
The C/BC Reports Calendar lists university-related or
university-sponsored events on campus and off campus within the Lower Mainland.
Calendar Items must be submitted on forms avail-
ablelromtheUBe Public Alfejrs Office, 310-6261 Cecil
Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1. Phone:
822-3131. Fax: 822-2684. Please limit to 35 words.
Submissions for the Calendar's Notices section may be
limited due to space.
Deadline for the September 5 issue of UBC Reports—
which covers the period September 8 to September 21
—- is nopn, AVigust 26.   ,   ., .    ... ....  ,...,..;.......„„.„.
Salcudean named to fluid dynamics chair
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff Writer
The Weyerhaeuser Company Foundation has donated $500,000 to the Faculty
of Applied Science for the creation ofthe
Weyerhaeuser Industrial Research Chair
in Computational Fluid Dynamics.
Computational fluid dynamics (CFD)
is the process of setting up equations,
making assumptions, repeating iterations
on a computer and interpreting the results to describe   how fluid, suspended
particles and thermal energy will move in a process,
a piece  of equipment,  or
other setting.
"Research into computational fluid dynamics has
the potential to significantly
increase the efficiency of
recovery boilers used in the
pulp and paper industry,"
said George Weyerhaeuser
Jr. "The Weyerhaeuser Company Foundation is pleased
to support the creation of
this new chair at UBC to Salcudean
advance and accelerate that
research."
The foundation's donation will be released to the university in $100,000 increments over five years and will be used
to support computational research on
phenomena related to the manufacture
of pulp and paper.
The university has named Martha
Salcudean, a professor of mechanical
engineering, to the chair.
"Prof. Salcudean is an internationally
recognized expert in computational fluid
dynamics," said Applied Science Dean
Axel Meisen. "There is nobody better qualified  in  Canada,   and  probably North
America, to undertake computational
fluid dynamics work related to the pulp
and paper industry."
Meisen said Salcudean, along with
mechanical engineering Prof. Ian
Gartshore and Zia Abdullah, who leads
the transfer of technology to industry, as
well as other collaborators, have made
key advances in research using computational fluid mechanics.
"The establishment ofthe chair is very
important as far as the continuation of
that research is concerned, especially
because the funding can
be used for exploratory
work of a general kind
rather than being tied to a
specific schedule or mission."
Salcudean, who came to
UBC in 1985, has served
as head of the Dept. of
Mechanical Engineering;
associate vice-president.
Research: and acting vice-
president, Research.
Her research related to
the pulp and paper industry is focused on recovery
boilers used in the pulp and paper process. The results of her research have
already been put into use in several mills
in Canada and the United States. She is
carrying out her research in collaboration with the Pulp and Paper Centre,
where she is a faculty associate.
"We calculate the process completely
and then visualize it through computer
graphics so that the operator can actually see everything happening. It creates
a virtual reality based on a real representation ofthe process," Salcudean said.
"We feel that it is going to be very
useful for the people who operate this
equipment, for us to understand how this
equipment works, and for training purposes.
"We are currently expanding our research to the modelling of other processes in the pulp and paper industry."
Weyerhaeuser Company is one of
North America's largest producers of
forest products. In recent years the
Weyerhaeuser Company Foundation
has also supported the creation of UBC's
Chair in Forest Products Biotechnology and the Fellowship in Wood Building and Design.
A Good Start
Stephen Forgacs photo
Lilian Dai of Calgary holds a handful of nutrient-rich compost that she
and 51 other Grade 11 and 12 students from across Canada prepared
while participating in the Shad Valley program at UBC. The students
planted a tree at the Totem Park student residence and used some ofthe
compost to give it a good start .The Shad Valley program immerses some
of Canada's brightest young minds in the areas of science, technology
and entrepreneurship. Students are selected for the program on the
basis of their academic achievements and leadership potential. UBC Reports August 15, 1996 5
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Policy and Procedure Hartdbodk: Revis
cy#3
i
Policy #3
Discrimination and Harassment
Guide to UBC's Policy on Discrimination
and Harassment
Introduction
This policy has two objectives:
1. to prevent discrimination and harassment on grounds protected by the B.C.
Human Rights Act, and
2. to provide procedures for handling complaints, remedying situations, and imposing discipline when such discrimination and harassment do occur.
UBC is committed to providing its students, staff, and faculty with the best possible environment for study and work, an
environment that fosters friendship and
collegiality. Therefore, it seeks to eliminate
behaviours, policies and practices that interfere with the pursuit of educational and
employment opportunities.
All UBC students, staff members, and faculty share responsibility for promoting a
learning environment of mutual trust and
respect. At the same time, those faculty and
administrative staff who supervise others
bear major responsibility for ensuring that
their instructional and managerial practices comply with human rights legislation.
UBC's procedures for handling complaints
of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, offer an internal
mechanism for complaint resolution that
supplements other University and extra-
University mechanisms, such as those procedures offered by employee associations
and unions, the courts, the B.C. Council of
Human Rights, and the B.C. Ombuds Office. Just as the University takes complaints of discrimination and harassment
seriously, so too. the University takes seriously any actions or inactions that obstruct
its procedures for handling complaints.
Definitions
"Discrimination" and "Harassment" refer
to intentional or unintentional behaviour
for which there is no reasonable justification. Such behaviour adversely affects specific individuals or groups on the basis of
characteristics defined by the 1992 B.C.
Human Rights Act. These characteristics
include age, race, colour, ancestry, place of
origin, political belief, religion, marital status, family status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, and unrelated criminal convictions. "Harassment"
also includes "Sexual Harassment." "Sexual
Harassment" is unwanted sexual behaviour, particularly sexual behaviour accompanied by promises of academic or employment opportunities or by threats of loss of
such opportunities.
What follows is a summary of procedures
for complainants—those who bring forward
complaints of discrimination or harassment—and for respondents—those alleged
to have engaged in discriminatory or harassing behaviours.
Complainants
Informal Resolution. Ifyou believe that you
have experienced discrimination or harassment and you have not been able to resolve
the situation satisfactorily, you may consult
eitheryour administrative head or an Equity
Advisor. Both administrative heads and
Equity Advisors have the responsibility to
listen in confidence to your concerns. If they
believe that these complaint procedures
apply and if they have your permission,
administrative heads and Equity Advisors
will attempt informal resolution. Many complaints are resolved informally.
Mediation. If informal resolution proves unsatisfactory, you may ask the Equity Office to
resolve your complaint through mediation
between yourself and the respondent.
Formal Investigation and Recommendation.
After discussing your case with an Equity
Advisor, you may apply for a formal investigation by filing a written request with the
Equity Office.    Your Equity Advisor then
informs the respondent and requests a written response. If this response is not satisfactory to you, the Equity Advisor informs the
respondent's administrative head and the
Associate Vice-President, Equity, who will
appoint an independent investigator. The
investigator interviews you, the respondent,
and any other persons who may have information about your complaint, and then presents
a written report to an independent, three-
person panel. If the panel concludes you have
suffered discrimination or harassment, the
panel sends a recommendation to the respondent's administrator. Prior to deciding
upon disciplinary and/or remedial measures,
the respondent's administrator meets individually with you, the respondent, and the
Associate Vice-President, Equity.
Respondents
Informal Resolution. If a UBC student or
member of staff or faculty brings forward a
complaint of discrimination or harassment
against you, no informal resolution that adversely affects your academic, employment,
or professional interests may take place without your consent.
Mediation. Mediation takes place only when the
complainant and the respondent agree to participate in the process. Similarly, no resolution
can be implemented without your consent.
Formal Investigation and Recommendation.
If a complainant files a written request for a
formal investigation, you have ten working
days to respond in writing to the complaint.
If your written response is not satisfactory to
the complainant, the Equity Office informs
your administrative head of the complaint
against you and appoints an independent
investigator and three-person panel to receive the investigator's report. Should the
panel uphold the complaint, an administrative head may discipline you.
Appeals
If either complainants or respondents disagree with the administrator's decision, they
may appeal the decision through grievance
procedures established by collective agreements, or by the UBC Senate, and/or by
agencies outside UBC, such as the provincial
Ombuds Office or the B.C. Council of Human
Rights. In addition, all students, staff members, and faculty can seek legal redress on
their own behalf.
Confidentiality
At all times, complainants, respondents, administrative heads, and Equity Advisors have
the responsibility to maintain confidentiality.
Nonetheless, concerns for an individual's
health, safety, and security may compel the
University to disclose information about complaints. As well, other measures, such as
arbitrations, court proceedings, or procedures
under the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act may require the University
to release information about complaints.
Further Information
For further information about UBC's procedures for handling complaints of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment
• read UBC's Policy on Discrimination and
Harassment
• consult with your student association,
employee association, union, or one ofthe
following student service units: Disability
Resource Centre. First Nations House of
Learning, International Student Services,
Student Health Services, Student Resources
Centre, or Women Students' Office
• phone the Equity Office (822-6353) to make
an appointment with an Equity Advisor
• discuss your concerns with your administrative head. Administrative heads include
the following: Academic Department Head.
Director. Principal. Dean. Associate Vice
President. University Librarian. Registrar.
Vice President, and President.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
August 15, 1996
Dear Colleagues:
The Policy on Discrimination and Harassment has been revised following
extensive consultation.
Please replace the version in your Policy Handbook (Policy #3) with this insert.
This revision is in effect immediately.  Changes to the old version are printed
here in italics for your convenience.
Sincerely,
David W. Strangway1
President
Note: New language is in italics
Approved: January 1995
Revised: July 1996
RESPONSIBLE: All Vice Presidents
Purpose
(l)The fundamental objectives of this
University policy are to prevent discrimination and harassment (see
definitions) on grounds protected by
the B. C. Human Rights Act, and to
provide procedures for handling complaints, remedying situations, and
imposing discipline when such discrimination and harassment do oc-
(2)In addition, the University has the
obligation to ensure that its policy
and procedures are fair and are applied fairly. It is therefore necessary
to provide an environment in which
victims of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment (see definition), feel free to bring
complaints forward. It is equally
important that those against whom
allegations are made have a full and
fair opportunity to meet those allegations.
Policy
(3)The University of British Columbia
is committed to providing its employees and students with the best
possible environment for working
and learning, an environment that
allows friendship and collegiality to
flourish. Every student and member of faculty and staff at the University of British Columbia has the right
to study and work in an environment free from discrimination and
harassment, including sexual harassment. The University therefore
does not condone discrimination and
harassment, including sexual harassment, of any kind. Indeed, the
University regards discrimination
and harassment as serious offenses
that are subject to a wide range of
disciplinary measures, including dismissal or expulsion from the University.
(4)The University and all members of
the University community share
responsibility for ensuring that the
work and study environment at
UBC is free from discrimination
and harassment. Specifically, Administrative Heads of Unit (see
definition) bear the primary responsibility for maintaining a study
and work environment free from
discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment; Administrative Heads of Unit are free
to act, and should act, on this
responsibility, whether or not they
are in receipt of individual complaints; and the knowledge and
experience of the Equity Office are
available to all members of the
University community.
(5) This policy addresses discrimination
and harassmentongrounds protected
by the B. C. Human Rights Act.
Background
(6)Discrimination and harassment,
including sexual harassment, can
occur between individuals of the
same or different status, and both
men and women can be the subject
of harassment by members of either gender. Discrimination and
harassment, including sexual harassment, can involve individuals
or groups; can occur during one
incident; or over a series of incidents including single incidents,
which, in isolation, would not necessarily constitute discrimination
or harassment; can be direct or
systemic (see definition); and can
occur on campus or off, during
working hours or not.
(7}The impact of behaviour on the
complainant subject to the reasonable person test (see definition)
defines the comment or conduct as
discrimination and harassment.
(8)This policy is to be interpreted in a
way that is consistent with the
UBC Calendar statement on academic freedom (see definition).
Neither this policy in general, nor 6 UBC Reports • August 15, 1996
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its definitions in particular, are to
be applied in such a way as to
detract from the right of faculty,
staff, and students to engage in the
frank discussion of potentially controversial matters, such as age,
race, politics, religion, sex and
sexual orientation. These are legitimate topics and no University
policy should have the effect of
limiting discussion of them or of
prohibiting instructional techniques, such as the use of irony,
the use of conjecture and refutation, or the assignment of readings
that advocate controversial positions, provided that such discussion and instructional techniques
are conducted in a mutually respectful and non-coercive manner.
(9)Neither this policy in general, nor
its definitions in particular, are to
be applied in such a way as to
detract from the right and obligation of those in supervisory roles to
manage and discipline employees
and students subject to managerial and instructional practices.
Access To Complaint
Procedures
(10) A complaint of discrimination or harassment pertaining to University
work, studies, or participation in
campus life may be lodged by any
memberfs) of the University community (see definition) against other
member(s) of the University community and/or the University.
(11)A complaint may be lodged even
when there has been apparent
acquiescence of the complainant
in the conduct or comment in
question.
(12) Contractors (see definition), their
employees and agents, and visitors
to the University also are expected
to conduct themselves in any University-related activity in a manner consistent with this policy. Allegations of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, against such persons will be
dealt with by the University as
potential breaches of contract, and/
or may result in suspension of
University privileges, such as access to the campus.
(13)Although contractors, their employees and agents, and visitors
to the University who suffer discrimination or harassment do not
have access to these complaint
procedures, such individuals are
encouraged to consult with an
Equity Advisor or express their
concerns directly to the Associate
Vice President Equity.
Complaint Procedures
(14) Complaints of discrimination and
harassment, including systemic
discrimination and sexual harassment, can be resolved by employing any or all of the following
procedures: (A) informal resolution, (B) mediation, (C) investigation and recommendation.
(15)The Equity Advisor or the Administrative Head of Unit (or designate) assists the complainant in
clarifying the allegations, and
their related consequences, and
in considering the applicability of
various options, such as an apology from the respondent or reassignment of duties.
A. Informal Resolution:
Administrative Head of Unit or
Equity Office
(16)Informal resolution is a resolution
to which the complainant consents,
and is arrived at with the assistance of an Administrative Head of
Unit and/or an Equity Advisor, but
without the use of either mediation
or investigation. The possible
means of achieving informal resolution are numerous. Examples
include advice to the complainant,
such as referral for counselling or
letter to the respondent; investigation by the Administrative Head of
Unit; relocation ofthe complainant
and/or the respondent; disciplining the respondent; or referral to
other University policies and procedures, such as the policy on student
discipline in the UBC Calendar or
the Policy on Scholarly Misconduct;
or any other appropriate and just
measures. Informal resolution can
occur without knowledge to anyone other than the complainant
and the Administrative Head of
Unit, or the Equity Advisor who
receives the complaint.
(17) Inkeeping with their administrative
responsibilities, Administrative
Heads of Unit take disciplinary or
remedial action upon informing the
individual affected. No informal
resolution of a complaint that adversely affects the academic, employment, professional, or other
interests of the respondent shall
proceed without the consent ofthe
respondent.
B. Mediation: Equity Office
(18) At any time after a complaint has
been received by the Equity Office,
the parties can attempt to resolve
the complaint through a process of
mediation, provided that both parties consent to such a process. The
Associate Vice President selects a
mediator who is external to UBC and
trained in alternate dispute resolution techniques. Appointed mediators and the format of the mediation
process are acceptable to both the
complainant arid the respondent.
(19)A mediated settlement arrived at
between the complainant and the
respondent is written out, signed
by the complainant and the respondent, and counter-signed by
the mediators. If a potential settlement entails action to be taken by
the University, the University becomes a third party to the mediation and also must agree for there
to be a settlement.
(20) A copy of any agreement reached
during mediation is provided to each
of the signatories and to the Equity
Office, and remains confidential.
(21) No person involved in a mediation
proceeding shall give evidence or
introduce documents from that proceeding during any other subsequent
University proceeding where that evidence or those documents would
disclose that any person had agreed
or refused to agree to mediation or. if
mediation occurred, what took place
during the mediation.
C. Formal Investigation and
Recommendation: Equity Office
Request for Investigation and
Recommendation
(22)At any time after the complaint has
been   made,   if the   complainant
wishes to have the complaint investigated, the complainant has the
right to file a written request for
investigation and recommendation
(see definition) with the Equity Office. Requests include detailed accounts ofthe conduct or comment
on the part of the respondent that
forms the basis of the complaint.
(23)Within five working days, the Equity Office delivers a copy of a
request for investigation to the respondent.
(24)The respondent has the right to
respond to the request in writing,
provided such right is exercised
within ten working days from receipt of that request. The respondent may acknowledge or deny the
validity of the complaint in whole
or in part, provide new information, or propose a resolution of the
complaint.
(25)Within five working days from receipt of the respondent's written
reply to a request for investigation
and recommendation, the Equity
Office delivers a copy of that reply
to the complainant.
(26) On receipt of the respondent's written reply, the complainant may
accept the reply as full resolution
ofthe complaint, or on the basis of
the respondent's written reply, the
complainant may choose to pursue either informal resolution or
mediation, in which case an Equity
Advisor puts into effect the appropriate procedures.
Investigation
(27)When informal resolution or mediation has failed to resolve a complaint, the Equity Office informs
the respondent's Administrative
Head of Unit, and the Associate
Vice President Equity assigns an
investigator who is external to UBC.
(28) The purpose ofthe investigation is
to provide information to Administrative Heads of Unit who are
charged with making sound managerial decisions about issues under
this policy.
(29)The investigator examines the complainant, the respondent, and such
other persons as she or he considers may have information pertaining to the complaint. The investigator re-examines or seeks additional witnesses in order to confirm evidence or explore discrepancies. The investigator prepares
a written report that includes adjudgment on both the applicability ofthe
policy and the facts of the case,
disputed and undisputed.
(30)Interviews are private and held
away from the work areas of those
involved.
(31)The investigator submits the report to a Panel comprised of three
people (one of whom is external to
UBC) appointed by the Associate
Vice President Equity. This Panel
meets with the complainant and
with the respondent to examine
each on the evidence in the investigator's report and on related allegations. At its discretion, but especially in cases of relevant, new
information arising that has not
been explored with both the complainant and the respondent, the
Panel may request supplementary
reports from the investigator or a
history of any previous discipline
from the Associate Vice President,
Equity. As well, the Panel may
meet with anyone else it deems
necessary.
(32)The Panel formulates recommendations on the following:
• whether the policy applies in the
circumstances;
• whether on the balance of probabilities, and with the onus of
proof being on the complainant,
there has been a violation ofthe
policy;
• whether discipline or remedies
are appropriate.
(33) In the event that the Panel recommends that the complaint be
upheld, it may recommend both
a form of discipline for the respondent and a remedy for the
complainant. It also may recommend any other measures it considers appropriate in the circumstances. Such recommendations
are made in writing and supported by reasons.
(34) In the event that the Panel recommends the complaint be dismissed, it may recommend counselling, support, education, and
such other measures as it considers appropriate for the complainant and/or the respondent.
It also may recommend such
measures as it considers appropriate to restore the complainant's or respondent's unit to effective functioning. Such recommendations are made in writing and supported by reasons.
(35) In the event that the Panel recommends not only dismissal of
the complaint but contemplates
finding the complaint to have
been made in bad faith, it shall
meet with the complainant and
provide an opportunity for the
complainant to respond prior to
making its recommendation. It
may recommend both a form of
discipline for the complainant
and a remedy for the respondent.
The Panel also may recommend
any other measures it considers
appropriate in the circumstances. Such recommendations
are made in writing and supported by reasons.
(36)The Panel distributes its recommendations and reasons to the
Associate Vice President Equity,
the complainant, the respondent, and Administrative Heads of
Unit with authority to receive the
recommendation.
Recommendation
(37) For students, the Administrative
Head of Unit with authority to
receive the Panel's recommendations is the President; for members of staff, it is the Director or
Head of Department; for faculty,
the authority may be either the
President or the Dean/Head, depending on the nature ofthe discipline contemplated. The Agreement on Conditions of Appointment states that only the President may discipline a faculty
member by dismissal or suspension without pay. The individual
receiving the Panel's recommendations meets with the complainant and with the respondent, confers with the Associate Vice Presi- UBC Reports August 15, 1996 7
•S'Lv:
THE uMVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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dent Equity and the appropriate
Dean or Vice President, and considers the Panel's recommendations.
(38)The individual receiving the Panel's recommendations may take
such disciplinary and remedial
measures as he or she considers
appropriate. A written report of
measures taken with supporting
reasons is distributed to the Associate Vice President Equity, the
appropriate Dean or Vice President, the complainant, the respondent, the investigator, and
the Panel.
Appeal
(39) A student who denies that a violation of the policy took place or who
disagrees with an imposed penalty
has recourse through the Senate
Committee on Appeals on Academic
Discipline. A member of staff or
faculty has recourse through the
provisions of the collective agreement or terms and conditions of
employment. To the extent provided for in collective agreements,
complainants also may have recourse to appeal the decision. As
well, the complainant and respondent may have recourse to extra-
University processes.
Initiation Of Complaint
Procedures
(40)While it is possible for anyone to
seek anonymously the advice and
assistance of an Equity Advisor,
only those complaints in which
the complainant's identity is disclosed may be taken through the
mediation and investigation
stages.
(41)Only those complaints lodged
within one calendar year of an
event, or in the case of a series of
events, the last event in a series
are processed. The Associate Vice
President Equity may grant extensions beyond this one-year
limit.
(42)The procedures in this policy can
be initiated by persons directly
affected (by the conduct or comment that forms the basis of the
complaint) or by Administrative
Heads of Unit.
A. Initiation of Procedures by Persons Directly Affected
(43) Persons directly affected by the
conduct or comment that forms
the basis of the complaint may
lodge the complaint with either
an Administrative Head of Unit or
with an Equity Advisor.
(44)At any time, complainants may
choose to withdraw from these
complaint proceedings. Nevertheless, the University's legal responsibility to provide an environment free from discrimination
and harassment, including sexual
harassment, may obligate the
University to proceed in the absence of a complaint from the
persons directly affected. In such
cases, the Administrative Head of
Unit and the Equity Advisor decide whether to proceed, taking
into account the need for protection against retaliation on the part
of witnesses and the need for due
process on the part of respondents.
Response of Administrative Heads of
Unit
(45)Administrative Heads of Unit deal
immediately with allegations of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, by investigating, by applying University
policies or procedures, by attempting to effect an informal resolution,
and by taking preventive, interim,
disciplinary and/or remedial measures including when appropriate,
ordering the behaviour to stop.
(46) In responding to complaints of discrimination or harassment, including sexual harassment, Administrative Heads of Unit are encouraged to seek the assistance of the
Equity Office.
(47)If at any time, the complainant is
dissatisfied with the actions taken
by an Administrative Head of Unit,
the complainant can lodge the same
complaint with an Equity Advisor
or extra-University agencies.
Response of Equity Advisors
(48)The Equity Advisor provides the
complainant with a copy of this
policy and explains available options. In addition, with the consent ofthe complainant, the Equity
Advisor attempts to effect an informal resolution ofthe complaint. As
well, the Equity Advisor recommends to the Administrative Head
of Unit measures to protect the
safety, academic, and other interests of the complainant pending
resolution of the complaint.
(49) If the complaint cannot be resolved
informally, and the complainant
wishes to access mediation or to
make a written request for investigation and recommendation, the Equity Advisor assists the complainant
in so doing.
B. Initiation of Procedures by Administrative Heads of Unit
(50)Administrative Heads of Unit may
lodge complaints with an Equity
Advisor to resolve allegations of
discrimination or harassment, including sexual harassment. An
Administrative Head of Unit who
lodges a complaint is identified as
the complainant, and the persons
directly affected by the conduct or
comment that forms the basis of
the complaint may be called upon
as witnesses in any subsequent
investigation.
(51)When an Administrative Head of
Unit becomes a complainant, she
or he surrenders any rights or responsibilities assigned to administrators by these procedures. The
individual to whom this complainant reports assumes the latter's
rights and responsibilities. Any
disputes that arise over the applicability of any of the procedures
shall be referred to the Associate
Vice President Equity, whose decision shall be final.
(52)If an Administrative Head of Unit
lodges a complaint with an Equity
Advisor, and the Equity Advisor
believes that these complaint procedures apply, the Advisor, in consultation with the complainant,
considers the appropriateness of
an informal resolution ofthe complaint, and where appropriate, follows the procedures provided for
informal resolution or mediation;
advises and assists the complain
ant in taking necessary measures
to protect the interests of those
directly affected by the complaint;
and if the complaint cannot be resolved informally or by mediation,
and the complainant wishes to
make a written request for investigation and recommendation, assists
him or her in so doing.
(53)If the Equity Advisor believes that
these complaint procedures do not
apply, the Advisor explains to the
Administrative Head of Unit why
this policy has no application and
refers him or her to another University office or extra-University
agencies.
(54)Where the identity of the persons
responsible for acts of harassment
is unknown to the Administrative
Head of Unit, the Associate Vice
President Equity arranges an investigation and notifies appropriate authorities both inside and outside the University. In addition,
the Administrative Head of Unit, in
consultation with the Associate Vice
President Equity, arranges for
measures intended to restore the
unit to effective functioning.
General Provisions
Right of Parties to Support and
Assistance
(55)The complainant and respondent
are at all times during these procedures entitled to have a representative present.
(56)The complainant is entitled to the
support and assistance of an Equity Advisor.
(57) The respondent is entitled to the support and assistance of an advisor external to UBC who is appointed by the
Associate Vice President Equity.
(58)Members of unions and employee
associations have all rights to representation that their collective
agreements confer.
Participation in the Process
(59) To ensure due process, both complainant and respondent are expected to participate and provide
evidence in a timely manner. In
cases where either the complainant
or respondent does not participate
or provide evidence within a reasonable time, the investigation and
recommendation process nevertheless may proceed.
(60) Any person whose willful actions or
inactions obstruct the application
of these procedures or who willfully
breaks an undertaking or agreement shall be subject to discipline.
Retaliation
(61)No one shall suffer reprisal for refusing to violate this policy or for
bringing forward, in good faith, a
complaint or concern about discrimination or harassment, including sexual harassment. The University considers retaliation or the
threat of retaliation at any stage to
be a serious offense because it prevents potential complainants, witnesses, and administrators from
acting on their concerns.
(62)A11 persons involved in these procedures shall report threats and
other safety concerns immediately
to the Equity Office and relevant
administrators.
(63) Administrative Heads of Unit deal
immediately with allegations of
retaliation by investigating, and
when appropriate, ordering the
behaviour to stop, and taking
preventive, interim, disciplinary
and/or remedial measures.
(64) In its deliberations and recom
mendations, the Panel shall consider any allegations of retaliation.
Confidentiality
(65JA11 members of the University
community involved in a case are
expected to maintain confidentiality, particularly within the work
or study area in question and in
shared professional or social circles. These members include Equity Advisors, support staff. Administrative Heads of Unit, and
witnesses, as well as the respondent and the complainant. Although at times difficult to avoid,
the breach of confidentiality undermines the provision of due
process, and thus proves a disservice to both the complainant
and the respondent.
(66) Confidentiality is not the same
as anonymity: For a complaint to
go forward to mediation or investigation and recommendation, the
identity of the complainant and
the details ofthe complaint must
be released to the Equity Advisor, the respondent, and those
involved in the application of
these procedures.
(67) Subject to the policy on confiden-
tialfiles (to be approved), terms of
confidentiality, including the
need to disclose information that
restores a unit to effective functioning, may be agreed on in informal or mediation agreements
between the complainant(s) and
respondent(s), or recommended
by the Panel, or ruled on by the
Administrative Head of Unit.
(68)The University, through the Associate Vice President Equity,
may take necessary steps to ensure the health, safety, and security of any member of the University community.
(69) For educational purposes, the Equity Office may discuss specific
cases and their resolutions without identifiers.
(70)Confidentiality may not apply to
persons subject to extra-University judicial processes.
Use of Documents
(71)Documents are used only for the
purpose for which they were created and are retained by the Equity Office. Access to Equity Office files is restricted to current
members of the Equity Office
staff. In cases involving repeat
complaints or security and safety
issues, a University Vice President may review Equity Office
files.
(72)Documents may be required by
law to be released to extra-University processes.
Multiple Proceedings
(73)A complaint under this policy
may also be pursued in extra-
University processes.
-Y 8 UBC Reports ■ August 15, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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(74)The fact that a complaint is being
pursued under these procedures
does not preclude the complainant from pursuing an extra-University process.
(75)Where two or more complaints
have been lodged against the
same respondent, these complaints may be dealt with by a
single Panel. Similarly, where
complaints are brought by a respondent against a complainant,
these complaints may be dealt
with by a single Panel.
Conflict of Interest
(76)Members of the University community are governed by the terms
of the University Conflict of Interest Policy. Individuals in an
intimate or sexual relationship
with a person in a subordinate
position shall disclose the relationship to the Administrative
Head of Unit and shall cooperate
with those measures the Administrative Head of Unit considers
appropriate to avoid conflict of
interest in matters such as supervision and evaluation.
(77)When power differentials exist
amongst or between faculty, staff,
and students, those holding positions of authority shall not
abuse, nor seem to abuse, the
power with which they are entrusted. Such relationships include, but are not limited to, those
between a coach, an academic
advisor, an instructor/professor,
a counsellor, a residence advisor, a tutor, a thesis/practicum
supervisor, a research head, or a
director and his or her subordinate, junior colleague, or student. Anyone who enters into a
sexual relationship with a person where a professional power
differential exists must realize
that, if a charge of sexual harassment is subsequently lodged, it
will be extremely difficult to defend the conduct on grounds of
mutual consent.
(78)An inappropriate sexual relationship may create a negative work
or study environment for others
and give rise to a complaint under this policy.
Interim Solutions
(79)The complainant, respondent, or
unit may require immediate
measures to preserve safety,
morale, or efficiency while a situation is being resolved, investigated, or decided. Such measures, whether carried out by the
Administrative Head of Unit or
by the Equity Advisor, should
not be viewed as judgment ofthe
credibility of the complainant or
respondent, who may appeal such
measures with the Associate Vice
President Equity. His or her decision is final, subject to the provisions of collective agreements.
Remedy Options
(80)Once a case has been decided,
the complainant or the respondent may request measures be
taken to correct damage done to
her or his career development,
academic record, physical or emotional health, reputation, or fi
nances. Arrangements are negotiated with the appropriate University officer.
Discipline Options
(81) Discipline is appropriate to the
offense and relevant circumstances
of the case, and is applied after an
admission or judgment of wrongdoing. Considerations in determining discipline include, but are
not limited to, work history, previous discipline, past cases, respondent's acknowledgment of wrong, relationship of parties, degree of aggression and physical contact,
number of events, impact on the
complainant, and intent of the respondent.
Stay or Termination of
Proceedings
(82) The Associate Vice President Equity, following consultation with the
Associate Vice President Academic
and Legal Affairs, may stay or terminate UBC's formal investigation
and recommendation proceedings.
Options Available Outside the
University
(83)Nothing in this policy shall be construed to remove any rights of appeal or rights to grieve that members of the University community
have independent of this policy, or
to remove any rights to take action
against the University or members
of the University community in
other processes within or without
the University.
Concerns and Complaints about
Procedures
(84)General or specific complaints
about the application of these procedures may be addressed to the
Associate Vice President Equity.
The Equity Office
(85)The Equity Office has responsibility for
• providing advice and assistance
to Administrative Heads of Unit
and others seeking direction in
the handling of cases;
• advising and assisting those who
bring forward complaints during
all stages of the procedures, including the initiation of a complaint, as well as the undertaking
of informal resolution, and arranging for mediation or investigation;
• ensuring that the policy and procedures in this document have
been appropriately and effectively
implemented;
• providing information and advice
on the complaint process and limitations to confidentiality to any
member of the University community;
• providing education to individuals and departments on the prevention and remediation of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment;
• publishing annually in UBC Reports statistical and summary reports on the number of complaints
made, types of complaints, outcomes, educational activities, and
an evaluation of this policy and
its procedures.
President's Advisory
Committee on Discrimination and Harassment
(86)The Associate Vice President Equity ensures that the President's
Advisory Committee on Discrimination and Harassment reflects the
diversity of members ofthe University with regard to gender, culture,
ethnicity, disability, and sexual
orientation.
(87)The tasks of this Committee are to
(a) advise and assist the Associate
Vice President Equity in creating and implementing an educational program designed to make
all members of the University
aware of
• the nature of discrimination
and harassment, including
sexual harassment;
• measures that should be
taken to prevent discrimination and harassment from
occurring; and
• the procedures to be followed
and possible outcomes involved in the event of a complaint.
(b)advise and assist the Associate
Vice President Equity in the
evaluation of Equity Office services, procedures, and educational programs.
Definitions
Academic freedom at UBC is defined in
the UBC Calendar: "The members of
the University enjoy certain rights and
privileges essential to the fulfilment of
its primary functions: instruction and
the pursuit of knowledge. Central
among these rights is the freedom,
within the law, to pursue what seem to
them fruitful avenues of inquiry, to
teach and learn unhindered by external or nonacademic constraints, to
engage in full and unrestricted consideration of any opinion. This freedom
extends not only to the regular members ofthe University but to all who are
invited to participate in its forum. Suppression of this freedom, whether by
institutions ofthe state, the officers of
the University or the actions of private
individuals, would prevent the University carrying out its primary functions.
All members of the University must
recognize this fundamental principle
and must share responsibility for supporting, safeguarding and preserving
this central freedom. Behaviour which
obstructs free and full discussion, not
only of ideas which are safe and accepted, but of those which may be
unpopular or even abhorrent, vitally
threatens the integrity of the University's forum. Such behaviour cannot be
tolerated."
Administrative head of unit is Director
of a service unit; Head of an academic
department; Director of a centre, institute or school; Principal of a college;
Dean; Associate Vice President; University Librarian; Registrar; Vice President; or President.
Contractors include vendors of goods
and services to the University, volunteers, homestay families, persons in
the community guiding practicum and
internship placements, and others with
similar connections to the University.
Discrimination refers to intentional
or unintentional treatment for which
there is no bona fide and reasonable
justification. Such discrimination
imposes burdens, obligations, or disadvantages on specific individuals
or groups as defined by the British
Columbia Human Rights Act (1984,
amended 1992.) The grounds protected against discrimination by the
British Columbia Human Rights Act
include age, race, colour, ancestry,
place of origin, political belief, religion, marital status, family status,
physical or mental disability, sex,
sexual orientation, and unrelated
criminal convictions. The Act contains a number of exemptions and
defenses. For example, the University's Employment Equity Policy,
which has as its object the amelioration of conditions of disadvantage, is
exempt from a complaint of discrimination under the Act. Similarly, the
Supreme Court of Canada upheld
the University's policy on mandatory
retirement, and therefore, it also is
exempt under the Act.
Harassment refers to physical, visual
or verbal behaviour directed against
a person for which there is no bona
fide and reasonable justification.
Such behaviour adversely affects
specific individuals or groups as defined by the British Columbia Human Rights Act. (See definition of
discrimination for a listing of protected grounds.)
Member of the University community
is a student, a member of faculty, or
a member of staff.
Reasonable person test refers to an
assessment of responsibility that
takes into account not only what the
complainant and respondent actually
experienced, knew, or understood
about one another or the situation,
but also what a reasonable person in
each of their circumstances would or
ought to have experienced, known, or
understood.
Sexual Harassment refers to comment or conduct of a sezxual nature by
a person who knows or ought reasonably to know that the conduct or comment is unwanted or unwelcome. The
conduct or comment detrimentally
affects the work or study environment or leads to adversejob- or study-
related consequences for the victims
of harassment.
Systemic Discrimination refers to policies or practices that appear neutral,
but which contain unjustifiable or unreasonable barriers that lead to adverse job- or study-related consequences for members of groups protected by the B. C. Human Rights Act.
Written request for investigation and
recommendation under these procedures means a written complaint by
an individual or group that he/she/
they have been discriminated against
or harassed including sexually harassed; or that there has been retaliation for consulting with an Equity
Advisor or for participating in proceedings under this policy; or that
there has been a breach of an undertaking as to future conduct. A written request must identify the protected ground under the B. C. Human
Rights Act that is the basis of the
complaint and provide sufficient detail for an investigation. UBC Reports August 15, 1996 9
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC GAZETTE
The Board of Governors took thefollowing actions at its meeting held on July
18. 1996.
FINANCE
The Board of Governors approved the
general budget strategy detailed in the
1996-97 Budget. Planning and Accountability document and, in particular, the following budgets:
General Purpose Operating Funds
•Core
•Non-Core
•Continuing Studies
Specific Purpose
•Endowment
•Trust
Physical Infrastructure 1996/97
UBC Utilities 1996/97
A roll-back of 1996/97 rents for
continuing Acadia Park tenants was
approved.
The Board approved an increase in the
Admission Application Processing Fees
for the admissions cycle commencing
September, 1997 as follows:   For
applicants presenting BC documents -
from $21 to 22.   For applicants presenting documents from outside BC -
from $52 to $54.
The University maintains a general
purpose operating budget program
which, subject to annual approval of
the Board of Governors, allows faculties
and operating areas aggregated at the
appropriate vice-presidential level to
carry forward unexpended funds into
the subsequent fiscal year up to a
maximum of 5% of the budget allocation for the current year. The Board
approved the carry-forward of general
purpose operating funds for the year
ended March 31, 1996 in the amount
of $9,297,438.
The University's financial statements
for the fiscal year ended March 31.
1996 were approved.
ACADEMIC AND STUDENT AFFAIRS
The revised policy on Discrimination
and Harassment was approved.
Strategic Planning and Property
The Board received a proposal with
respect to the Liu Centre for International Studies.   It was agreed that
public information meetings will be
held on the proposal as soon as possible with a target date of early September 1996.
The Board approved the establishment
of the Rick Hansen Centre and authorized the President to (1)   facilitate the
process on behalf of UBC to allow the
transfer of the endowments to the Rick
Hansen Trust managed by UBC, and
(2) to enter into a Memorandum of
Understanding regarding the creation
and role of the Rick Hansen Centre.
Appointments
Dr. John Cairns. Dean of the
Faculty of Medicine, was nominated
to the Board of Trustees, Vancouver
Hospital and Health Sciences
Centre effective October 1,  1996,
and to the Group Hospital Board
upon its formation.
Professor Kenneth R. MacCrimmon was
appointed a member of the Peter Wall
Institute for Advanced Studies through
December 31, 2002, and as Director of
the Institute, initially through June 30,
1998; the appointments to take effect
immediately.
Other
The following dates of meetings of the
Board ofGovernors in 1996/97 were
approved:
October 10, 1996: December 12, 1996;
February 6, 1997; March 20, 1997;
May 22, 1997; July 24, 1997.
July 1996
The Board of Governors at its meeting of
July 1, 1996 approved thefollowing recommendations and received notice about
thefollowing items.
APPOINTMENTS
Michael D. Pitt, Assoc. Dean, Faculty of
Agricultural Sciences, July 1, 1996 to
June 30, 1997.
Michael Davies. Assoc. Dean, Faculty of
Applied Science. July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
Ian Gartshore. Assoc. Dean, Faculty of
Applied Science, Julyl, 1996 to August
31, 1996.
Siegfried Steimer. Assoc. Dean, Faculty
of Applied Science, May 1, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
Neil Guppy, Assoc. Dean, Faculty of Arts,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Janet Werker, Assoc. Dean, Faculty of
Arts, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Gemot Wieland. Asst. Dean, Faculty of
Arts, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Derek Atkins, Assoc. Dean, Faculty of
Commerce & Business Administration,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Izak Benbasat. Assoc. Dean. Faculty of
Commerce & Business Administration,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Ethel Davis, Asst. Dean, Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration.
July 1. 1996 to June 30. 1997.
Daniel F. Gardiner, Asst. Dean, Faculty
of Commerce &  Business Administration, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31. 1997.
Jon Shapiro. Assoc. Dean, Faculty of
Education, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 2001.
Antal Kozak. Assoc. Dean.  Faculty of
Forestry, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
John A. McLean. Assoc. Dean, Facultyof
Forestry, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
James Maclntyre. Assoc. Dean. Faculty
of Law, July 1, 1996 to June 30. 1997.
Ruth Patrick. University Librarian, Library. July 1. 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Martin J. Hollenberg. Dean. Faculty of
Medicine, July 1, 1996 to Sept. 30, 1996.
Aubrey Tingle, Acting Assoc. Dean, Faculty of Medicine, July 1, 1996 to June 30.
1997.
David S. Hill. Assoc. Dean, Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences, July 1, 1996 to
June 30. 1997.
James M. Orr. Assoc. Dean. Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences. July 1. 1996 to
Dec. 31. 1996.
John G. Sinclair. Assoc. Dean. Faculty
of Pharmaceutical Sciences, July 1. 1996
to June 30, 1997.
Julyet Benbasat. Assoc. Dean. Faculty
of Science. July 1. 1996 to June 30. 2001.
David Holm. Assoc. Dean. Faculty of
Science, July 1. 1996 to June 30. 1997.
David Measday, Assoc. Dean. Facultyof
Science. July 1. 1996 to June 30. 1997.
A. A. Bomke. Acting Head. Dept. of Soil
Science. July 1. 1996 to June 30. 1997.
Richard Johnston. Acting Head. Dept.
of Political Science, May 16, 1996 to July
31, 1996.
Douglas C. Kilburn, Director, Biotechnology Laboratory. July 1, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
Rabab Ward, Director, Centre for Integrated Computer Systems Research, July
1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Alan A. Lowe, Head, Dept. of Clinical
Dental Sciences. July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31,
1996.
Donald M. Brunette, Head, Dept. of Oral
Biology, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
David Donaldson, Head, Dept. of Oral
Medical & Surgical Sciences, July 1,1996
to June 30, 1997.
Michael Houston, Director, School of
Human Kinetics, July 1, 1996 to June
30, 2001.
Marion Crowhurst, Head, Dept. of Language Education, July 1, 1996 to June
30. 1999.
Michael MacEntee, Acting Director, Institute of Health Promotion Research,
July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31. 1996.
John Schrader, Director, Biomedical Research Centre, May 1, 1996 to June 30,
1999.
Ross Petty. Acting Head, Dept. of Paediatrics. July 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1996.
Brian Len tie. Head, Dept. of Radiology,
July 1. 1996 to Aug. 31, 1996.
Ryna Levy Milne. Instructor II. School of
Family & Nutritional Sciences. July 1,
1996 to June 30. 1998.
DonaldT. Luymes, Asst. Professor, Landscape Architecture Program/Dept. of Forest Resources Management, June 1, 1996
to June 30, 1999.
Christopher Macdonald. Assoc. Professor. School of Architecture, Jan. 1, 1997
(tenured).
Barbara J. Lence. Assoc. Professor, Dept.
of Civil Engineering, Sept. 1, 1996 to
June 30. 1999.
Robert Gary Millar, Asst. Professor, Dept.
of Civil Engineering. Aug. 15. 1996 to
June 30, 1999.
Steven J. E. Wilton. Asst. Professor,
Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Jan. 1,
1997 to June 30. 2000.
Pamela A. Ratner. Asst Professor. School
of Nursing, July 1, 1996 I o June 30, 1999.
You-Tien Hsing. Asst. I^ofessor. Dept. of
Geography, July 1, 1996 to June 30. 1999.
Rita F. De Grandis. Assoc. Professor.
Dept. of Hispanic & Italian Studies. July
1, 1996 (tenured).
Michael Tenzer. Asst. Professor. School
of Music, July 1, 1996 to June 30. 1999.
Mitchell A. Farlee, Asst. Professor, Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration, July 1. 1996 to June 30. 1999.
Gerald T. Garvey, Assoc. Professor, Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration, Jan. 1. 1997 (tenured).
Eunkyu Lee. Asst. Professor, Faculty of
Commerce & Business Administration,
July 1, 1996 to June 30. 1999.
Pat Mirenda, Assoc. Professor. Dept. of
Educational Psychology & Special Education, Sept. 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Linda Siegel, Professor, Dept. of Educational Psychology & Special Education,
July 1, 1996 (tenured).
Sharilyn Calliou. Asst. Professor, Dept.
of Educational Studies, July 1, 1996 to
June 30, 1999.
Michael Marker, Asst. Professor, Dept.
of Educational Studies, July 1, 1997 to
June 30. 2000.
Michael Houston, Professor, School of
Human Kinetics, July 1, 1996 (tenured).
Joseph McNeel. Assoc. Professor, Dept.
of Forest Resources Management, July 1,
1996 to June 30, 1999.
Sally N. Aitken, Asst. Professor, Dept. of
Forest Sciences, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1999.
Kermit Ritland, Professor, Dept. of Forest Sciences, July 1, 1996 (tenured).
Steffanie A. Strathdee, Asst. Professor,
Dept. of Health Care & Epidemiology, July
1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
SylvieLanglois, Asst. Professor, Dept. of
Medical Genetics, July 1, 1996 to June
30, 1999.
Victor Tron, Assoc. Professor. Dept. of
Pathology, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Stephen W. Chung, Assoc. Professor, Dept.
of Surgery, July 1. 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Richard Simons, Assoc. Professor, Dept.
of Surgery, July 1, 1996 to June 30.
1999.
Timothy-John Grainger-Rousseau,
Asst. Professor, Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
David McConville. Asst. Professor, Dept.
of Chemistry, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1999.
Mark Thachuk. Asst. Professor, Dept. of
Chemistry, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Ian Cavers, Instructor I, Dept. of Computer
Science. July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1998.
Alan J. Hu. Asst. Professor. Dept. of
Computer Science, Oct. 1, 1996 to June
30. 1999.
Gail C. Murphy. Asst. Professor, Dept. of
Computer Science, Aug. 1, 1996 to June
30, 1999.
Oldrich Hungr. Assoc. Professor, Dept.
of Earth & Ocean Sciences, May 1, 1996
to June 30. 1999.
Anthony P. Pierce, Assoc. Professor,
Dept. of Mathematics, July 1, 1996
(tenured).
Rachel Fernandez, Asst. Professor, Dept.
of Microbiology. Sept. 1, 1996 to June 30,
1999.
Eric B. Taylor. Instructor I. Dept. of
Zoology, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1998.
Kathryn Hornby, General Librarian, Library. July 1. 1996 to June 30, 1999.
CHANGES TO HIRE DATE
Kenneth Carty. Head, Dept. of Political
Science, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 2001 to
August 1. 1996 to June 30. 2001.
CORRECTIONS
Janice Eng. Asst. Professor, School of
Rehabilitation Sciences. Jan. 1. 1997 to
June 30, 2000.
Darlene Redenbach, Asst. Professor,
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, July 1,
1996 to June 30, 1999.
RESIGNATIONS
Richard M. Beames. Professor. Dept. of
Animal Science, July 31, 1996.
Carole A. Robinson, Assoc. Professor,
School of Nursing, June 30, 1996.
Louise Jackson. Asst. Professor. Dept.
of Anthropology & Sociology. June 30,
1996.
Robert M. Will, Professor, Dept. of Economics, June 28, 1996.
Kristen Hanson, Asst. Professor, Dept.
of English, June 30, 1996.
Maria G.  Tomsich, Assoc.  Professor,
Dept. of Hispanic & Italian Studies, June
29, 1996.
Jerry S. Wiggins,  Professor,  Dept.  of
Psychology, June 29, 1996.
William J. P. Logan, Assoc. Professor,
Dept. of Curriculum Studies. June 29.
1996.
Erminia Pedretti, Asst. Professor, Dept.
of Curriculum Studies, June 30, 1996.
Neil Sutherland. Professor. Dept. of Educational Studies, June 29, 1996.
You-tien Hsing. Asst. Professor, School
of Community & Regional Planning, June
30, 1996.
Philip Bryden, Assoc. Dean. Faculty of
Law, June 30, 1996. (continues as Assoc.
Professor in Law.)
Donald D. Greenwood, Professor, School
of Audiology & Speech Sciences, June 29,
1996.
Sharon Cassol. Asst. Professor. Dept. of
Pathology, July 12, 1996.
Margaret Norman.  Professor. Dept. of
Pathology, Aug. 31. 1996.
Bomshik Chang. Assoc. Professor, Dept.
of Mathematics, June 29, 1996.
Bruce White. Professor. Dept. of Physics.
June 29. 1996.
Anthony Perks. Professor, Dept. of Zoology, Dec. 30, 1996.
David Reimer, General Librarian, Library, June 30, 1996.
LEAVES OF ABSENCE
STUDY LEAVES
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
Susan I. Barr, School of Family & Nutritional Sciences, July 1. 1996 to June 30,
1997.
Mahesh K. Upadhyaya. Dept. of Plant
Science, July 1, 1996 to December 31,
1996.
APPLIED SCIENCE
Clive Brereton. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, July 1. 1996 to June 30, 1997.
SeptimiuE. Salcudean, Dept. of Electrical Engineering. Sept. 1. 1996 toAugust
31, 1997.
Neil R. Risebrough. Dept. ol' Metals &
Materials Engineering. Jan.  1,  1997 to
Continued next page 10 UBC Reports ■ August 15, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dec. 31, 1997.
Anne Wyness, School of Nursing, Jan. 1.
1997 to June 30, 1997.
ARTS
Harjot Singh  Oberoi,  Dept.  of Asian
Studies, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Mukesh Eswaran, Dept. of Economics.
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Geoffrey Hainsworth. Dept. of Economics, Jan. 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996; Jan.
1, 1997 to June 30. 1997.
Gordon R. Munro. Dept. of Economics,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Guofu Tan, Dept. of Economics. July 1.
1996 to June 30, 1997.
Michael Scott Taylor, Dept. of Economics, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
John A. Weymark, Dept. of Economics,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Kenneth J. White, Dept. of Economics.
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Nancy Frelick, Dept. of French. July 1,
1996 to June 30, 1997.
Guy Carden, Dept. of Linguistics, July 1,
1996 to June 30, 1997.
Douglas Pulleyblank, Dept. of Linguistics, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
J. Evan Kreider, School of Music, July 1,
1996 to June 30, 1997.
Paule McNicoll, School of Music, July 1,
1996 to June 30, 1997.
Gerald Stanick, School of Music, July 1,
1996 to Dec. 31, 1996.
Kenneth D. Craig, Dept. of Psychology,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Donald G. Dutton, Dept. of Psychology,
Jan. 1, 1997 to June 30, 1997.
Delroy L. Paulhus. Dept. of Psychology,
Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
Roderick Wong,  Dept.  of Psychology,
July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996.
COMMERCE
& BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Raphael Amit, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
James Brander, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
P. Devereaux Jennings, Jan 1, 1997 to
Dec. 31, 1997.
Maurice D.Levi, Jan 1, 1997toJune30,
1997; Jan. 1, 1998 to June 30, 1998.
Richard Pollay, Jan 1, 1997 to Dec. 31,
1997.
Mark Thompson, Jan. 1, 1997 to June
30, 1997.
DENTISTRY
Veli-Jukka Uitto , Dept. of Oral Biology.
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
EDUCATION
Inge Andreen, Dept. of Curriculum Studies, Jan. 1, 1997 to June 30, 1997.
Jack Kehoe, Dept. of Curriculum Studies, July 1, 1997 to Dec. 31, 1997.
Billie Housego,  Dept.  of Educational
Psychology & Special Education, Jan. 1,
1997 to June 30, 1997.
Adel Safty, Dept. of Language Education,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
FORESTRY
Robert D. Guy, Dept. of Forest Sciences,
July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996.
GRADUATE STUDD3S
Michael Seelig, School of Community &
Regional Planning, July 1, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
GRADUATE STUDIES/
APPLIED SCDXNCE
Charles Laszlo, Institute for Hearing Accessibility Research/Electrical Engineering, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
GRADUATE STUDIES/SCIENCE
Carl Walters, Fisheries Centre/Zoology,
Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
LAW
William W. Black, July 1, 1996 to Dec.
31, 1996.
Isabel Grant, Jan. 1,1997toJune30,1997.
Robert K. Paterson, July 1,  1996 to
June 30, 1997.
MEDICINE
Everard M. Trip, Dept. of Biochemistry,
Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
Joseph K. H. Tan, Dept. of Health Care &
Epidemiology, July 1,1996 to Dec. 31,1996.
R. A. Pederson, Dept. of Physiology, Jan.
1, 1997 to June 30, 1997.
Christine Carpenter, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, July 1, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
Lyn Jongbloed, School of Rehabilitation
Sciences, July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996.
Melinda Jane Suto. School of Rehabilitation Sciences, July 1, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
Murray Douglas  Morrison,  Dept. of
Surgery, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
P. Terence Phang, Dept. of Surgery,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
SCIENCE
Bruce A. Bohm, Dept. of Botany, July
1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
FredR. Ganders, Dept. of Botany, July
1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
James J. Little, Dept. of Computer Science, Jan. 1, 1997 to June 30, 1997.
Alan K. Mackworth. Dept. of Computer
Science, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Richard S. Rosenberg, Dept. of Computer Science, July 1, 1996toJune30, 1997.
Carlo A. Giovanella. Dept. of Earth &
Ocean Sciences, Jan. 1, 1997 to June
30, 1997.
Colin I. Godwin, Dept. of Earth &
Ocean Sciences, July 1, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
Lee Groat, Dept. of Earth & Ocean
Sciences, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31,
1997.
Jason R. Auman, Dept. of Physics &
Astronomy, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
Martin T. Barlow, Dept. of Mathematics, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
LeahEdelstein-Keshet. Dept. of Mathematics, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
Edmond E. Granirer, Dept. of Mathematics, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
PriscillaE. Greenwood, Dept. of Mathematics. Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
John Heywood, Dept. of Mathematics,
Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
Stanleys. Page, Dept. of Mathematics,
July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996.
Denis Sjerve, Dept. of Mathematics.
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
John  Walsh,  Dept.  of Mathematics,
Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
Dolph Schluter, Dept. of Zoology, Sept.
1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
SCHCNCE/GRADUATE STUDD2S
Kellogg Booth, Dept. of Computer Sci-
ence/MAGIC, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
VICE PRESIDENT STUDENT
& ACADEMIC SERVICES
Jo-Anne M. Naslund, Library, Sept. 1,
1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
Tim Ross. Library. Sept. 1, 1996 to
Aug. 31, 1997.
CANCELLATIONS OF STUDY LEAVES
SCD5NCE
Frank Curzon, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
CHANGES TO STUDY LEAVES
APPLIED SCIENCE
Perry Adebar, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Jan. 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996 to
Jan. 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
ARTS
Brian Elliott, Dept. of Anthropology &
Sociology, Jan.   1,  1996 to June 30.
1996andJan. 1, 1998toJune30, 1998
to Jan. 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
SCDXNCE
David Dolphin, Dept. of Chemistry,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997 to Jan. 1,
1997 to Dec. 31, 1997.
OTHER LEAVES
APPLDXD SCONCE
Andrew Gruft, School of Architecture,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
ARTS
Joshua S. Mostow, Dept. of Asian Studies, July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996.
Daniel Overmyer, Dept. of Asian Studies, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
John M. Archer, Dept. of English, July
1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Kenneth R. Lum, Dept. of Fine Arts,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Paul L. Krause, Dept. of History, July
1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
J. P. Russell, Dept. of Philosophy, July
1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996.
GAZETTE
David J. Albert,  Dept. of Psychology,
July 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996.
COMMERCE  &  BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Amitava Chattopadhyay. July 1, 1996
to June 30. 1997.
Hong Chen. Jan. 1. 1997 to Dec. 31. 1997.
Garland Chow, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
Piet De Jong, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
Keith Murnighan. July 1, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
W. T. Stanbury, July 1. 1996 to June 30,
1997.
LAW
Ian Townsend-Gault. Apr.   1,   1996 to
May 31, 1997.
MEDICINE
Ian Clark-Lewis, Dept. of Biochemistry,
July 1. 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Stuart Fine, Dept. of Psychiatry, Sept. 1,
1996 to Nov. 30, 1996.
PHARMACEUTICAL SCD5NCES
Helen M. Burt, June 15, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
Lynda Eccott, June 1, 1996 to June 30,
1996.
SCIENCE
Sam Chanson, Dept. of Computer Science, Jan. 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
Dale H. Peterson, Dept. of Mathematics,
Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
Nathan Weiss, Dept. of Physics & Astronomy, Sept. 1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
VP STUDENT & ACADEMIC SERVICES
Julie Stevens, Library, July 1, 1996 to
Sept. 30, 1996.
ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVES
AGRICULTURAL SCHCNCES
Patrick M. Condon. Dept. of Plant Science/Landscape Architecture Program,
July 1, 1996 to April 30, 1997.
APPLIED SCIENCE
S. T. Chieng, Dept. of Chemical & Bio-
Resource Engineering. July 1,   1997 to
Dec. 31, 1997.
ARTS
Michael Duke, Dept. of Asian Studies,
July 1, 1997 to June 30, 1998.
Donald Paterson, Dept. of Economics,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
James Caswell, Dept. of Fine Arts, July
1, 1997 to Dec. 31, 1998.
Valerie Raoul, Dept. of French,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Timothy Oke, Dept. of Geography, Sept.
1, 1996 to Aug. 31, 1997.
Graeme Wynn, Dept. of Geography, July
1, 1997 to June 30, 1998.
W. Peter Ward, Dept. of History, July 1,
1996 to June 30, 1997.
Robert Silverman, School of Music, July
1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
DENTISTRY
Alan Lowe, Dept. of Clinical Dental Sciences, Jan. 1, 1997 to Dec. 31, 1997.
GRADUATE STUDD3S
John R. Grace, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
MEDICINE/SCDSNCE
Michael Smith, Dept. of Biochemistry/
Biotechnology Laboratory, Sept. 1, 1996
to Aug. 31, 1997.
PHARMACEUTICAL SCDSNCES
James Orr, Jan. 1, 1997 to Dec. 31, 1997.
John G. Sinclair, July 1, 1997 to June
30, 1998.
SCD2NCE
John Sams, Dept. of Chemistry, July 1,
1996 to June 30, 1997.
CHANGES   TO   ADMINISTRATIVE
LEAVES
MEDICINE
Martin J. Hollenberg, Dept. of Anatomy,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997 to Oct. 1,
1996 to Sept. 30, 1997.
SCDSNCE
Robert M. Ellis, Dept. of Geophysics &
Astronomy, Jan 1, 1996 to Dec. 31, 1996
to Jan 1, 1996 to Mar. 31, 1996.
Thefollowing is a list of recommendations
for promotions to the rank of Senior Instructor. Asst. Professor, Assoc. Professor, and Professor; and tenure effective
July 1, 1996:
PROMOTION TO SENIOR INSTRUCTOR
Kyung Hee Lynn. Asian Studies (with
tenure)
Norma Wieland, Germanic Studies (with
tenure)
PROMOTION TO ASST. PROFESSOR
Robert Eberle, Theatre, Film & Creative
Writing
PROMOTION TO
ASSOC. PROFESSOR
Craig Boutilier, Computer Science (with
tenure)
Marilyn Chapman, Language Education
(with tenure)
John X. Cooper, English (with tenure)
Graeme Dougherty, Pathology & Laboratory Medicine (with grant tenure)
Simon Ellis, Wood Science (with tenure)
Guy Fradet, Surgery (with grant tenure)
Ricki Goldman-Segall, Curriculum Studies (with tenure)
Lee Groat. Earth & Ocean Sciences (with
tenure)
Penelope C. Gurstein,  Community &
Regional Planning (with tenure)
Wendy Hall. Nursing
Greg Henry, Geography (with tenure)
Paul Hewitt, Psychology (with tenure)
David S. Hill, Pharmaceutical Sciences
William Honer, Psychiatry (with tenure)
Pauline Johnson, Microbiology (with tenure)
Robert Kay, Medical Genetics (with grant
tenure)
Steven Kehl. Physiology
Deirdre Kelly, Educational Studies (with
tenure)
Neil Kit son. Medicine (with grant tenure)
Brian Klinkenberg, Geography
Bruce MacDougall. Law (with tenure)
Stephen Malloy. Theatre, Film & Creative Writing
Brendan P. M. McCabe. Commerce &
Business Administration
Robert McDonald, History
Brian Mcllroy. Theatre, Film & Creative
Writing
Dinesh Pai, Computer Science (with tenure)
Rimas Pakalnis. Mining & Mineral Process Engineering
Michael Pezim, Surgery (with tenure)
Michelle Piccione, Economics (with tenure)
Darlene Reid. Rehabilitation Sciences
K. Wayne Riggs.  Pharmaceutical Sciences (with tenure)
Jason Rivers, Medicine (with grant tenure)
Michael Roberge, Biochemistry (with
tenure)
Stephen M. Salzberg, Law
Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, Educational
Psychology & Special  Education (with
tenure)
John Sherman, Chemistry (with tenure)
Jack Snoeyink, Computer Science (with
tenure)
Peter Soja. Pharmaceutical Sciences (with
grant tenure)
Richard Sullivan, Social Work (with tenure)
Guofo Tan, Economics (with tenure)
Steven Taylor, Psychiatry (with tenure)
James Vercammen, Agricultural Economics (with tenure)
David Walker, Pathology
Joanne Walton, Clinical Dental Sciences
(with tenure)
Brian Wetton, Mathematics (with tenure)
Matthew Yedlin, Electrical Engineering/
Earth & Ocean Sciences (with tenure)
PROMOTION TO PROFESSOR
Martin Adamson. Zoology
Yusuf Altintas, Mechanical Engineering
Paul Beaudry, Economics
Susan Boyd, Law
Daniel Brown, Educational Studies
Kenneth Carty, Political Science
Kimberly Cheng, Animal Science
Douglas Cochrane, Surgery (with grant
tenure)
Brian Copeland, Economics
Bruce J. Crawford, Anatomy
Michael Davies, Electrical Engineering
Katerina Dorovini-Zis, Pathology
Continued next page UBC Reports August 15, 1996 11
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
James Enns, Psychology
David Fielding, Pharmaceutical Sciences
Brett Finlay. Biotechnology Lab
Christopher Friedrichs, History
Lee Gunderson. Language Education
Eric Hall, Civil Engineering
Paul Hickson. Physics & Astronomy
George Iwama, Animal Science
Peter Jewesson. Pharmaceutical Sciences
Graham Kelsey, Educational Studies
Dixie Mager, Medical Genetics
Frederick Mikelberg, Ophthalmology
Peter N. Nemetz. Commerce & Business
Administration
Gordon Page, Medicine
Richard Pardy, Medicine
Pitman Potter, Law
Douglas Pulleyblank, Linguistics
John Roeder. Music
Thomas Ross. Commerce & Business
Administration
James Russell. Medicine (with grant tenure)
Dolph Schluter. Zoology
Terence Snutch. Biotechnology Lab
Paul Steinbok. Surgery (with grant tenure)
Norman L. M. Wong, Medicine
Claire Young, Law
Jeff Young. Physics & Astronomy (with
tenure)
TENURE
H. M. Alnuweiri. Electrical Engineering
James Anderson. Language Education
Michael Bebbington. Obstetrics & Gynaecology
Craig Boutilier. Computer Science (as
Assoc. Professor)
Marilyn Chapman. Language Education
(as Assoc. Professor)
Douglas Cochrane. Surgery (grant) (as
Professor)
John X. Cooper. English (as Assoc. Professor)
Graeme Dougherty.  Pathology (grant)
(as Assoc. Professor)
Simon Ellis. Wood Science (as Assoc.
Professor)
Caroline Ford, History
Guy Fradet. Surgery (grant) (as Assoc.
GAZETTE
Professor)
Joanne  Goldman-Segall,  Curriculum
Studies (as Assoc. Professor)
Lee Groat, Earth & Ocean Sciences (as
Assoc. Professor)
Penelope C. Gurstein Community & Regional Planning (as Assoc. Professor)
Mark Halpern, Physics
Greg Henry, Geography (as Assoc. Professor)
Paul Hewitt, Psychology (as Assoc. Professor)
William Honer,  Psychiatry (as Assoc.
Professor)
Thomas A. Hutton, Community & Regional Planning
Pauline Johnson, Microbiology (as Assoc.
Professor)
Robert Kay, Medical Genetics (grant) (as
Assoc. Professor)
Deirdre Kelly, Educational Studies (as
Assoc. Professor)
Neil Kit son. Medicine (grant) (as Assoc.
Professor)
Kyung Hee Lynn, Asian Studies (as Senior Instructor)
Bruce MacDougall, Law (as Assoc. Professor)
Dinesh Pai, Computer Science (as Assoc.
Professor)
M. R. Palmer, Electrical Engineering
Michael Pezim. Surgery (as Assoc. Professor)
Michelle Piccione, Economics (as Assoc.
Professor)
H. Prion, Civil Engineering
Wayne Riggs, Pharmaceutical Sciences
(as Assoc. Professor)
Jason Rivers, Medicine (grant) (as Assoc.
Professor)
Michael  Roberge,   Biochemistry  (as
Assoc. Professor)
Dorin Ruse, Oral Biology
James Russell, Medicine (grant) (as Professor)
Kimberly Schonert-Reichl, Educational
Psychology & Special Education (as Assoc.
Professor)
Judy Segall, English
John Sherman, Chemistry (as Assoc.
Professor)
Kevin Smith, Chemical Engineering
Jack Snoeyink, Computer Science (as
Assoc. Professor)
Peter  Soja,   Pharmaceutical  Sciences
(grant) (as Assoc. Professor)
Paul Steinbok, Surgery (grant) (as Professor)
Richard Sullivan, Social Work (as Assoc.
Professor)
GuofoTan, Economics (as Assoc. Professor)
Gloria Tang, Language Education
Steven Taylor, Psychiatry (as Assoc. Professor)
James Vercammen. Agricultural Economics (as Assoc. Professor)
Joanne Walton, Clincal Dental Sciences
(as Assoc. Professor)
Brian Wetton, Mathematics (as Assoc.
Professor)
Norma Wieland, Germanic Studies (as
Senior Instructor)
Matthew Yedlin, Electrical Engineering/
Earth & Ocean Sciences (as Assoc. Professor)
Jeff Young, Physics & Astronomy (as
Professor)
Lewei Zhang, Oral Medical & Surgical
Sciences
The following is a recommendation for
promotion to the rank of Assoc. Professor
and tenure effective July 1. 1993:
PROMOTION TO ASSOC. PROFESSOR
Adel Safty. Language Education (with
tenure)
TENURE
Adel  Safty,   Language  Education  (as
Assoc. Professor)
The following is a recommendation for
promotion to the rank of Professor effective July 1, 1995:
PROMOTION TO PROFESSOR
Graham Johnson, Anthropology & Sociology
News Digest
An additional elevator for disabled persons in the Walter C. Koerner
Library is the first special project
funded through UBC's agreement
with Coca-Cola.
The second elevator will provide
access to and from the library for
disabled persons in case of emergencies or if the other elevator is out
of order. The elevator project, which
received additional financial support from Suzanne and Earl Dodson,
includes extra features designed to
provide maximum access to better
serve the needs of persons with disabilities.
Funds received from Coca-Cola
over the life of the agreement will be
spent on improving access for disabled people to premises and programs at UBC.
UBC's annual orientation program for new international students
attending the university is underway.
Services provided by International
Student Services (ISS) include airport reception, housing assistance
and a peer program which matches
new international students with
trained Canadian 'buddies' who provide them'with on-going support in
their first year on campus.
ISS will also host Orientation
Week '96, August 26 to 30, featuring
information sessions and skill development workshops designed to
ease the transition to life in Canada
and at UBC for international students. Registration and a fee are
required. For more information, call
(604) 822-5021, or visit the ISS
homepage at http://www.student-
services, ubc.ca/internal/
Classified
Accommodation
House Sitters
The classified advertising rate is $15.75 for 35 words or less. Each additional word
is 50 cents. Rate includes GST. Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park Road,
Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1, accompanied by payment in cash, cheque (made out to UBC
Reports) or internal requisition. Advertising enquiries: 822-3131.
The deadline for the September 5, 1996 issue of UBC Reports is noon, August 26.
Accommodation
POINT GREY GUEST HOUSE  A
perfect spot to reserve
accommodation for guest
lecturers or other university
members who visit throughout
the year. Close to UBC and other
Vancouver attractions, a tasteful
representation of our city and of
UBC. 4103 W. 10th Ave.,
Vancouver. BC. V6R 2H2. Call or
fax (604)222-4104.
TINA'S GUEST HOUSE Elegant
accom. in Pt. Grey area. Minutes
to UBC. On main busroutes. Close
to shops and restaurants. Inc. TV,
tea and coffee making, private
phone/fridge. Weekly rates
available. Call 222-3461. Fax:222-
9279.
ENGLISH COUNTRY GARDEN bed
and breakfast. Warm hospitality
and full breakfast welcome you
to this central view home. Close
to UBC, downtown and bus
service. Large ensuite rooms with
TV and phone. 3466 West 15th
Avenue. 737-2526. 	
KITSILANO, 6th AVENUE, 3200
BLOCK. Furnished, 1 bedroom
plus den. Main floor. 6
appliances. From Sept. 1-Nov. 15
(flexible). $1200/month. 732-6852.
Accommodation
MONET'S ROOM BED AND
BREAKFAST. Close to UBC. Close
to ocean, shops and restaurants,
Smoke-free environment, ensuite
bathroom. Weekly rates
available. Call 734-2921.
GREEN COLLEGE GUEST HOUSE.
Five suites available for
academic visitors to UBC only.
Guests dine with residents and
enjoy college life. Daily rate $50,
plus $13/dayformeals Sun.-Thurs.
Call 822-8660 for more
information and availability.
OLD RECTORY, U.K. 17th Century
seaside cottage. 20 mins. to
Lancaster Univ./College and
Lake District. 3 bedroom, 2 bath.
Furnished, central heating. House
available October-May. Also
summer B&B. Call 011-44-1524-
85-9357.
BEAUTIFUL BED AND BREAKFAST.
Relax in elegance. Gorgeous
colonial home, antiques,flowers,
views. Central location, minutes
to downtown. 3/4 block bus
directly to UBC, downtown,
Victoria ferries, airport, Seattle,
Q.E. Park, VanDusen Gardens,
shopping, restaurants. 327-1102.
Accommodation
PANORAMIC MOUNTAIN, CITY &
WATER view home near UBC,fully
furnished, 3-4 BR, 2 LR plus nanny's
quarters. Available Sept. 1.1 year
lease. $3600/mo. plus utilities. Call
738-8717.	
POINT GREY HOUSE TO RENT in
Sept. Quiet treed street, minutes
to UBC. 3 bedrooms, 2
bathrooms, family room,
fireplace, solarium. References
required. Leave message at 222-
2509.	
FALSE CREEK, 2 BEDROOM, 2 full
baths, condo fully furnished.
Garage and balcony.
Overlooking fisherman's marina.
Steps to Granville Market.
Available Oct. 1. $1600/month.
NS. Call 739-1113.
FOR RENT, FURNISHED 2 FLOORS
of house, overlooking park in
Dunbar. Quiet, 6 rooms, spacious
deck, W/D, fax/answering
machine, carport. Utilities,
gardener, cleaning lady twice/
mo., cable. Close to UBC and
amenities. Ideal for visiting
professor/professional couple.
Avail. Aug. 15/96 NS, NP. refs.
$1800. Call/Fax (604)222-1778.
FOR RENT OR LEASE. Furnished or
semi-furnished basement suite in
Kerrisdale. Close to UBC and
downtown buses. $950furnished,
or $850/unfumished, plus 1/3
utilities. NS, NP. Available
immediately, Call 264-7564.
SUBLET AVAILABLE (Sept-June
each year): Shaughnessy area.
Furnished. Two bedroom
character house. Yard. View. Suit
single person or couple. NS, NP.
Direct bus line to UBC. $ 1,000 plus
utilities. Call 738-0290. __
FURNISHED    ONE    BEDROOM
basement suite, private entry,full
kitchen and bath, shared
laundry, gas fireplace, five
minute walk to UBC. $850/mo.
incl. utilities and cable TV. NS, NP.
Avail. Sept. 1.224-8818.
BROWN'S      BY      UBC      B&B
Comfortable and relaxing
accommodation close to UBC in
quiet area. Quality breakfasts,
queen-sized beds, private bath
available. Satisfaction is assured
for your friends or professional
guests. Reasonable rates. 222-
8073.	
S.W. MARINE DRIVE NEAR
GRANVILLE - 1 bedroom
unfurnished suite, second floor,
secure. Large deck. Suit one.
Non-smoker. No pets. No washer/
dryer. $650 utilities incl. 261-2352.
FULLY FURNISHED 2-3 bedroom
house in Kerrisdale to sublet
November 1 until March 31 (dates
flexible). Gas fireplace, very cosy
and comfortable, lots of storage.
Ideal for visiting professor. $1500/
month. 261-3649.
PROFESSIONAL COUPLE wishes
to housesit (renovating own
home). Non-smoking. No pets, 2
daughters. Can do minor repairs.
Available mid Sept. (flexible). 222-
3006 (eves, or leave message).
Se**rictEp
LICENSED ELECTRICIAN living in
Point Grey specialising in home
repairs and installations. Can fix
anything (almost). Reasonable.
References. Call Brian 733-3171.
MADRONA      SCHOOL.      An
independent elementary school
for academically advanced,
well-motivated children.
Challenging academic
program. Modern facility, ten
minutes from UBC. 2165 West 10
Ave. 732-9965.	
GHOST WRITER FOR HIRE. 25 years
experience, writing and editing.
Low rate for contract work. Books,
articles, radio, video, academia
to plain language. Call Tom 451-
9609.	
EDITING/WORD  PROCESSING:
academic editor of long
experience surviving the 90s.
Richard Howard, 681-7255. 12 UBC Reports ■ August 15, 1996
In Memoriam
Peter Larkin: 1924- 1996
A champion of common sense
by W.H. New	
McLean Chair of Canadian Studies
Peter Larkin solved problems. He did
so in part by refusing to believe they
were problems in the first place.
Instead, he saw difficulties and disagreements simply as challenges to the
imagination, impasses as sites to climb
through.
I remember how, shortly after I first
began to work with him in 1975, I ran
headlong one afternoon into a stubborn
procedural knot. "It's sunny out." he
said, when I tried to explain what was
going wrong; "let's go for a walk." It was
one of those crisp autumn days when
the UBC campus seems electric and
alive, and 20 minutes later the knot no
longer seemed stubborn. We didn't
exactly talk things through, nor did he
tell me what to do. It was more Peter's
way to let you work out for yourself the
separate consequences of differing
actions. He just listened, attentively.
But his own commitment was never in
doubt: to the highest standards of
scholarship, to clarity and precision, to
creative and judicious solutions, to the
continuing exercise of humane choice.
These commitments are, of course,
some of the reasons why he was so
widely admired. He loved to teach. (He
won UBC's Master Teacher Award in
1971, and a dozen other medals and
prizes, including two honorary degress,
the Order of Canada, and the Order of
British Columbia.) Role model as well
as teacher, he was, however, always too
modest ever to admit to that fact. "I'm
just an ordinary fellow doing his job,"
he'd say. Everyone else knew that he
was much, much more.
One measure of the breadth of his
accomplishment is that his life and
career cannot be easily summarized.
Born in New Zealand, he came to
Canada as a child, and was educated
at the University of Saskatchewan and
at Oxford (where he was a Rhodes
Scholar, earning his DPhil at the age of
24). He moved to B.C. as Chief Fisheries biologist for the B.C. Game Commission in 1948, and in 1955 he joined
the faculty at UBC. He worked first in
the Fisheries Institute, and then in the
Dept. of Zoology: and subsequently he
became head of department, then dean
of Graduate Studies, and later still,
vice-president in charge of research.
Author of some 160 scientific papers,
he also served over the course of his
career on some 50 local, national, and
international commissions, ranging
from the Science Council of Canada
and the National Research Council to
TRIUMF and the Vancouver Hospital
Board, and from federal studies ofthe
impact of pesticides, and United
Nations studies of marine mammals, to
the Board of B.C. Packers Ltd., the B.C.
Advisory Committee on Ecological
Reserves, and the committee that
worked on preserving and developing
Strathcona Park.
After his retirement from UBC, he
became actively involved in the Northern River Basins Study, and he maintained his interest in marine research.
Always he engaged creatively with the
world around him. As a scientist, he
wanted to know more about the world;
as a thinking scientist who was also a
sensible human being, he wanted also
to make sure that the world remained—or sometimes became again—
a liveable place.
By one of those ironies that go by
the name of coincidence, Peter's last
note to me arrived in the mail on July
10, the morning he died. The note (as
usual, brief) began with the single word
"Awesome!" He was describing something that had appealed to him, and he
went on to talk about it in a little more
detail. But in retrospect I read that one
word as characteristic of the way he
met life in general. Enthusiastically.
Energetically. Irrepressibly. For him the
world was an endless source of wonder
and delight.   He strove to understand it
better, and if possible explain a little
more about it. But he took pleasure
also in its mysteries. For those things
that persistently remained unclear—
those that continued beyond the reach
of explanation—obliquely and indirectly
promised a kind of continuity to
scholarly enquiry. Mysteries inevitably
led to more thought, more wonder,
and—occasionally (the scholar-teacher's dream)—more understanding.
Peter was concerned about the
shaping of public policy, and he
participated willingly in government
commissions, trying to match scientific
knowledge with community wishes and
needs. He took real delight in the
intricacies of scientific enquiry. Yet he
balanced these pursuits by delighting
in people and language as well. An
intensely private family man, he was
always at ease on the public stage. He
wrote skits. He wrote comic verses.  He
espoused scholarly clarity, and at the
same time appreciated a good (or a very
awful) pun. He loved celebrating others'
accomplishments, and frequently did
so, with wit and a sense of occasion. He
could be passionately serious. He was a
witty raconteur. There was no inconsistency here. He simply had the ability
to lead without requiring that he be
praised for leading; and he had both
the expertise to provide judicious and
informed advice, and the wisdom not to
mistake advice and opinion for infallibility. His intelligence shaped his
understanding of the world; his faith in
human worthiness sustained it; his gift
of laughter helped him share this
Peter Larkin
understanding with others.
And share he did. Over the 20 years
that I knew him, 1 saw him teach by
example rather than by rule. He
understood that people work best when
they work with you rather than for you.
He knew that administration is the art
of enabling possibilities rather than the
act of designing restrictions. And he
encouraged and supported others—
supported them in their research and
aspirations, encouraged them to
recognize and respect the talents they
themselves possessed, to express their
views frankly and fairly, and to appreciate that all perspectives and talents
need not be the same to be of value.
He demanded as much of himself as
he did of others: honesty, accuracy,
integrity, consideration. And he gave of
himself in return: to science, to academe,
to the community, friends and home. A
modest man, yes. But inestimable.
His family—his wife Lois, their five
daughters, and their families—have
lost a constant and loving companion;
the university has lost a champion of
common sense; the country has lost an
effective advocate for science and
ecology; the world has lost an incomparable mentor and friend. We remember
him with honour, and appreciation.
Alan Donald, Ph.D.
Biostatistical Consultant
Medicine, dentistry, biosciences, aquaculture
101-5805 Balsam Street, Vancouver, V6M 4B9
264 -9918 donald@portal.ca
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48 MONTH LEASE
WITH $1,595 DOWN
OR    .OUST
48 MONTH LEASE
WITH $0 DOWN
OR
267
«tt
MONTH
OAC
48 MONTH LEASE
WITH s0 DOWN
PER MONTH O.A.C.
48 MONTH LEASE
WITH $1,595 DOWN
ABBOTSFORD
THE HONDA WAY
857-1430
LANGLEY
LANGLEY HONDA
530-6281
PORT MOODY
WESTWOOD HONDA
461-0633
WHITE ROCK
WHITE ROCK HONDA
536-2111
SURREY
SUR-DEL HONDA
583-7421
MAPLE RIDGE/
PITT MEADOWS
MARV JONES HONDA
465-5464
VANCOUVER
CARTER HONDA
736-2821
REGENCY HONDA
873-3676
VANCOUVER HONDA
324-6666
RICHMOND
RICHMOND HONDA
270-1367
BURNABY SOUTH/
NEW WEST
MIDDLEGATE
HONDA
525-4667
BURNABY NORTH
HAPPY HONDA
294-2111
NORTH &
WEST VANCOUVER
PACIFIC HONDA
984-0331
Y0URB.C
HONDA
DEAlflB
Built Without Compromise. ikoiJ

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