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UBC Reports Nov 2, 1995

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UNIVERSITY OF B.C. LIBRARY
THE  UNIVERSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
3 9424 03736 21
15
UBCREPORTS
November 2, 1995
Agreement reached,
admissions
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
The suspension of graduate admissions to the Dept. of Political Science at
UBC has been lifted. Dean of Graduate
Studies John Grace announced at a meeting of the university Senate October 18.
Grace lifted the suspension after reaching an agreement with the department.
Grace said his decision came after the
department made substantial progress -
in the form of the agreement - toward
improving the learning environment and
showed a commitment to progress.
'This has been a difficult time for all
concerned. I am pleased that it has been
possible to reach this agreement and look
forward to working with the faculty and
students of the department in the days
ahead." Grace wrote in a statement to
Senate.
The suspension was imposed last summer after the UBC administration implemented recommendations made by law-
ened
a report to the uni-
with allegations of
n the department
suspension, which
ternational atten-
s in the department
ionai equity, and ...
afforSSe8 a lear^n^and working environment wmshjgfciiarassrnent and discrimination-free."
"As dean of Graduate Studies my first
concern has to be for graduate students
current and future," Grace said. "I hope
that out of this the university emerges
stronger... I appeal to everybody to make
this agreement work."
David Elkins, acting head ofthe Dept.
of Political Science, said members of the
department look forward to moving
bePolitical Science and the dean of Graduate Studies comprises eight points. It
states that the department agrees "to
See LIFT Page 2
See also AGREEMENT Page 3
Man in Motion funds
spinal cord research
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
Dr. Wolfram Tetzlaff has been named
to the Man in Motion Chair in Spinal Cord
Research, the first university chair funded
by the legacy of Rick Hansen's world tour.
Tetzlaff s research focuses on neural
repair; specifically, on determining which
genes are altered after a spinal cord injury and which genes or growth factors
are thought to be critical to promote
repair.
Understanding the initial development
of nervous systems will be key to the
development of future therapies for the
regeneration and rehabilitation of damaged spinal cords.
"Dr. Tetzlaff brings extensive experience and unique skills to UBC," said Prof.
John Steeves, a neuroscientist who is
director ofthe research group Tetzlaff will
join. Collaboration on Repair Discoveries
(CORD). "His research will be an important addition to the work underway at the
university."
Tetzlaff will hold the position of Associate Professor with appointments in the
Departments of Zoology and Surgery.
After completing his MD in Germany
and a post doctoral fellowship at the Max-
Planck Institute in Munich, Tetzlaff arrived at the University of Calgary for a
second post doctoral fellowship.During
his stay at Calgary, he also completed his
PhD.
Later he was an Alberta Heritage and
MRC Scholar, during which time he was
a faculty member of the University of
See CORD Page 2
See also SCIENTISTS Page 3
Alumni, students work to
raise funds for university
Volunteers are gearing up on the
phones this month as part ofthe 1995/
96 Alumni Annual Fund Appeal.
"We've had a tremendous response so
far." said Leanne Bemaerdt, fund-raising
co-ordinator in UBC's Development Office.
The volunteers and students are hard
workers and there's no question their efforts have a significant impact on the final
total. We're really grateful for their help."
The appeal, which began Apr. 1, 1995,
is nearing the 50 per cent mark with
$450,000 toward the campaign goal of
$988,000 raised. More than 8,000
alumni have donated so far.
Funds raised support faculty priority projects, scholarships, bursaries,
the library and athletics.
Volunteers from numerous faculties
and schools spend one or two evenings
contacting alumni from their area. To
date, volunteers from Geological Sciences, Medicine, Social Work, Theatre,
Forestry, Science and the School of Library, Archival and Information Studies
have taken turns on the phones. Forestry Dean Clark Binkley, Science Dean
Barry McBride, and Ken Haycock, director of Library, Archival and Information
Studies, joined their volunteers.
'The fact that a dean or director is
there, on the phones, certainly helps
impress upon the alumni and the volunteers the importance of their contribution," Bernaerdt said.
Volunteers from Law, Architecture,
Dentistry, Nursing, Family and Nutritional Sciences, Athletics and Applied
Science will also take to the phones this
month.
Star Attractions
Zoology graduate student Shaun Foy shows young
Open House visitor sea creatures in the marine
invertebrate pool, one of the Open House displays in
the Biological Sciences building. For more moments
from Open House see special Open House insert
starting on page 9.
UBC remembers at service Nov. 11
Members ofthe university community
will gather in War Memorial Gym Nov. 11
for UBC's annual Remembrance Day service. This year's service also marks the
50th anniversary ofthe end ofthe Second
World War.
"Our audience consists of students,
staff, veterans and the public," Event Co
ordinator Eilis Courtney said,  adding
that anyone is welcome at the service.
UBC President David Strangway will
conduct an inspection of the troops at
10:15 a.m. before the ceremony gets
underway at 10:45 a.m. Guest speaker is
Ron Jeffels, former UBC faculty member
and a retired major.
Inside
Flower Power
3
Offbeat: Ray Hall turns petals into film stars
Air Care
5
Increased pollutants in the air we breathe are taking their toll
Quebec Libre
4
Forum: John Helliwell takes a look at the equalities of trade
Wild Man
20
Profile: Tony Sinclair makes wildlife dynamics life's work 2 UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995
Letters
LETTERS POLICY
UBC Reports welcomes letters to the editor on topics relevant to the
university community. Letters must be signed and include an address
and phone number for verification. Please limit letters, which may be
edited for length, style and clarity, to 300 words. Deadline is 10 days
before publication date. Submit letters in person or by mail to the UBC
Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C.,
V6T 121, by fax to 822-2684 or by e-mail to paula.martin@ubc.ca.
Revamp sign
policy says Law
professor
Editor:
It was profoundly saddening
to read the university's new Policy
on Posting of Notices, Posters and
Signs (UBC Reports. Oct. 19,
1995). The saddest, and most
disturbing, aspect ofthe policy is
that it reveals a mentality that
fundamentally misunderstands
what it means to live in a free and
democratic society, and to live
and work, to learn and grow
within a university, an institution that more than any other
should respect and embody in
practice the free and open exchange of ideas and information.
The Supreme Court of
Canada, in 1993, struck down
as unconstitutional a Peterborough, Ont. by-law prohibiting
the placement of posters on public property. In so doing, it recognized the importance of postering
as a medium of expression and
communication: "Posters have
communicated political, cultural
and social information for cen
turies. Postering on public
property...increases the availability of these messages, and
thereby fosters social and political decision-making." One would
think that a university should be
in the forefront of maintaining
and protecting the values of free
and robust communication.
Instead we have a policy that
imposes severe restrictions, as
well as a system of prior approval, something that courts
and citizens have condemned in
every society where freedom of
speech is constitutionally protected and socially valued. In
building interiors under the new
UBC policy, for example, "notice
boards are under the control of
the department or other unit in
whose area they are located.
Notices and other material may
be posted only on the notice
boards provided and only when
approved by the controlling department or other unit." Is this
intended, as the policy claims, to
"promote campus communications"?
What other justifications are
we given for this draconian control measure? The policy, we are
told, is intended to "avoid un-
Cord
Continued from Page 1
Calgary and the University of
Ottawa.
The UBC chair is funded with
a $500,000 donation made by
the Man in Motion Foundation
and matched by the provincial
government.
The foundation administers
the $20-million legacy of Rick
Hansen's Man in Motion tour
and supports spinal cord injury
research and rehabilitation
across Canada.
The foundation, through the
expertise of a national advisory
research panel, has contributed
close to $7 million to research
since Hansen tour's ended in
1987.
Edith Ehlers, executive director of the Man in Motion Foundation, said UBC was chosen for
funding because of the excel-
Lift	
Continued from Page 1
strengthen mechanisms
whereby input is sought on a
regular basis from graduate students in evaluating its graduate
programs and in making further improvements," and "to
commit itself to deal promptly
with any allegations of harassment and discrimination in full
accordance with university
policy."
A conference on equity and
discrimination issues sponsored
by UBC, the Graduate Student
Society, the Alma Mater Society
and the Faculty Association, will
take place early in the new year.
Please
Jk
^^   .m        Recycle
lence of its research in
neuroscience.
"We certainly feel that UBC is
a leader in this area of research,"
she said. "We are excited to be
part of it."
The fact that UBC offered to
match the donation dollar-for-
dollar was also a strong incentive for the foundation to support the chair, she added.
The foundation's contribution
and matching funds, which were
part ofthe World of Opportunity
campaign, will fund the position in perpetuity.
necessary maintenance costs,
safety hazards, and visual pollution." One can easily imagine,
however, increased maintenance
costs in enforcing the policy, not
to mention administrative time
and energy spent reviewing and
approving posters and notices. If
there are safety hazards, it
should be easy enough to establish carefully tailored rules to
avoid them, such as prohibiting
posting within a certain distance
of fire safety equipment or on
glass doors that open. Finally,
as should be plain to anyone,
one person's "visual pollution"
may be another person's beauty,
and can certainly be a source of
new, interesting, useful, provocative or even entertaining information.
My advice, although I cannot
now post it publicly except in
approved places and only upon
approval by my controlling department or other unit, is to take
this policy back to the drawing
board, and this time give a little
thought as to what a university
is and to the values it should
represent.
Stephan M. Salzberg
Assistant Professor, Law
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JUBC REPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December, June, July and August) for the entire university
community by the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251
Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1.
Associate Director, University Relations: Steve Crombie
(Stephen.crombie@ubc.ca)
Managing Editor: Paula Martin(paula.martin@ubc.ca)
Editor/Production: Janet Ansell (janet.ansell@ubc.ca)
Contributors: Connie Filletti (connie.filletti@ubc.ca),
Stephen Forgacs (Stephen.forgacs@ubc.ca)
Charles Ker (charles.ker@ubc.ca),
Gavin Wilson (gavin.wilson@ubc.ca).
Editorial and advertising enquiries: (604) 822-3131 (phone),
(604) 822-2684 (fax).
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in UBC
Reports do not necessarily reflect official university policy.
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995 3
Gavin Wilson photo
Adding to UBC's strength in neuroscience, Dr. Wolfram Tetzlaff brings a
unique blend of skills to his position as the Man in Motion Chair in Spinal
Cord Research. His research focuses on the genetics of neural repair.
Offbeat
by staff writers
A rose is a rose, is a rose.
Or is it?
Certainly the little yellow roses sprinkled amidst the splendour of the
official Open House bouquet weren't your ordinary petals. Donated by the
United Flower Growers Co-op (UFG) to the Dept. of Plant Science for
display at Open House, they had that special something sought by UBC
film-maker Ray Hall.
Hall, a professor in the Dept. of Theatre and Film, showed up at the
UFG headquarters in Burnaby at 6 a.m. to pick up the prized bouquet
which included lilies, chrysanthemums and
alstromeria. Hall's docudrama was going to
depict the Open House celebrations through
the eyes of these flowers.
UFG's Henk Grasmeyer met Hall and
introduced the UBC film crew to the stars of
their soon-to-be released feature. The Yellow
and Purple Rose.
"When I asked Henk where the purple rose
was he looked around for one but couldn't And
it." said Hall. 'There's a sequel there somewhere."
Next. Christia Roberts, UBC floriculturaiist,
brought the film stars back to campus into the
waiting arms of Judy Newton from UBC's
Botanical Garden.
Newton, a veteran flower arranger on CBC's
The Canadian Gardener,  quickly ushered the
colourful assortment into the gift shop and
worked her magic. A touch of ferns, hydrangea,
other greens and—presto! a star was arranged.
The bashful bouquet slept under a tarp that evening and was looking
radiant at its debut at the Student Recreation Centre the next morning.
There it took centre stage on the dais for Open House's grand opening.
Stage jitters led to the cancellation of further campus appearances on
Friday. However, late Friday afternoon, the bouquet thrilled an audience
at the downtown law courts by making a guest appearance during a
special Congregation ceremony marking the Faculty of Law's 50th anniversary.
The flowers then made a triumphant return to campus (film crew in
tow) Saturday and Sunday with stunning appearances at the Wyman
Plaza Opening, the First Nations House of Learning, UBC's 80th birthday
bash and finally at a reception for university emeriti.
Hall and cinematographers Brendan Keown and Jeff Houde said
surging crowds, eager to catch a glimpse of the celebrity bouquet, made
the filming assignment an exciting challenge but one they wouldn't have
missed.
The Yellow and Purple Rose is scheduled for release next month.
Scientists at forefront
of neuro discoveries
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
UBC and its affiliated hospitals have
become a leading centre for the study of
neuroscience, says Prof. John Steeves,
director of Collaboration on Repair Discoveries (CORD).
More than 70 UBC researchers conduct research in neuroscience and many
are world leaders in the field, he said. If
their research groups are added to this
total, there are over 250 researchers at
UBC and affiliated hospitals.
"New discoveries are being made at a
fast pace. It's an exciting discipline,"
Steeves said.
CORD is part of the proposed Brain
and Spinal Cord Research Centre, a joint
project of the faculties of Science, Medicine and Graduate Studies with Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre.
Other proposed research areas of the
centre are multiple sclerosis,
neurodegenerative disorders, schizophrenia, vision and stroke.
It is fitting that Vancouver boasts such
a complement of experts in neuro-trauma,
because B.C. bears a disproportionate
number of Canada's spinal cord injuries,
Steeves said.
Each year, 250 of Canada's 1,000 spinal cord injuries occur in B.C., despite
the fact that B.C. has only 13 per cent of
the country's total population.
In B.C. alone there are 10,000 people
with chronic head or spinal cord injuries,
numbers that translate into a high economic cost as well as a great deal of
human suffering.
Most injuries occur to males under the
age of 25, but because their injuries are
rarely life-threatening or lifespan-short-
ening, each injured person requires decades of expensive health care.
The economic costs to society are
staggering. It could add up to as much as
several billions of dollars a year in
Canada," Steeves said.
Right now, there is nothing that can be
done to heal spinal cord injuries, but
recent research is providing hope that
some of the damage will one day be
reversed with new therapies.
Steeves and his research group are
developing a "protein cocktail" that would
stimulate the regrowth of nerve fibres
called axons in damaged spinal cords.
The proteins would do this by temporarily curbing the formation of myelin, a
protective covering on normal nerve fibres that also seems to hinder the
regrowth of nerves and axons.
Other members of CORD are Asst. Prof.
Vanessa Auld. Asst. Prof. Timothy
O'Conner, Asst. Prof. Tom Zwimpfer and,
the latest addition to the team. Dr. Wolfram Tetzlaff, holder of the Man in Motion
Chair in Spinal Cord Research. All have
appointments in the Dept. of Zoology, with
several members also appointed in the
departments of Anatomy and Surgery.
Campus aims to reach
$300,000 United Way goal
United Way's campus campaign is one-
third of the way toward its goal of
$300,000.
Campaign organizers have extended
the appeal to the end of November since
much of the campus was preoccupied
with last month's Open House, said Louise
Shaw, campaign co-ordinator.
The campaign has raised approximately $111,000 from 772 donors since
the campaign kickoff Oct. 2.
United Way reminders and pledge
forms were recently sent to UBC employees. Shaw said employee contributions
made through payroll deduction have the
biggest impact on campaign success.
"We got off to a slow start this year," she
said. "Now people have a bit more time and
energy and the campaign is picking up steam."
Several groups on campus are organizing United Way activities during November and it's shaping up to be a great
month for lovers of baked goods.
The Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration is once again holding its Bakemeister Challenge Nov. 8 at
2:30 p.m. Commerce faculty, staff and
doctoral students are invited to compete.
Winners are chosen by a panel of gourmet judges, but with a $3 donation all
non-bakers are welcome to attend and
sample the entries. All proceeds go to the
United Way.
Plant Operations is also repeating a
bake sale that raised $900 for the United
Way last year. The sale will be held Nov. 24
at 11 a.m. in the cafeteria ofthe University
Services Building.
PoliSci: the agreement
The suspension of admissions to graduate studies in the Dept. of Political Science
was lifted by Graduate Studies Dean John
Grace after members of the department
reached thefollowing agreement:
The department agrees:
1. (a) to ensure that the department's
current process for effecting and implementing improvements in the climate for
graduate study and in the administration of graduate programs will operate in
good faith, efficiently and effectively to
ensure that there are satisfactory provisions in place for educational equity and
a learning environment of mutual trust
and respect.
(b) to strengthen mechanisms whereby
input is sought on a regular basis from
graduate students in evaluating its graduate programs and in making further improvements.
(c) to meet all the necessary elements
ofthe final approved version ofthe matrix
being developed by the Dean's Equity
Advisory Committee for all graduate programs, and, where possible, to implement the desirable elements also.
(d) to consider carefully other recommendations which will be made by the
Dean's Equity Advisory Committee, and
to respond in writing to these in the
reports covered in No. 2 below.
(e) to announce publicly its commitment to a goal of educational equity.
(f) to commit itself to deal promptly
with any allegations of harassment and
discrimination in full accordance with
university policy.
2. The department will issue written
reports in February, May and October,
1996, detailing what steps have been
taken, any problems encountered, and
plans for further actions. These reports
will be made available to the deans of
Arts and Graduate Studies and all graduate students in the department, as well
as to the associate vice-president. Equity. If at least two of the dean of Arts,
dean of Graduate Studies and associate
vice-president, Equity deem it to be necessary, a further report could be required
in 1997.
It is understood that the dean of Graduate Studies could reimpose a suspension
on graduate admissions if the department fails to comply with the provisions
of this agreement within a reasonable
period of time. 4 UBC Reports • November 2, 1995
Witty And Wilde
Joel Spicer and Rebecca Harker play the characters of Jack and Gwendolen
in this month's Frederic Wood Production of The Importance of Being
Earnest. Text editor Errol Durbach has drawn material from Oscar Wilde's
little known original four-act play to create a truly scathing social commentary
of the times. The play runs from Nov. 15-25. Phone 822-2678 for ticket
information.
Conference to tackle
health care ethics
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
Do scientists have a moral obligation
to communicate their findings to the communities in which they do research? Do
hospitals have an ethical responsibility
to provide culturally sensitive care?
Health care professionals, academics
and members of community groups from
across Canada and the United States will
explore these issues and others at the
annual conference of the Canadian
Bioethics Society which focuses on health
care ethics in a multicultural society,
Nov. 23 to 25 at Vancouver's Coast Plaza
Hotel at Stanley Park.
"One of the biggest challenges we face
in health care today is making decisions
that are both ethical and culturally sensitive," said Paddy Rodney, chair of the
conference planning committee and a
UBC doctoral candidate in the School of
Nursing.
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a cross-cultural perspective is tremendously important but has not been addressed in academic or practice settings.
The strength of this conference is bringing the two perspectives together."
Input from multicultural and aboriginal communities in this year's proceedings is another major asset ofthe conference, Rodney said.
She believes that a symposium on
cross-cultural issues in research ethics, presented by the Affiliation of
Multicultural Societies and Service
Agencies of B.C. and the Aboriginal
Health Research Council, will be particularly enlightening for .conference
participants.
"Apart from giving of their time and
energy to being studied, members of
multicultural and aboriginal communities often feel that they haven't been
partners in the process when scientists
grab the data and run. Mostly, they just
feel objectified and some even feel betrayed."
Other highlights ofthe three-day event
include presentations on reproductive
technology, disclosing cancer diagnosis
in developing countries, and social justice in Canadian health policy.
The Canadian Bioethics Society annual conference is sponsored in co-operation with UBC's Centre for Applied
Ethics, the Division of Health Care Ethics
and the Division of Continuing Education in the Health Sciences. For more
information, call (604) 732-0734 or (604)
822-5398.
Forum
Do national borders
matter for Quebec's
trade?
By John Helliwell
John Helliwell is a professor in the
Dept. of Economics.
Growing trade and capital mobility, and much talk of globalization,
may have created the impression that
national boundaries no longer matter
much for trade and capital movements. The fact is, Canadian provinces trade 20 times as much with
each other as with U.S. states of a
similar size and distance.
If national boundaries are so
important a determinant of trade, the
ability to maintain the existing trade
linkages with
The results show that
Quebec is even more
tightly tied in to the fabric
of Canada, relative to its
ties to the United States,
than are the anglophone
provinces.
the rest of
Canada after
separation
becomes both
more important
and less likely.
Similarly, if
interprovincial
trade is so
much more
important than      	
international
trade, it is less easy to assume that
expanded trade with the United States
can be used to replace interprovincial
trade now taking place.
Canadians know well that Canada
and the United States are on either
side of the world's largest bilateral
trading flows. The two countries
share an enormous land mass
divided by a border that is part
easily navigable water and part an
unmarked line that cuts the continental divide almost at right angles.
The tariffs and other border limitations to trade and capital movements
are, and have long been, lower than
almost anywhere in the world.
Canada also has the largest degree
of foreign ownership among any of
the industrial countries, with the
United States being by far the largest
source country. If ever one would
expect to find a national border that
had relatively little effect on trade
and capital movements, it would be
the line between Canada and the
United States.
When asked to estimate how much
trade Canadian provinces do with
each other, in comparison to how
much they trade with U.S. states of
similar economic size and at a similar
distance, almost everyone gives an
estimate falling in the range between
0.6 and 1.4 times, with the median
answer being below 1.0. That is.
some think that trade linkages
among the provinces are slightly
tighter than are the trade linkages
between the Canadian provinces and
U.S. states, and some think that they
are slightly weaker, with the range of
answers being fairly narrow.
But the best estimate of the
number is not 0.7 or 1.3, or anything
even remotely close. As stated earlier,
the current best estimate for the
1988-90 period for which data are
available is more than 20 for Canada
as a whole and more than 25 for
Quebec. There could hardly be a fact
that would be more important for
      Quebeckers and
Canadians to
consider. The
results show that
Quebec is even
more tightly tied
in to the fabric of
Canada, relative
to its ties to the
United States,
than are the
      anglophone
provinces.
One line of thought concerning
separation is based on the belief that
Quebec already has equally close
trading ties with the rest of Canada
and the United States, so that there
could not be much at stake in moving
from treating the rest of Canada as
other provinces to another country.
But, as proved by research, this
premise is false by a factor of 25.
The central point is that the fabric
of the Canadian economic union is
much tighter and more closely woven
than anyone had previously believed.
This implies that it would be no
trivial matter, for either Quebec or
the remaining parts of Canada, if
Quebec were to change from being
part of Canada to being an independent country.
Since the discovery of the relative
tightness of the economic union is
relatively recent, we still do not have a
full understanding of what makes the
economic linkages among provinces so
much stronger than those with the
United States. It is therefore not easy
to tell which of these factors would be
most likely to be put at risk if Quebec
became an independent country.
It is clear that Canadians have put
together a much tighter economic
federation than anyone believed, so
that there is much more to lose than
anyone would have guessed if the
country were to split.
Merger changes few emergency details
The merger on Oct. 16 ofthe University Endowment Lands fire department
and the Vancouver fire department should
result in better fire and rescue protection
for UBC and its neighbours.
But it does create some changes that
members of the campus community
should be aware of, said Donna Ashick,
chemical safety officer with the Dept. of
Health, Safety and Environment.
For example, all calls will now be answered at a central dispatch office downtown. This includes the hazardous materials response line, the emergency first
aid line and the non-emergency fire department line.
In the past, calls to the 822-4567
HazMat line and the 822-4444 first aid
line would light up on a board in the local
dispatch office, showing the caller's location on campus. This will no longer happen, and callers should be prepared to
give a detailed location, Ashick said.
The 822-8282 line, once a non-emergency line to a dispatcher at the UEL's fire
hall on Wesbrook Mall, will also be answered downtown.
As always, 911 calls will continue to be
answered by central dispatch downtown.
Under the merger agreement, the UEL's
59 firefighters are now employees of the
Vancouver fire department. The UEL fire
hall will now be known as VFD Hall No. 10.
Prior to this, fire protection on Point
Grey was provided by the provincial government, which administers the endowment lands. When a large fire occurred,
the UEL department had to call in Vancouver firefighters, and then pay a service fee.
The Fire Prevention Office at UBC can
be reached at 665-6066. UBC Reports • November 2, 1995 5
Eco-certification on
agenda for 1996
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
Schemes designed to protect the environment and encourage sustainable forest practices will be the topic of discussion at an international conference organized by UBC's Faculty of Forestry and
Universiti Pertanian Malaysia.
The conference, to take place in Kuala
Lumpur, Malaysia in May 1996, will examine the issues surrounding eco-label-
ling and certification. Recommendations
stemming from the conference will be
fowarded to the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Forests.
"Certification and eco-labelling are
pretty hot issues right now." said Sandra
Schinnerl. Forestry's assistant director
of International Programs, adding that
little work has been done to determine
the feasibility and efficacy of certification
schemes.
Ideally, certification and eco-labelling
programs will encourage sound forest
management and harvesting practices by
allowing certified wood products companies to put eco-labels on their products.
However, the certification movement's
rapid gain in momentum is exposing a
range of problems and increasing the
need to chart a course for certification on
a global level, said Forestry Prof. Hamish
Kimmins.
"One of the big concerns is that there
is a proliferation of schemes, and if there's
a proliferation the whole purpose and
power of green labelling will be lost," he
said.
To obtain certification, companies harvesting or managing forests will have to
meet certain criteria which are components of sustainable forestry.
'This means that if they harvest, they
harvest in such a way that doesn't upset
the ecosystems in which they are harvesting," Schinnerl said.
The diversity of ecosystems around
the globe adds to the difficulty in developing certification criteria.
'The whole debate about green labelling has to proceed beyond this nice idea
that it is a good thing to do, to what do you
do, how do you measure it, how do you
report it and how do you make sure that
the criteria and indicators being used
respect the ecological difference between
different ecosystems," Kimmins said.
Attendance at the conference, titled
The Ecological, Social and Political Issues in Vertification of Forest Management," is by invitation only and will have
participants from several interest groups
and countries. Canadian High Commissioner to Malaysia John Bell, a UBC
alumnus, provided seed money for an
organizational meeting held earlier in
Vancouver and attended by Canadian
and Malaysian representatives.
"This conference is trying to bring together a lot of seminal thinkers to make
a major review of what's going on, so that
we can contribute to bringing some order
out of what could become chaos,"
Kimmins said.
He acknowledges that, given the range
and diverse agendas of the groups that
should be involved in this conference—
political or otherwise — it may be difficult
to reach agreement.
"I hope that we're going to conclude that
(certification) has to be socially and economically rational but fundamentally
driven by the ecology ofthe values we want
to sustain," he said. "Will we make a
unique contribution? Only time will tell."
D. Thomson photo
Flying High
Likha, a Philippine dance troupe from San Francisco, mesmerized an
appreciative audience at the Asian Centre with their performance
depicting birds in flight. The dancers were part of an event sponsored
by the Centre for Southeast Asia Research called A Glimpse ofPhilippine
Culture through Music and Dance.
Elizabeth Godley photo
Dr. Sverre Vedal, associate professor of Medicine, believes children, the
elderly and people with pre-existing lung and heart conditions may be more
susceptible to the adverse effects of air pollution.
Air pollution tied to
lung, heart ailments
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
British Columbians are visiting hospital emergency rooms with respiratory
conditions and being admitted for treatment of lung and heart ailments after
repeated, short-term exposure to increased concentrations of inhalable particles polluting the air, a UBC researcher
estimates.
Higher levels of PM10, or pollution consisting of particles smaller than 10
micrometres in diameter, are also associated with increases in total mortality rates
and deaths from respiratory and cardiac
illness in B.C., says Dr. Sverre Vedal, an
associate professor of Medicine.
Vedal draws his conclusions from a
review of published health studies examining the effects of PM10, data from B.C.
hospitals and provincial government statistics on concentrations of inhalable particles for a report commissioned by the
Ministry of Environment, Lands and Parks.
"The most disturbing aspect of many
recent health studies is their findings
regarding mortality," Vedal said. "Increases in particle concentrations are
associated with increases in the risk of
dying from lung or heart disease."
He cautioned, however, that although
these observations are consistent across
many studies, more research and statistical analysis are needed.
In the report, Vedal estimated that increases in PM10 pollution cause, on an
annual basis in B.C., an extra 82 deaths,
283 emergency room visits and 69
hospitalizations for lung and heart disorders.
Among other health-related consequences of elevated PM10 levels the report documents are increased school
absenteeism among children and restricted activity in adults with pre-existing respiratory problems.
"PM10 was an appropriate choice for
study because, ofthe types of pollutants
we are exposed to, PM10 is the most
consistent in terms of creating adverse
health effects," Vedal explained.
Primary sources of inhalable particles
are industry, motor vehicles, residential
wood-burning fireplaces and natural
sources such as windblown dust. In B.C.,
all vehicles account for approximately 25
per cent of PM 10 emissions, mainly from
heavy duty diesel engines.
"Although it is difficult to estimate how
much PM10 is harmful, it is critical to
know its lowest level of concentration
where ill effects on health can really be
seen," Vedal said.
"Based on my review, it appears that
30 micrograms per cubic metre is a concentration that might result in some mild
symptoms in healthy persons, such as
cough, chest tightness and ear, nose and
throat irritations, and more pronounced
effects in unhealthy individuals. Current
B.C. standards are twice that amount."
Vedal added that although there are
some residential hot spots outside the
Lower Mainland where PM10 concentrations are high because of wood smoke,
Ontario and parts of Quebec have greater
levels of the pollutant.
He said there are about 30 days each
year when residents of the Lower Mainland would be exposed to increases in
PM10, usually in the winter.
To minimize risk, Vedal advised people
to consult air quality index information
available daily through the media.
"Although it is a relatively crude measure and is driven by any type of pollutant,
by and large the advice would be the same;
stay indoors and reduce activities."
Among Vedal's recommendations in
the report, he suggested further research
in several areas including the effects of
brief peaks of particle exposure and experimental work on the mechanisms of
particle health effects.
The ministry commissioned the report
to help in its ongoing deliberations on air
quality policy for British Columbia. 6 UBC Reports • November 2, 1995
Calendar
November 5 through November 18
Sunday, November 5
9th Annual B.C. HTV/AIDS
Conference
HIV In Canada Today. Continues
Nov. 7. Sponsors: Continuing
Education in the Health Sciences,
BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/
AIDS, the Province of BC Ministry of Health, and St. Pauls Hospital. Westin Bayshore Hotel. Call
822-4965 or fax 822-4835.
Monday, November 6
Astronomy Seminar
Saturn's Rings, Fractals And
Comet SL/9. Derek Richardson.
Canadian Institute of Theoretical
Astrophysics. Geophysics & Astronomy 260, 4pm. Refreshments
from 3:30pm. Call 822-2267/
822-2696.
Seminar
Detection Of Bacterial Ring-Rot
In Potatoes. Solke De Boer. PARC
Vancouver. MacMillan 318D,
12:30pm. Call 822-9646.
Seminar
Structural Biology Of Proteins Involved In Ca+2 Signalling. Dr. W.
Chazin, Scripps Research Institute. IRC#4, 3:45pm. Refreshments. Call 822-9871.
Public Lecture
The Intelligence Of Dogs. Stanley
Coren, Psychology Professor.
Friedman Bldg. 37; 4:30pm. A
presentation of the Sigma XI Society.  Free. Call 266-5879.
Lecture
Development Alternatives And
Feminist Action. Dr. Janice
Jackson, Women's Studies, U. of
Guyana. School of Social Work
028 (lower level), 12:30-l:30pm.
Free. Call 822-3185/822-6622.
Lecture in Modern
European Literature
Six Men With Raincoats: Storytelling In Calvino. Gianpaolo
Biasin, U. California, Berkeley.
Buchanan Penthouse, 12:30pm.
Call 822-2268.
Green College Writer-in-
Residence
Writing For Children: Theatre As
A Means Of Empowerment - My
Experience Of Writing For Children And Teenagers. Sue Ashby,
English playwright. Green College recreation lounge. 7:30-
9:30pm. Call 822-6067.
19th Century Colloquium
Series
Urban Spectacles. Richard L.
Stein, U. of Oregon. Green College, reception room, Graham
House, 8pm. Call 822-6067.
Centre for Southeast Asia
Research - Cultural
Performance Series
Malaysian Traditional Dances.
National Dance Troupe of Malaysia. Asian Centre auditorium,
12:30-l:30pm. Free. Bring your
lunch. Call 822-2629.
Tuesday, Nov. 7
Environmental Programs
Seminar
The Future Of Solid Waste Management: Rethink, Reduce,
Rouse, Recycle And Compost.
John Metras, UBC Waste Reduction Coordinator. IRC#5,
12:30pm. Call 822-8759.
Seminar
Ecology Today: Science, Metaphor, Ideology, Or Gospel? V.J.
Krajina Memorial Lecture. Dr.
Mohan K. Wali, School of Natural
Resources, Ohio State U.. Dept. of
Botany and Centre for Biodiversity
Research. BioSciences 2000, 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-2133.
Seminar
Time-Dependent Fluctuations In
A Mid-Latitude River Plume Over
The Shelf: The Columbia River
Study. Dr. Barbara Hickey. U of
Washington, Seattle, Wa.
BioSciences 1456. 3:30pm. Call
822-2821.
Statistics Seminar
Numerical Optimization With Imprecise Function Evaluations. Prof.
Harry Joe, Dept. of Statistics. CSCI
301,4-5:30pm. Refreshments. Call
822-0570.
Green College Seminar
Reflections On The Quebec Referendum. Richard Johnston, Political Science, Dany Lacombe, Sociology, SFU and Douglas Sanders,
Law. Green College recreation
lounge, 7:30-9pm. Call 822-6067.
Seminar
TheAntiestrogenicActivityorrCDD:
Effects On PS-2. A Prognostic
Marker For Human Breast Cancer.
Dr.TimZacharewski, PMAC-HRF/
MRC research scientist in Medicine, Dept. of Pharmacology, U. of
Western Ontario. IRC#3, 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-4645.
Seminar
Controversies In Atrial Fibrillation
Management. Dr. Wendy Leong,
Clinical Pharmacy specialist and
director of Cardiology and Emergency Medicines Research,
Burnaby Hospital. Vancouver
Hosp/HSC Heather Pavilion, lecture room B, 4:30-5:30pm. Call
822-4645.
Green College Writer-in-
Residence
Theatre As A Collaborative Process: The Group Dynamics Of A
Theatre Company. Sue Ashby,
English playwright. Green College
recreation lounge 5:30-6:30pm.
Reception in Graham House 4:45-
5:30pm.   Call 822-6067.
Forum
The United Nations: Fifty Years
On. Dr. Steven Lee, History. Dr.
Cathal Nolan, Political Science, Dr.
Robert Jackson, Political Science.
Continues Nov. 14,21. Hotel Georgia. 12:05 1:30pm. Bring lunch.
Free. Call 822-1450.
Centre for Applied Ethics
Colloquium
How Responsible Are We For Our
Health? Walter Glannon, Centre
for Applied Ethics. Angus 413, 4-
6pm. Call 822-5139.
Information Night
Sponsored by the School of Rehabilitation Sciences. Speakers: faculty, admissions personnel, students. IRC#2, 7-9pm. Call 822-
7392.
Faculty Women's Club
meeting
Forgotten Prisoners. Jennifer
Wade, Amnesty International. Cecil
Green Park House, main floor,
7:30pm. Film and speaker to follow. Refreshments. Guests welcome. Call 228-1116.
Wednesday, Nov. 8
Centre for Southeast Asia
Research Seminar
Cambodia: Prospects And Challenges. Martin Collacott, Foreign
Service Visitor, Faculty of Law 95/
96. Asian Centre 604, 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-2629.
Microbiology and
Immunology Seminar Series
Differential Signal Transduction
Pathways In Naive And Proliferat-
ingTCells. Dr. Patricia Orchansky.
Dept. of Microbiology and Immu
nology. Wesbrook 201, 12-
1:30pm. Call 822-3308.
Ecology and Centre for
Biodiversity Research
Seminar
Tales Of Sheep, Plants And Fungi
From The Island At The Edge Of
The World. Dawn Bazely, Biology,
York U.. Toronto. Host Dr. Judy
Myers. Family/Nutritional Sciences, 4:30pm. Refreshments in
coffee room Hut B8, 4:10pm. Call
822-3957.
Continuing Studies
Workshop
Effective Working Habits Of Successful People. Susan Curtis, MEd.
Women's Resources Centre, # 1 -
1144 Robson St., 7:30-9:30pm
(continues Weds. Nov. 8-29). $65.
Pre-registration required. Call 482-
8585.
Department of Geography
Colloquium
Reporting News, Constructing Communities: Changing Racialised Discourses In Vancouver. Gillian
Creese, Sociology-Women's Studies. Geography 201, 3:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-4929.
Continuing Studies Lecture
How I Stopped Yawning And
Learned To Love Poetry. Cecilia
Danaher, PhD candidate in English. Scarfe 210, 7:30-9pm. $45.
Call 822-1450.
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
Faculty Development: The New
Curriculum. Dr. W. Regan. Chair
Dr. Peter C. Wing. Eye Care Centre
auditorium, 7am. Call 875-4272.
Forum
Access to Computing. Call Namiko
Kunimoto, AMS vice president,
822-3092.
Noon Hour Concert
Jean-Guy Boisvert, The Electric
Clarinet. Music recital hall,
12:30pm. $2.50 at the door. Call
822-5574.
Thursday, Nov. 9
Genetics Graduate Program
Seminar
The Role Of The Erythropoetin
Receptor In The Regulation Of
Hematopoesis. JannaKrosl, PhD candidate, Dept. of Medicine. Wesbrook
201, 4:30pm. Call 822-8764.
Colloquium
Raman Scattering Studies Of Spin
And Charge Excitations In Cuprate
High Temperature Superconductors. Miles Klein, U. of Illinois.
Hennings 201, 4pm. Call 822-3853.
CICSR Distinguished Lecture
Series
What Do Car Parking, Space Robots And Air Traffic Control Have
In Common. Dr. Shankar Sastry,
Dept. EE/CS, U of California,
Berkeley. CICSR/CS 208, 4-
5:30pm. Refreshments. Free. Call
822-6894.
Students for Forestry
Awareness Speaker Series
EnforcingThe Forest Practices Code.
Trevor Swan, Enforcement Branch,
BC M.O.F., Victoria. MacMillan 166,
12:30pm. Call 274-4730.
Green College Writer-in-
Residence
Contemporary Drama In The UK.
Sue Ashby, English playwright.
Green College recreation lounge,
7:30-9:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Distinguished Artists
Concert
Nancy Hermiston, lyric coloratura
with Rena Sharon, piano. Music
recital hall, 8pm. SI7 adult, student/senior $9. Call 822-5574.
Friday, Nov. 10
Seminar
CYP2D6: A Pharmacogenetic Risk
Factor In Drug Abuse? Dr. Victoria Otten, Dept. of Pharmacology,
U of Toronto. IRC#3. 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-4645.
Theoretical Chemistry
Seminar
Weak Global Solutions Of The
Boltzman Equation In A 1-D Slab
With Diffuse Boundary Conditions.
Dr. R. Illner, Dept. of Mathematics, U of Victoria. Chemistry D402
(centre block), 4pm. Call 822-3266.
Seminar
Why Do Fish Stocks Collapse? The
Case Of Cod In Eastern Canada.
Dr. Ransom A. Myers, Fisheries
and Oceans, Newfoundland. Fisheries Centre (Hut B8), Ralf Yorque
room, 2-3pm. Call 822-0618.
Occupational Hygiene
Program Seminar
Estimating Dioxin And Furan Body
Burdens In Sawmill Workers.
Cathy Campbell, Masters candidate. Vancouver Hosp/HSC,
Koerner Theatre, G279, 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-9595.
Lecture
Lu Xun's Individualism And His
Views Of National Character: Their
Historical Implications. Lin Yii-
sheng, Professor of Chinese History, U. of Wisconsin. Asian Centre 604, 4pm. Call 822-5728.
Linguistics Colloquium
Women, Men And Prestige Speech:
A Critical Review. Prof. Deborah
James, Buchanan penthouse,
3:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-
4256, 822-5594.
Graduate Colloquium Series
Accent And Beat-Class Tonics In
Steve Reich's Recent Music. Prof.
John Roeder, School of Music.
Music Library Seminar Room
400B, 3:30pm. Free. Open to public. Call 822-3588.
Grand Rounds
Gene Therapy For Cystic Fibrosis.
Dr. Pamela Zeitlin, Johns Hopkins
U., Dept. of Paediatrics. GF Strong
auditorium. 9am. Call 875-2307.
Saturday, Nov. 11
Vancouver Institute Lecture
Shaping Canada's Foreign Policy,
1968-84. Prof. Ivan Head, O.C.,
Faculty of Law and Dept. of Political Science. IRC#2, 8:15pm. Call
822-3131.	
Sunday, Nov. 12
Cultural Performance
Nehru Day Celebration. Goel Family Charitable Foundation. International House auditorium.  7-
10pm. Refreshments. Call 822-
3846/822-5021.	
Tuesday, Nov. 14
Seminar
Applications Of Matrix-Assisted
Laser Desorption Ionization Time-
Of-Flight Mass Spectrometry
(MALDI-TOF) To The Analysis Of
Biomolecules. Dr. Guenter
Eigendorf, director. BC Regional
Mass Spectrometry Centre. Dept.
of Chemistry. IRC#3, 12:30-
1:30pm. Calf822-4645.
Seminar
Environmental Planning In Developing Countries: Opportunities And Challenges. Dr. Patrick
Duffy. Environmental and Resource Management Consultant.
Lasserre 205. 12:30-1:30pm.
Free. Call 822-3914.
Seminar
Is There A Role For ACE Inhibitors In The Treatment Of Ischemic
Heart Disease? Peter Loewen,
Pharm.D. student, Division of
Clinical Pharmacy, Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Vancouver Hosp/HSC, Heather Pavilion lecture room B, 4:30-
5:30pm. Call 822-4645.
Astronomy Seminar
The Perigalactic Distances Of
Globular Clusters. Sidney van
den        Bergh, Dominion
Astrophysical Observatory. Geophysics & Astronomy 260. 4pm.
Refreshments from 3:30pm. Call
822-2267/822-2696.
Seminar
Structure And Biosynthesis Of
The Cell Walls Of Grasses. Dr.
Nick Carpita, Dept. of Botany,
Purdue U. BioSciences 2000,
12:30-1:30. Call 822-2133.
Seminar
Using Oxygen Isotopes To Follow
The Mackenzie Plume Under Ice
In Winter. A Look At Freshwater
And Salt Balance For An Arctic
Shelf. Dr. Rob MacDonald, Institute of Ocean Sciences, Sidney,
B.C. BioSciences 1465, 3:30pm.
Call 822-2821.
Centre for Applied Ethics/
School of Nursing Seminar
Series
Human Rights and Health Care.
Moderator, Joan Anderson,
School of Nursing. Angus 423, 4-
6pm. RSVP by Nov. 10 to 822-
5139. For information call 822-
7455.
Green College Speaker
Series
Expression Of Freedom: Free
Speech And The Production Of
Knowledge. Joel Bakan, Faculty
of Law. Green College recreation
lounge, 5:30-6:30pm. Reception
in Graham House 4:45-5:30pm.
Call 822-6067.
UBC REPORTS I
CALENDAR POLICY AND DEADLINES
The UBC Reports Calendar lists university-related or
university-sponsored events on campus and off campus within the Lower Mainland.
Calendar items must be submitted on forms available from the UBC Public Affairs Office. 310-6251 Cecil
Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1. Phone:
822-3131. Fax: 822-2684. Please limit to 35 words.
Submissions for the Calendar's Notices section may be
limited due to space.
Deadline for the November 16 issue of UBC Reports
— which covers the period November 19 to December 2
— is noon, November 7. UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995 7
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC GAZETTE
The Board ofGovernors took thefollowing actions at its meetings held on Mag
18. July 20 and October 5, 1995.
Strategic Planning and Property
The Board approved the 1995-96
cyclical maintenance budget, totalling
$6,089,000.
The Board approved the naming of the
Multitenant Facilities Building as the
"Gerald McGavin Building."
A policy on the posting of notices,
posters and signs was approved.
Finance
The Board approved a carry-forward of
general purpose operating funds for the
year ended March 31, 1995, in the
amount of $10,149,530.
The Financial Statements for the fiscal
year ended March 31, 1995, were
approved.
The General Purpose Operating Funds
Budget for 1995-96, and the strategy
reflected therein, was approved, and
the officers of the University were
instructed to operate in accordance
with the budget.
The Board approved cash advances to
the following departments, subject to
the departments agreeing to repay the
advance over a specified period.
(a) Athletic
Sport Services and Athletics
Sport Facilities to finance the
construction of the Five Court
Tennis Centre at Osborne Centre—
$750,000 over a period of two years.
(b) Parking Services to finance structural repairs to the Health Sciences
Parkade—$1.2 Million over a period
of seven years.
The [Board noted the Academic Equipment Fund grant of $3,421,488 for
1995/96 as a designated element
within the general purpose operating
grant, authorising its expenditure for
the stated purpose.
The Board approved allocation of the
$400,000 government grant for UBC's
partnerships with Okanagan University
College and University College of the
Cariboo as follows:
Arts $148,000
Science 148,000
Education 87,000
Central 17,000
The Board noted the Teacher Education Expansion Grant of $1,212,669 for
1995/96, approving its allocation to
the Faculty of Education.
The Board ratified the allocation of the
Co-operative Education grant
($121,895 to the Faculty of Applied
Science and $72,205 to the Faculty of
Science) for 1995-96.
Academic and Student Affairs
The agreement between the University
and the Faculty Association of the
University with respect to salaries and
economic benefits for the year July 1,
1994. to June 30. 1995, and for the
year July 1. 1995, to June 30, 1996,
was ratified.
The Framework Agreement reached
between the University of British
Columbia and the Association of
Administrative and Professional Staff
(AAPS) was approved.
The Board ratified the following memoranda of agreement:
• Union Local # 116—Five year collective agreement for the period April 1.
1994. to March 31, 1999.
• Union Local #2950—Five year
collective agreement for the period
April 2, 1994. to March 31, 1999.
• Union Local #2278—Five year
collective agreement for the period
September 2, 1994, to August 31,
1999.
• Children's Services Employees'
Union—3.5 year agreement for the
period November 1, 1994, to April
30, 1998.
The Board approved the Job Evaluation
Plan developed jointly by the University
and the Association of Administrative
and Professional Staff (AAPS)/
The Board approved a policy on
Postdoctoral Fellows with effect from
January 1, 1996, for all new appointments and any reappointments from
that date forward, and noted the
President's procedures for implementation and administration.
The Board limited the terms of appointment for Research Associates, Adjunct
Professors, and Clinical faculty members to not more than three years,
although the terms may be renewable.
The Policy on Research Grants during
periods other than study leave was
approved; and the President's procedures for implementation and administration were noted.
Acting on Senate recommendations, the
Board approved the following:
• Admission and enrolment quotas for
the various faculties and schools, as
approved by Senate:
• Curriculum proposals from the
Faculties of Applied Science. Arts,
Education, Graduate Studies. Law,
and Science
• Education Abroad Programs, as
recommended by Senate
• Diploma Program in Management of
Aquaculture Systems
• Amalgamation of the Westwater
Research Centre and the Graduate
Program in Resource Management
and Environmental Studies with
effect from July 1, 1995; the merged
unit to be called "Resource Management and Environmental Studies."
• Merging of the Departments of
Creative Writing and Theatre & Film
to form the Department of Theatre,
Film and Creative Writing.
The Board approved the following
Endowment Deeds:
• Amended Endowment Deed for the
Real Estate Foundation Junior
Professorships in Urban Land
Economics.
• Approval to reduce by $136,667 the
endowment capital of the Saudi
Arabian Medical Education Program
endowment. The funds will be
transferred to the Rheumatology
Research Endowment Fund.
• Faculty of Agricultural Sciences—
Chair in Animal Welfare Endowment
Deed
• Faculty of Forestry—Asa Johal
Graduate Fellowship in Forestry
Endowment Deed
• Faculty of Education Chair in the
Application of Media and Technology
in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education Endowment Deed
• Faculty of Education Chair in the
Application of Media and Technology
in Mathematics, Science and Technology Education Endowment Deed,
as amended.
• Thomas and Marguerite Mackay
Memorial Scholarship Endowment
Deed as amended.
• Transfer of the funds in the Chair in
Plant Biotechnology Endowment
Deed ($738.15) to the Faculty of
Science General Endowment.
Appointments
Board Chair:
• Ms. Barbara Crompton was reelected as Board Chair for the period
ending August 31, 1996
• Ms. Shirley Chan was elected as
Board Chair for the period September 1, 1996, to August 31. 1997
Vice Chairs:
• Ms. Shirley Chan, Vice Chair,
External, for the period ending
August 31, 1996
• Dr. William R. Cullen, Vice Chair,
Internal, for the period ending
August 31, 1996
Mr. Terry Sumner was appointed as
Vice President, Administration and
Finance for a four-year term from
January 1, 1996.
Professor Dennis Pavlich was appointed
as Associate Vice President. Academic
& Legal Affairs for the period September 1, 1995, through August 31, 1999.
Dr. Martha Salcudean was appointed as
Vice President Research pro tern, for the
period October 1, 1995, to December 31,
1995, or until a successor is in place.
Mr. R. Dumouchelle was appointed as
Acting Vice President, External Affairs,
for the period April 1 to September 30,
1995.
Dr. John H. V. Gilbert was appointed
as Co-ordinator of Health Sciences for
the period September 1, 1995, through
August 31, 1999.
Dr. Daniel R. Birch, Vice President and
Provost, was appointed as UBC's
additional nominee to the Hamber
Foundation's Board. The term will run
from the appointment date i.e. May 18.
1995, until the Foundation's next
Annual Meeting (February 1996) and
for two years thereafter.
Dr. David Measday, Associate Dean,
Faculty of Science and Professor of
Physics, was reappointed a member of
TRIUMF's Board of Management for the
period July 1. 1995, to June 30, 1998.
The Board approved appointments to
the Board of Directors of each of the
organisations listed below:
B.C. Cancer Agency
B.R. Centre Limited
Cedar Lodge Society
Discovery Foundation
Discovery Parks Inc.
IRIS
PAPRICAN
TRIUMF
UBC Faculty
Pension Plan
Board of Trustees
UBC Research
Enterprises Inc.
Vancouver Hospital
Other Business
Dr. D. Birch
Prof. D. Pavlich
Mr. T. Fogarassy
Dr. J.H.V. Gilbert
Dr. M- Salcudean
Mr. W. Palm
Dr. M. Salcudean
Dr. M. Salcudean
Dr. M. Salcudean
Prof. D. Pavlich
Dr. J. Emerman
Dr. M. Arcus
Mr. T. Fogarassy
Dr. M. Salcudean
Mr. D. Pavlich
Dr. D. Hardwick
The resignation of Mr. Dennis Pavlich
as a member of the Board with effect
from August 31, 1995, was noted and
the Secretary to the Board was requested to declare a vacancy in the
minutes of the Board as required under
Section 24 of the University Act.
The minutes of the open sessions of the
Board of Governors, dating from
January 1995, will be made available
on the Internet/World-Wide Web as of
early June. 1995. Board Secretary Nina
Robinson will co-ordinate the establishment and maintenance of the Board's
Internet homepage. The homepage will
include links to information on the
Board and its members, UBC Reports
gazette items, and Board minutes and
announcements. It can be accessed at
http:/ /unixg. ubc.ca: 780~bog/
board.htm as well as from View UBC.
May 1995
The Board of Governors at its meeting of
May 18. 1995 approved thefollowing
recommendations and received notice
about thefollowing items:
APPOINTMENTS
David J. Fairholm. Assistant Dean.
Faculty of Medicine, July 1, 1994 to
June 30, 1997.
Ashok Kotwal. Head, Department of
Economics, July 1, 1995 to June 30.
2000.
Cornells Van Breeman. Head, Department of Pharmacology & Therapeutics,
Mar 1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Zhaoming Xu, Assistant Professor,
School of Family & Nutritional Sciences, Jan 1. 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Christine Seaman, Assistant Professor, Department of Food Science. July
1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Sherry McKay, Assistant Professor,
School of Architecture, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1998.
Hua Jin, Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Antony J. Hodgson. Assistant Professor. Department of Mechanical Engineering, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
John Michael Archer, Assistant
Professor. Department of English, July
1. 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Patricia Louise Badir, Assistant
Professor, Department of English, July
1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Nancy Jane Hermiston. Assistant
Professor, School of Music, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Paul Bart ha. Assistant Professor,
Department of Philosophy, July 1.
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Deborah O'Connor, Instructor II,
School of Social Work, July 1. 1995 to
June 30, 1997.
Brian O'Neill, Assistant Professor,
School of Social Work, July 1. 1995 to
June 30, 1998.
Paul Courtright, Assistant Professor.
Department of Ophthalmology. Jan 1.
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Donald Douglas, Professor, Department of Chemistry, April 1, 1995
(tenured).
Changfeng Gui, Assistant Professor,
Department of Mathematics, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Ariel Zhitnitsky. Assistant Professor.
Department of Physics, July 1. 1995 to
June 30, 1998.
Paul Gustaf son. Assistant Professor,
Department of Statistics. July 1, 1995
to June 30, 1998.
CANCELLATIONS
Michael Brennan, Professor, Faculty of
Commerce & Business Administration,
July 1, 1995 (tenured).
J. Patricia Hughes. Associate Professor, Faculty of Commerce & Business
Administration, July 1, 1995 (tenured).
RESIGNATIONS
Andrew L. Mular. Professor, Department of Mining & Mineral Process
Engineering. Dec 30. 1995.
Makoto Saito. Assistant Professor,
Department of Economics, June 30.
1995.
Joel H. Kaplan. Professor, Department
of English, June 30, 1995.
Lesley Ellies. Assistant Professor,
Department of Clinical Dental Sciences.
April 30, 1995. 8 UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC GAZETTE
Wendy Wickwire, Assistant Professor,
Department of Educational Studies,
June 30, 1995.
Alison Dewar, Assistant Professor,
School of Human Kinetics, June 30,
1995.
Phillip Burton, Assistant Professor,
Department of Forest Sciences, June
30, 1995.
Steven L. Point, Assistant Professor,
Faculty of Law, June 30, 1995.
DEATH
The Board learned, with regret, the
death of:
William L.H. Shuter, Professor,
Department of Physics, March 19,
1995.
July 1995
The Board of Governors at its meeting of
July 1, 1995 approved thefollowing
recommendations and received notice
about thefollowing items.
APPOINTMENTS
Michael Davies, Associate Dean,
Faculty of Applied Science, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1996.
Sidney Mindess, Associate Dean,
Faculty of Applied Science, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1996.
Errol Durback. Associate Dean,
Facultyof Arts, Julyl 1, 1995 to June
30, 1996.
Derek R. Atkins, Associate Dean,
Faculty of Commerce, July 1,1 995 to
June 30, 1996.
Ethel Davis, Assistant Dean, Faculty of
Commerce, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Daniel F. Gardiner, Assistant Dean,
Faculty of Commerce. Sept 1. 1995 to
Aug 31, 1996.
Michael Alex MacNeil, Assistant Dean,
Faculty of Dentistry, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1997.
Philip L. Bryden, Associate Dean,
Faculty of Law, July 1, 1995 to June
30, 1997.
Robert D. Diebolt, Associate Dean,
Faculty of Law, July 1, 1995 to June
30, 1997.
James C. Hogg, Assistant Dean,
Faculty of Medicine, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1998.
Victor Ling, Assistant Dean, Faculty of
Medicine, June 1, 1995 to June 30,
1998.
Aubrey Tingle, Assistant Dean,
Faculty of Medicine, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1998.
Sie-Tan Chieng, Acting Head, Department of Bio-Resource Engineering, July
1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
Anthony Barrett, Head, Department of
Classical, Near Eastern and Religious
Studies, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1998.
Bryan Wade, Acting Head, Department
of Creative Writing, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1996.
David Elkins, Acting Head, Department of Political Science, July 1, 1995
to June 30, 1996.
Patricia Vertinsky, Head, Department
of Educational Studies, Sept 1, 1995 to
June 30, 2000.
Robert M. Miura, Acting Director,
Institute of Applied Mathematics, Jan
1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
Edward Piers, Acting Head, Department of Chemistry. July 1, 1995 to Dec
31, 1995.
Susan Elizabeth Samuels, Assistant
Professor, Department of Animal
Science, Jan 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Loretta Li, Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Reza Vaziri, Assistant Professor,
Department of Civil Engineering, July
1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Becky Ross, Assistant Professor,
Department of Anthropology and
Sociology, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1998.
Robert Cousland, Assistant Professor,
Department of Classical, Near Eastern
and Religious Studies, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1998.
Sneja Gunew, Professor, Department of
English, July 1, 1995 (tenured).
Alan Richardson, Assistant Professor,
Department of Philosophy, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Richard Vedan. Associate Professor,
School of Social Work, July 1, 1995
(tenured).
Werner Antweiler, Assistant Professor,
Faculty of Commerce, Jan 1, 1996 to
June 30, 1999.
Christina Sylka. General Librarian,
Faculty of Commerce, May 1, 1995 to
Apr 30, 1997.
David Coulter, Assistant Professor,
Department of Educational Studies,
July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Calvin D. Roskelley, Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
John J. Spinelli, Assistant Professor,
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1998.
Eric Hassall, Associate Professor.
Department of Paediatrics, July 1,
1995 (Grant Tenured).
Richard Stokes, Assistant Professor,
Department of Paediatrics, July 1.
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Victor Ling, Professor, Department of
Pathology, June 1, 1995 (Tenured).
Kerry Jang. Assistant Professor,
Department of Psychiatry, July 1. 1995
to June 30, 1998.
S. Larry Goldenberg, Associate
Professor, Department of Surgery, July
1, 1995 to June 30. 1998.
David Taylor. Associate Professor.
Department of Surgery, July 1. 1995 to
June 30, 1998.
Donna Maclntyre, Assistant Professor,
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, July
1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Phillip W. Kash, Assistant Professor,
Department of Chemistry, July 1. 1995
to June 30, 1998.
Michael O. Wolf, Assistant Professor.
Department of Chemistry, July 1, 1995
to June 30, 1998.
Douglas Scott, Assistant Professor,
Department of Geophysics and Astronomy/Physics, August 1, 1995 to
June 30. 1998.
Curtis Arnold Suttle, Associate
Professor, Department of Oceanography, Botany, and Microbiology, Sept 1.
1995  (tenured).
CHANGES TO HIRE DATE
Ariel Zhitnitsky, Assistant Professor.
Department of Physics, July 1. 1995 to
June 30, 1998 to Sept 1, 1995 to June
30, 1998.
RESIGNATIONS
Richard Poulin, Assistant Professor,
Department of Mining and Mineral
Process Engineering, Dec 31, 1995.
Ingrida Brenzinger, Senior Instructor,
Department of Linguistics, June 29,
1995.
John Stewart, Assistant Professor,
Department of Philosophy. June 29.
1995.
Alan C. Cairns, Professor, Department
of Political Science, June 29. 1995.
Michael Gerlach, Associate Professor,
Faculty of Commerce, June 30, 1995.
Mary Margiotta, Associate Professor,
Faculty of Commerce, June 30. 1995.
Sally M. Rogow, Professor, Department of Educational Psychology and
Special Education, June 29, 1995.
LeRoi Daniels, Professor, Department
of Educational Studies, June 29, 1995.
Robert G. Hindmarch, Professor,
School of Human Kinetics, June 29,
1995.
W. Robert Morford, Professor, School
of Human Kinetics, June 29, 1995.
Sydney J. Butler, Assistant Professor,
Department of Language Education,
June 29, 1995.
Joseph C. Smith, Professor, Law, June
29, 1995.
Vincent P. Sweeney, Professor,
Department of Medicine, June 29,
1995.
Sidney B. Effer, Professor, Department
of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, June
29, 1995.
Simon Dobson, Assistant Professor
(moves to Clinical position effective
July 1, 1995), Department of Paediatrics, June 30, 1995.
Glenn P. Taylor, Associate Professor,
Department of Pathology, June 30.
1995.
Lili C. Kopala, Assistant Professor,
Department of Psychiatry, Aug 31,
1995.
Naseem Amarshi, Assistant Professor,
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences,
June 30, 1995.
Glenda Meneilly, Assistant Professor.
Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences,
June 30, 1995.
DEATHS
John A. McDonald, Professor Emeritus, Department of Hispanic and
Italian Studies, May 21, 1995.
Paul Steiner, Professor, Department of
Wood Science, May 10, 1995.
Graham Elliston. Administrative
Librarian Emeritus, Library, May 17.
1995.
LEAVES OF ABSENCE
STUDY LEAVES
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
G. Cornells van Kooten, Department
of Agricultural Economics, July 1. 1995
to June 30. 1996.
Brian de Vries, School of Family &
Nutritional Sciences, July 1. 1995 to
June 30. 1996.
APPLIED SCIENCE
Richard Branion, Department of
Chemical Engineering, July 1, 1995 to
Dec 31, 1995.
Donald W. Thompson, Department of
Chemical Engineering, July 1, 1995 to
Dec 31. 1995.
Mabo R. Ito. Department of Electrical
Engineering. July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Don W. McAdam. Department of
Mechanical Engineering, July 1. 1995
to June 30. 1996.
Wendy A. Hall, School of Nursing, July
1, 1995 to June 30. 1996.
Virginia E. Hayes, School of Nursing,
Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
Angela D. Henderson, School of
Nursing, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Anna Marie Hughes, School of Nursing, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Linda G. Leonard, School of Nursing,
July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
M. Judith Lynam. School of Nursing,
July 1. 1995 to June 30, 1996.
M. Anne Wyness, School of Nursing,
Jan 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
ARTS
David Schweitzer, Department of
Anthropology & Sociology, Jan 1. 1996
to June 30. 1996.
Anthony J. Podlecki, Department of
Classical Studies, July 1, 1995 to June
30, 1996.
Terence J. Wales, Department of
Economics, July 1, 1995 to Dec 31,
1995.
Maureen P. Ryan, Department of Fine
Arts, July 1. 1995 to June 30. 1996.
Margaret E. North. Department of
Geography. July 1, 1995 to June 30.
1996.
Robert N. North, Department of Geography. July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Charles W. Humphries, Department of
History, Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
David Ingram. Department of Linguistics, Sept 1. 1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
Gregory G. Butler, School of Music,
July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997.
Vera Micznik, School of Music, July 1,
1995 to June 30. 1996.
Alan R. Thrasher, School of Music,
Jan 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
Eric J. Wilson, School of Music, July
1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Andrew Irvine, Department of Philosophy, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Thomas E. Patton, Department of
Philosophy, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Sharon Manson Singer, School of
Social Work, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
COMMERCE
Izak Benbasat, July 1, 1995 to June
30, 1996.
John D. Claxton, Jan 1, 1996 to June
30, 1996.
Maurice Levi, Jan 1, 1997 to Dec 31,
1997.
Michael W. Tretheway, Jan 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1995.
Gordon A. Walter, July 1, 1996 to
June 30, 1997.
DENTISTRY
Virginia M. Diewert, Department of
Clinical Dental Sciences, Jan 1, 1996
to June 30, 1996.
EDUCATION
Beth E. Haverkamp, Department of
Counselling Psychology. July 1, 1995
to June 30, 1996.
Marvin J. Westwood, Department of
Counselling Psychology, Jan 1, 1996 to
June 30, 1996.
Donald Fisher, Department of Educational Studies, July 1, 1996 to June
30, 1997.
Janet Jamieson, Department of
Educational Psychology and Special
Education, Jan 1, 1996 to Aug 31,
1996.
Nand Kishor. Department of Educational Psychology and Special Education, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Wendy Frisby, School of Human
Kinetics, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
LAW
Joel Conrad Bakan, Jan 1, 1996 to
June 30, 1996.
William Black, July 1, 1995 to Dec 31,
1995.
Donald J. Egleston. July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1996.
Marlee Kline, Jan 1, 1996 to June 30,
1996.
Stephan M. Salzberg, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1996.
MEDICINE
Carolyn E. Johnson. School of Audiology and Speech Sciences, July 1, 1995
to June 30, 1996.
Ross MacGillivray, Department of
Biochemistry, Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31,
1996.
Robert E. Modrow, Department of
Health Care and Epidemiology, Jan 1,
1996 to June 30, 1996.
C. Van Netten, Department of Health
Care and Epidemiology, Jan 1, 1996 to
Dec 31, 1996.
Joseph K.H. Tan, Department of
Health Care and Epidemiology, July 1,
1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
Robert M .Douglas, Department of
Ophthalmology, Jan 1, 1995 to Dec 31,
1995.
Steven R. Vincent, Department of
Psychiatry, Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31,
1995.
Isabel Dyck, School of Rehabilitation
Sciences, Jan 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
Susan R. Harris, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jan 1, 1996 to Dec 31,
1996.
Margaret J. McCuaig, School of
Rehabilitation Sciences, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1996.
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
James E. Axelson, Sept 1, 1995 to Aug
31, 1996.
SCIENCE
Jack Reiser Maze, Department of
Botany, July 1, 1996 to June 30, 1997. UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995 9
UBC OPEN HOUSE. OCTOBER 13-14-15
S1
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
To the UBC Family:
It is our distinct pleasure to sincerely thank, and commend, each of you for your significant
contributions toward the success of Open House '95.
Your superb collective efforts in preparing for, and presenting, the campus-wide event Oct. 13-14-
15 resulted in one of the most memorable public functions UBC has ever staged.
Your hard work defined the meaning of esprit de corps, and at the same time enabled us to
showcase for our many constituents the diverse academic programs which are preparing our
students—our leaders of tomorrow—for the challenges ofthe 21st century.
This was accomplished through the presentation of more than 400 faculty exhibits (three times
more things to see than at our last Open House in 1990) and we thank the 2,500 students, faculty and
staff members who conceived, structured and presented these vibrant and creative displays.
Similarly, we applaud the 350 students who served as infrastructure volunteers, staffing our nine
information booths and four shuttle buses and assisting in traffic and parking. We also acknowledge
the vital contributions of UBC's permanent facilities and support groups.
Commercial sponsors and the media also played a major role in our success, and we are most
appreciative of their generous support.
Finally, we thank the many thousands of visitors who joined us, including approximately 6,000
elementary and secondary students on Student Day, Friday, October 13.
Judging from the comments we received over the entire weekend, our visitors found Open House
to be "fascinating," "educational" and "informative."
The UBC family, in other words, fulfilled its mandate.
Welldone, evervnnel OPEN HOUSE
, everyone
Robert H. Lee,
Chancellor
David W. Strangway,
President
Barbara Crompton,
Chair, Board of Governors 10 UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995
{&/ (j^/ <W THANKYOU UBC      r^/   (g/ ®f
Hats off to yoU-B-C
The campus community came
together to greet thousands of
visitors to UBC during the three-
day Open House '95 event, October 13-15.
"Open House was a great success," said UBC President David
Strangway, who attributed much
of the success to the co-operation of the faculties and departments, and to the hundreds of
volunteers who worked preparing exhibits, organizing events
and helping out during the event.
"The thing that really impressed me was the effort that
everybody put into this. It was a
huge effort."
More than 400 exhibits and
attractions were set up across
campus, from the Museum of
Anthropology at the north end of
campus to TRIUMF in the south.
Although attendance estimates vary, several areas of cam
pus were particularly busy either for the entire three-day
event, or during specific events.
Kids' World gave out 3,000
name tags to child visitors during Open House, and there were
often lineups for the Chemistry
Magic Show.
The ever-popular Apple Festival at the UBC Botanical Garden
drew nearly 6,000 apple fans
and sold about 6,300 kilograms
of apples.
'The Apple Festival touches
the need to celebrate harvest, to
celebrate the end of a season. It
seems to meet that need in urban
people," said Anne Gartshore,
Apple Festival co-ordinator.
Meanwhile, across campus at
the Surplus Equipment Recycling Facility (SERF), people were
lining up to satisfy the need for
office furniture, computer equipment and other university sur
plus at the SERF Supersale.
SERF manager Vince Grant
said the one-day sale brought in
close to $20,000 and that further sales were sure to follow as
a result ofthe Open House exposure.
"Now a lot of people who had
never heard of SERF before Open
House know about us. We're going
to have spill-over sales for several
weeks," he said. Grant said he is
considering holding two large SERF
sales per year after witnessing the
sale's popularity.
A sampling of visitors' comments suggested interactive or
hands-on displays were the most
popular and many areas received
enthusiastic reviews.
Many ofthe suggestions from
volunteers and visitors will be
used to help make the next Open
House better still.
Winner of the Open House
Grand Prize, a 1995 Honda
Odyssey valued at $30,000,
is Carolina Mora of Surrey,
who entered the free draw at
Safeway.
"I actually liked Open
House a lot. I'd like to
have more contact
with people in science
in the future." - visitor
Children exhausted themselves, and the
student volunteers, playing a variety of
games on Maclnnes Field during the three-
day Open House event in October. More
than 3,000 children visited Kids' World for
educational and fun encounters with science,
art, sports and music.
Stephen Forgacs photo
Student volunteers helped Open House
visitors navigate their way around the
campus and among the more than 400
events.
Alastaif Bird photo UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995 11
r&f (^/ {&/  THANKYOU UBC      @/   ^/ {&/
"There was one little
girl, about four years
old, who kept coming
back. She wanted to
see all the pictures in
the microbiology book
She told me that she
found out today that
cows were actually
soft, She used to think
they were hard."
- volunteer
"Every person we met
was friendly, helpful
and informative. We
had a wonderful time.'
- visitor
"It was a blast. My best
job was trying to
convince a kid math is
fun." - volunteer
Dr. Richard Loonier, a clinical professor in Orthopaedics,
guides a visitor through laparoscopic surgery techniques on
a dummy knee.
Gavin Wilson photo
Gavin Wilson photo
Computer Science graduate
student Don Murray
demonstrates how Spinoza,
a mobile autonomous robot,
can track the movement of a
ball and then chase it.
Gavin Wilson photo
enjoyed explaining
things to people,
especially the kids who
were often very
excited by what they
Saw." - volunteer
really enjoyed it,
finding it hard to leave
the display once I
arrived there. I spent 10
hours helping out
instead of two as
planned." -   volunteer
The virtual reality stationary bike was one of the star
attractions at the Bird Coop, the exercise room in the
Student Recreation Centre, which officially opened on the
first day of Open House.
"I thought this year was
a great success
because lots of kids
came out (entire
families). This was good
for promoting science
and education."
- volunteer
- r Bird photo 12 UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995
UBC OPEN HOUSE. OCTOBER 13 -14 -15
Premier Sponsors
Coca-Cola Bottling Ltd.
Lower Mainland Honda Dealers
The Vancouver Sun
BCTV
Promotional and Media Sponsors
BC TEL Mobility
Benndorf Verster
Canadian Airlines International
Canon
Safeway
Toshiba
CFOX
CHMB
CKNW
TV WEEK
Z95.3
Corporate Sponsors
Apple Canada Inc.
Dairyland
Priceless Copies
Artcraft Advertising Ltd.
ICBC
UBC Chancellor Robert H. Lee
C Ministry of Employment
MOCO Canda
Xerox the Document Company
and Investment
Sponsors of volunteer draw prizes
Alma Mater Society
Blackcomb
Boston Pizza
Cambie Hotel
Fitness Group
Fitness World
Great Wilderness Company
Kernels Richmond Centre
Molson Breweries
Noteworthy Music
Papi's Ristorante
Parks Canada
Purdy's
Science World
Spectra Group Restaurants
Star Anise
Vancouver Aquarium
Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra
The University of British Columbia
sincerely thanks all ofthe above-named
companies for their generous contributions
toward the success of Open House '95
Serious fun2 for the entire family
UBC
OPEN HOUSE
an Odyssey
|OCTOBEM3,l4,l5,l995l
White Spot Restaurants
UBC Asian Centre
UBC Athletics
UBC Bookstore
UBC Intramurals
UBC Parking and Security UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995 13
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC GAZETTE
Thomas Cavalier-Smith, Department
of Botany, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Frank J.R. Taylor, Department of
Botany and Oceanography, Sept 1,
1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
Uri Ascher, Department of Computer
Science, Jan 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
Alain Fournier, Department of Computer Science, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Carolo Giovanella, Department of
Geological Sciences, Jan 1, 1996 to
June 30, 1996.
Richard L. Chase, Department of
Geological Sciences and Oceanography,
Jan 1, 1996 to Dec 31, 1996.
Garry K.C. Clarke, Department of
Geophysics and Astronomy, Sept 1,
1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
Richard Anstee. Department of
Mathematics, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
David W. Boyd, Department of Mathematics, Jan 1, 1996 to June 30, 1996.
Richard Froese, Department of
Mathematics. July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Rajiv Gupta, Department of Mathematics, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Philip Daniel Loewen. Department of
Mathematics, July 1. 1995 to June 30.
1996.
Erhard Luft. Department of Mathematics. Sept 1. 1995 to Aug 31. 1996.
Paul J. Harrison. Department of
Oceanography and Botany, July 1,
1995 to Dec 31. 1995.
G.G.E. Scudder, Department of
Zoology, July 1. 1995 to Dec 31. 1995.
VICE PRESIDENT STUDENT
& ACADEMIC SERVICES
Beverley Scott. Library, July 1, 1995
to June 30. 1996.
CANCELLATIONS OF STUDY LEAVES
ARTS
Dennis Danielson, Department of
English. July 1. 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Mark Vessey. Department of English.
Sept 1. 1995 to Aug 31. 1996.
COMMERCE & BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
Maurice Levi. July 1, 1995 to June 30.
1996.
Gordon A. Walter, Jan 1, 1995 to Dec-
Si. 1995.
EDUCATION
Robert Chester. Department of
Language Education. July 1, 1995 to
June 30. 1996.
CHANGES TO STUDY LEAVES
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
F.B. Holl, Department of Plant Science,
July 1, 1995 to June 30. 1996 to July
1, 1995 to Feb 29. 1996.
APPLIED SCIENCE
Dino Rapanos. School of Architecture.
July 1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1995 to July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1996.
J.S. Laskowski. Department of Mining
and Mineral Process Engineering. July
1, 1995 to June 30, 1996 to Jan 1,
1996 to June 30, 1996.
APPLIED SCIENCE/FORESTRY
Johnathan Fannin, Department of
Civil Engineering and Forest Resource
Management, Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31.
1996 to Jan 1, 1996 to Dec 31, 1996.
ARTS
Robert Young. Department of Fine
Arts. Jan 1, 1995 to June 30. 1995 to
Jan 1, 1995 to June 30. 1995.
Christine Rouget, Department of
French, July 1, 1995 to June 30. 1996
to Jan 1. 1996 to Dec 31. 1996.
Thomas Patton. Department of
Philosophy, July 1. 1995 to June 30.
1996 to Jan 1, 1996 to Dec 31. 1996.
Ken Carty, Department of Political
Science, Jan 1, 1996 to Dec 31. 1996
to Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
COMMERCE
Gordon A. Walter, Jan 1, 1995 to Dec
31, 1995 to July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
LAW
Robin Elliott M., July 1, 1994 to June
30, 1995 to July 1, 1994 to June 18,
1995.
MEDICINE
Bill Nelems, Department of Surgery,
Septl, 1994 to Aug 31, 1995 to Sept 1,
1994 to June 30, 1995.
SCIENCE
Felix Aubke, Department of Chemistry,
Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31, 1996 to July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1996.
OTHER LEAVES
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES
James A. Vercammen, Department of
Agricultural Economics, July 1, 1995
to June 30, 1996.
ARTS
Graham Johnson, Department of
Anthropology and Sociology, Sept 1,
1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
Don Baker. Department of Asian
Studies, July 1. 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Keizo Nagatani, Department of Economics, July 1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
John O'Brian. Department of Fine
Arts, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Andrew Dawes, School of Music, July
1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
COMMERCE
Jonathan Berk, Sept 1, 1995 to Aug
31. 1996.
Piet de Jong, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
Murray Frank, July 1. 1995 to June
30. 1996.
Michael Tretheway. July 1. 1995 to
Dec 31, 1995.
CONTINUING STUDIES
Carole Trepanier. Mar 20, 1995 to Feb
29. 1996.
IAW
Ian Townsend-Gault, June 1, 1995 to
May 31, 1996.
MEDICINE
Elizabeth Akesson, Department of    ,
Anatomy, June 1, 1995 to Aug 31,
1995.
Ian Clark-Lewis. Biochemistry/
Biomedical Research Centre, July 1,
1995 to June 30. 1996.
Michael Hope. Department of Medicine, July 1. 1995 to June 30. 1996.
Roger Sutton. Department of Medicine. Jan 1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES
Ross Tsuyuki, Sept 1, 1995 to July 31,
1996.
SCIENCE
Joel Feldman. Department of Mathematics. July 1. 1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
Sandra Bridgman, Department of
Microbiology, June 1, 1995 to May 31.
1996.
CHANGES TO OTHER LEAVES
LAW
Robin Elliot M., July 1. 1995 to June
30, 1997 to June 19, 1995 to June 30,
1997.
ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVES
ARTS
Robert Kubicek, Department of
History, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Paul Mosca. Department of Religious
Studies. July 1, 1995 to June 30.
1996.
DENTISTRY
Marcia Boyd. Department of Clinical
Dental Science, July 1, 1995 to June
30, 1996.
EDUCATION
William A. Borgen. Department of
Counselling Psychology, Sept 1, 1995
to Aug 31. 1996.
David Robitaille. Department of
Curriculum Studies. Sept 1, 1995 to
Feb 29, 1996.
Ron Neufeld, Distance Education, Sept
1, 1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
Jane Gaskell, Department of Educational Studies, July 1, 1995 to June
30, 1996.
John Willinsky. Department of Language Education, July 1, 1995 to Dec
31, 1995.
MEDICINE
John Livesley, Department of Psychiatry, Jan 1, 1997 to Dec 31, 1997.
SCIENCE
James Varah, Department of Computer Science, July 1, 1996 to June 30,
1997.
CHANGES TO ADMINISTRATIVE
LEAVES
EDUCATION
Robert Schutz, School of Human
Kinetics, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996
to Jan 1, 1996 to Dec 31, 1996.
GRADUATE STUDIES
Michael Healey, Westwater Research
Centre, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996
to Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31, 1996.
MEDICINE
Judith Johnston. School of Audiology
& Speech Sciences, Jan 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1995 to Jan 1, 1995 to May
31. 1995.
The following is a list of recommendations for promotions to the rank of
Assistant Professor. Associate Professor,
and Professor; and tenure effective
July 1, 1995:
PROMOTION FROM
SENIOR INSTRUCTOR TO
ASSISTANT PROFESSOR
Paul Burns, Religious Studies
PROMOTION TO
ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR
P. Adebar, Civil Engineering (with
tenure)
Ann Anderson, Curriculum Studies
(with tenure)
David Austin, Mathematics (with
tenure)
Philip Austin, Geography (with tenure)
Tony Bai, Medicine (with grant tenure)
Daniela Boccassini, Hispanic & Italian
Studies (with tenure)
Catherine Burnett. Theatre and Film
(with tenure)
Robert Carlisle, Curriculm Studies
John Church, Anatomy (with tenure)
Millie Creighton. Anthropology/
Sociology (with tenure)
Dana Devine, Pathology & Laboratory
Medicine(with grant tenure)
Glen Donaldson, Faculty of Commerce
(with tenure)
Sheldon Duff, Chemical Engineering
(with tenure)
Isabel Dyck. School of Rehabilitation
Science
Susanna Egan, English (with tenure)
P. Englezos, Chemical Engineering
(with tenure)
Mark, Fizgerald, Medicine (with grant
tenure)
Nancy Frelick. French (with tenure)
William French. History (with tenure)
Wendy Frisby, School of Human
Kinetics (with tenure)
Louise Glass, Botany (with tenure)
Peter Gouzouasis, Curriculum Studies
Sheldon Green, Mechanical Engineering
S. Hatzikiriakos. Chemical Engineering (with tenure)
Daniel Hiebert. Geography
Murray Hodgson. Occupational
Hygiene Program/Mechanical Engineering (with tenure)
York Hsiang, Surgery (with grant
tenure)
Rita Irwin, Curriculum Studies (with
tenure)
Anna Kindler, Curriculum Studies
(with tenure)
Nand Kishor, Educational Psychology
& Special Education (with tenure)
Lili Kopala. Psychiatry (with grant
tenure)
Charles Krieger, Medicine (with grant
tenure)
Edward Kruk. Social Work (with
tenure)
Carl Leggo, Language Education (with
tenure)
Kenneth Lum. Fine Arts (with tenure)
Timothy McDaniels. School of Community & Regional Planning/Westwater
Research Centre  (with tenure)
Ian McKendry, Geography (with
tenure)
Thomas Maness, Wood Science (with
tenure)
Bruce Miller. Anthropology/Sociology
(with tenure)
Joshua Mostow, Asian Studies (with
tenure)
Vasanttilak Naik, Faculty of Commerce (with tenure)
James Nason, Economics (with tenure)
Kyung Ae Park. Institute of Asian
Research/Political Science (with
tenure)
Terence Phang. Surgery
Richard Poulin. Mining and Mineral
Process Engineering (with tenure)
Ian Pratt, Theatre & Film
Ivan Sadowski. Biochemistry/Molecular Biology (with tenure)
R.S.E. Salcudean. Electrical Engineering (with tenure)
Carl Seger. Computer Science (with
tenure)
Peter Seixas. Curriculum Studies (with
tenure)
Christopher Shaw, Ophthalmology
William Strange. Faculty of Commerce
(with tenure)
Scott Taylor. Economics (with tenure)
Robin Turner, Biotechnology Laboratory/Electrical Engineering (with
tenure)
Raman Uppal. Faculty of Commerce
(with tenure)
Carlos Ventura, Civil Engineering (with
tenure)
Mark Vessey, English (with tenure)
Michael Ward, Mathematics (with
tenure)
Carson Woo, Faculty of Commerce
Michael Zeitlin. English (with tenure)
PROMOTION TO PROFESSOR
I. Susan Barr, School of Family &
Nutritional Sciences
Peter Boothroyd. School of Community and Regional Planning
Laurel Brinton. English
Helen Burt. Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences
S. T. Chieng. Bio-Resource Engineering
Christopher Clark, Clinical Dental
Science
Peter Danielson, Philosophy
Albert Dexter, Faculty of Commerce
Leah Edelstein-Keshet, Mathematics
Peter Graf, Psychology
Ray Hall, Theatre & Film
Clyde Hertzman. Health Care &
Epidemiology
Nicholas Hudson. English
Edward Hundert, History
Lawrence Jones, Faculty of Commerce
Robert Kiefl, Physics
Wolfgang Linden, Psychology
Jo-Ann McEachern, French
Barbara McGillivray, Medical Genetics
David McLean, Medicine
Dianne Newell. History
Christopher Orvig, Chemistry
David Ostrow, Medicine
Geraldine Pratt, Geography
Moura Quayle, School of Architecture/
Plant Science
R. Rajamahendran, Animal Science
Jeremy Road, Medicine
Mary Russell. School of Social Work
G.F. Schrack. Electrical Engineering
Douw Steyn, Geography
Roger Tonkin, Paediatrics
Alan Tully, History 14 UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC GAZETTE
Bart Van der Kamp, Forest Sciences
Yair Wand, Faculty of Commerce
TENURE
P. Adebar, Civil Engineering (as
Associate Professor)
Ann Anderson, Curriculum Studies (as
Associate Professor)
David Austin, Mathematics (as Associate Professor)
Philip Austin, Geography (as Associate
Professor)
Tony Bai, Medicine (as Associate
Professor)
Daniela Boccassini, Hispanic & Italian
Studies (as Associate Professor)
Joan Bottorff. School of Nursing
Catherine Burnett. Theatre and Film
(as Associate Professor)
John Church. Anatomy (as Associate
Professor)
Millie Creighton, Anthropology/
Sociology (as Associate Professor)
Dana Devine, Pathology & Laboratory
Medicine(as Associate Professor)
Glen Donaldson, Faculty of Commerce
(as Associate Professor)
Sheldon Duff, Chemical Engineering
(as Associate Professor)
Susanna Egan, English (as Associate
Professor)
P. Englezos. Chemical Engineering (as
Associate Professor)
Mark Fizgerald. Medicine (as Associate
Professor)
Nancy Frelick, French (as Associate
Professor)
William French, History (as Associate
Professor)
Wendy Frisby, School of Human
Kinetics (as Associate Professor)
Louise Glass, Botany (as Associate
Professor)
S. Hatzikiriakos, Chemical Engineering (as Associate Professor)
Iain Higgins, English
Murray Hodgson, Occupational
Hygiene Program/Mechanical Engineering (as Associate Professor)
York Hsiang, Surgery (as Associate
Professor)
Rita Irwin. Curriculum Studies (as
Associate Professor)
Janet Jamieson, Educational Psychology and Special Education
Anna Kindler. Curriculum Studies (as
Associate Professor)
Nand Kishor. Educational Psychology
and Special Education (as Associate
Professor)
Lili Kopala, Psychiatry (as Associate
Professor)
Charles Krieger. Medicine (as Associate Professor)
Edward Kruk, Social Work (as Associate Professor)
Nancy Langton. Faculty of Commerce
R.W. Lawrence, Mining and Mineral
Process Engineering
Carl Leggo, Language Education (as
Associate Professor)
Kenneth Lum, Fine Arts (as Associate
Professor)
Brendan McCabe, Faculty of Commerce
Timothy McDaniels. School of Community & Regional Planning/Westwater
Research Centre (as Associate Professor)
Ian McKendry, Geography (as Associate Professor)
Enrique Manchon, Hispanic & Italian
Studies (as Senior Instructor)
Thomas Maness. Wood Science (as
Associate Professor)
Alan Martin. School of Human Kinetics
Bruce Miller. Anthropology/Sociology
(as Associate Professor)
Joshua Mostow. Asian Studies (as
Associate Professor)
Vasanttilak Naik, Faculty of Commerce (as Associate Professor)
James Nason, Economics (as Associate
Professor)
Kenneth Poskitt, Radiology
Richard Poulin, Mining and Mineral
Process Engineering (as Associate
Professor)
Ivan Sadowski, Biochemistry/Molecular Biology (as Associate Professor)
Hassan Salari. Medicine
R.S.E. Salcudean, Electrical Engineering (as Associate Professor)
Carl Seger, Computer Science (as
Associate Professor)
Peter Seixas, Curriculum Studies (as
Associate Professor)
William Strange, Faculty of Commerce
(as Associate Professor)
Scott Taylor, Economics (as Associate
Professor)
Frank Tester, School of Social Work
Robin Turner, Biotechnology/
LaboratoryElectrical Engineering (as
Associate Professor)
Raman Uppal. Faculty of Commerce
(as Associate Professor)
Carlos Ventura, Civil Engineering (as
Associate Professor)
Mark Vessey, English (as Associate
Professor)
Michael Ward, Mathematics (as
Associate Professor)
Jerzy Wojtowicz, School of Architecture
Michael Zeitlin. English (as Associate
Professor)
October 1995
The Board of Governors at its meeting of
October 5, 1995 approved thefollowing
recommendations and received notice
about thefollowing items.
Gerald Gorn, Associate Dean, Faculty
of Commerce and Business Administration, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Antal Kozak, Associate Dean, Faculty of
Forestry, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
John A. McLean, Associate Dean,
Faculty of Forestry, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1996.
William A. Webber, Coordinator Health
Sciences, July 1, 1995 to Aug 31,
1995.
John H.V. Gilbert. Coordinator Health
Sciences. Sept 1. 1995 to Aug 31,
1999.
David Holm. Associate Dean, Faculty
of Science. July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1996.
David Measday. Associate Dean,
Faculty of Science, July 1. 1995 to
June 30, 1996.
Judith Myers, Associate Dean, Faculty
of Science, July 1. 1995 to June 30,
1996.
John Sams. Associate Dean, Faculty of
Science. July 1. 1995 to June 30. 1996.
John Vanderstoep, Acting Head,
Department of Food Science. July 1,
1995 to June 30. 1996.
Arthur A. Bomke. Acting Head,
Department of Soil Science, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1996.
Bonita Long, Acting Head, Department
of Counselling Psychology, July 1, 1995
to Aug 31. 1995.
Richard Young, Head, Department of
Counselling Psychology, Sept 1, 1995
to Aug 31. 2000.
Robert Schutz. Director, School of
Human Kinetics, July 1, 1995 to Dec
31, 1995.
Terence G. McGee, Director, Institute
of Asian Research, July 1, 1995 to
June 30. 1996.
Frederick Mikelberg, Acting Head,
Department of Opthamology, Oct-1,
1995 to Apr 30. 1996.
Jack Root man. Head. Department of
Opthamology, Julv 1. 1995 to June 30.
2001.
Peter Wing, Acting Head, Department
of Orthopaedics, July 1, 1995 to Sept
30, 1995.
Judith Hall. Head. Department of
Paediatrics. July 1. 1995 to June 30,
2000.
Robert Woodham. Head, Department
of Computer Science, July 1. 1995 to
June 30. 2000.
J. Leslie Smith. Acting Head, Department of Geological Sciences, Apr 15,
1995 to June 30. 1996.
Alan G. Lewis, Acting Head. Department of Oceanography, July 1, 1995 to
June 30. 1996.
Peggy Thompson. Assistant Professor,
Department of Creative Writing, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Daphna V. Arbel. Instructor, Department of Religious Studies, July 1. 1995
to June 30, 1997.
Gerardo Maupome, Assistant Professor,
Department of Clinical Dental Science,
Sept 1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Stephen Forgacs photo
Birds Of A
Feather
Members of UBC's Board of
Governors and other members of
the UBC community check out the
equipment in the new fitness
facility in the recently opened
Student Recreation Centre. Present
were (back row, l-r) Harold Kalke;
Tong Louie; Shirley Chan; William
Cullen; Chair Barbara Crompton;
Michael Partridge; Marion York;
Intramurals co-ordinator Nestor
Korchinsky; Tom Berger; Dan Birch,
vice-president. Academic and
Provost; Sonya Lumholst-Smith,
campus recreation co-ordinator;
(front row, l-r) Heather Hermant;
Michael Hughes; Maria Klawe, vice-
president, Student and Academic
Services; and Nina Robinson,
secretary to the Board.
Christopher Wyatt, Assistant Professor, Department of Clinical Dental
Science, Jan 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999.
Aslam H. Anis, Assistant Professor,
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1998.
Dean H. Uyeno, Associate Professor,
Department of Health Care and Epidemiology. Aug 1, 1995 (tenured).
Shoo Kim Lee, Associate Professor,
Department of Paediatrics, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Ismail Laher, Assistant Professor,
Department of Pharmacology and
Therapeutics, July 1, 1995 to June 30,
1998.
Grant Iverson, Assistant Professor,
Department of Psychiatry, Aug 14,
1995 to June 30, 1998.
Anne Carswell, Associate Professor,
School of Rehabilitation Sciences, July
1, 1996 (tenured).
Lynn Stothers, Assistant Professor,
Department of Surgery, July 1, 1995 to
June 30, 1998.
Gene A. Joseph, Administrative Librarian, Library, First Nations House of
Learning, Sept 1, 1995 to Aug 31, 1997.
CHANGES TO HIRE DATE
Zhaoming Xu, Assistant Professor,
School of Family and Nutritional
Sciences, Jan 1, 1996 to June 30, 1999
to Nov 1, 1995 to June 30, 1998.
Loretta Li, Assistant Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1998 to Aug 21, 1995
to June 30, 1998.
Curtis Arnold Suttle, Associate
Professor, Department of Oceanography, Sept 1, 1995 (tenured) to Jan 1,
1996 (tenured).
RESIGNATIONS
Vasu Krishnamurthy, Assistant
Professor, Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration, June 30,
1995.
Dean H. Uyeno, Associate Professor,
Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration, July 31, 1995.
Joseph Zechner, Associate Professor,
Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration, July 31, 1995.
Carole Trepanier, Continuing Studies
Program Director, Centre for Continuing Studies, Aug 31, 1995.
Rita Watson, Associate Professor,
Department of Educational Psychology
and Special Education, Aug 31, 1995.
Mark Fruin, Director (appointment as
Professor continues), Institute of Asian
Research, June 30, 1995.
Dr. Yuanhong (Robin) Ma, Assistant
Professor, Faculty of Medicine, August
31, 1995.
Martin P.R. Walker, Assistant Professor, Department of Obstetrics and
Gynaecology, Aug 15, 1995.
Douglas J. Courtemanche, Assistant
Professor (appointed as Clinical Assistant Professor July 1, 1995), Department of Surgery, June 30, 1995.
Susan Kieffer. Head (appointment as
Professor continues), Department of
Geological Sciences. Apr 15, 1995.
K.W. Savigny, Associate Professor.
Department of Geological Sciences. Aug
31, 1995.
Rodrigo A. Restrepo, Professor,
Department of Mathematics, Dec 30,
1995.
Robert C. Miller, Jr., Vice President
Research, Vice President Research,
Sept 30, 1995.
DEATHS
Danilo Aguzzi-Barbagli, Professor
Emeritus, Department of Hispanic and
Italian Studies, August 1995
Ronald F. Jarman, Professor, Department of Educational Psychology and
Special Education, August 29, 1995.
Vladimar J. Okulich, Dean Emeritus,
Faculty of Science, Aug 31, 1995. UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995 15
Calendar
November 5 through November 18
Green College Speaker
Series
Through Canada With A Kodak.
Marjorie Harper. Lecturer in History, U. of Aberdeen. Green College recreation lounge. 7:30-9pm.
Call 822-6067.
Wednesday, Nov. 15
Seminar
On The Margins Of Marginality:
Low Income Single Mothers In
Search Of Shelter In
Guadalajara, Mexico. Faranak
Miraftab, Killam Postdoctorate.
School of Community and Regional Planning, Centre for Human Settlements. Centre for Research In Women's Studies and
Gender Relations, 3:30-5pm.
Free. Call 822-9171.
Microbiology and
Immunology Seminar
Series
The Molecular Pathogenesis of
Aeromonas Salmonicida, The
Causitave Of Fish Furunculosis.
Dr. Bill Kay, Dept. of Biochemistry and Microbiology, U of Victoria. Wesbrook 201, 12-1:30pm.
Call 822-3308.
Ecology Seminar
Intraspecific Genetic Variation
Revealed In Interspecific Hybrids.
Michael Wade, Biology, U. of Chicago. Family/Nutritional Sciences 60, 4:30pm. Host. Dr.
Judy Myers. Refreshments Hut
B8, 4:10pm. Call 822-3957.
Scholarly Colloquia
Doctoral Programs In The United
Kingdom. Wendy Hall and Angela
Henderson, School of Nurshing.
Vancouver Hosp/HSC. T206,
4:30-5:30. Free. Call 822-7453.
Green College Writer-in-
Residence
"Gender In Theatre: Writing
Women Characters, Writing For
Women Actors. Writing About
Women's Issues And Contemporary Women Playwrights. Sue
Ashby. English playwright. Green
College recreation lounge, 7:30-
9:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Department of Geography
Colloquium
The Pinotubo Eruption And Climate: An Investigation Using A
General Circulation Model. Lionel
Pandolfo, Oceanography. Geography 201, 3:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-4929.
Opera Panel Discussion
Mozart's Cosi Fan Tutte. Susan
Bennett, Vancouver Opera, Floyd
St. Clair, French, John Mitchell,
Vancouver Opera and Andrew
Busza, English. Buchanan Penthouse, 12:30pm. Call 822-4060.
Senate
The Third Regular Meeting Of
The Senate, UBC's Academic Parliament. Curtis 102, 8pm. Call
822-2951.
Noon Hour Concert
The Yaletown String Quartet.
Music recital hall. 12:30pm.
$2.50 at the door. Call 822-5574.
Theatre Performance
The Importance Of Being Earnest by Oscar Wilde. Until Nov.
25. Frederic Wood Theatre. 8pm.
Three play season tickets still
available. Preview Wed. 2 for $12.
For reservations and ticket information call 822-2678 or 822-
3880.
Orthopaedics Grand
Rounds
Non-Operative Management of
Tibial Fractures. Dr. Piotr
Blachut. Eye Care Centre auditorium, 7am. Call 875-4272.
Thursday, Nov. 16
Critical Issues in Global
Development Seminar
Computer Technology And Multimedia: A Tool For Third World
Development? A Case Study In
Nepal. Dr. Hans Schreier, Depts.
of Soil Science and Resource Management and Environmental Studies. Green College recreation
lounge, 8-10pm. Call 822-6067.
Genetics Graduate Program
Seminar
High Fluorescence Mutants Of
Arabidopsis—Tools For Studying
Nuclear Control Of Chloroplast
Gene Expression. Dr. Beverley
Green, Dept. of Botany. Wesbrook
201, 4:30pm. Call 822-8764.
Earth Sciences Seminar
The Canadian Concept For High-
Level Nuclear Fuel Disposal: The
Process And Some Earth Science
Aspects. Susan Kieffer and Leslie
Smith, Dept. of Geological Sciences. Geological Sciences 330A,
12:30pm. Refreshments and discussion follow. Call 822-2267.
Medieval and Renaissance
Lecture
Varieties Of Codes In Early Medieval Latin Writings. Michael W.
Herren, Humanities, Atkinson
College, York U. Green College
small dining room, 8-10pm. Call
822-6067.
Students for Forestry
Awareness Speaker Series
How Many Female Senior Executives Does It Take To Put In A B.C.
Forest Industry Light Bulb? Linda
Coady, VP Environmental Affairs,
MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. MacMillan
166, 12:30pm. Call 274-4730.
Colloquia
Identifying And Addressing Conceptual Difficulties In Physics.
Lillian McDermott, U. ofWashington. Hennings 201, 4pm. Call 822-
3853.
CICSR Faculty Forum
Broadband Ultrasound Localized
Waves For Medical Imaging. Dr.
Matthew Palmer, Electrical Engineering. CICSR/CS 208. 4-5pm.
Refreshments. Free. Call 822-6894.
Board of Governors Meeting
Open session begins at 9am. Old
Administration Bldg. Board and
Senate Room, 6328 Memorial Road.
Hort Club
Sustainable Agriculture.
MacMillan 318, l:30-2:20pm.
Members and non-members welcome. Call 822-0894.
Concert
Hindemith Celebration. Concert by
graduate students marking 100th
anniversary of composer's birth.
Music recital hall, 8pm. Free. Call
822-3113.
Friday, Nov. 17
Weekly Seminar
Enhanced Sulphur Capture For
Environmental Protection. Dr.
Clive Brereton, Dept. of Chemical
Engineering. ChemEng 206,
3:30pm. Call 822-3238.
Theoretical Chemistry
Seminar
Steady State Model For Ruptures
In An Elastic Medium: AToy Model
For Earthquakes. Dr. B. Bergersen.
Dept. of Physics. Chemistry D402
(centre block), 4pm. Call 822-3266.
Occupational Hygiene
Program Seminar
The Scientific Basis Of Standard
Setting: The Non-Proposed US
Osha    Ergonomic    Standard.
Barbara Silverstein, PhD, Director, SHARP Program, Washington
State Dept. of Labor and Industries. Vancouver Hosp/HSC.
Koerner Theatre G279, 12:30-
1:30pm. Free. Call 822-9595.
Wood Science Seminar
Series
TBA. Yu (Lucy) Zheng (Msc candidate). Paprican, 4pm. Call 222-3220.
Seminar
Ecological Consequence Of Shell-Fish
Gathering At The Rocky Shores In
Chile. Dr. Carlos Moreno, Universidad
Austral de Chile. Fisheries Centre
(Hut B8), Ralf Yorque room, 11:30-
12:30pm. Call 822-0618.
Graduate Colloquium Series
John Dowland's Melancholy Genius. Nathaniel Hurvitz, School of
Music. Music Library Seminar
Room 400B, 3:30pm. Free. Open
to public. Call 822-3588.
Leon and Thea Koerner
Lecture
Old Wives' Tales: Classicism And
Anti-Classicism From Apuleius To
Chaucer. Prof. Jan Ziolkowski,
Comparative Literature, Harvard
U. Keynote speaker for 25th Medieval Workshop. Buchanan A102,
12:30pm. Call 822-5122.
Leon and Thea Koerner
Memorial Lecture
Thirty Years Of Underwater Archaeology In The Canadian Parks
Service. Robert Grenier, Head,
Underwater Archaeology Parks
Canada, Ottawa. Lasserre 102,
12:30pm.  Call 822-5675.
Mathematics Colloquium
An Introduction To The Inverse
Problem In The Calculus Of Variations. Dr. N. Kamran, Dept. of
Mathematics and Statistics, McGill
U. Mathematics 104, 3:35 pm.
Refreshments 3:15pm Math Annex, 1115. Call 822-2666.
Grand Rounds
The Practical Approach To Diagnosis And Treatment Of Metabolic
Diseases. Dr. Susan Winter, Medical Director of Medical Genetics
Metabolism, Valley Children's Hospital, Fresno, Ca. GF Strong auditorium. 9am. Call 875-2307.
Psychotherapy Workshop
Dialectical Behavioural Therapy
Of Borderline Personality Disorder. Hubert E. Armstrong, Assoc.
Prof., U. ofWashington. Hyatt Regency Hotel, 655 Burrard St., Vancouver V6C 2R7, 12:30pm. $80.
Call 822-0574.
Theatre Workshop
Workshop With Full Circle First
Nations Performance Society. MOA,
7-10pm. Cont. Nov. 18,10am-4pm.
$75 general: $60 members/students/seniors. Call 822-5087.
Saturday, Nov. 18
Vancouver Institute Lecture
Red Bay: A 16th Century Basque
Seafaring, Shipbuilding And Whaling Site In Labrador. Robert
Grenier, Head, Underwater Archaeology Parks Canada, Ottawa.
IRC#2, 8:15pm. Call 822-3131.
Continuing Studies
Workshop
Interior Design: ColourWorkshop.
Elizabeth Hawkins, Family/Nutritional Sciences 40, 9:30am-
3:30pm. Cost is $140. includes
lunch. Call 822-1450.
Performance
Full Circle First Nations Society
"Work-in-Progress". MOA, 8-
10pm. $ 12 general: $ 10 members/
students/seniors. Call 822-5087.
Notices
Art Gallery
The Morris and Helen Belkin Art
Gallery hours are Tuesday - Friday 10am-5pm and Saturday, 12-
5pm. 1825 Main Mall. Call 822-
2759.
Badminton Drop-In
Faculty/Staff/Grad Students are
welcome to join the fun at the
Student Recreation Centre,
Wednesdays and Fridays, 6:45-
8:15pm now through March 1996.
Bringyour library card. Check for
cancellations:
jratkay@unixg.ubc.ca or call 822-
6000.
LEON AND THEA KOERNER
MEMORIAL LECTURES
ROBERT GRENIER
Head, Underwater Archaeology
PARKS CANADA, OTTAWA
Shipwrecks ofLouisburg, Cape Breton Island
Thursday, November 16 at 7:30 PM       Admission $7
Vancouver Museum Auditorium, 1100 Chestnut Street
30 Years of Underwater Archaeology in the Canadian Parks
Service
Friday, November 17 at 12:30 PM
in Lasserre 102
Red Bay: A 16th century Basque Seafaring,
Shipbuilding and Whaling Site in Labrador
Vancouver Institute, Saturday, November 18 at 8:15 PM
in Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, Hall 2
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Dean
The University of British Columbia invites applications for
the position of Dean of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences. The preferred starting date is July 1,1996.
The successful candidate will be a recognised scholar with
proven administrative/financial ability and will have
demonstrated a dedication to excellence in teaching and
research. He or she will provide dynamic leadership within
the faculty, the university and the profession.
The Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences has a strong and
diverse research program and offers courses leading to the
degrees of BSc (Pharm.), MSc, PharmD and PhD. Its major
activities are conducted at the Point Grey Campus of the
University, in affiliated hospitals (hospital pharmacy
residency programs) and within the profession (community
clerkships).
The appointment is for a term of six years and is renewable.
Applications and nominations should be sent by
December 15,1995 to:
Dr. Daniel R. Birch
Academic Vice-President and Provost
University of British Columbia
6328 Memorial Road
Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1Z2
The search for a new Dean of the Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences is limited to candidates internal to the University of
British Columbia.
The University of British Columbia welcomes all qualified
applicants, especially women, aboriginal people, visible
minorities and persons-with disabilities. 16 UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995
A VISIT TO  OUR BEAUTIFUL
DESIGNER DISPLAY HOMES  COULD
CHANGE YOUR LIFE FOREVER
The Bristol at Hampton Place captures the enchantment of English country life
on the UBC grounds near the Pacific Spirit Park. Classic architectural symmetry in the
Regency style and exquisite interior detailing are the hallmarks of The Bristol.
An incomparable collection of one, two and two bedroom with den and family room homes from only $179,000.
THE BRISTOL
AT       HAMPTON       PLACE
COME AND SEE THE BRISTOL PRESENTATION CENTRE AND DISPLAY HOMES
near it all, yet far from the ordinary
Open daily 12 noon - 6pm, except Friday
Hampton Place at West 16th and Wesbrook Mall,
West Point Grey, Vancouver
Telephone 222-1070
h
MILLENNIUM UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995 17
The UBC Conference Centre
WOULD LIKETO THANK YOU FOR
HELPING US WELCOME OVER
35,000 VISITORS
TO UBC THIS SEASON
We hosted over 450 groups this summer,
from youth and sports camps to retreats and
international congresses.
Some ofthe 1995 conferences UBC
hosted this summer included:
International Diabetic Athletic Association
Vth COMTOX Symposium
ACM Symposium on Computational Geometry
Joint Map Conference
Society for Psychotherapy Research
International Association for Germanic Studies
Pediatric Laboratory Medicine Congress
American Association for the
Advancement of Science
BCTF Summer Conference
International Symposium on Radiation Chemistry
Canadian Council for Refugees
World Valuation Congress VI
Society of Chinese Bioscientists in America
If your department or professional association is
looking for a site for their next conference,
consider the UBC Conference Centre.
The University of British Columbia
5961 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 2C9
Tel: 604-822-1060
Fax: 604-822-1069
e-mail: conferences@brock.housing.ubc.ca
UBC
CONFERENCE
CENTRE
BRING YOUR NEXT CONFERENCE TO
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
T-bird notes
by Don Wells
thunderbird Athletics
T-birds in fall
trophy hunt
As the end of the regular
season schedule approaches
for fall sports, university
athletic departments nationwide are bracing themselves
for the fever of another
championship season. In
total, 92 teams from the 47-
member Canadian
Interuniversity Athletic Union
(CIAU) will compete for 17
conference championships
and six national crowns
between now and Nov. 25.
Top honours in men's and
women's soccer, cross
country and women's field
hockey are at stake as well as
football's coveted Vanier Cup.
The national, televised CIAU
final, played before crowds of
up to 33,000 at Toronto's
SkyDome, annually signals
the end of the fall schedule of
varsity competition, which
this year involved 2,700
student athletes from Victoria
to St. John's.
Speaking of football, UBC
Head Coach Casey Smith
certainly wishes that coming
close counted in more than
just horseshoes. The first
year 'bird boss did a superb
job of rebuilding the team
following a disastrous 1 -8-1
season last year, however, the
Thunderbirds were out-
scored by a mere 15 points in
their last four league games
after getting off to an encouraging 3-1 start. The difference
between the best and the
also-rans is again a hair's
breadth in the Canada West
University Athletics Association conference and only a
minor miracle will see UBC
WL:-      m^zn^mti
Rainbow
on the road to SkyDome
despite close encounters with
Vanier Cup contenders Saskatchewan and Calgary and a
convincing 29-7 win over SFU
in the annual Shrum Bowl.
Graduating UBC
quarterback Adrian Rainbow's
swan song may be more like a
symphony as he continues to
be the national leader in all
passing categories. His favourite targets so far have been
CIAU top-10 receivers Grayson
Shillingford, Simon Beckow
Biomedical Communications
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Vancouver, B.C.   V6T1Z3
and national scoring leader
Andrew English. TheT-
Birds finish up their schedule
with a 2 p.m. kick-off Nov. 4
against Saskatchewan at
Thunderbird Stadium.
Women's Field Hockey
Coach Hash Kanjee has been
named the 1995 Canada
West Coach of the Year
following a brilliant undefeated season which culminated in a conference championship Oct. 22 in Victoria.
Five UBC players, Ayra
Davy, Juhli and Jacqollyne
Morrisson, Ann Harada and
Laura Prellwitz were named
to the Canada West All-star
team. The T-Birds will be in
Toronto Nov. 2-5 for a run at
their sixth CIAU crown in 18
years.
UBC s men's and women's
soccer teams, traditionally
the most dominant contenders for national championships in any given year, were
still in the thick of the playoff race at publication
deadline, though Dick
Mosher's men's team has
struggled in the 1995 campaign and will be hard-
pressed to repeat as CIAU
champs. The women's team,
however, appear to have all
but clinched first place and
home field advantage in the
conference final Nov. 5.
UBC's men's and women's
cross-country teams edged
Victoria Vikes in a dual meet
Oct. 21 to determine the
Canada West representative
at the national championships Nov. 11 at the University of Western Ontario.
Kristine Chambers took top
spot in the women's division
while Zeba Crook paced the
men's side with a third place
finish. 18 UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995
News Digest
The Faculty of Medicine has established a committee to review
UBC's Student Health Services (SHS).
The committee, chaired by Dr. Carol Herbert, head ofthe Family
Practice Dept., will examine the mission of SHS, the quality and
scope ofthe service it provides, the measures used to assess quality
of service and cost effectiveness, and the unit's staffing, management and operational structure.
The review will also identify the key challenges facing the SHS,
recommend action to enhance the strengths of the unit and
comment on how it compares with others with a similar mandate.
Students with an interest in SHS are invited to an open meeting
with the review committee on Nov. 2 from 1:30 to 2:20 p.m. in IRC
lecture hall 3.
UBC has become an official chapter ofthe Sigma Xi Society after
20 years of club status.
Founded in 1886, the scientific research society fosters interaction among science, technology and society; encourages appreciation and support of original work in science and technology; and
honours scientific research accomplishments.
The Sigma Xi Society has 500 chapters and clubs across North
America and approximately 100.000 active members, including
more than 150 Nobel laureates.
The society's major activities include sponsorship of grants,
awards and prizes programs, publication of American Scientist
magazine and the presentation of national workshops and lectures.
For its first event as a chapter, UBC's Sigma Xi Society will
present The Intelligence of Dogs, a lecture by Psychology Prof.
Stanley Coren, on Nov. 6 at 4:30 p.m. in room 37 ofthe Friedman
Building, 2177 Wesbrook Mall. For more information, call 266-
5879.
The official opening of St. Andrew's Hall, a new student residence
on campus, was marked with a ribbon-cutting ceremony on Sept.
30.
A complex of three residential houses located on Iona Drive
between the Vancouver School of Theology and the Faculty of Law,
St. Andrew's Hall will house 200 students. In addition to studio
apartments and one- and two-bedroom suites, three- and four-
bedroom townhomes are available to students with families.
Several units have been designed to accommodate students in
wheelchairs.
The residence was developed by St. Andrew's Hall, the theological
college of the Presbyterian Church of Canada located on campus,
which also lends its name to the facility. The college recently
launched a $l-million appeal to raise the final portion ofthe $7.5
million cost of the project.
The First Nations House of Learning has won a Canadian Society
of Landscape Architects Regional Citation award.
The award, presented to landscape architects Christopher Phillips
and Associates of Vancouver, recognizes a superior degree of
professional accomplishment with respect to design and implementation.
Landscaping around the Longhouse uses many tree, shrub and
flower species native to British Columbia, and includes a naturalistic waterfall.
Elektra Women's Choir has been invited to represent Canada at
the World Symposium on Choral Music in Sydney, Australia in
August 1996.
The 40-member choir, half of which is made up of UBC graduates, was selected as the only Canadian representative at the
symposium. The triennial gathering of professional choral conductors from 70 countries is sponsored by the International Federation
for Choral Music, under the auspices of UNESCO.
Elektra, co-directed by UBC alumni Diane Loomer and Morna
Edmundson, will give a world premier performance of Stabat Mater
at St. John's Shaughnessy at 8 p.m.. Friday, Nov. 17. The piece is
composed by another UBC alumna, Ramona Luegen.
UBC's Parking and Security Services has introduced free evening
parking on campus, effective immediately.
Complimentary parking is available Monday to Friday after 5
p.m. at campus meters and in most faculty and staff surface lots.
No special permits are needed.
Fees are still in effect on weekends until 5 p.m. and seven days
a week at staffed locations which include all parkades and B lots.
The move makes UBC's evening parking policy consistent with
that of most municipalities in the Lower Mainland.
Classified
Senate approved the merger ofthe Dept. of Geological Sciences
and Oceanography with the Geophysics section of Geophysics and
Astronomy to form the Dept. of Earth and Ocean Sciences.
Astronomy will merge with the Physics Dept. to form the Dept.
of Physics and Astronomy.
The mergers follow Senate requirements for minimum department size while also bringing together related disciplines.
The classified advertising rate is $15.75 for 35 words or less. Each additional word
is 50 cents. Rate includes GST. Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park Road,
Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1, accompanied by payment in cash, cheque (made out to UBC
Reports) or internal requisition. Advertising enquiries: 822-3131.
The deadline for the November 16, 1995 issue of UBC Reports is noon, November 7.
Services
For Sale
NEED SATURDAYS OFF? Jill-of-all
Trades will help you Saturdays
and other negotiable times in
exchange for West Side Room.
Childcare, housework,
eldercare, gardening,shopping,
ironing, sewing, editing, French
conversation, etc. Call 527-2027.
PARTYLINE Vancouver's best
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KERRISDALE SECRETARIAL
SERVICES. Reports, essays,
resumes, fax and copy service,
2361 West 41st Ave. (upstairs).
Business Hours: Monday-Friday,
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Call 261-
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DOWNSIZING? KITS POINT TOWN
HOME 2 bedroom + den, 1300
square feet; wonderful
neighbourhood. Elegantly
renovated with accents of
marble, wrought-iron and
granite. Hardwood floors,
woodburning fireplace. Asking
$389,900. Call Spice Lucks at
Dexter Properties 228-9339.
CHARACTER HOME 4448 West 4th
Avenue, California craftsman
home on a 33x122 property.
Hardwood floors. Some view.
Priced to sell $438,000. Call Spice
Lucks,DexterProperties228-9339.
For Sale
STUDENT SUMMER  BUSINESS.
Produce theU.B.C. Campus Desk
Blotter. I'm looking for a student
to take over my summer business.
Established 4 years ago. Profits
range from $7000 - $8000. Call Bill
Gorman 730-9195.
LARGE  POINT GREY PROPERTY
69x122 size lot. Lovely character
home, hardwood floors, leaded
glass windows, newly renovated
kitchen. 4676 West 13th Ave.
Asking $729,000. Call Spice Lucks,
Dexter Properties 228-9339.
Accommodation
POINT GREY GUEST  HOUSE  A
perfect spot to reserve
accommodation for guest
lecturers or other university
members who visit throughout
the year. Close to UBC and other
Vancouver attractions, a tasteful
representation of our city and of
UBC. 4103 W. 10th Ave.,
Vancouver. BC. V6R2H2. Phone
or fax (604)222-4104.
TINA'S GUEST HOUSE Elegant
accom. in Pt. Grey area. Minutes
to UBC. On main bus routes. Close
to shops and restaurants. Inc. TV,
tea and coffee making, private
phone/fridge. Weekly rates
available. Tel: 222-3461. Fax:222-
9279.	
GREEN COLLEGE GUEST HOUSE
Five suites available for
academic visitors to UBC only.
Guests dine with residents and
enjoy college life. Daily rate $50,
plus $13/day for meals Sun.-Thurs.
Call 822-8660 for more
information and availability,
ONE BEDROOM APARTMENT for
rent at Hampton Place. Quiet,
courtyard-facing,  720  sq.  ft.
Complex equipped with exercise
room,Jacuzzi, sauna, lounge and
guest suites. Rent $990/m. Move-
in date Dec. 1. Call 222-4496.
GERARD EMANUEL - HAUTE COIFFURE
Grand Opening Special
20% off cuts
Gerard does not cut your hair right away. First he looks at the shape of your
face. He wants to know what you want, the time you want to spend on your
hair, your lifestyle. Once your desires are communicated, Gerard's design
creativity flourishes into action to leave you feeling great by looking your
very best. Gerard uses natural products. He also specializes in men and
women's hair loss using Thymu-Skin, the only one in North America using
this technique. Gerard was trained in Paris and worked for Nexxus as a
platform artist. Watch Gerard at work on Channel Four, Nov. 19 at 11 am,
Nov. 20 at 6:30 pm, Nov. 22 at 4 pm and Nov. 23 at 9:30 pm.
Gerard invites you to his recently opened salon in Kitsilano.
3432 W. Broadway 732-4240
Accommodation
HOUSE FOR RENT, fully furnished,
1 January to 30 June, 1996.
Dunbar area, very quiet location,
7 mins. to UBC by car. 2 bedroom
plus study. Non smokers. $1300.
p.m. Phone 263-4780 after 6pm.
COSY CEDAR GUEST COTTAGE
UBC endowment lands/Spanish
Banks Beach. Offers a peaceful
alternative for Vancouver visitors.
Furnished with charm, equipped
kitchen, linens, laundry, 1
bedroom plus study. On beautiful
one acre natural forest setting.
NS. 222-0060.
Housing Wanted
NORTH COAST PROFESSOR seeks
sublet or shared
accommodation overChristmas
in Kitsilano, 14 December - 4
January inclusive. David (604)
624-6054 ext. 5729.
VISITING PROFESSOR REQUIRES
furnished accommodation for 3
months, January to March 1996,
preferably 1 or 2 bedroom
apartment, Flexible on dates,
location. No children or pets.
Phone (403) 434-1398 or Fax (403)
492-2881.
CHRISTMAS SUBLET or housesit
near UBC wanted. Two UCLA
doctoral students: approx. Dec.
16 to Jan. 1; garage for
wheelchair. Contact Dennis
Sexsmith, 801 Hilgard Ave., Los
Angeles, CA 90024. (310) 794-
3279; message (310) 825-3691.
UBC FACULTY MEMBER, wife, son
and poodle seek short-term
furnished accommodation in
West Side Vancouver from
December 1, 1995. N.S.
References available. Tel. 261-
1076.
ONTARIO SABBATICAL FAMILY
seeking 3-4 BR, furnished home.
Kitsilano to UBC area. Approx.
Jan 1 - July 31/96. Contact E.
Gross (519)823-1738. M. Sobol
sobol@psyadm.css.uoguelph.ca
SABBATICAL ACCOM. REQUIRED.
University of Waterloo Stats Prof.,
wife, student daughter and dog
wish housing nr. UBC for 12-15
months in period June 96 to
August 97 flexible. Contact Rob
Brown, fax (519) 746-1875. E-mail
rlbrown@jeeves.uwaterloo.ca
House Exchange
EXCHANGE. Near GUELPH,
WILFRED  LAURIER, WATERLOO.
Furnished house: BR, studio and
piano room. Private yard. Fortwo-
bedroom house, West Side or
Skyway. Non-smoking couple,
quiet dog, two cars. November 1
nine months. Phone: 519-846-
8162 Fax: 519-846-0697.
Next ad deadline:
Noon, Tuesday, Nov. 7
J^L   Please
^W Recycle UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995 19
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The Perfect Christmas Gift 'X    Efficacy of drugs
A Most Wanted Collection of Recipes from
the UBC Bakeshop       ^
People
by staff writers
John Grace, professor of Chemical Engineering and
dean of the Faculty of Graduate Studies, has received
the premier prize of the Canadian Society for Chemical Engineering, the R.S. Jane Memorial Lecture Award.
The award, for outstanding contributions to chemical
engineering, consists of a $3,000 cash prize and a scroll.
Grace has been a faculty member at UBC since 1979,
serving as department head and, since 1990, as dean of
Graduate Studies.
He was presented with the award at the society's 45th
annual conference, held in October in Quebec City.
Grace's research activities have focused on fluidized beds
and other multi-phase systems.
George Curtis, founding dean of UBC's Faculty of
Law, received the Order of British Columbia (OBC)
last month as part of a special ceremony commemorating the faculty's 50th anniversary.
Curtis is one of 97 people to be inducted into the order
since it was established in 1990. The OBC - the highest form
of recognition the province extends to
citizens - recognizes those "who have
served with the greatest distinction
and excelled in any field of endeavour
benefitting the people of the Province
or elsewhere."
Alumni Nathan Nemetz, former
Chancellor Leslie Peterson and
current Chancellor Robert Lee—each
honoured with the OBC in 1990—
were among those who attended the
ceremony at the downtown Law
Courts.
In June, 16 British Columbians
were invested with the OBC for 1995.
Curtis' investiture was delayed to
coincide with the faculty's anniversary
celebrations. The OBC is the second honour bestowed on
Curtis this year for his contributions to the field of law. He is
also the 1995 recipient ofthe Ramon John Hnatyshyn Award
for Law.
Curtis
A Must-Have Cookbook! ^
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Drugs are one way to deal
with high blood pressure. Visiting a psychotherapist for stress
management therapy is another.
UBC Psychologist Wolfgang
Linden says the latter is particularly appealing to those who
aren't getting relief from medication or who just don't want to
take drugs any more. However,
while stress management and
other psychotherapy techniques
have been researched, their exact effectiveness in the treatment of hypertension has yet to
be determined
"We're trying to properly
evaluate what a good psychotherapist does in clinical practice, which has never been done
before," said Linden. "People
have been too preoccupied with
studying the results of various
individual techniques. However,
technique and therapy are two
different things."
It is generally assumed that
stress causes hypertension,
which is most commonly linked
to high blood pressure.
Linden said the purpose of his
study is to test how effective psychotherapy can be when clinicians give clients what they need
versus what theory says they
need. Rather than make assumptions about what stressors are
causing a patient's blood pressure to shoot up, Linden suggests that people need individualized treatment to deduce what
is bothering them first.
"Once the therapist talks to a
client and understands what his
or her particular situation is,
then an individualized treatment
program can be prescribed," he
said. "It may seem like common
sense but nobody has measured the effectiveness of this
individualized approach."
An individual treatment
program might include any
combination of relaxation
techniques, coping methods,
problem-solving skills or marital therapy.
For his study, Linden will ask
a group of people suffering from
high blood pressure to wear a
monitor to measure their blood
pressure for 24 hours. Half the
group will start receiving individualized psychotherapy treat-
ment immediately. Three
months later, their condition will
be compared to those who didn't
receive treatment.
Linden said everyone who
participates in the study will be
offered treatment. He added that
the study is open to anybody
whether on medication or not.
More than five million Canadians have been diagnosed with
the normally symptomless condition of hypertension. If left
untreated, hypertension can
greatly increase the likelihood
of kidney failure, stroke and
heart attack.
For more information about
the study call Andrea Con at
822-3800. 20 UBC Reports ■ November 2, 1995
Profile
Working with the wildebeest
Tony Sinclair hopes understanding biodiversity will help lead to its conservation
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
For the past 30 years, the semi-
arid plains of the Serengeti
have been a natural laboratory
for Zoology Prof. Tony Sinclair.
Located in Tanzania near the
Kenyan border, the Serengeti is home
to an extraordinary diversity of mammals, birds and insects — and to the
greatest herds of animals on the face of
the earth.
Sinclair has dedicated his profes
sional life to discovering how this
ecosystem works. His research team
monitors populations of large mammals
to see what regulates their numbers
and how different species relate to each
other.
The awe and respect Sinclair has for
the Serengeti is clear when he shows a
visitor a photo of wildebeest herds
stretching to the horizon on a golden
plain.
"Imagine this all around you. Once I
traveled 80 kilometres through a
wildebeest herd like that, and I still
hadn't reached the end of them."
"If I devoted my life to anything, this
is the place to do it"
A New Zealander, Sinclair was born
and raised in Northern Rhodesia (now
Zambia) and later moved to Dar es
Salaam, on Tanzania's Indian Ocean
coast. His parents sent him to boarding
school in England to be educated, but
the lure of Africa and its natural
wonders remained strong.
"From an early age I wanted to get
involved in the study of animals and
what we now call ecology.
"In my first week as an undergraduate at Oxford I heard of a professor who
had an African project. I went up to
him and said, 'How do I get to Africa to
work?'
"He was completely taken aback by
this. Here I was, a student who was
barely there a week. He blurted out
You can come as my assistant in two
years' time.'
"I never let him forget that he'd said
that."
That is how Sinclair found himself
doing research in Africa after his
Tony Sinclair slogs his way to study population dynamics of species in
the Yukon.
second year of university, dropped off
in the Serengeti one bright and dusty
day and left to fend for himself.
"I could speak Swahili," he now
shrugs. "I knew how to cope."
But in a few years Sinclair had
a young family, and decided
there were better places to
raise children. He took a job in Australia studying water buffalo in the
Northern Territory.
Fate soon intervened on that decision. A cyclone struck on Christmas
Day, 1974, devastating the city of
Darwin. Like thousands of other
families, the Sinclairs lost everything.
Unsure of their future, they joined a
convoy of refugees in a remarkable
5,000-kilometre trek across the Outback, much of it on dirt roads, to
Canberra.
"It was clear that after the cyclone I
had no job left, but by sheer luck I had
a job offer from UBC just before
Christmas," Sinclair says.
He hand-wrote the application by
candlelight as he was bedding down for
the night under one of the convoy's
trucks.
Zoology Prof. Charles Krebs, then
head of the search committee, remembers it as one ofthe strangest job
applications he has ever received. That
began a research association that
continues to this day.
Sinclair is a member of multi-
university team headed by Krebs that
looks at long-term population dynamics
of snowshoe hares, lynx and other
animals in the Yukon.
Sinclair has also kept his Australian
connections, and is currently on a
year-long sabbatical there.
Australia's major ecological problem
is introduced species, such as the fox,
which is exterminating small marsupials that cannot fend off such efficient
and fast predators.
Sinclair is advising on a government
project that uses a virus to sterilize wild
rabbits, another introduced species that
is the main source of food for foxes.
But the Serengeti remains Sinclair's
major interest. He has returned there
every year since joining UBC in 1975,
monitoring a phenomenon that has its
roots in British colonialism a hundred
years before.
The British brought a cattle virus to
East Africa in the 19th century that
killed off 95 per cent of the cattle,
buffalo and wildebeest. This also.
Sinclair points out. left the local people
who depended on them starving and
destitute, and an easy conquest for the
invaders.
It was not until the 1950s, when the
Serengeti was surrounded by inoculated domestic cattle, that the virus
died out.
This prompted a population boom
for the wildebeest, one that Sinclair
first witnessed when he began his
research as an undergraduate.
"This made for an ideal laboratory
for the study of population dynamics,
because you have to have an alteration
in a system to understand how it
works.
"You can't do it yourself, you have to
wait until it happens naturally. We had
the good luck to be there when it did."
As the wildebeest numbers
soared five-fold to more than
1.5 million, Sinclair and his
colleagues were able to monitor the
repercussions throughout the entire
ecosystem — from grasses to elephants.
They came to realize that the entire
system is dominated by this mega-
herd, that the wildebeest is the keystone of the Serengeti.
A recently-published book, his
second on the Serengeti, summarizes
the past three decades of Sinclair's
work.
Now he is preparing to pass the
torch to Tanzanians, such as his
doctoral student Simon Mduma, as he
turns his attention to a new project —
the proposed Centre for Biodiversity at
UBC.
Sinclair envisions a centre that will
provide intellectual leadership for the
international conservation community,
producing research that will lead to
better protection for threatened ecosystems.
If the centre does what Sinclair
hopes it will, perhaps places like the
Serengeti will be something future
generations can marvel at, not mourn.

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