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UBC Reports Mar 6, 2008

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 THE  UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
VOL   54   I   NO   3   I   MARCH   6,   2008
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UBC REPORTS
3 Physics class
4 Goals up
5 Chancellor candidates
6 Olympic doctors
Passion, pure research and happy accidents
BY CATHERINE LOIACONO
Public universities are often
recognized as a central hub for
research - both pure and applied.
Although much has been said
about applied research in recent
years, what does pure research
really mean today? Why is it still
such a fundamental cornerstone
of universities?
This year's Celebrate Research
Week is an important part of
UBC's 2008 Centenary.
See page 5 for events and visit:
www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca
As we celebrate UBC's eighth
Annual Research Week, we
explore the importance of the
most basic form of research, its
value and implications.
"Pure," "basic," "curiosity-
driven," or "fundamental" are all
terms used to describe research
that is done for the sole purpose
of following one's passion and
curiosity in the search for new
knowledge - without a direct
practical application in mind.
UBC Vice President, Research
John Hepburn says, "We have
attracted some of the top
researchers in the world whose
work is driven by discovery.
UBC takes pride in creating an
environment where researchers
can pursue their curiosity and
access the best facilities, because
we recognize the importance it
has in contributing to a greater
global understanding."
Pure research is entirely
exploratory, advancing
knowledge and theoretica
understanding among variables.
It is found in all faculties and
can often lead to a significant
discovery - or "happy accident"
- which contributes to
advancements in fields such as
medicine and biotechnology.
For instance, Dr. Hugh Brock,
Director of the UBC Genetics
Graduate Program, discovered
a protein that helped address
untreatable childhood leukemias
while studying the three-
dimensional pattern formation
of fruit fly wings. His research
shows that the fly protein has
a key role in promoting the
activity of the leukemia protein,
and provides unexpected insight
into its function.
"One of the wonderful
complexities of nature is our
Pure research is best likened to solving one piece of a puzzle.
inability to predict what will
turn out to be an important
discovery," says Brock. "That's
why curiosity driven research is
so fruitful."
Director of the Brain Research
Centre, Dr. Max Cynader, works
with many scientists who have
made major scientific discoveries
purely by accident. Says Cynader,
"What I do know is to expect
something revolutionary in the
next five years in brain research,
but I can't tell you what it is
going to be."
Dr. Anthony Phillips and
Dr.Yu Tian Wang, university
professors and members of the
Brain Research Centre, wanted
to understand how the brain '.
learns new things, specifically        ;
what molecular mechanisms ',
underlie how we learn and make  :
memories. The tools and drugs      ;
they developed for their study
led them to discover a way i
to block the communication '
between brain cells that triggers    <
drug cravings, a finding that |
could lead to new therapies to       j
treat addiction and relapse as
continued on page 2
Watch for broken rungs on the job ladder
BY LORRAINE CHAN
The grass often looks greener
when we're browsing through
job ads, but UBC sociology
research cautions against
frequent changes in employment
since it can create a loss rather
than a gain in wages.
This is especially true for
women with children and
families, says Sylvia Fuller, an
assistant professor in the Dept.
of Sociology.
market. She looked at the cohort
entering the work force during
the late 1970s to early 1990s.
"This is a generation of
U.S. workers who started their
careers during major economic
upheaval and corporate
restructuring," says Fuller, whose
findings were recently published
in the American Sociological
Review.
Fuller's research shows a
strong correlation between a
drop in earnings and the number
"In a way the ideal is the old
story. You can afford a divorce
from employers a few times, but
after a while, it diminishes your
attractiveness.
>}
In the first detailed study
of its kind, Fuller probed the
consequences of frequent job
changes on men and women's
wages. Using nationally
representative data from
the United States National
Longitudinal Survey of Youth,
Fuller analyzed the pattern of
wage growth of workers during
their first 12 years in the labour
of times someone changes
employers, especially due to
layoffs or firings.
"On average, every job change
reduces a worker's wage by a
little over one per cent. So if
someone changes jobs 10 times,
they'd be earning about 11 per
cent less."
The statistics paint a sobering
picture of wage penalties for
Sociologist Sylvia Fuller says every job change can reduce your pay cheque by more than one per cent.
women who leave a job for
family reasons, almost on par
with getting fired. For example,
female employees who quit for
reasons such as taking care of
children or following a husband
to another city would see a 2.6
per cent drop in wages compared
to 2.7 per cent less if they were
fired.
"It seems that leaving a job for
a family-related reason results in
significant wage disadvantages,
even beyond what we would
expect given the time out of the
labour force that such quits often
entail."
Fuller says reasons for this
may be that women who leave
jobs for family-related reasons
may be seen as less committed to
their careers, making employers
more hesitant to hire them for
jobs with good wages.
Her research shows that
men and women enjoy a brief
window when they first enter the
job market to look around and
continued on page 6 I     UBC    REPORTS     |     MARCH
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INTHE NEWS
Highlights of UBC media coverage in February 2008.  compiled by basil waugh
No skyscrapers required for
urban density, prof says
Lawrence Frank, a professor of
sustainable transportation at
UBC, commented in an article on
urban density in The New York
Times.
Frank said even moderate
increases in density can help
significantly in curbing carbon
emissions.
"You don't have to live in
a skyscraper," he said. "You
can have relatively low density
and still maintain a more
environmentally responsible
lifestyle."
Empathy lessons:
School program uses babies to
reduce bullying
UBC developmental psychologist
Kimberly Schonert-Reichl was
quoted in The Wall Street
Journal.
The article was on Roots
of Empathy, a non-profit
organization that uses babies to
teach grade schoolers empathy.
Schonert-Reichl's research
has found a drop in aggressive
behavior among students who
were in classrooms with the so-
called "empathy babies."
Autopsies forecast surge in U.S.
heart disease
Heart disease may be on the
upswing, according to a UBC
study that looked at autopsy
data from Minnesota residents
who died from unnatural causes.
Researchers from UBC and
Minnesota's Mayo Clinic found
that many of those who died
from incidents such as motor
vehicle crashes already had
clogged arteries.
The study, published in the
Archives of Internal Medicine,
was reported by Reuters,
Canada.com, Vancouver Sun,
and Calgary Herald.
Sleep apnea doubles car crash
risk
People with sleep apnea, a
breathing disorder that disrupts
sleep, are more likely to be in a
severe car crash involving injury,
UBC researchers have found.
In a study of almost 1,600
people, respirologists at UBC and
the Vancouver Coastal Health
Research Institute determined
that sufferers of sleep apnea were
at double the risk of being in a
collision.
"Even those patients with
fairly mild sleep apnea had an
increased risk of serious crashes,"
said lead author Dr. Najib Ayas,
a professor of medicine at UBC.
The study, published in the
journal Thorax, was covered
by the National Post, Calgary
Herald and Canada.com.
RESEARCH
continued from page 1
well as compulsive behaviours associated with
schizophrenia.
Often times, the findings from basic research
will be used by another group of researchers
as a missing link to a significant discovery. Dr.
Ann Marie Craig, UBC professor and member
of the Brain Research Centre, and her team,
demonstrated that neurexins induce formation of
neurotransmitter receptor sites. This finding was
used by another group of experts to discover that
mutations in neurexins and neuroligins appear to
cause autism in a small number of cases.
"Although, the number of cases was small, the
results give us a cellular and molecular link to study
how the disorder occurs," says, Craig. "Research
from our late colleague, Dr. Alaa El-Husseini
contributed further by showing how neuroligans
control the balance of synaptic connections. These
studies continue to inform ongoing research on
potential treatments for Autism."
Dr. Julia Levy, an immunologist at UBC, noticed
that her children would sometimes develop lesions
on their legs and torso after playing in a field of
cow parsley. Curious as to what was causing this,
Levy consulted with a colleague in the botany
department at UBC who explained how cow parsley
contains a photosensitizer chemical activated by
light. This started Levy's interest in photodynamic
therapies, which she incorporated into her work on
cancer immunology. Levy's work, alongside that of
David Dolphin led to the formation of QLT and the
development of Visudyne™, a treatment for age-
related blindness that has been used to treat more
than half a million people and is now available in
more than 70 countries.
UBC Professor of Music Theory William
Benjamin, says his current research is purely
curiosity driven. He is exploring the behaviour of
hearing music.
"The impulse to re-hear music in our heads is
close to universal," says Benjamin. "One of the
reasons we seek out music is to remember it vividly.
My focus is to understand why we replay music in
our heads whether or not it affects us deeply in an
emotional sense."
Benjamin says his research will contribute to
understanding the nature of our culture. He adds
that most pure research driven by passion can
eventually be applied to have a positive impact on
the world. 13
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UBC REPORTS
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Contributors  Lorraine Chan lorraine.chan@ubc.ca
Brian Lin brian.lin@ubc.ca
Catherine Loiacono Catherine.loiacono@ubc.ca
Bud Mortenson bud.mortenson@ubc.ca
Basil Waugh basil.waugh@ubc.ca
Advertising Sarah Walker public.a££airs@ubc.ca
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I     3
Lauren Weatherdon: First year physics course helps see the world through a new lens.
Nothing too theoretical about this physics class
BY BRI AN LIN
Lauren Weatherdon had never
taken physics until last fall. She
didn't expect to like it either.
"The people I had spoken
with didn't enjoy first-year
physics courses, and didn't find
the knowledge helpful in real
life," says the English-biology
double major. "I was pleasantly
surprised. I'm even considering
switching from biology to
physics."
Weatherdon's reaction is
what a group of instructors and
teaching assistants had hoped to
achieve when they got together
last summer to redesign PHYS
100, an introductory course
offered by the Dept. of Physics.
More than 700 students
studied basic physics concepts
by dissecting and analyzing
real-world situations such as
energy consumption and the
greenhouse effect, the first time
such an approach has been taken
in a mandatory undergraduate
physics course.
"The conventional approach
to teaching first-year physics
involves a lot of esoteric
problems that are good
intellectual exercises if you're
interested in physics," says
instructor Andrzej Kotlicki, who
has taught physics for 40 years.
"But in a course like PHYS 100,
you simply can't assume that."
The bulk of the students are
from arts and life sciences, where
only minimal physics courses are
required. Half of the students
have never taken physics and
more than half never take
physics again.
"This may be the only formal
exposure to physics for these
students, and their impression
here may last a lifetime," says
Sandy Martinuk, a PhD student
and teaching assistant who
helped redesign the course.
Kotlicki and fellow instructors
Fei Zhou and Georg Rieger drew
inspiration from the hottest topic
on earth and devised lectures,
lab experiments and assignments
to not only show students
how physics lives in everyday
situations but also to empower
them to apply scientific problem-
solving skills in other contexts.
For example, students in
class are led step by step to
examine and calculate the
amount of energy it takes to fly
a commercial jetliner, taking into
account factors such as altitude,
acceleration, drag, fuel and
engine type and passenger load.
Other scenarios include
comparing the energy efficiency
of an SVU to a Prius hybrid
vehicle and extrapolating global
greenhouse effects based on data
from a real greenhouse.
All 45 incoming graduate
students in the Dept. of Physics
completed the mandatory
program last fall. It will be
offered to current TAs starting
next term.
For the first time, students are
asked to team up and present
a project where they use real
data to prove or debunk myths
about energy consumption. "I've
never seen such enthusiasm in
this class," says Kotlicki, adding
that it makes the extra time and
energy he devoted to revamping
the course well worth it.
Martinuk is documenting that
enthusiasm as part of his PhD
thesis. The first doctoral student
in the department to focus on
physics education, Martinuk
joins a growing number of
Redesigned first year course
teaches concepts with real world
problems
In parallel with these changes
to the course, the new crop of
teaching assistants has been put
through a TA training program.
This training gives them the tools
to help students learn to flex
their own critical muscles.
"We're encouraging TAs to
examine their own 'expert-like'
thinking - which often involves
skipping certain steps that have
become second nature - so that
they can impart this flow of logic
to their students," says Mya
Warren, a TA who spearheaded
the program that also includes
mentoring by senior TAs
and regular discussions with
instructors.
"I've come to realize that
teaching is so much more than
just answering questions. The
process has made me a better
teacher and a better physicist,"
says Warren. "I may be a physics
professor one day and this is a
very important part of the job."
physicists who are looking into
the unique traits that makes
good physics teaching stick.
He's been working with the
Carl Wieman Science Education
Initiative (CWSEI) to implement
surveys that measure students'
attitude and beliefs towards
Physics. His study, along with
the TA training program, is now
part of a five-year project funded
by the CWSEI to systematically
improve learning in the
department.
"There's already been a
significant improvement in how
confident students feel about
their ability to assess a situation
and problem-solve," says
Martinuk. "This is important
because educational research has
shown that positive beliefs help
bridge the connection between
knowledge - what you have
- and process - what you do
with that knowledge." 13
UBC science students creme de la creme
Incoming UBC Science students might as well have ivy on their
acceptance letters.
A recent review of admissions standards indicates first-year science
students here are comparable to students at prestigious Ivy League
schools and superior to those at any U.S. public university.
Researchers from the UBC's Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative
(CWSEI) and Planning And Institutional Research (PAIR) compared
first-year students at UBC with those from a number of major U.S.
universities by examining their ranking among their high school cohorts
and how those cohorts rated in international comparisons.
"We found that when it comes to science students in Canada and the
U.S., UBC is slightly less selective than the most elite Ivy League schools
such as Yale University. However, it is more selective than the next tier
of Ivy's such as Columbia and well ahead ofthe leading U.S. public
Universities," says CWSEI director and Nobel laureate Carl Wieman.
The "average" first-year science student at UBC ranked at the 94th
percentile in their high school class. The corresponding class ranking for
all first-year students at SFU and UVic are 82 and 85.5, respectively.
Statistics Canada's 2006 Performance for International Student
Assessment shows that B.C. high school students score on average
50 points higher than U.S. students in science. This means that the
94th percentile science student in a B.C. high school is equivalent to
the 96th percentile student in a U.S. high school. This 96th percentile
equivalent can be compared with leading U.S. universities such as Yale
at 97.5, Columbia at 95.5, University of Virginia at 95, and the other most
prominent and selective U.S. public universities in the 91-93 percentile
range.
"This gives us a benchmark for comparing student achievement," says
Wieman. "It also helps us set educational standards and expectations
for success that are appropriate to the quality ofthe students."
There are currently no common measures of student quality across
Canada and the U.S. The CWSEI comparison is based on publicly
available data, which precludes high school scores from other Canadian
provinces. The B.C. stats were made available through Ministry of
Education's Student Transitions Project.
The full report is available at:
www.cwsei.ubc.ca/resources/files/selectivity_report.pdf
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CAMPUS & COMMUNITY PLANNING
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Update on the
Strategic Transportation Plan, Transit,
and Campus Traffic Calming Projects
Thursday, March 13, 2008
1:30 pm - 7:30 pm
Student Union Building Concourse
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MARKETING DIVISION    |    SAUDER SCHOOL OF BUSINESS
POLLAY PRIZE LECTURE
Honouring Intellectual Excellence in Research on Marketing
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FRIDAY, MARCH 7, 2008
2:00 - 3:30pm
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David Lam Amphitheatre, 2033 Main Mall
OPEN ATTENDANCE
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THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
THE   UNIVERSITY  OF   BRITISH   COLUMBIA
Program Director
Centre for Intercultural Communication
UBC Continuing Studies
/O:
v-:,
This position is expected to be filled by promotion/reassignment and
is included here to inform you of its vacancy at the University.
UBC Continuing Studies seeks to appoint a Program Director responsible for professional
programs within the Centre for Intercultural Communication (CIC). Reporting to the
Divisional Director, this position has leadership and management responsibilities for
the professional programs offered through CIC. The Program Director works with
faculties and departments within the broad scope of UBC to provide outstanding
programs for individuals, organizations, undergraduate and graduate students.
The candidate must have a Masters or PhD in an appropriate discipline and a minimum
of five years experience in adult education and in the development of educational
programs; a minimum of five years of teaching experience in higher education with
a commitment to excellence in teaching; understanding of international issues in
education and training; scholarly activities and publications in the field of intercultural
communication; demonstrated leadership, organization, administrative and
interpersonal skills.
Inquiries about the position can be directed to:
Office ofthe Executive Director, UBC Continuing Studies
410-5950 University Blvd, Vancouver, BC V6T1Z3
or to: joyce.dsouza@ubc.ca
UBC hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity
We encourage all qualified persons to apply.
Georgia Pomaki: when a person's goals are positive, they will spiral up.
Goals up, burnout down
Study of Dutch healthcare workers
links wellbeing to goal setting
BY LORRAINE CHAN
People working in jobs with
a high burnout rate share one
thing in common. If they feel
supported and see opportunities
to grow and improve, they'll
likely thrive.
But the moment workers
believe their best hope is to keep
their heads above water, they put
themselves at increased risk for
depression, exhaustion, burnout
and absenteeism, according to
UBC psychology research.
"Goals play a key role
in predicting physical and
psychological wellbeing,"
says Georgia Pomaki, a
postdoctoral fellow in the Dept.
of Psychology. She is among a
handful of scholars worldwide
In spiraling downward,
explains Pomaki, individuals
increase their risk of depression
and physical symptoms such as
back pain and headaches.
She recently explored the
pursuit and attainment of goals
among nurses and doctors in
Leiden, Holland, conducting
studies at a major teaching
hospital that employs 3,500
healthcare workers.
Her research included 175
doctors, half of whom had been
working at the hospital for more
than five years. Pomaki found
that 68 per cent of the doctors
described their goals in positive
terms. These included better care
for patients, securing a raise,
publishing more papers and
maintaining a balance between
unsurprising outcome, says
Pomaki, given the links between
chronic stress and irregular
production of coritsol, a stress
hormone.
"Too much or too little
Cortisol can result in a
compromised immune
functioning."
Pomaki's study at the Dutch
hospital included 1,400 nurses.
Her findings show that two-
thirds of the nurses were fairly
optimistic, setting their sights
on future promotions or taking
courses to upgrade their skills
and performance.
However, 17 per cent of the
nurses focused on "avoidance
goals," namely the desire to
work fewer hours and to protect
themselves from utter physical
Pomaki says because these doctors were able to
look forward to new opportunities, they experienced
higher rates of well-being and were at lower risk for
depression and physical ailments.
looking at the mobilizing power
of a person's desires and dreams
on work life.
Pomaki studies how people
cope when working in the
toughest jobs - those with high
demand, but low control and
low support. She has found that
goals are a key indicator whether
a person will flourish or fade
under pressure.
"When a person's goals are
positive they will spiral up, but
when they're focusing on just
surviving, they will spiral down,"
says Pomaki, who's also an
investigator at the Michael Smith
Foundation for Health Research.
their professional and home life.
Pomaki says because these
doctors were able to look
forward to new opportunities,
they experienced higher rates
of well-being and were at lower
risk for depression and physical
ailments.
More pessimistic were 32
per cent of the doctors who
framed their goals in avoidance
terms. "For them, it was much
more about minimizing harm
to themselves because of
perceived time pressures and
responsibilities."
These doctors reported
more health complaints - an
and mental exhaustion. For
the most part, these nurses had
poorer health than their peers
with the more positive goals.
Pomaki says that while
hospital administrators may feel
heartened that greater than fewer
numbers of nurses and doctors
are optimists, her findings point
to systemic issues that need to be
addressed to increase employee
health.
"But unfortunately," she
acknowledges, "the usual
practice is for management not
to deal with processes until
there's a major problem." 13 UBC    REPORTS     |     MARCH
I    S
Meet the Chancellor candidates
Elections are now under way for the position of Chancellor of The University of British
Columbia. The Chancellor presides over all major university ceremonies and is an ex
officio member of the Board of Governors, the Senates and the Council of Senates.
The position of Chancellor is prescribed in the University Act - the Centenary of which
UBC is celebrating this year - which requires an election every three years by members
of the Convocation. The Convocation include all graduates of UBC degree programs
(including graduates of many degree programs offered by the former Okanagan University
College), all members of either UBC Senate, all UBC professional librarians, and all
UBC faculty members with the ranks of Professor (any grade), Instructor (any grade), or
Lecturer. Emeritus, clinical, adjunct, and honorary professors are not eligible.
More than 250,000 people are eligible to vote.
Nominations closed Nov. 12, 2007, and voting for the two candidates closes April 4,
2008. Online voting is at: http :lI students.ubc.cai elections
UBC Reports asked the candidates to write about their qualifications and vision.
Dr. Bikkar S. Lalli, PhD 1966
I believe the role of UBC is to challenge,
stimulate, and stretch the minds of
its students so that they become agents
of leadership, creativity and change in
a multicultural society. In this global
economy, higher learning is the key to
achieving success for individuals and for
nations. It is essential that we provide
equitable access, attract quality students
and encourage more young people to
pursue higher learning. We must support
research since it strengthens teaching and
leads to innovation. My experience as a
visiting scholar in institutions worldwide
has provided me with a strong conviction
that international collaboration among
institutions of higher learning is critical
to developing innovative solutions for
common social problems.
My passion for education has shaped
my commitment to assist others in
attaining their educational dreams. I am
a proud alumnus of UBC (PhD, 15
with a successful academic career at the
University of Saskatchewan, as Professor
and Department Head, with over 150
research publications. Since 1999 I have
served as a Convocation Senator for
UBC, where I worked closely with other
Senators to enable UBC to fulfill its role
in the areas of teaching, research and
community outreach.
The focus of some of my other
volunteer work with community groups
in the Lower Mainland has been the
welfare of vulnerable societal groups,
including seniors, women and young
people. In addition to serving on the UBC
Senate, I have served on the Boards of The
Kwantlen Foundation and The College of
Dental Technicians, and lectured on behalf
of BC Coalition to Eliminate Abuse of
Seniors. This work has provided me with
an opportunity to contribute for all the
benefits that I have derived from having
received a higher education.
I believe that a Chancellor can be an
active ambassador between the university
and the communities it serves. After
spending a lifetime in institutions of higher
learning in different cultural settings,
combined with a thorough understanding
of the problems faced by communities
at the grassroots level, I believe that I
can make an important contribution
as an ambassador for UBC. If elected
Chancellor, it would be an honour to serve
and represent this prestigious institution.
Sarah Morgan-Silvester, BCom 1982
My parents came to Canada with
good educations, a great deal of
energy and truly nothing else. My mother
was a teacher and my father was an
engineer, and I was fortunate to grow
up in a family that valued education.
My sister and I both went to UBC, not
because we knew it was a great university,
but because it was far enough away from
home to loosen up our social lives!
But what a great decision it turned out
to be. A large part of who I am can be
traced back to the time I spent as a student
at UBC. During those years I developed an
immense respect for the institution and for
the individuals - faculty, staff and students
- who made the university what it is
today. That time also provided exceptional
training for my career and helped me
develop a sense of responsibility about my
own community.
My background in business and
community service is quite varied. I
have taken on leadership roles in the
transportation, financial service and
energy sectors, and I have been a senior
volunteer in organizations focussed on
health, the environment and the economy.
I am currently chair of the Vancouver
Fraser Port Authority, chair of the BC
Women's Hospital and Health Centre
Foundation, and a member of the Sauder
School of Business Faculty Advisory
Board.
The common thread in all my business
and community involvements is people:
people working together in collaboration
to spark a level of creativity that
individuals are rarely able to achieve.
UBC is a great university, with a quarter
of a million alumni who have made their
mark on our society. UBC invests in and
develops human capital which, to my
mind, is the most important element of
a successful enterprise. As Chancellor,
I will focus on engaging UBC's wider
community in the success of the university.
I am honoured to be nominated by the
Alumni Association for the Chancellor's
position, and offer my thanks to them for
giving me the opportunity to be a part of
UBC's future.
SATURDAY MARCH  8
Diabetes - Genes or Lifestyle?
10:00AM-12:00PM
Join the Faculty of Medicine for a free interactive
public forum and live webcast with leading
diabetes researchers and CBC News Science and
Environment Reporter Eve Savory.
Visit www.med.ubc.ca/diabetesforum for details.
To register: infobc@diabetes.ca
Victoria Learning Theatre (Rm 182), The Irving K.
Barber Learning Centre - 1961 East Mall
Sleep: A Window on Infant and Young
Children's Development
2:00PM-3:00PM
The area of sleep deprivation for infants and
children is a sometimes controversial topic. Dr.
Hall, who has assisted many families with their
infants' and pre-schoolers' sleep problems,
will provide answers to a number of questions.
Contact: Merrilee Hughes, 604.822.1409,
ONRTS@nursing.ubc.ca
IRC-Lecture Theatre 6 (Woodward Building)
MONDAY MARCH  10
Action on Seafood Sustainability: Consumer
Impact on Dwindling Marine Resources
7:30PM-9:30PM
Join us for an interactive discussion to
highlight issues around seafood sustainability.
Representatives of diverse interest groups will
explore ecological, social and economic concerns
that should influence our decisions. Contact:
Amanda Vincent, a.vincent@fisheries.ubc.ca
Robson Square - 800 Robson Street
Solving Complex Real-world Problems:
An Issue-based Interdisciplinary Approach
March 10 to March 14
12:00PM-2:00PM
In this series of lunch-time talks and videos,
faculty and students discuss the collaborative
ifs yours
A LEGACY OF RESEARCH EXCELLENCE
CELEBRATE RESEARCH WEEK I 4-15 MARCH 2008
and interdisciplinary approaches used to address
complex societal and environmental issues.
Contact: John Corry, 604.822.4131 or visit www.
cfis.ubc.ca/crw
Rm 120 CKChoi Building- 1855 West Mall
TUESDAY MARCH  11
Celebrating Women's Health Research
Discoveries
8:00AM-4:00PM
Women's Health Research Day features keynote
speaker Dr. Joy Johnson. Presentations on topics
such as Women's Heart Health, Reproductive
Health and Infection will be spotlighted. Contact:
Christina Schmidt, 604.875.3459, cschmidt®
cw.bc.ca
UBC Life Sciences Centre, LSC1 - 2350 Health
Sciences Mall
Trees: The Building Blocks of a Global Bio-
economy
4:00 pm to 8:30 pm
Dr. Ian de la Roche, President and CEO of
FPInnovations, will be the guest speaker at
the Annual Forestry Lecture in Sustainability
sponsored by the Koerner Foundation. All are
welcome to view research poster displays prior
to the lecture and to join us at a reception
immediately following. Admission is free. For
more information, visit www.forestry.ubc.ca or
contact 604-822-6784
Forest Sciences Centre, 2424 Main Mall
WEDNESDAY  MARCH  12
Obesity: The Skinny on Weight Loss: Dieting
and Physical Activity in a Weight Conscious
Society
7:30PM-9:30PM
Join the Heart and Stroke Foundation of B.C. &
Yukon for an evening with leading experts in
weight loss, eating, and physical activity who
will answer the age old question: Is dieting safe
and do any diets really work? If not, what is
the alternative? Please RSVP to 604.736.4404
Ext.270 or research@hsf.bc.ca
Robson Square - 800 Robson Street
Wine Library Open House
10:00AM-4:00PM
Free 30 minute tours throughout the day. Tour
the UBC Wine Library, one ofthe most exclusive
wine libraries in the world. To register contact:
wine@interchange.ubc.ca, www.landfood.ubc.
ca/wine
Nutrition and Health Building - 2205 East Mall
THURSDAY MARCH  13
Sustainability and Social Enterprise-James
Tansey
5:00PM-7:30PM
This presentation focuses on the findings of a
survey of social enterprises across North America
and Europe and includes presentations by MBA
students who have developed business plans in
this domain. Reception from 5:00PM to 6:00PM
Contact: Jessie Lam, jessie.lam@sauder.ubc.ca,
or visit: www.sauder.ubc.ca
Robson Square Theatre - 800 Robson Street
FRIDAY MARCH  14
Celebrate Hearing Health - Day 2
10:00am-4:00pm
Interested in Audiology or Speech-Language
Pathology? Are you a student exploring career
options in health care and technology? Are
you wondering if you're listening to your iPod
at a dangerous level? Discover the career
opportunities available to you! Contact: Valter
Cioccadirector@audiospeech@ubc.ca
IRC- B27-28 (Woodward Building)
All Celebrate Research Events:
www.celebrateresearch.ubc.ca
Celebrate Research Week is an important
part of UBC's 2008 Centenary year.
Check out all the Centenary events at:
www.100.ubc.ca
^2°o,
Cc
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BY BASIL WAUGH
It is every Olympic athlete's
nightmare. After years of training
and sacrifice, an injury or failed
blood test suddenly disqualifies
you from competition.
It is something Dr. Bob
McCormack, Canada's Chief
Medical Officer (CMO) for the
2008 Olympic Summer Games in
Beijing, knows a little about. Set
to represent Canada at the 1980
games in Moscow, the former
track star's Olympic dreams were
dashed when the Western world
boycotted the games due to Cold
War tensions.
"It was pretty unlucky," says
McCormack, a UBC orthopedic
surgeon who watched the
boycotted games on TV while
holding two national middle
distance track records at the
time. "But it is huge honour to
now be able to help others to try
to achieve their own dreams. I
live a little vicariously through
them, I guess."
UGHTIN#PATH
CONNECTIONS FOR THE FUTURE
PRIL
WESTERN CANADA'S PREMIER TECHNOLOGY
EVENT FOR RESEARCH & HIGHER EDUCATION
Dr. BradC. Wheeler, CIO, Indiana University
Dr. Steven Hand, Chief Architect, Visualization <& Management
at Citrix and Senior Lecturer, University ofCambridge
CHOOSE FROM OVER 30 SESSIONS
WITH A FOCUS ON VIRTUALIZATION
AND NEXT GENERATION NETWORKS
INCLUDING:
• REGIONAL AND NATIONAL INITIATIVES
■ NETWORK PLANNING Et STRATEGIES
INNOVATIONS IN NETWORK RESEARCH
COLLABORATIONS Et LEARNING TECHNOLOGIES
INFORMATION SECURITY Et SHARED RESOURCES
Learn about new and innovative technologies that are
being used to enhance research and education.
Connect with some of BC's most prominent researchers,
academics, IT professionals, executives and government
leaders.
Dr. Bob McCormack.
In Beijing, McCormack will
lead a small army of sports
physicians, physiotherapists
and nutritionists, overseeing
everything from medical care
to banned-substance testing, to
ensure Canada's athletes are in
peak condition.
McCormack's team will also
be involved in two research
projects: One will investigate
how the Beijing's notoriously
bad air quality will impact
athletes; the other is a national
study on the athletic benefits of
food supplements.
J ^0 TMO
QOO
McCormack will not be the
only UBC sports physician
helping athletes to achieve the
Olympic motto of "faster, higher,
stronger" this summer. Each
of the 29 sports has a sport
federation (NSF) physician
responsible for assisting with
medical care and doping controls
for international athletes during
competition. Two will be
from UBC: Dr. Don McKenzie
(canoeing) and Dr. Babak
Shadgan (wrestling).
"UBC is really well
represented in Beijing," says
McCormack. "UBC has been a
hub for cutting edge research in
sports medicine for some time.
There are excellent people here,
many who are working with
national and professional teams."
As CMOs and NSF doctors
work under the leadership of
a head physician appointed by
the host country, UBC will play
an even more prominent role in
2010: the Vancouver Olympic
Committee (VANOC) has
named UBC sports doctor Dr.
Jack Taunton to the Vancouver
Winter Games' top medical
position.
As a NSF doctor
for a combat
sport, Shadgan
will be a busy
man in Beijing.
When wresters suffer sprains,
dislocations or cuts, the PhD
student will be responsible
for overseeing medical care. If
an athlete is too wounded to
safely continue, Shadgan - who
researches muscle injuries at
flfc
UBC's new Muscle Biophysics
Laboratory - has the difficult
task of disqualifying the athlete
from the match.
In the early 1990s, Shadgan
became Iran's first accredited
sports physician; he has since
devoted his career to injury
prevention. For the past four
years has been tracking and
analyzing wrestling injuries
in international competitions,
including the Athens Olympics.
After collecting more data in
Beijing, he will present to the
International Federation of
Associated Wrestling Styles a
series of suggested rule and
technique changes to reduce the
rate and severity of injuries.
A   With three
medals in
2004, flatwater
canoeing is one
">* *"™**^    of Canada's
most successful Olympic
events. McKenzie, Director
of Sports Medicine at UBC,
attributes some of this success to
pioneering research at UBC that
used science to improve athletic
training.
"Back in the 1980s, we started
measuring performance and
using science to determine how
to improve performance," said
McKenzie, who fits athletes
with heart monitors Global
Positioning Systems (GPS)
to monitor their training.
"Combining science and training
was something UBC was
instrumental in and still is."
McKenzie, for whom Beijing
will be his seventh Olympics,
says the thought of helping
athletes defy the limits of
physical performance keeps him
coming back to international
event. "It is pretty exciting to
watch evolution happen right
before your eyes."
McKenzie is known
internationally as founder of
the Abreast in a Boat non-profit
organization that promotes
dragon boating to raise
awareness about breast cancer
and to encourage those living
with breast cancer to live full
and active lives. 13
JOB continued from
I
BC.N/fr
EOOS CONFERENCE SPONSORS
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find a good fit.
"Early voluntary mobility
can improve wages, but after
five years of working you start
to lose ground if haven't found
your place in the labour market.
Even if you're not fired or laid
off, changing jobs later in your
career doesn't tend to bring any
monetary benefits."
In fact, frequent changes may
start to stigmatize one's career,
says Fuller, and workers who
change jobs too frequently also
lose out on the wage premiums
associated with accumulating
some tenure with an employer.
"It brings diminishing returns.
Employers may start wondering
why aren't you aren't able to
stay in one place."
What really surprised her,
says Fuller, is how these findings
contradict what many young
people accept as sound career
advice, "that success no longer
comes from staying in one place,
that this is an old fashioned
model not relevant for today's
workplace."
She observes that this "new
norm" came about during a
period of corporate downsizing
and outsourcing, giving rise
to rhetoric that painted job
mobility as a glamorous means
to higher pay and better status.
"During the '90s, the New
York Times ran a series on 'the
end of the job.' There was the
idea of the migrant professional
and the understanding that
companies no longer expect
lifetime loyalty from their
employees, who in turn wouldn't
expect any job security."
Fuller says her findings
provide a cautionary tale
that the labour market hasn't
fundamentally changed, and that
the work model our parents and
grandparents enjoyed may be
the best way to get ahead in life
after all.
"In a way the ideal is the old
story. You can afford a divorce
from employers a few times, but
after a while, it diminishes your
attractiveness."
Fuller is currently researching
the earning outcomes for
Canadian workers who get
caught in cycles of temporary
work compared to permanent
positions. 13 UBC    REPORTS     |     MARCH
I     7
Heavy medal:
UBC's Olympic history
As UBC this year celebrates the Centenary of the University Act, we look back at our Olympic history. In
1928, Harry Warren became UBC's first Olympian, running track at the Summer Games in Amsterdam. Since
then, 213 UBC athletes, coaches and managers have competed for Canada at the Olympics.
1932 LOS ANGELES
1936 BERLIN
1956 MELBOURNE
1960 ROME
1964 TOKYO
1968 GRENOBLE
1972 MUNICH
1984 LOS ANGELES
1992 BARCELONA
1996 ATLANTA
2000 SYDNEY
Ned Pratt
Bob Osborne
Wayne Pretty
Bill McKerlich
Doug McDonald
Bob Wilson
Phil Kueber
Laurie West
Dick McClure
David Helliwell
Carl Ogawa
Walter d'Hondt
Archie McKinnon
Don Arnold
Lome Loomer
Bill McKerlich
Walter d'Hondt
Archie McKinnon
Don Arnold
Glen Mervyn
John Lecky
Nelson Kuhn
David Anderson
Sohen Biln
George Hungerford
Roger Jackson
Roger Bourbonnais
Ken Broderick
Gary Dineen
Barry McKenzie
Terry O'Malley
David Miller
Paul Cote
John Ekels
Bill Mahony
Tricia Smith
Bruce Ford
Pat Turner
Paul Steele
Sue Holloway
Megan Delehanty
Brenda Taylor
Mike Rascher
Kathleen Heddle
Kathleen Heddle
Lauryssa Biesenthal
Lauryssa Biesenthal
Emma Robinson
Heather Davis
Doubles Rowing
Basketball
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Four Rowing
Four Rowing
Four Rowing
Four Rowing
Eights
Eights
Eights
Eights
Eights
Eights
Eights
Eights
Eights
Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
Rowing
Pair Rowing
Pair Rowing
Ice Hockey
Ice Hockey
Ice Hockey
Ice Hockey
Ice Hockey
Yachting
Yachting
Yachting
Swimming
Pair Rowing
Quad Skulls
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Pairs Kayaking
Fours Kayaking
Eights Rowing
Fours Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Pairs Rowing
Eights Rowing
Pairs Rowing
Fours Rowing
Fours Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
Eights Rowing
For more on UBC and the Olympics, visit: www.gothunderbirds.ca/ubc_the_olympics.
Bronze
Silver
lver
lver
lver
lver
lver
lver
lver
lver
Silver
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
lver
lver
lver
lver
lver
lver
lver
lver
Silver
Gold
Gold
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Silver
Bronze
Gold
Gold
Silver
Bronze
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
Gold
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
SJC
UBC
sap
St. John's College
UBC Guest
Accommodation
St. John's College extends an
invitation to visitors to UBC to stay
in our quiet, comfortable, and
well-appointed guest rooms.
Available year-round, guest rooms
are furnished with a double or
queen bed, private washroom,
telephone, television, coffee
maker, bar fridge and internet
connection.
Dining with College residents in our
spacious Dining Hall is an integral part
of the life of the College, and meals
are included in the guest room fees.
For further information or to make a reservation, contact us by
phone at 604-822-6522, or by e-mail: sjc.reception@ubc.ca
www.stjohns.ubc.ca
ike's
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Irving K. Barber Learning Centre
Opening
March 72
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WE'RE OPEN
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Accommodations to match our spectacular setting!
Warm, welcoming suites. Kitchens, flat panel TV and wireless
internet. Natural wood and stone, king beds with luxury linens,
conveniently located on campus.
All new. Right here.
West Coast Suites
at The University of British Columbia
www.ubcconferences.com
Reservations 604.822.1000 Toll Free 1.888.822.1030 I     UBC    REPORTS     |     MARCH     6,    200!
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