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UBC Publications

UBC Reports Oct 20, 1976

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reports
Vol. 22, No. 36, Oct. 20, 1976. Published by Information Services, University of B.C., 2075
WesbrookJVJall. Vancouver. B.C. V6T 1W5. Judith Walker^dilfl^iSSN 0497-2929.
UBC VALUABLES MARKED
Operation Identification
makes thievery hard work
It used to be thought that UBC was
an easy place to steal from. The
laboratories are full of very expensive
equipment; typewriters and tape-
recorders are commonplace. And the
experienced thief can easily remove
serial numbers.
But that is rapidly changing. UBC is
now taking part in an RCMP program
called "Operation Identification."
Every item of value on the campus
is being engraved with the account
number of the department that owns
it. That number will be filed in a
computer at RCMP headquarters in
Ottawa so that not only can the item
be identified immediately as belonging to UBC, it can
also be traced back
to the department
from anywhere in
Canada.
"A lot of buildings are vulnerable in
the sense that they have to remain
open at night for night school classes."
And, he adds, a lot of students aren't
too careful about locking doors when
they leave a campus building after an
evening of studying.
UBC decided to implement Operation Identification after hearing of
the success the program has had in
Burnaby where most private houses
and all public schools have valuables
marked. Since the program began in
that area in May there has been a
36-per-cent reduction in residential
burglaries as compared to last year
during the same months.
NXA*^-
niSSt-
M.I
#S$rV
PRO
Recovering goods
stolen from B.C. in
other parts of the
country is quite
common, Dave Hannah, acting superintendent of traffic
and security for
UBC. The RCMP
have just recently
recovered a large
number of stolen
articles in eastern
Canada, for example. "We feel that some of it may
belong to us, but we have no way of
identifying it," he says.
Theft of property costs UBC
$25,000 to $30,000 a year. Articles
most commonly stolen are pocket
calculators, overhead projectors, typewriters, chairs, desks — almost any
kind of furniture that can be carried
away, in fact.
urn
The
self wil
terrent
thieves,
hopes.
marking    it-
I act as a de-
for     most
Mr. Hannah
The account
OP^jcATlOH
HCMP
^rAT»0NAII
number will be
marked on the item
with an electric engraver and cannot be
removed.
So far all valuables in the traffic
and security office
have been marked as
well as some in the
president's office
and in Physical
Plant. The campus
patrol will continue
this month marking
valuables in the smaller departments
while the larger departments have been
asked to arrange teams to engrave
account numbers on valuables during
the evening or on a weekend.
Students in residence will also be
able to have their personal belongings
identified by having their social insurance   number  engraved  on valuables.
RVCtO
Briefs on UEL
requested by
UBC committee
An ad hoc Committee on the
Future of the University Endowment
Lands established by President
Douglas Kenny has asked members of
the University community to submit
briefs for consideration by Nov. 5.
Dean of Graduate Studies Peter
Larkin, chairman of the 16-member
committee, said briefs should be sent
to him at the Graduate Studies office
in the General Services Administration
Building on campus.
Dean Larkin said the committee
had been asked to report to President
Kenny by Nov. 15.
The committee's terms of reference
are "to advise the president on the
future development of the University
Endowment Lands, keeping in mind
the special nature of the endowment
lands, their original purpose, their
present use as well as the future land
and related requirements of the
University of British Columbia."
Prof. Larkin said the committee
would welcome briefs from campus
organizations and individuals on any
matters affecting the endowment
lands.
The committee's report will serve as
the basis for a submission by the
University to the Universfty
Endowment Lands Special Planning
Project, which has established an
office at 2174 Western Parkway in the
University Village area near the
campus.
The UEL study team, which was
established in July by Environment
Minister James Nielsen, plans to hold a
public forum on the endowment lands
next Wednesday (Oct. 27) at 7:30
p.m. in the Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre.
The primary objective of the UEL
study team is to develop
recommendations for integrated land
use and planning that will assist the
provincial government in making
decisions for the future use of the
UEL.
The University Endowment Lands
on the end of Point Grey were set
aside by the provincial government in
1923 to provide land and revenue for
UBC. The University campus occupies
about 1,000 acres on the tip of Point
Grey. About 750 acres of the
endowment lands have been sold or
leased by the provincial government,
mostly for residential construction,
and about 1,750 remain undeveloped. Schwarz talk disruptions provoke
statement on freedom of speech
Three speeches delivered to campus
audiences last week by Harry Schwarz,
a member of parliament in South
Africa, were seriously disrupted by a
group of people waving placards and
chanting slogans.
The group, calling themselves the
Ad Hoc Committee to Support the
Just Struggle of the Azanian People,
interrupted the three public speeches
given by Mr. Schwarz on aspects of
South Africa with chants of "fascists
have no right to speak" and "go
home."
On Wednesday, the day following
the first speech, President Douglas
Kenny issued the following statement.
I deplore in the strongest terms the
recent disruption by a group of
individuals of a lecture given on
campus by Mr. Harry Schwarz, a
member of parliament for the
Progressive Reform Party of South
Africa.
The denial of the right of free
speech to a visitor to the University is
a total rejection of the values on which
a university is founded. Without
freedom of thought, freedom of
enquiry and freedom of speech a
university cannot exist. These
freedoms must be maintained at all
costs.
I would be greatly disappointed if
the individuals who took part in this
offensive demonstration were UBC
people. Such undemocratic refusal to
grant a fair hearing to any person's
views is not acceptable behavior by
any member of the University.
Journalism at UBC?
A committee was established in
the summer to investigate whether
or not a graduate journalism
program should be instituted at
UBC. The committee, headed by
Dr. Fred Bowers of the English
department, would like to receive
written submissions from interested
students and faculty members who
have views about a program of this
nature — whether or not it is
advisable and how it might be
organized.
Submissions should be sent to
Dr. Bowers by the end of
November so that the committee
can report to the Faculty of
Graduate Studies by the new year.
The statement was spontaneously
and unanimously endorsed by the
Senate of the University later that day.
Chemistry professor
honored again for work
Laurance Hall and medal
Prof. Laurance D. Hall, of UBC's
chemistry department, has again been
honored for his research activities, this
time by the Chemical Society of
London, England.
Prof. Hall attended the society's fall
meeting in Sheffield late in September
to receive the Corday-Morgan Medal
and Prize, which includes a cash
award.
The award was for Prof. Hall's
contribution to the development of
nuclear magnetic resonance techniques
relating to the understanding of
molecular structure and conformation.
In 1974, Prof. Hall was the
recipient of the Carbohydrate
Chemistry Award of the British
Chemical Society, and of the Prof.
Jacob Biely Faculty Research Prize
from UBC.
The following year Prof. Hall was
awarded the Merck, Sharpe and
Dohme Lecture Award by the
Chemical Institute of Canada.
Prof. Hall joins a distinguished
group of UBC chemists who have been
awarded the Corday-Morgan Medal
and Prize in the past. Previous winners
were Prof. Neil Bartlett, now at the
University of California at Berkeley;
Prof. A. I. Scott, now at Yale
University; and Prof. Frank McCapra,
who is this year a visiting professor at
UBC on leave from the University of
Sussex in England.
Senate
A report on the Bookstore
A survey of capital needs and
long-term objectives of UBC's
Bookstore is being carried out by
Bookstore manager John Hedgecock,
President Douglas Kenny told the
October meeting of Senate last week.
President Kenny, who was
reporting to Senate on a $108,039
surplus made by the Bookstore in the
last fiscal year, said the manager's
report would be submitted to a joint
faculty-student Bookstore committee
that reports to the president.
President Kenny said the surplus
represented approximately three per
cent of the total revenue of the
Bookstore in the 1975-76 fiscal year.
He said he had checked with people
both inside and outside the University
and had been told that a three per cent
profit was on the "knife edge of fiscal
viability."
A slight change in buying habits
could easily change the surplus into a
loss, the president said.
President Kenny emphasized that
the surplus was the result of the sale of
stationery, calculators and sundry
items, and not the sale of text and
general books.
The Bookstore had gross sales of
$1.6 million on textbooks, which
resulted in a loss of $6,700. Gross sales
of general books amounted to
$395,000 and a loss of slightly over
$11,000. UBC's annual book clearance
last year had gross sales of $149,000
and a loss of slightly over $1 7,000.
Altogether, the president said, the
Bookstore's loss on book operations
totalled $35,136.
The sale of stationery through the
Bookstore yielded a profit of
$119,606, the president said, but 30
per cent of the sales were to UBC
faculties and departments and
represented an internal transfer of
University funds.
Calculator sales resulted in a profit
of $14,430 and the sale of other
Bookstore items resulted in a profit of
$9,138.
The president said the Board of
Governors had a policy that the
Bookstore must operate on a
self-sustaining basis for both operating
and capital funds. He said this policy
was a requirement of the provincial
government.
The president added that provincial
government policy on capital grants
may change in the future as the result
2/UBC Reports/Oct 20, 1976 of the recent passage by the
government of the B.C. Educational
Institutions Capital Financing
Authority Act, which is designed to
assist educational institutions to
finance capital expenditures by
borrowing.
He said the University is seeking
clarification from the Universities
Council and the provincial government
on "the rules of the game" for
borrowing capital under the new act.
The president also assured Senate
that the 1975-76 surplus and a
$119,358 surplus from the previous
fiscal year had been placed in a reserve
for future capital expansion of the
Bookstore.
Replying to a question. President
Kenny said he hoped the University
would not have to draw on the surplus
if operating deficits occurred in the
Bookstore in the future.
He said the University might be
forced to dip into the surplus by an
unexpected drop in student enrolment
or an economic depression that
reduced grants from the government.
He added, however, that as a general
approach, University policy would be
to leave the reserve intact for future
expansion of the Bookstore.
On another matter related to the
Bookstore, Senate voted to ask its
nominating committee to strike an ad
hoc committee to consider a motion
submitted by four members of the
Faculty of Arts.
The motion asked that Senate
adopt the principle that the Bookstore
is an academic service to the
University analagous to that of the
library and the Computing Centre,
contributing services of a broad
education character.
The motion also asked that an ad
hoc committee be formed to examine
the implications of the principle as
well as a series of eight proposals
related to the administration and
financing of the Bookstore.
Dr. Malcolm McGregor, of the
Senate agenda committee, said it was
felt a special committee was necessary
because the motion contained
financial implications.
New exam policies approved
New policies and practices related
to student examinations at UBC were
approved by Senate after review by
University faculties and schools.
Senate approved five
recommendations, which will apply in
all UBC faculties with the exception of
the Faculty of Graduate Studies and
post-graduate professional faculties.
Recommendation 1 of the report,
prepared by a committee chaired by
Prof. Malcolm McGregor, Classics,
urges faculties to make full use of
December and April formal exam
periods.
It also provides for December and
April exams for all courses designed
for first- and second-year students,
unless exemption is granted by the
relevant dean or department head "for
sound academic reason," and for the
reporting of results in the same form
as final results.
Recommendation 2 called on
Senate to re-emphasize and insist upon
adherence to a previous statement of
policy that forbids the holding of any
exam, formal or informal, during the
two weeks preceding the scheduled
exam periods in December and April.
The policy does not apply to regular
weekly or bi-weekly tests or to current
practices in laboratories.
Recommendation 3 requires
"scrupulous adherence by invigilators
to the regulations governing
invigilation of exams," and
Recommendation 4 provides for slight
revision of instructions printed on
exam booklets.
Recommendation 5 urges faculties
to curtail the use of take-home exams,
both in the extent of their
administration and in the weight
assigned to them in the calculation of
marks.
Prof. McGregor said the faculties
were in almost complete agreement
with the report, which had been
prepared in response to reports of
abuses and complaints from students
and faculty members.
Non-smokers liberation
Senate has reaffirmed its ban on
smoking in University classrooms at
the request of student senator Joan
Blandford.
Ms. Blandford was supported in her
request for reaffirmation of the ban by
President Douglas Kenny, who said
that if Senate had passed rules they
should be adhered to, "otherwise we
shouldn't have them."
The president said deans,
department heads and individual
faculty members had an obligation to
ensure that the rule against smoking
was enforced at UBC.
Ms. Blandford said it was difficult
for non-smokers to concentrate in
classrooms where smoking was
permitted. She added: "It's also very
difficult for a student to stand up in
the classroom and request that
students not smoke when the faculty
member is smoking."
President Kenny said no-smoking
signs are available for posting
throughout the University. They may
be obtained from the planning division
of Physical Plant, local 2513.
Tenure review proceeding
A review of tenure by UBC's Board
of Governors is proceeding and a
report is expected before the end of
the current academic year. Senate was
told at its October meeting.
In a letter to Senate, the secretary
to the Board said specific attention is
being directed to the criteria used for
granting tenure, the relative weights
placed on the criteria, the methods
used in ascertaining performance by
faculty members, and the extent to
which the criteria are applied
consistent with the interests of the
department and the University in
maintaining strength and balance.
The tenure review, which is being
carried out by the Board's staff
committee, was requested in a motion
passed by Senate in February.
Student elections set
Dates for student elections to
UBC's two main governing bodies —
the Board of Governors and the Senate
— were approved at the Oct. 13
meeting of Senate.
Students will go to the polls on Jan.
19, 1977, to elect two members to the
15-member Board of Governors and
17 members to the 86-member Senate.
Those elected will hold their posts for
one year.
Senate, which is responsible for
regulations governing elections to the
Board and Senate, approved the
following schedule of dates for the
elections: call for nominations - Nov.
19; close of nominations - 4 p.m. on
Dec. 21; advance polls - 5 to 7 p.m. on
Jan. 18; election day - Jan. 19.
All elections to the Board and
Senate are conducted by UBC's
registrar, J. E. A. Parnall. Students
elected to the Board will take office
next February. Student senators will
take office at the April meeting of
Senate.
UBC Reports/Oct 20, 1976/3 8f«ciM.eou.ECTi<w*
NEXT WEEK AT UBC
Not teas mutt reach Inf or matk>nServices,MainMall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5p.m. Thursday of wNk preceding publicationof notice.
12:30p.m. EXERCISE CLASS for faculty and staff, men and
women. Class meets five times a week from 12:30 to
1:05 p.m. Gym B, South Campus P.E. Complex. Call
Recreation UBC, 228-3996, for information.
MONDAY, OCT. 18
11:30a.m. COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. Dr. James
C. King, IBM, Thomas J. Watson Research Center,
New York, on Proving the Correctness of Programs.
Room 308, old Engineering Building.
12:30p.m. CANCER RESEARCH CENTRE. Nelly Auersperg.
Cancer Research Centre, UBC, on Report on NCI
Workshop: Viruses and Human Cancer. Library,
Cancer Research Centre, Block B, Medical Sciences
Building.
3:00 p.m. CARDIOVASCULAR STUDY GROUP. Dr. Leon I.
Goldberg, professor of medicine and pharmacology.
University of Chicago, on Cardiovascular Drugs.
Lecture Hall 4, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre.
3:30p.m. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE SEMINAR. Dr. S.L.
Brumelle, Commerce and Business Administration,
UBC, on A Generalization of Erlang's Loss System.
Room 321, Angus Building.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Peter
Sullivan, graduate student. Mechanical Engineering,
UBC, on Three-Dimensional Effects on Wind-
Induced Galloping Oscillations. Room 1215, Civil
and Mechanical Engineering Building.
KABUKI FILM presented by Tetsuro Nakamura,
Kabuki expert. Sponsored by Asian Studies, UBC.
Room 100, Buchanan Building.
4:00p.m. ASTRONOMY AND SPACE SCIENCE SEMINAR.
Dr. Gilles Beaudet, University of Montreal, on The
Deuterium Problem. Room 318, Hennings Building.
BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. Larry Skogerson,
biochemistry department, Columbia University,
New York, on Interaction of Inhibitors of Protein
Synthesis with Yeast Ribosomes. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
4:30p.m. PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. William Prince,
A.R.C. Unit on Invertebrate Physiology, zoology
department. University of Cambridge, England, on
Role of Cyclic AMP and Calcium in Fluid Secretion
in Salivary Glands. Room 2449, Biological Sciences
Building.
7:00 p.m. INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING. Emphasis on
dances from eastern Europe. Every Monday until 10
p.m. International House. For further information,
call R.Fraley, 228-2083.
8:00p.m. IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Marvin Rittenberg,
professor of microbiology. University of Oregon
Medical School, Portland, on An In Vitro Model to
Study the IgM to IgG Switch in Antibody Production. Salon B, Faculty Club.
DR. J.F. McCREARY LECTURE. Dr. Leon I.
Goldberg, professor of medicine and pharmacology,
chairman of Committee on Clinical Pharmacology,
University of Chicago, on The Development of New
Drugs: Interprofessional Implications. Lecture Hall
2,   Woodward  Instructional  Resources Centre.
TUESDAY, OCT. 19
12 noon CANADIAN   CITIZENSHIP   REGISTRATION.
Continues until 8 p.m. Tuesdays until Nov. 9 at
International House. For further information, call
666-3971 (days) or 253-4391 (evenings).
12:30p.m. BOTANY LECTURE. Richard Hebda, Botany,
UBC, on The Birth and Death of a Raised Bog: The
Paleoecology of Burn's Bog, Delta, B.C. Room 3219,
Biological SciencesBuilding.
3:30p.m. OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. Dr. R.W. Burling.
Institute of Oceanography, UBC, on Center of Cold
Resources Engineering (CORE) at Memorial University, St. John's, Newfoundland. Room 1465,
west wing. Biological SciencesBuilding.
4:00p.m. BIOCHEMICAL DISCUSSION GROUP. Dr. Mike
Smith, Biochemistry, UBC, on Sequence of Bacteriophage Phi X174 DNA. Lecture Hall 5, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
4:30p.m. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. L. Weiler, Chemistry,
UBC, on An Organic Chemist's View of One-Dimensional Metals. Room 250, Chemistry Building.
REGENT COLLEGE FACULTY SEMINAR. Dr.
Grace Dyck, Trinity Western College, on Chains of
Human Freedom: Currents in 19th Century Philosophy. Regent College, 2130 Wesbrook Crescent.
5:00p.m. CURLING. A mixed league for novices and experienced curlers. Continues Tuesday evenings until
7:00 p.m. For more information, call 228-4186 or
228-3478.
7:30p.m. BADMINTON CLUB. New faculty and staff members welcome. Club meets Tuesday and Friday
evenings from 7:30 to 11:00 in Gym A, Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre.
8:00p.m. CUSO Development Awareness Lecture. Dr. RS.
Anderson, Institute of Asian and Slavonic Research,
UBC, leads the discussion on Cultivating Famine.
The second in a series of five lectures on "Conflicts
in Development." Room 202, Buchanan Building.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY LECTURE. Dr.
Richard Unger, History, UBC, on Excavating Viking
Ships. Room 104, Lasserre Building.
8:30 p.m. OPENING OF EXHIBIT Bo'jou Neejee, a collection
of Canadian Indian artifacts and works of art from
the mid-19th century on loan to the Museum of
Anthropology from the National Museum of Man in
Ottawa. Reception follows. Museumof Anthropology. On display at the museum until Dec. 31.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20
12:30p.m. NOON-HOUR CONCERT. Paul Douglas, flute; and
Fredrick Geoghegan, organ, play Music of Vinci,
Vivaldi and Marcello. Recital Hall, Music Building.
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. C. Bates,
Departments of Anaesthesia and Pharmacology,
UBC, on Immunologic Effects of Anaesthetics.
Room 221, Block C, Medical SciencesBuilding.
12:35p.m. FREESEE FILMS. The second of seven films from
the Civilisation series — The Great Thaw. Auditorium, Student Union Building. Free.
2:30p.m. APPLIED MATH SEMINAR. Prof. B.N. Moyls,
Mathematics, UBC, on The Road to the Institute of
Applied Mathematics at UBC. Room 202, Mathematics Building.
3:30p.m. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. G.S.
McNab, University of Oxford, England, on Stereo-
photogrammetry Applied to Spouted Beds. Room
206, Chemical Engineering Building.
STATISTICS WORKSHOP. SG. Ghurye, visiting
professor, Mathematics, UBC, on Identification of
Parameters by the Distribution of the Maximum
Random Variable: An Exercise in Calculus. Room
321, Angus Building.
4:30 p.m. ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr.
P. Ives, Institute of Animal Resource Ecology, UBC,
on "Ladybird, ladybird fly away ..." Where, When
and How? Room 2449, Biological SciencesBuilding.
HISTORY COLLOQUIUM. Prof. George Egerton
on Great Britain and the American Debate on the
Ratification of the Treaty of Versailles 1919-1920.
Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
7:30p.m. FOLK DANCING. A program of beginning and intermediate dances open to all. Continues Wednesday
evenings until 10:30 p.m. International House. Call
224-0226 or 228-8415 for more information.
CANADIANS FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. Organizational Meeting for citizens concerned with the
state and future of medical research funding in
Canada. Auditorium, Vancouver Public Library, 750
Burrard St.
Please turn over WEDNESDAY, OCT. 20
Continued
7:30 p.m. DENTISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. Bengt F. Ingervall,
School of Dentistry, University of Gothenburg,
Sweden, on Recent Scandinavian Studies of Functional Disturbances of the Occlusion and their
Relationship to Orthodontics. Music Room, Faculty
Club.
8:00p.m. AND MISS REARDON DRINKS A LITTLE. Play
by Paul Zindel performed nightly until Saturday,
Oct. 23. Tickets: $3, students $2. For reservations
call 228-2678. Dorothy Somerset Studio.
THURSDAY, OCT. 21
12 noon RESEARCH,   SCIENCE   AND  TECHNOLOGY
WORKSHOP. W.H.C. Simmonds, Industrial Programmes, NRC, on The Usefulness of Technological
Forecasting for Industry. Conference Centre, Angus
Building. Fee, $25. For further information, call
Chris de Bresson at 228-6153, or Executive Programmes at 228-3200.
12:30p.m. HABITAT FILM PREVIEW from the UBC Centre
for Human Settlements. Three European films are
featured in the second of a continuing weekly series
of representative national films prepared for the
Habitat conference. Discussion follows led by Dr.
Peter Oberlander and Jim Carney, Centre for Human
Settlements. Room B79, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre.
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA directed
by Douglas Talney plays Music of Schumann, Grieg
and Weber. Old Auditorium.
2:30p.m. CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR. Dr. M.J.
Crooks, Physics, UBC, on Is the Superfluid Transition Temperature in 4He affected by Heat Flow?
Room 318, Hennings Building.
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM. Prof. L.C. Woods, Institute of Mathematics,
University of Oxford, England, on Entropy and Pink
Elephants. Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. R. Drever, Department
of Natural Philosophy, University of Glasgow, Scotland, on Gravitational Wave Experiments. Room
201, Hennings Building.
8:00p.m. GRADUATION RECITAL. David Keeble, composer, with Music of Keeble. Recital Hall, Music
Building.
10:30 p.m. UBC PUBLIC AF FAIRS presented by the Centre for
Continuing Education. This week's program is The
Middle East. Channel 10, Vancouver Cablevision.
FRIDAY, OCT. 22
9:00a.m. PEDIATRICS GRAND ROUNDS. Dr. Alexander
Ferguson, UBC, on Malnutrition and Immunity.
Lecture Room B, Heather Pavilion, Vancouver
General Hospital.
3:30p.m. COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Harvey
Abramson, Computer Science, UBC, on TOFI: A
Tree Oriented String Interpreter for the Design and
Implementation of Semantics. Room 326, Angus
Building.
FINANCE WORKSHOP. Dr Robert White, Commerce and Business Adminiswation, UBC, on The
Price Effects of Rights Offerings. Room 325, Angus
Building.
8:00 p.m. UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA directed
by Douglas Talney play Music of Schumann, Grieg
and Weber. Old Auditorium.
SATURDAY, OCT. 23
8:00p.m. DISCO DANCING in The Pit. Music supplied by
CITR radio disk jockeys. Continues until 12:30 a.m.
Admission free. Student Union Building.
8:15p.m. VANCOUVER INSTITUTE LECTURE. Prof.
Thomas C. Hall, director. Cancer Control Agency of
B.C., and professor of medicine, UBC, on Emerging
Understanding of Cancer Causation. Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. NEXT WEEK flTUBCl
Notices must reach InformationServices^MainMall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5p.m.Thursday of week preceding publicationof notice.
SUNDAY, OCT. 24
3:00 p.m. SLAHAL, a singing and gambling game of the
Coast Salish Indians, demonstrated by Wendy
Stuart. Participants will play the game
accompanied by singing and drumming. Museum of
Anthropology, Northwest Marine Drive. Regular
museum admission charged.
MONDAY, OCT. 25
TERM PAPER CLINIC. Appointments available
anytime between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. for the next
two weeks for students requiring individual
assistance locating Sedgewick Library materials for
term papers and essays. Ends Nov. 5. Sign up at
Sedgewick Library Information Desk.
12:30 p.m. CANCER RESEARCH SEMINAR. Connie
Gregory, B.C. Cancer Foundation, on
Differentiation Markers in Mouse and Human
Hemopoietic Cells. Library, Cancer Research
Centre, Block B, Medical Sciences Building.
3:45 p.m. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE SEMINAR. Dr. M. L.
Puterman, Commerce and Business Administration,
UBC, on Convergence of Policy Improvement in
Dynamic Programming. Room 321, Angus.
4:00 p.m. ASTRONOMY AND SPACE SCIENCE SEMINAR.
Dr. John Kormendy, University of California,
Berkeley, on Brightness Distributions in Compact
and Normal Galaxies.  Room 318, Hennings.
4:30 p.m. CANCER CONTROL SEMINAR. Dr. David Kessel,
Pharmacology and Oncology, Milton A. Darling
Memorial Center, Detroit, Mich., on Anticancer
Drug Effects on Cell Surfaces. Second floor
conference room. Cancer Control Agency of B.C.,
2656 Heather St.
TUESDAY, OCT. 26
3:30 p.m. ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Graham Good,
English, UBC, on Re-Reading Stevenson: The
Novel of Action. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
4:30 p.m. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Prof. E. Atkins, Physics,
University of Bristol, England, on X-ray Structure
of Biopolymers. Room 250, Chemistry Building.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 27
12:00 noon RESOURCE POLICY AND MANAGEMENT
ISSUES WORKSHOP. Hon. J. V. Clyne, former
chairman, MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. and now
member of board of directors of that company, on
Resource Policy in British Columbia. Room 125,
Angus Building.
12:30 p.m. HISTORY LECTURE. Prof. Derek Pearsall,
Medieval Studies, University of York, England, on
The Troilus Frontispiece and Chaucer's Audience.
Room 102, Lasserre Building.
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Prof. James
Kutney, Chemistry, UBC, on Studies on Clinically
Important Anti-Tumor Agents. Room 221, Block
C, Medicai Sciences Building.
NOON HOUR CONCERT. Gloria Doubleday,
mezzo-soprano; and Harold Brown, piano, perform
Music of Barber and Granados. Recital Hall, Music
Building.
12:35 p.m. FREESEE FILM SERIES. The third of seven films
from the Civilisation series — Romance and
Reality. Auditorium, Student Union Building.
Free.
3:30 p.m. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. A.
Hirata, Waseda University, Tokyo, on Interfacial
Velocity Effect on Mass Transfer. Room 206,
Chemical Engineering Building.
ENGLISH SEMINAR. Prof. Derek Pearsall,
Medieval Studies, University of York, England, on
Piers Plowman — The Text and the Texts.
Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS WORKSHOP.
Prof. Cesareo Villegas, Mathematics, SFU, on Inner
Statistical Inference. Room 321, Angus Building.
OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. Dr. June Siva,
Atlantic Richfield Co., San Diego, Calif., on Oil
Spill Response Planning for Biologically Sensitive
Areas. Room 1465, west wing, Biological Sciences.
4:00 p.m. HEALTH CARE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
SEMINAR. Dr. John Milsum, Health Care and
Epidemiology, UBC, on Health Hazard Appraisal as
a Core Facility for Health Promotion and Illness
Prevention. Room 146, Mather Building.
GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY SEMINAR.
Dr. R. D. Russell, Geophysics and Astronomy,
UBC, on The International Geodynamics Program.
Room 260, Geophysics Building.
4:30 p.m. PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Carl Walters,
Institute of Animal Resource Ecology, UBC, on
Models, Myths and Strategies for Ecological
Research. Room 2000, Biological Sciences
Building.
7:30 p.m. ENDOWMENT LANDS PUBLIC FORUM with the
UEL study team established by Environment
Minister Jim Nielsen. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
THURSDAY, OCT. 28
12:30 p.m.    ANNUAL TEA CUP BOWL FOOTBALL GAME.
UBC   Nurses v.   Home  Economics.  Admission  by
donation     for     various    charities.     Thunderbird
Stadium.
FACULTY  RECITAL.  James  Fankhauser, tenor;
and Robert Rogers, piano, perform Music of Ives
and Britten. Recital Hall, Music Building.
2:30 p.m. CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR. MikeThewalt,
UBC, on Bound Excitons and Bound Multi-Exciton
Complexes in Si. Room 318, Hennings Building.
3:45p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS
COLLOQUIUM. Dr. George Bluman, Mathematics,
UBC, on The Use of Similarity Methods to Relate
Solutions of Partial Differential Equations. Room
2449, Biological Sciences Building.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. K. Colbow, Physics,
SFU, on Slime Moulds. Room 201, Hennings
Building.
4:30 p.m. BIOMEMBRANES GROUP SEMINAR. Dr. A. P.
Singh, Biochemistry, UBC, on Studies on Energy
Transduction in Bacterial Membranes. Lecture Hall
1, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
FRIDAY, OCT. 29
9:00 a.m. PEDIATRICS GRAND ROUND on Jaundice in the
Newborn — Recent Diagnostic and Therapeutic
Advances, presented by the Division of Pediatric
Surgery, VGH. Lecture Room B, Heather Pavilion,
VGH.
3:30 p.m.     COMPUTER   SCIENCE   COLLOQUIUM.   Dr.   Uri
Ascher,    Computer    Science,    UBC,    on    Linear
Programming     Algorithm     for     the    Chebyshev
Solution    to    a   System   of   Consistent    Linear     j
Equations. Room 326, Angus Building. |
8:00 p.m.    CANADIAN PRISONS SYMPOSIUM. Francis Fox,
solicitor general of Canada, will deliver the opening j
address for this two-day symposium in Lecture \
Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. '
Symposium continues all day Saturday. For
information, call the Centre for Continuing \
Education, 228-2181.
FACULTY RECITAL with Jane Martin, flute, and      ;
Jocelyn    Pritchard,    piano.    Recital    Hall,   Music
Building. j
SATURDAY, OCT. 30 j
9:00 a.m. CONTINUING AND COMMUNITY EDUCATION I
HEARINGS. Commission established by the
Department of Education and headed by Dr. Ron
Faris to look into ways of delivering continuing
and community education to adults throughout
B.C. Those interested in adult education are invited
to present written and oral briefs to the
commission. Continues until 5 p.m. Maritime
Museum, 1905Ogden St., Vancouver.
8:15 p.m. VANCOUVER INSTITUTE. English troubador
Martin Best, guitarist, lutenist and singer, gives a
concert-lecture. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
4/UBC Reports/Oct. 20, 197u

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