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UBC Reports Apr 29, 1999

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 THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
T JBC REPORTS
Volume 45, Number 9
April 29, 1999
Find UBC Reports on the Web at www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca
Arm Raising
John Chong photo
Music fans from UBC and the Vancouver area demonstrate their
appreciation for Pure, the first of five bands who performed at the eighth
annual Arts County Fair celebrating the last day of classes at UBC April
9. The star-studded lineup also featured 54-40, Econoline Crush, The
Planet Smashers and Odds. Organized by students in the UBC Arts
Undergraduate Society, the sold-out event raised more than $25,000 for
the Canadian Cancer Society, AIDS Vancouver and St. John Ambulance.
Record 12 women up
for YWCA distinction
The talents and achievements of UBC
women students and faculty light up the
nominations list for this year's YWCA
Women of Distinction awards. A record
five students, one alumna and six faculty
are among the
nominees.
Sociology
Prof. Patricia
Marchak,
former dean of
Arts and a newly
elected member
of UBC's Board
of Governors,
has been nominated in the category of Education, Training
and Development for her contributions to UBC and the
province's economy and environment.
One of Canada's foremost sociologists,
Marchak has written numerous books
and articles on fisheries, political ideologies, political economy and forestry.
UBC alumna Allison Dunnet has been
nominated as a Young Woman of Distinction.
Dunnet graduated last year with a degree in Political Science. As a third-year
student she created and co-chaired Imagine UBC, an orientation program for first-
year students. She was also instrumental
in developing Humanities 101, a general
Marchak
arts program for people living in Vancouver's Downtown Eastside.
Dunnet currently works as an intern
in UBC's Development Office.
Other UBC student nominees in this
category include Science students
Priscilla Brastianos, Andrea Dahl, Riga
Godron and Kumi Teranishi and Nursing student Nicole Fulton.
Nominees in the Health and Wellness
category include
pediatrician
Jean Hlady and
ophthalmologist
Katherine Paton,
both UBC clinical professors of
Medicine.
Nominated in
the Science and
Technology category is Zoology
Prof.       Judith
Myers,   one   of
Canada's leading
ecologists. A specialist in the field of population biology, Myers is an expert on the biological control of introduced pests.
She has also served as associate dean
of Science for the promotion of women in
science.
Also nominated in this category are
Assoc. Prof. Virginia Baldwin ofthe Dept.
See YWCA Page 2
Dunnet
Research plan zeros
in to build strengths
by Hilary Thomson
Staff writer
Putting research at the heart of UBC
activities is the aim of Research Turns on
Knowledge, a planning document recently
released by the Office of the Vice-President, Research.
"We're starting from a position of
strength in terms of our performance and
reputation as a research university." says
Bernard Bressler. vice-president. Research. "We want to engage all faculty,
staff and students to make research central to what we do here."
The document is linked to the strategies
outlined in Trek 2000. UBC's vision for the
next century, and elaborates on the activities needed to make UBC one ofthe world's
outstanding research universities.
It lists nine major objectives and provides a framework for making decisions,
allocating resources and managing
change.
Also included is a statement of values
that will guide the mission of advancing
Canadian intellectual, social, cultural and
economic growth through scholarship.
Innovation,  investigative  integrity and
collaborative research are some of the
values identified.
Many factors influence the success of
research at UBC. says Bressler. These include human, physical and financial resources, technology, economic conditions
and the activities of competing universities.
The Helping UBC Generate Excellence
(H.U.G.E.) fund is being established to
help build the quality and capacity of
UBC research.
It co-ordinates existing sources of research support such as the Peter Wall
Fund, the Hampton Fund and the Humanities and Social Sciences Fund.
UBC will also look for new contributors from private, industrial and public
donors to create a UBC Research and
Faculty Development Endowment Fund.
The University-Industry Liaison Office
will contribute to the fund from equity
holdings in UBC spin-off companies created as a result of the transfer of technologies discovered on campus.
Encouraging and celebrating individual
and collaborative research will be accomplished by strategies such as a "Celebration
of Research" recognition event and support-
See RESEARCH Page 2
Scholars pull in major
NSERC grants
UBC researchers have been
awarded over 175 research grants in
the annual competition ofthe Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research
Council of Canada (NSERC).
"UBC is very well represented in the
new research grants and scholarships
awarded in B.C., which total $47.6
million for 327 research projects and
190 young researchers in the province," says Bernard Bressler, vice-
president. Research.
"We continue to maintain our competitive position due to the extremely
talented and dedicated research community at UBC," says Bressler. 'The
fact that so many young researchers
were funded is a very positive signal
for future success."
Among the major grants awarded
to the university are two equipment
grants to the Chemistry Dept. for 400-
megahertz NMR spectrometers.
"It's the most powerful tool available to characterize molecules in solution," says Chemistry Prof. Raymond
Andersen who successfully applied for
a $757,049 grant. "It will be a core
facility utilized by many people in both
organic and inorganic chemistry."
A research group led by Pathology
and Chemistry Prof. Colin Fyfe will
receive $745,980 for a similar
spectrometer.
"Our group will use it to investigate
chemical structures of new solid structures such as ceramics, catalysts and
plastics," says Fyfe. "The spectrometer
also acts as a microscope for magnetic
resonance imaging."
The Pacific Institute for the Mathematical Sciences, directed by Nassif
Ghoussoub, has been awarded a
$600,000 institutes research grant.
Two UBC faculty members in Physics and Astronomy, Assoc. Prof. Janis
McKenna and Asst. Prof. Christopher
Hearty will share in a $650,000 subatomic physics grant with five other
researchers across Canada. They are
involved in an international research
project in elementary physics, which
includes over 500 scientists.
See JVSERC Page 2
Inside
Shrewd Move
Prof. Geoff Scudder's insect search turned up something out of the ordinary
Thinking Camp 17
A cross between summer camp and Plato's Academy comes west
Treasure Trove 20
For 25 years, they've been a large part of what makes UBC tick 2 UBC Reports • April 29, 1999
Research
Continued from Page 1
ing UBC-wide research cafes —
informal meetings that promote
discussion among researchers from
various disciplines.
Integrating teaching and research is another key strategic
objective.
"We will be working with the
Academic Plan Advisory Committee to help faculty include
undergraduate students in research and mentor them as investigators," says Bressler.
Research focus themes that
cut across disciplines will be
promoted, he adds. In addition
to breaking down barriers between academic units and stimulating investigation, thematic
research is attractive to funding
sources such as the Canada
Foundation for Innovation, the
Major Collaborative Research Initiative (a program of the Social
Sciences and Humanities Research Council) and the Network
of Centres of Excellence.
UBC will also look for community, national and international
partnerships to develop research
questions and apply new knowledge. Opportunities include partnership with industry, investors
and entrepreneurs, community
and cultural organizations and
philanthropic foundations.
Raising awareness of the value
of UBC research continues to be a
YWCA
Continued from Page 1
of Pathology and Laboratory
Medicine and Mary Stephenson,
assistant professor in the Dept.
of Obstetrics and Gynecology.
UBC is sponsoring the Voluntary, Community and Humanitarian Service category for the
1 Oth year. The awards recognize
women who have made outstanding contributions to the
community through professional
or volunteer work.
The YWCA Women of Distinction awards dinner takes
place May 27 at the Hyatt Regency Hotel. For tickets call
Ticketmaster at 280-4444.
NSERC
Continued from Page 1
Commerce Prof. Tae Oum will
improve tools and models to forecast future flight demand for
airlines.
Assoc. Prof. Carlos Ventura
and his colleagues in Civil Engineering have been awarded a
grant to upgrade the simulator
in the Earthquake Engineering
Research Laboratory, used to research how to build safer structures and retrofit existing ones.
Psychology Prof. James Enns
will explore the processes between the eye and the brain that
lead to perception.
For more information on
UBC's NSERC research grants
check the Web site, http://
www. nserc.ca/programs/ result/ 1999/rg/ubc. htm
priority. Faculty and students will
be encouraged to make presentations on their work and participate
in community activities related to
their research throughout B.C.
"We have such a richness of
research here," says Bressler.
"We want to develop that wealth
by making sure it's integrated
into our day-to-day activities."
The Executive Committee for
Research welcomes responses to
Research Turns on Knowledge. The
document appears in this issue of
UBC Reports. Copies are also available from the Office of the Vice-
president, Research, or on the Web
at www.research.ubc.ca. Comments may be sent by e-mail to
thinkres@interchange.ubc.ca.
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Sunday, May 9
Two Sittings: 1 pm or 3 pm
$18.50 per person
6251 Cecil Green Park Road
Tea is presented by the UBC Alumni Association
Catered by UBC Catering
Jot reservations, catt 822-3313
Con • graf • ulations
The May 20 UBC Reports will be a special
Congregation issue highlighting the
achievements of more than 5000 UBC graduates.
Many special guests, family and friends are
expected on campus for this event. More than
20,000 copies will be distributed.
To advertise in this issue, call 822-4636 by noon,
Tuesday, May 11.
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UBC REPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December. June, July and August) for the entire university
community by the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251
Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1. It is
distributed on campus to most campus buildings.
UBC Reports can be found on the World Wide Web at
http://www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca
Managing Editor: Paula Martin (pauia.martin@ubc.ca)
Editor/Production: Janet Ansell (janet.ansell@ubc.ca)
Contributors:   Bruce Mason (bruce.mason@ubc.ca),
Susan Stern (susan.stem@ubc.ca),
Hilary Thomson (hilary.thomson@ubc.ca).
Calendar: Natalie Boucher (natalie.boucher@ubc.ca)
Editorial and advertising enquiries: (604) UBC-INFO (822-4636)
(phone), (604) 822-2684 (fax). UBC Information Line: (604) UBC-
INFO (822-4636)
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in UBC
Reports do not necessarily reflect official university policy.
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. UBC Reports • April 29, 1999 3
Campus prepares for
emergencies May 3-7
May 3-7 is Emergency Preparedness
Week across B.C. and at the province's
largest university there will be campaigns
to provide information and raise awareness, including fire and earthquake drills.
"We will stage short. quick earthquake
drills in some classes and present other
activities and opportunities for people to
learn more," says Jody Sydor, UBC's
emergency planning co-ordinator.
"During the week we hope everyone at
UBC asks themselves. When was the last
time I crawled under my desk in an
earthquake drill, or took part in a fire
drill? Am I prepared? "'
Sydor points out that at the university
perfecting disaster planning and education takes place on a day to-day. year-
round basis. Everyone has opportunities
to become better informed.
More than 1,750 UBC employees have
completed emergency training workshops
and nearly 100 participated in fire warden training says Sydor, who works on
developing the university's disaster plan
in Health, Safety and Environment.
She is also responsible for training
faculty, staff and students in emergency
preparedness and response at a local
level, and for roles on the university's
emergency response teams.
Rapid building damage assessment, emergency social services, first aid and fire safety
are other training areas offered to support
UBC's overall emergency capacity.
An essential component of the community-wide disaster planning process is
the annual emergency scenario. This year
it's being dubbed, "Operation T-Bird." It
is UBC's eighth scenario and is being
staged on campus June 10.
"It will be a simulated partial structure
collapse of one of the campus ice rinks
complete with actors from University Hill
Secondary School." says Sydor. "For the
first time, we're announcing the scenario
in advance to encourage everyone at UBC
to become more informed about emergencies and the roles they could play in one."
Health, Safety and Environment conducts the emergency scenario in conjunction with a committee of representatives from other departments and first
responders including the B.C. Ambulance Service. Vancouver Fire and Rescue Services, the RCMP, Campus Security and UBC Hospital.
The scenarios provide an opportunity
for emergency services and university
personnel to put their skills and procedures to the test.
In past years, a simulated plane crash,
major motor vehicle accidents, chemical
spills and the explosion of hazardous
materials have been staged.
They provide an invaluable opportunity for inter-agency co-operation," says
Ross Eliason, a fire prevention officer
with Vancouver Fire and Rescue. "First
responders actually meet and interact
with the university community, which is
very important."
For information on emergency preparedness on campus and the university's
emergency plans, call (604) 822-1237 or
e-mail sydor@safety.ubc.ca.
Offbeat
by Bruce Mason
Staff writer
Wi
'hen UBC entomologist
Prof. Geoff Scudder
accidentally captured a
tiny shrew in a trap set for insects
last summer, he had few clues that
he had uncovered a scientific
mystery.
His discovery — which had
experts scratching their heads —
has now been identified as a
Merriam's Shrew. The rare mammal, never before found in Canada, has
attracted national media attention and a warning from scientists that we
know too little about B.C.'s animal and plant life.
"It is highly unusual to discover a mammal," says Scudder, who
trapped the Sorex merriami in a pit-fall trap set up to collect insects for a
survey in the Kilpoola Lake area, a few kilometres west of Osoyoos.
A curious Scudder sent the specimen to Dave Huggard, a biologist with
the Ministry of Forests at Kamloops who studies small mammals in the
B.C. Interior.
Huggard spotted several anomalies — light-colored fur and in particular, unusual teeth — and he suspected he was witnessing Merriam's
Shrew.
Next stop for the specimen was positive identification in the lineup at
the Royal B.C. Museum (RBCM).
"We have over 8,000 shrews in our collection: that's greater than the
number of light bulbs in the legislature," says John Matters, spokesperson for the RBCM.
Dave Nagorsen, curator of vertebrates at the museum, is an authority
on the identification and life histories of shrews. However, Merriam's
Shrew is difficult. It can only be identified by its teeth. Despite the large
collection at hand, Nagorsen had to rely on reference skulls borrowed
from Washington State University.
At last, a positive identification — Scudder's discovery was indeed a
Merriam's Shrew, a small 9- to-10-centimetre-long animal associated with
the dry grasslands of the western United States.
In a press release announcing the rare discovery and identification, the
museum states, "We regret there are no photographs of the animal
available. The specimen was in advanced decay when captured but
crucial skeletal evidence confirmed its identification."
For the team that collaborated on the identification, the shrew's
presence at Kilpoola Lake — an area supposedly well-surveyed biologically
— demonstrates the importance of this and other sites for conserving
B.C.'s grassland plants and animals.
"The discovery of a new mammal points out the fact that we need to
learn more about what's out there if we are to have any hope of conserving it," Scudder says.
Kent Kallberg photo
UBC Library Facilities and Preservations manager Suzanne Dodson and her
husband Earl have worked to improve and preserve UBC's libraries for more
than 30 years. Dodson retires tomorrow but her last project, the restoration
of a reading room in Main Library, will honour the pair's contributions for
years to come.
Dynamic duo's lives
linked to Main Library
by Susan Stern
Staff writer
The lives of Suzanne and Earl Dodson
have been uniquely connected to UBC
Libraries, and the Main Library in particular, for more than three decades.
It started in the 1950s when the two
UBC students met at the Biology Club.
Then Suzanne Cates, she was initially
uncertain about her suitor and used to
hide behind the dictionary stand in Main
Library's Ridington Room to avoid his
determined pursuit.
After getting her degree in librarian-
ship from UBC, Dodson was hired by the
Library but only intended to work for a
couple of years to gain experience.
Tomorrow, after holding numerous positions, Dodson is reluctantly sayinggood-
bye after a 36-year career in UBC libraries.
Dodson says she and her husband
had always been attached to the Main
Library. When she took on her most
recent position as Facilities and
Preservations manager her responsibilities included the libraries' physical plant.
"I was always seeing things that needed
doing," says Dodson. "We both wanted to
give something back to UBC."
Their contributions have been considerable and include many behind-the-
scenes improvements — a second elevator in the Koerner Library for people with
disabilities and air conditioning to protect rare materials held in the Special
Collections and University Archives vault.
They also supported microfilming B.C.
government sessional papers as a first
step toward an ongoing preservation program for the Library.
"I was always coming home to Earl and
saying we need this and we need that and
he always forked over the money," Dodson
says.
She was especially pleased with replicas they had made of the only two remaining classic wrought iron and glass
lamps hanging in Main Library's front
hall. Adolf Becker. Werner Mueller and
Paul Rogan from Plant Operations created them.
"Take a look sometime — the restorations are beautiful," she says.
Her last major assignment has been
the restoration of Main Library's Room
502 from office space to some semblance
of its original 1925 splendour as a reading room.
University Librarian Catherine Quinlan
wanted to make the restoration a surprise for the couple in honour of their
support, but it was impossible because
the workers naturally went to Dodson for
direction.
"Catherine told me it was like giving
me a Christmas present and asking me to
wrap it up myself," says Dodson, "but I
wouldn't have missed the fun of being
involved for anything."
The room's huge wooden roof beams
have been refinished. The centre beams
are decorated with plaster ribbons and
stylized flower plaques. UBC artisan Paul
Rogan and Constantine Pardalis
handpainted a tricky decorative frieze of
Celtic design around the top of the room.
The room, officially dedicated today in
a ceremony led by UBC President Martha
Piper, has been renamed The Suzanne
Cates Dodson and Earl D. Dodson Reading Room in their honour. It will be used
not only for reading, but also for concerts,
meetings, lectures, and other events.
"Given their interest in the refurbishment of Main Library and their many
efforts as benefactors and great friends of
the university, it was particularly fitting
that Room 502 be named in their honour," Quinlan says.
For Dodson, the arrival of her retirement is a bit overwhelming. Main Library
has been her second home for so long she
says it will take her a while to adjust. She
admits she will miss all the colleagues
she has worked with for so long, and
whom she considers part of her UBC
family.
"Earl compares my retirement to jumping off a speeding train," she says. "But
really, it's been a wonderful ride." 4 UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999
Calendar
May 2 through June 12
Sunday, May 2
Chan Centre Concert
The Juilliard String Quartet.
Chan Centre Chan Shun Concert Hall at 3pm. Web site: http:/
/www.chancentre.com. Call
Ticketmaster 280-3311 or for
more information 822-2697.
Monday, May 3
Chan Centre Concert
Music InThe Morning. CBC Vancouver Orchestra. Chan Centre
at 11:30am. Web site: http://
www.chancentre.com. Call
Ticketmaster 280-3311 or for
more information 822-2697.
Member Speaker Series
Turning Commercial: Public Science And Private Profit. Janet
Atkinson-Grosjean, Interdisciplinary Studies. Green College at
5:30pm. Call 822-1878.	
Tuesday, May 4
Chan Centre Concert
Glenn Miller Orchestra: Big Band
Music. Chan Centre Chan Shun
Concert Hall at 8pm. Web site:
http://www.chancentre.com.
Call Ticketmaster 280-3311 or
for more information 822-2697.
Wednesday, May 5
Orthopedics Grand Rounds
Total Knee Arthroplasty, Tourniquet Usage And Arterial Complications. Dr. Robert McGraw; Dr.
Donna Smith; Dr. David C. Taylor.
VGH, Eye Care Centre Aud. at
7am. Call 875-4192.
Engineering And
Architecture Continuing
Education
Risk Management. Franco Oboni;
Stewart Behie. Forestry Sciences
1001 from8:30am-5:30pm. Continues to May 7. $900; $400 student (includes materials, lunches,
certificate). Call 822-1884.
Individual Interdisciplinary
Studies
Interdisciplinary Science And The
Environment. Grant Ingram, principal, St. John's College. Green
College at 5pm. Call 822-1878.
Chemical Engineering Video
Presentation/Talk
Vipassana Meditation. Raman
Khosla, Vipassana teacher.
Graduate Student Centre Thea's
Lounge from 7-10pm. Call 822-
8554; 738-1984.
Thursday, May 6
Occupational First Aid
Course
Level I. Vancouver Fire Hall #10.
2992 Wesbrook Mall from
8:30am-4:30pm. $90. To register call Pamela Rydings 822-2029.
Friday, May 7
Plant Sale
Cash -n' Carry. Horticulture
Greenhouse from 9am-5pm. Call
822-3283.
Health Care And
Epidemiology Rounds
Drug Resistant Tuberculosis:
Limited Effectiveness Of First Line
Therapy In Azerbaijani Prisons.
David Meddings, International
Committee of the Red Cross.
Mather 253 from 9-10am. Paid
parking available in Lot B. Call
822-2772.
Pediatric Grand Rounds
Cancer Vaccines: A Great Idea, But
Will It Work? Dr. Kirk R Schultz,
Oncology, B.C's Children's Hosp.
GF Strong Aud. from 9-10am. Call
Ruth Giesbrecht 875-2307.
Engineering/Architecture
Continuing Education
Architecture And Preservation -
The Practice Of Preservation. Various speakers. Downtown campus;
School of Architecture; AIBC office
from 9am-4:30pm. Continues to
June 25. $800 AIBC members/
associates: $450 intern architects;
$900 non-members; $ 170/day (in
eludes materials, lunches, certificate). To register call 822-1884.
Couchiching Institute On
Public Affairs Conference
Individual Rights And Society's Re
sponsibilities: Striking The Balance.
Various experts. Green College from
7:30-9:30pm. Continues to Mav 8
from 9am-4:30pm. $95; $85 CI PA
members. Student bursaries available. To register call 904-5777.
Chan Centre Concert
Jeannie's Percussion Concert.
Chan Centre Chan Shun Concert
Hall at 8pm. Web site: http://
www.chancentre.com. Call
Ticketmaster 280-3311 or for more
information 822-2697.	
Saturday, May 8
Garden Tour And Tea
University Women's Club. Hycroft
House from l-5pm. $10 includes
tea. Call 731-4661.	
Sunday, May 9
Chan Centre Concert
30th Anniversary Mother's Day
Celebration. British Columbia
Boy's Choir. Chan Centre Chan
Shun Concert Hall at 3pm. Web
site: http://www.chancentre.com.
Call Ticketmaster 280-3311 or for
more information 822-2697.
Monday, May 10
Member Speaker Series
Transfer Of Development Rights
In Vancouver: How The New Wall
Centre's Tower Got To Be So Darn
Tall. Ari Goelman. Green College
at 5:30pm. Call 822-1878.	
Wednesday, May 12
Orthopedics Grand Rounds
Arthroscopy And Posterior
Cruciate Reconstruction. Dr. B.
Day. VGH, Eye Care Centre Aud.
at 7am. Call 875-4192.	
Thursday, May 13
Occupational First Aid
Course
Level I. Vancouver Fire Hall #10,
2992 Wesbrook Mall from 8:30am-
4:30pm. $90. To register call
Pamela Rydings 822-2029.
Peter Wall Institute
Complexity Seminar
Cross-Cultural Perspectives On
Women, Identity, Food. S. Smith: S.
Geok-lin Lim; M. Ellmann. M.
Katzman; P. Van Esterik. University
Centre Peter Wall Institute small conference area from 9:30am-5pm. To
register Web site: www.wmst.ubc.ca
or for info call 822-9171.
Friday, May 14
North Shore Counselling
Centre Course
Exploring Human Freedom: Science,
Systems And Spirituality. Various
speakers. IRC from 8:30am-4pm.
Continues to May 15. $175-$ 195;
$150 group; $115 one day. E-mail:
imjonsson@aol.com or call Molly
Jonsson 926-5496 voice mail #20.
Pediatric Grand Rounds
The Diagnosis And Management
Of Non-Epileptic Seizures In Chil
dren. Various speakers. GF Strong
Aud. from 9-10am. Call Ruth
Giesbrecht 875-2307.
Health Care And
Epidemiology Rounds
Public Health Initiative In Shanghai. Hua Fu, dean, Shanghai Public Health. Mather 253 from 9-
10am. Paid parking available in
Lot B. Call 822-2772.
North Shore Counselling
Centre Course
Individual Responsibility In A Chaotic World. Michael Kerr. IRC from
7-9pm. $15 at the door. E-mail:
imjonsson@aol.com or call Molly
Jonsson 926-5496 voice mail #20.
Sunday, May 16
Chan Centre Concert
Northern Journey. Elcktra Women's Choir. Chan Centre Chan
Shun Concert Hall at 2:30pm. Web
site: http://www.chancentre.com.
Call Ticketmaster 280-3311 or for
more information 822-2697.
Monday, May 17
Education Noted Scholar
Lecture
The Politics Of Reforming Or Replacing Public Schools: Threats
And Opportunities. Prof. William
Lowe Boyd. Education, Pennsylvania State U. Scarfe 310 from 1-
2pm. Call 822-9136.
Science And Society
What Is A Rhetoric Of Medicine?
Judy Segal, English; Science Studies. Green College at Spin. Call
822-1871.
Wednesday, May 19
Orthopedics Grand Rounds
Health Economics: What An
Orthopedist NeedsTo Know. Dr. J.
Esdaile. VGH. Eye Care Centre
Aud. at 7am. Call 875-4192.
Education Noted Scholar
Lecture
The Importance Of Synergy To Independent Living Skills For Individuals With Visual Impairments:
Good Old-Fashioned Teamwork.
Patricia Smith, chairperson. Rehabilitation, U of Arkansas at Little Rock. Scarfe 310 from 12noon-
lpm. Call 822-9136.
Senate Meeting
Regular Meeting Of The Senate.
UBC'sAeademic Parliament. Curtis
102 at 8pm.  Call 822-2951.
Thursday, May 20
Board of Governors Meeting
Open Session Begins At Sam. Fifteen
tickets are available on a first-come,
first-served basis on application to
the Board Secretary at least 24 hrs
before each meeting. OAB Board and
Senate room. Call 822-2127.
Friday, May 21
Pediatric Grand Rounds
The Enemy Within: Mutations And
Cancers Result From The Absence
Of Genes That Correct Mistakes
Made During Chromosomal DNA
Replication. Dr. Frank R. Jirik,
Centre for Molecular Medicine and
Therapeutics, B.C.'s Children's
and Women's Hosp. GF Strong
Aud. from 9- 10am. Call Ruth
Giesbrecht 875-2307.
Health Care And
Epidemiology Rounds
Time To Use Epidemiology And
The Health Care System To Control The Tobacco Epidemic.
Frederic Bass, director, B.C. Doctors' Stop-Smoking Program.
Mather 253 from 9-10am. Paid
parking available in Lot B. Call
822-2772.
Chan Centre Concert
Pianos Galore Presented By The
Canadian Vocal And Performing
Arts Society. Chan Centre
at 8pm. Web site: http://
www.chancentre.com. Call
Ticketmaster 280-3311 or for
more information 822-2697.
Tuesday, May 25
Poetic Persuasions
Readings From His Book Of Poems: "Keeping In Touch". Eugene
McNamara. poet. Green College at
7:30pm. Call 822-1878.
Wednesday, May 26
CZM Workshop
Ecosystem-Based Management In
Coastal Zone. University Centre
from 9am-12pm. To register Web
site: www.ire.ubc.ca.
Thursday, May 27
B.C. Post-Secondary
Education Policy Issues
Consequences  Of Success:   Old
Solutions And New Problems For
: Higher Education. Martin Trow.
| Goldman School of Public Policy.
U of California. Green College at
4:30pm. Call 822-1878.
Friday, May 28
Pediatric Grand Rounds
Process And Outcome In Reproductive Care. Robert M. Liston.
head, Obstetrics and Gynecology;
Margaret R. Pendray, Neonatology,
B.C.'s Children's Hosp. GF Strong
Aud. from 9-10am. Call Ruth
Giesbrecht 875-2307.
Health Care And
Epidemiology Rounds
UBC Farmer And Farmworker
Study: Assessing Chromosomal
Damage In Fraser Valley Berry
Workers Exposed To Pesticides.
Anne Marie Nicol. Mather 253 from
9- 10am. Paid parking available in
Lot B. Call 822-2772.
Saturday, May 29
Chalmers Institute
Celebrating Women. Land, Spirit
With Carolyn McDade. VST
Epiphany Chapel from 10am-4pm.
$50; $40 group; $25 seniors. To
register call 822-9815.
Thursday, June 3
Occupational First Aid
Course
Level I. Vancouver Fire Hall #10,
2992 Wesbrook Mall from 8:30am-
4:30pm. $90. To register call
Pamela Rydings 822-2029.
Friday, June 4
Pediatric Grand Rounds
Why Examine A Placenta? Fergall
Magee, clinical assistant professor. Pathology. GF Strong Aud.
from 9-10am. Call Ruth
Giesbrecht 875-2307.
Health Care And
Epidemiology Rounds
Using Laboratory Analyses In Epidemiologic Studies: Practicalities,
Pitfalls And Pratfalls. Shona Kelly,
research scientist. Mather 253
from 9- 10am. Paid parkingavail-
able in Lot B. Call 822-2772.
Saturday, June 5
Engineering And
Architecture Continuing
Education
Information Security For Technical Professionals. CEME 1202
from9am-5pm. $1 50-$180; $60
students includes materials,
lunch, certificate. To register call
822-1884.
Museum Of Anthropology
Black Tie
The Golden Gala - Fundraising
Event. MOA at 7pm. For tickets
call 822-5087.	
Friday, June 11
Pediatric Grand Rounds
Reach For The Top. GF Strong
Aud.   from  9-10am.   Call  Ruth
Giesbrecht 875-2307.
Health Care And
Epidemiology Rounds
Income Inequality As A Cause Of
Death - True. False Or Statistical
Artifact? Michael Wolfson, Statistics Canada. Mather 253 from
9-10am. Paid parking available
in Lot B. Call 822-2772.
No
Calendar.
Please note, there will
be no Calendar in the
next UBC Reports.
The Calendar returns
with the June 10 issue.
(Deadline   for   submissions is noon, June
I)
^UBC REPORTS
The UBC Reports Calendar lists university-related or
university-sponsored events on campus and off campus within the Lower Mainland.
Calendar items must be submitted on forms available
from the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green
Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 121. Phone: UBC-INFO
(822-4636). Fax: 822-2684. An electronic form Is available at http://www.pubUcaffairs.ubc.ca. Please Itottto
35 words. Submissions fof the Calendar's Notices section
may be limited due to space.
Deadline for the June 10 issue of UBC Reports—
which covers the period June 13 to July 10 -
June 1. UBC Reports ■ April 29,1999 5
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
April 29, 1999
Dear Colleague:
To meet requirements ofthe Federal Contractors Program and UBC's Policy
on Discrimination and Harassment, our Equity Office annually summarizes
campus-wide efforts to promote equity and to resolve complaints of
discrimination and harassment. I am pleased to provide you with the Equity
Office Annual Report 1998.
Please read this report and discuss it with your colleagues. The Equity Office
welcomes any questions and comments.
Sincerely,
Martha C. Piper
f?
Message from the Associate Vice President, Equity
The purpose of UBC's Equity Office is to promote equity and to teach the Universiry
community to recognize and respond appropriately to unjustified discriminatory
practices and harassing behaviours.
In 1998, the Office expanded its educational efforts by increasing the number of
its customized presentations and workshops. These have met with considerable
success: an overwhelming majority of participants reported that the workshops
successfully communicated effective procedures for dealing with equity concerns as
well as complaints of discrimination and harassment. Participants commented that
the workshops taught them to think about equity and discrimination in terms of
current human rights law and to understand the effectiveness of various strategies
for resolving discrimination and harassment allegations. Participants agreed that
they would recommend Equity Office workshops to colleagues.
To increase student understanding of equity principles and practices, the Office
addressed one-half of its 1998 presentations to student audiences. As well, the Office
continued to work with the Culturally Inclusive Campus Committee, which includes
faculty, staff, and students interested in promoting and presenting educational
events on issues of anti-racism, diversity, and inclusiveness. In addition. Office staff
served on a variety of University committees: the Personal Security Advisory Committee, the Advisory Committee on Information Technology, and the Search Committee
for the Vice President, Students.
As a result ofthe number and variety of its educational activities, many individuals
have come to rely on Equity Office Advisors for information on ways to promote equity
and to resolve allegations of discrimination and harassment. The Office helps
administrative heads who wish to integrate University equity goals into the day-today operation of their units. It helps complainants to discover effective solutions for
problems involving discrimination and harassment.
A major goal of the Equity Office's educational services is to help members of the
UBC community distinguish acts of discrimination and harassment that violate
human rights legislation from acts of inappropriate interpersonal conflict, such as
habitual bullying, persistent rudeness, and hurtful teasing. The Equity Office refers
to such acts as "personal harassment."
Authority to act on complaints of personal harassment rests appropriately with
line management rather than UBC's Equity Office, which can do no more than provide
complainants with basic information and referrals. Nevertheless, personal harassment should concern everyone on a campus dedicated to providing students, faculty,
and staff with a work and study environment that offers everyone an equal
opportunity to realize his or her potential.
In recent years, the number of complaints of personal harassment brought to the
Equity Office has grown; in 1998, they made up one-quarter ofthe grievances brought
to Equity Advisors. Moreover, the report ofthe 1998 external review of UBC's Equity
Office expressed concern over UBC's failure to address the issue of personal
harassment and recommended development of "a code of conduct or behaviour for
faculty, staff, and students similar to that found at other Canadian universities." The
Office supports this recommendation and proposes the formulation of a general code
that administrative heads could adapt to meet the needs of their units.
The Equity Office would like to stimulate discussion on the desirability of the
University developing a general statement of appropriate conduct for faculty, staff,
and students. The Office invites your thoughts on this matter. As well, the Office
invites your comments and questions on its 1998 Annual Report.
(^uJb^J^	
Sharon E. Kahn
Education & Training Report
The purpose of UBC's Equity Office education and training program, which
includes panel discussions, customized presentations, and workshops, is to heighten
awareness and understanding of two University policies: Employment Equity, and
Discrimination and Harassment. The audience for these educational sessions
consists of students, administrators, faculty, staff, and representatives from unions,
employee associations, and departmental equity committees (see Figure 1).
FIGURE 1
Training & Education
by audience
January to December 1998
administrative
heads of units
FIGURE 2
Training & Education
by type
January to December 1998
presentations
69%
workshops
31%
In 1998, the Office delivered 38 presentations, including lectures, informal talks, and
informations session, and conducted 17 workshops (see Figure 2). Many of these were in
response to individual requests for specialized training. In addition to on-campus educational activities, the Equity Office also participated in several community initiatives.
1998 Highlights of Equity Office Education and Training Initiatives
Core Training Workshops
Five workshops on "Discrimination and Harassment Awareness" and "Discrimination and Harassment Skills Training" to administrative heads of unit and to staff
with supervisory responsibilities.
Two workshops on "Discrimination and Harassment Awareness" for support staff.
Customized Workshops and Seminars
"Discrimination and Harassment Awareness" workshop for faculty and graduate
students in Earth and Ocean Sciences.
Two workshops on "Fostering an Inclusive Classroom" for faculty and staff.
"Professional Relationships and Personal Boundaries" seminar for graduate
students in History.
"Discrimination and Harassment Skills Training" seminar for graduate students
in Social Work.
"Discrimination and Harassment Awareness" workshops for management and
support staff in Plant Operations and Media Services.
Seminar on UBC's Discrimination and Harassment Policy and complaint resolution process to First Nations House of Learning staff.
"Discrimination and Harassment: Roles and Responsibilities of Student Leaders"
workshop for residence advisors at Vancouver School of Theology.
Customized Presentations
Lectures on sexual harassment to undergraduate students in Family Science.
Lectures on employment equity and on discrimination and harassment to students in the Faculties of Applied Science and Dentistry.
Presentation on human rights and equity-related issues to international students
completing short-term programs at the English Language Institute.
Presentation on UBC's Discrimination and Harassment Policy to First Nations
Summer Program supervisory staff.
Presentations on the role of the Equity Office to the AMS and other undergraduate
societies, including those in the Faculties of Agricultural Sciences, Arts, and
Commerce.
Presentation titled "What is the Equity Office?" to the Graduate Student Society.
Partnerships
Guidance for administrative heads of unit, faculty, staff, and students developing
unit equity plans and establishing unit equity committees.
Assistance to undergraduate students preparing class projects on racism and
diversity issues.
Collaboration with a Student Services committee to develop a diversity program for
Student Services staff.
Cooperation with staff in the Registrar's Office, Women Students' Office, and
Human Resources engaged in staff training on discrimination and harassment
awareness, employment equity, and equity-related issues.
With the Culturally Inclusive Campus Committee (CICC), coordination of educational events on anti-racism, diversity, and inclusiveness, as well as response to
inequity and discrimination concerns. CICC is composed of students, faculty, and
staff from across campus. Examples of CICC events in 1998 include
• Panel discussion titled "Student Rights and Responsibilities" to commemorate
Human Rights Day, December 10. The panel featured representatives from the
Commerce Undergraduate Society, the Graduate Student Society, Student
Services, the Faculty of Law, and the Equity Office.
• Student seminar titled "Students' Perspectives on Dealing with Racism."
• Conference titled "Cry Freedom: Allying Ourselves Against Racism" to celebrate
March 21, International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination. This
conference was co-sponsored by CICC and the student group Colour Connected. 6 UBC Reports • April 29, 1999
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
Community Initiatives
• Presentations titled "Managing the Criminal Aspects of Harassment Law" and
"Confidentiality" at a conference for human rights practitioners organized by
Continuing Legal Education.
• Presentations on discrimination and harassment issues for female support
workers and management staff at a local community services society, as well as for
high school students.
• Media interviews on equity and human rights topics.
• Advice on equity and human rights policies and practices to universities, employers, and various community organizations.
Educational & Employment Equity Report
UBC's Policy on Employment Equity (1990) is based on principles of individual
merit and achievement, which means that employment decisions at the University are
based on job performance criteria such as skills, knowledge, and abilities relevant to
specific positions.
In keeping with these principles, the University's Employment Equity Plan (1991,
revised in 1997) is designed to make the University a fair and equitable workplace
in terms of hiring, training, and advancement. The Plan also seeks to attract and
retain members ofthe four groups that the Federal Contractors Program designates
as traditionally under-represented: women, First Nations people, visible minorities,
and persons with disabilities.
Progress Toward Equity in 1998
Achievements in educational and employment equity over the past year are listed
under the four objectives of UBC's Employment Equity Plan.
Objective A
Review of UBC's employment policies and practices for their potential discriminatory
effect on members of designated groups; design of policies and practices to support
employment equity opportunities for designated-group members.
1. UBC's vision statement, TREK 2000, identifies recruitment and retention of
outstanding faculty and staff as a strategy in the University's pursuit of "an
equitable environment that celebrates diversity, respects difference, and ensures
that all may achieve their highest potential." To this end, "hiring policies should
... recognize questions of merit, equity, and the representation of under-represented groups on campus." TREK 2000 also recognizes that "First Nations faculty
and students are a resource that will ... expand the study of aboriginal cultures
both regionally and internationally."
In support of the principles, goals, and strategies outlined in TREK 2000, the Vice
President Academic and Provost established a committee to develop an academic
plan. Terms of reference for this plan include recognition of the multicultural
nature of British Columbia's population and of the University, as well as the
diversity of aboriginal peoples.
2. As part ofthe TREK 2000 consultation process, the Equity Office joined with various
groups, including the Status of Women Committee ofthe Faculty Association, the
Centre for Research in Women's Studies, and the Women Students' Office, to prepare
"A Vision of UBC for Women" statement, which was submitted to the President.
3. UBC's Board of Governors ratified the Agreement on Conditions of Appointment for
Sessional and Part-time Faculty. This agreement brings more part-time faculty
members into the Faculty Association bargaining unit by eliminating the distinction between "regular" and extra-sessional courses. As well as providing a career
path, improved job security, and credit for length of service, the agreement also
provides for regular reviews of teaching contribution.
4. To direct departments in recommendation of faculty appointments, the Office of
the Associate Vice President Academic and Provost compiled the Faculty Records
Information Package. This package includes information on the required employment-equity statement for all advertisements and the recruiting summary required for new tenure-track faculty appointments.
5. In reviewing the conditions for membership in the UBC 25 Year Club, the
University changed eligibility from 25 years of uninterrupted service to 25 years of
accumulated service.
6. Personalized benefits binders were distributed to over 6,000 UBC employees. In
addition to summarizing coverage details, these binders give information on
benefits eligibility, effective dates, and premiums.
7. The Department of Human Resources produced the Handbook for Non-Union
Clerical/Secretarial Staff, which describes terms of employment for this group of
employees.
8. The University Administration approved and CUPE Local 2950 ratified the Job
Evaluation System Project (JESP). As a result, a 1% pay equity increase, which had
been held in trust pending completion of JESP, was applied to all female-
dominated classifications in CUPE 2950. To access additional pay equity funds
from the provincial government, the Administration and the Union are negotiating
a new salary grid. CUPE 116 has not yet ratified JESP; in addition, JESP
negotiations for non-union clerical/secretarial staff remain ongoing.
The Association of Administrative and Professional Staff (AAPS) and the University
Administration successfully completed a mini-project designed to test the validity of
the outcomes from JESP for Management and Professional (M&P) staff. The
Admiriistration and AAPS are discussing ways to continue joint partnership of JESP.
9. UBC's Equity Office offered five workshops on "Discrimination and Harassment
Awareness" and "Discrimination and Harassment Skills Training" to administrative heads of unit and to staff and faculty with supervisory responsibilities. In
addition, the Equity Office continues to offer customized workshops to students,
staff, and faculty (see Education and Training Report).
10. UBC's Equity Office wrote and distributed a guide, "Creating an Environment
Free from Discrimination and Harassment," to assist administrative heads of
unit develop internal structures and procedures to prevent and remediate cases
of discrimination and harassment.
11. The Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth (TAG) produced a video and
guidebook on supervising graduate students. The video features equity-related
issues that may arise between graduate supervisors and graduate students. In
conjunction with the Equity Office, TAG offered a "Fostering Community and
Inclusion in the University Classroom" workshop.
Objective B
Development of special measures and reasonable accommodations to achieve and
maintain a UBC workforce representative of qualified applicant pools.
1. In 1998, UBC maintained its workforce representation of members ofthe designated employment equity groups: women 51%, aboriginal people 1%, visible
minorities 22%, and persons with disabilities 4% (see UBC Workforce Data).
2. As it has for several years, UBC achieved its goal of appointing women to 35% of
vacant tenure-track positions. The goal of 35% is based on the proportion of women
earning doctoral degrees from Canadian universities and thus is consonant with
the merit principle.
3. The Senior Faculty Opportunity Fund continued to be used to redress imbalances
in the representation at senior faculty levels of women. First Nations persons,
members of visible minorities, and persons with disabilities. The fund enables
departments to appoint at senior ranks women and minorities with exceptional
qualifications. In addition, the fund may be used when the University can secure
the employment of an eminent academic by hiring his or her spouse or partner—
but only when the spouse or partner also has outstanding qualifications.
4. UBC's Equipment Accommodation Fund was revised to require the formal
involvement ofthe Disability Resource Centre in vetting all requests. In 1998, the
fund was used to purchase ergonomic furniture and computer enhancements for
employees requiring special accommodations.
5. UBC's Equity Enhancement Fund was used to assist three projects:
• A Faculty of Education initiative to enlarge the pool of female candidates eligible
to enter the Technology Studies Education program.
• A Faculty of Forestry initiative to involve elders in the First Nations Professional
Sciences Access Program.
• An English Department conference, "Writing, Diversity, and Social Critique,"
that provided a forum for presentations and discussions on identity politics,
ethnicity in literature, multiculturalism, and Asian-Canadian writing. Held in
April, the conference attracted sixty-eight participants.
6. UBC joined with other B.C. universities to organize a conference to encourage
faculty women to apply for academic administrative positions.
7. In 1998-99 and under the Interdisciplinary Studies rubric, two graduate courses
in Women's Studies and Gender Relations were offered at the Centre for Research
in Women's Studies and Gender Relations. In addition, the Centre continued to
sponsor an annual symposium for graduate students working on topics related to
Women's Studies and Gender Relations.
8. UBC's Academic Women's Association convened with the President to explore
issues and ideas that relate to the status of women at UBC.
9. UBC continued to be a gold sponsor of the Vancouver YWCA's Women of
Distinction awards. Four UBC faculty members and a former Alma Mater Society
executive member were nominees in 1998. Two faculty members and the former
Alma Mater Society executive member were honoured as award winners.
10. UBC, Simon Fraser University, and industry co-developed "Alternate Routes to
Computing." This pilot diploma program addresses the shortage of qualified high-
tech workers by training top university graduates with little or no computer
experience. This program requires that at least half of its participants be women.
11. UBC's Colour Connected Against Racism, a student group committed to anti-
racism, presented a one-day conference, "Cry Freedom: Allying Ourselves."
Presented in cooperation with the Culturally Inclusive Campus Committee and
the Equity Office, the event celebrated the International Day for the Elimination
of Racism, March 21.
12. UBC's Women of Colour Mentoring Network, sponsored by the Women Students'
Office, presented a program titled "Systemic and Institutional Racism from the
Perspective of a First Nations Woman." In addition, the Women Students' Office's
Safer Campus Peer Educators joined the First Nations House of Learning to
present a seminar on hate crimes.
13. As part ofthe UBC President Speakers' Series, the House of Learning celebrated
its tenth anniversary with a program titled "Sacajawea and Her Sisters: Images
and Indians." Other events included
• A career fair for First Nations high school students interested in attending
UBC.
• A celebration for First Nations students who graduated in 1998.
• A conference, "Perspectives on Native American Oral Literatures," which
featured the annual Sedgewick Memorial Lecture and was co-sponsored by
Green College.
• A discussion in conjunction with International Student Services on First
Nations legends and stories.
A major 1998 undertaking was establishing the Institute of Aboriginal Health to
support the education of aboriginal health professionals. A partnership of the
First Nations House of Learning and the Office of the Coordinator of Health
Sciences, the Institute will develop undergraduate and graduate health science
courses for aboriginal students. In addition, the Institute will conduct and
coordinate research at UBC and will develop a support network for aboriginal
health workers in communities throughout Canada.
14. Based on the success ofthe University's pilot project with CUPE Local 116, a joint
committee composed of representatives ofthe University Administration and the
unions and associations representing employees launched the Return to Work
Program, which provides meaningful productive employment to employees who
have become ill or injured, but who wish and are able to return to work. As well,
the program provides guidelines and support to bring employees back into the
workplace in a fair and consistent manner. This innovative initiative helped the
Administration arrange for ten employees to return to work. Accommodations
included reduced work hours, modified work duties, and alternate job classifications. In addition, a number of employees were offered rehabilitation assistance,
such as volunteer placements, vocational counselling, retraining, skills upgrading, and the opportunity to return to work gradually. UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999 7
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
15. Spearheaded by UBC's Disability Resource Centre and the Rick Hansen Institute,
Strategy 2010 is a campus-wide plan to create full access for people with
disabilities. In 1998, minor capital funds were used to provide disability access
to several academic buildings. Some examples of these renovations include
• Providing access to areas not served by elevators by constructing ramps in the
Buchanan Building between wings C and D, and between wings D and E.
• Enabling students in wheelchairs to move from tier to tier by installing ramps
in a tiered lecture hall in the Friedman Building.
• Facilitating phone communication for those with hearing loss by installing a
TTY system in the Scarfe Building.
In addition, UBC's Coca-Cola Fund provided money to UBC's Institute for
Hearing Accessibility Research (IHEAR) and the Faculty of Education to incorporate standards for classroom design into the specification of a model classroom
for hearing accessibility at UBC.
Objective C
Establishment of a UBC work environment that supports the successful integration
of designated-group members.
1. UBC's University Orientation Program for new employees was presented four times
and attracted 148 staff and faculty. UBC's Equity Office continued to participate
in these orientation sessions, as well as in sessions for new undergraduate and
graduate students. In addition, the Equity Office participated in the Centre for
Teaching and Academic Growth's faculty mentoring program.
2. In cooperation with UBC's Equity Office, UBC's Human Resources Department
offered the workshop "Selection Interviewing: Ensuring Equity" to 56 administrators
in 1998. To date, 373 administrators have participated in this one-day workshop.
3. Through the Safer Campus Initiative sponsored by the provincial Ministry of
Advanced Education, Training and Technology, UBC continued to receive minor
capital funds to improve safety on campus. In 1998, funds were used to improve
lighting, provide additional emergency telephones, and build security bus shelters.
In addition, personal security information was made available through UBC's
Department of Health, Safety and Environment's website, www.safety.ubc.ca.
4. UBC's RCMP office created the position of community liaison officer to assist the
Equity Office, Housing and Conferences, the Women Students' Office, and UBC's
Personal Security Coordinator address sexual assault and other personal safety
concerns.
5. UBC's Housing and Conferences presented a program for students in residence on
date rape and sexual assault prevention. The UBC Sexual Assault Information Line
(822-9090) continued to provide recorded information about steps to take following an assault.
6. In 1998, the MOST Program registered 609 attendees for 61 workshops. MOST
provides UBC staff with opportunities to develop or enhance workplace skills and
knowledge. The five MOST certificate programs each comprise five components,
including workplace culture and values, UBC-specific issues, computer skills, job-
related skills, and professional and personal development. The twenty-one staff
members who completed all requirements for a MOST certificate were recognized
at a special graduation ceremony.
Some examples of no-cost workshops on workplace culture and values offered
through MOST were "Disability Awareness," "Working with People with Disabilities,"
"Valuing and Working with Cultural Diversity," "Personal Diversity Portfolio Development," "Discrimination and Harassment Awareness," and "Discrimination and
Harassment Skills Training." Other no-cost MOST courses offered were "Safety
Skills," for safety committee members who design departmental safety programs,
"Understanding Your Pension," "Employee Relations Skills," and "Central Agencies,"
which covers information on Human Resources, Purchasing, and Financial Services.
A new initiative begun in 1998 by the MOST Program was UBC's Career Development Project, which provided twenty academic and administrative units with
training in career development.
7. UBC's Better English Skills Training Program (BEST), a 12-week workplace
language training program, was offered at no cost to 36 staff members. In addition
to its regular program, BEST also offered specialized workshops, such as "Writing
Memos and Letters for Beginners" and "Writing Minutes." For the first time, BEST
offered one of its sessions in the evening.
8. In conjunction with the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth, the Equity
Office sponsored a workshop on "Fostering Community and Inclusion in the
University Classroom."
9. To celebrate Human Rights Day, December 10, UBC's Culturally Inclusive
Campus Committee and the Equity Office organized a panel of students, staff, and
faculty to encourage dialogue on "Student Rights and Responsibilities."
10. A campus ad hoc Committee to Report on the Use of Abusive Language in Teaching
Evaluation Forms addressed the issue of insulting and abusive remarks on
teaching evaluations. This committee made recommendations on ways to ensure
that students take teaching evaluations as a forum for serious, constructive
critique, rather than as a vehicle for racist, sexist, and homophobic comments.
Objective D
Adoption of monitoring and accountability mechanisms to evaluate and adjust
UBC's employment equity program.
1. In accordance with general UBC policy, an external review was conducted of the
Equity Office's operation, organization, management, and service role. Copies of
the review report were sent to all administrative heads of unit, as well as to
representatives of student and employee associations. In addition, the Equity
Office published the review report on its website, www.equity.ubc.ca.
2. UBC's Equity Office continued to administer the employment equity census to
newly hired faculty and staff. The response rate to this census was 74% for 8,041
employees.
3. UBC's Equity Office produced its third annual report reviewing the University's
progress toward equity and providing an overview of case processing and resolution of complaints of discrimination and harassment. In addition, this report
describes the Equity Office's educational and training activities. UBC's Equity
Office Annual Report 1997 was published in UBC Reports and on the Equity
Office's website, www.equity.ubc.ca.
4. UBC's Equity Office met with the B.C. Commissioner for Freedom of Information
and Protection of Privacy to review its confidential record-management procedures
in an effort to ensure that they are appropriate and necessary to achieving
resolution of discrimination and harassment cases.
5. UBC's Equity Office continued to work with two university-wide advisory committees—the President's Advisory Committee on Discrimination and Harassment,
and the President's Advisory Committee on Equity (see Appendices).
6. In 1998, the Faculty of Education updated its equity plan. In addition, several units
added equity plans to the 52 developed in 1995 by academic and administrative
units. These include plans prepared by the Centre for Teaching and Academic
Growth and the Department of Land and Building Services.
7. The Vice President Academic and Provost distributed copies of Guidelines on
Academic Administrative Appointments to all deans. In addition, the Vice President distributed a reminder to administrative heads of unit concerning the
requirement to use UBC's employment-equity statement in advertisements for
faculty and staff vacancies.
8. UBC's Equity Office continued to publicize its services through various campus
publications, including the Centre for Teaching and Academic Growth's Handbook
of Graduate Supervision. In addition, Equity Office staff wrote articles and letters
to the editor concerning UBC's equity program. These materials appeared in UBC
Reports, The Ubyssey, and the Vancouver Sun.
9. In conjunction with UBC's Office of Budget and Planning, the Equity Office
completed a salary analysis of five employee groups: Assistant Professors. Management and Professional Staff, CUPE 2950, CUPE 116, and Non-Union Technicians.
The analysis compared the starting salaries of members ofthe four employment-
equity designated groups with the salaries of non-designated group men hired
within a recent five-year period (see Salary Analysis).
FIGURE 3
Employment Equity Occupational Groups (EEOG)
EEOG
1  Senior Managers
2 Middle and Other Managers
3.1  University Teachers
3.2 Professionals Excluding
UniversityTeachers
4 Semi-professionals and
Technicians
5 Supervisors
6 Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
7 Administrative and Senior
Clerical Personnel
8 Skilled Sales and Service
Personnel
9 Skilled Crafts and Trades Workers
10 Clerical Personnel
11 Intermediate Sales and Service
Personnel
12 Semi-skilled Manual Workers
13  Other Sales and Service
Personnel
14 Other Manual Workers
Examples of UBC Positions
Associate Vice President, Dean, President, Registrar,
University Librarian, Vice President.
Associate Dean, Chair, Computer Systems Manager,
Director, Financial Manager, Food Service Manager, Head.
Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Clinical Instructor,
Instructor I and II, Lecturer, Member Extra Sessional
Studies, Professor, Senior Instructor, Sessional Lecturer.
Accountant, Coordinator Student Services,
Counsellor, Editor, Employee Relations Officer, General
Librarian, Genetic Assistant, Physician, Programmer/
Analyst, Scientific Engineer, Social Science Researcher.
Bio-Safety Officer, Building Inspector, Coach, Engineering
Technician, Graphics Supervisor, Horticultur
ist, Library Assistant, Medical Artist, Research Assistant/
Technician, Research Scientist.
Accommodation Manager, Accounting Supervisor, Campus
Mail Supervisor, Cleaning Supervisor, Head Service Worker,
Section Head, Senior Resident Attendant, Supervisor
(Administration), Word Processing Coordinator.
Farm Manager, Grounds Supervisor, Head Carpenter, Head
Plumber, Herd Manager, Mechanical Trades Supervisor,
Sub-Head Electrician, Sub-Head Gardener.
Administrative Assistant, Administrator, Budget Analyst,
Conference Coordinator, Executive Assistant, Lab Supervi
sor, Office Manager, Personnel Assistant, Secretary 1 to 5,
Senior Admissions Officer.
Assistant Cook, Commissary Cook, Commissary Baker,
First Cook, Head Cook, Relief Cook, Second Cook.
Bricklayer, Carpenter, Electrician, Locksmith, Maintenance
Engineer I and II, Painter, Plumber, Sheet Metal Worker,
Shift Engineer.
Administrative Clerk, Buyer 1 to 3, Clerk 1 to 3, Clinical
Office Assistant 1 to 3, Computer Operator, Data Entry
Clerk, General Clerk, Mail Clerk, Program Assistant, Store
Person.
Bookstore Assistant, Computer Salesperson, Dental
Assistant, Housekeeper, Patrol Person, Sales Attendant, Sales
Clerk, Utility Worker, Waiter/Waitress.
Clerk Driver, Farm Worker 1 to 5, Milker, Nursery and
Greenhouse Gardener, Printing Operator 2 and 3, Spray
Painter, Truck Driver.
Food Services Assistant, Gate Keeper, General Worker,
Grocery Clerk, Janitor, Caretaker, Building Supplies Service
Worker, Kiosk Attendant, Residence Attendant, Service
Worker: Ice Maker.
Labourer 2, Labourer 2 (Const, and Hvy.), Labourer 3
(Special).
UBC Workforce Data
UBC classifies its employment positions using the 15 Employment Equity Occupational Groups (EEOGs) established by the Federal Contractors Program to facilitate
monitoring the Canadian labour force. The 15 EEOGs and examples of UBC positions
in each category are listed in Figure 3. 8 UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
FIGURE 4:  UBC Workforce: Gender by EEOG
Fema
le
Male
May 1997      May
1998
May
1997
May
1998
Employment Equity Occupational Group
N
%       N
%
N
%
N
%
Senior Managers
9
31.03 10
32.26
20
68.97
21
67.74
Middle and Other Managers
119
36.28 139
39.15
209
63.72
216
60.85
University Teachers*
542
25.52 553
26.15
1582
74.48
1562
73.85
Professionals (excluding University
562
51.94 527
50.14
520
48.06
524
49.86
Teachers)
Semi-professionals & Technicians
730
55.85 743
56.25
577
44.15
578
43.75
Supervisors
61
61.00 57
62.64
39
39.00
34
37.36
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
3
9.38   3
9.09
29
90.62
30
90.91
Administrative &C Senior Clerical
832
96.63 819
96.35
29
3.37
31
3.65
Personnel
Skilled Sales & Service Personnel
9
25.71  10
27.78
26
74.29
26
72.22
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
2
1.05   4
1.83
188
98.95
214
98.17
Clerical Personnel
584
81.11 615
80.50
136
18.89
149
19.50
Intermediate Sales & Service Perso
nnel
232
62.37 249
64.01
140
37.63
140
35.99
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
8
8.99    5
5.95
81
91.01
79
94.05
Other Sales & Service Personnel
384
58.45 373
57.83
273
41.55
272
42.17
Other Manual Workers
5
13.16 9
15.52
33
86.84
49
84.48
Total
4082
51.26 4116
51.19
3882
48.74
3925
48.81
'University Teachers includes sessional and extra
-sessional appointments. Faculty with administrative
appointments are included amor
g Middle an
i other Managers, or S
enior Managers
Note: Data from the University's
ntegrated Hi
jman Resource Information System (IHRIS!
on the
extract dates of May 31, 1997 ar
d May 31, 1998.
FIGURE 5:  UBC Workforce: Aboriginal
People
& Visible Minorities by EEOG
Aboriginal People
Visib
e Minorities
May
1997
May
1998
May
1997
May 1998
Employment Equity Occupational Group
N
%
N
%
N
%
N     %
Senior Managers
0
0.00
0
0.00
2
6.90
2      6.90
Middle and Other Managers
3
0.99
2
0.62
20
6.60
29    8.95
University Teachers*
20
1.20
21
1.34
173
10.98
202  11.56
Professionals (excluding University
8
0.89
9
1.07
190
22.26
200 23.84
Teachers)
Semi-professionals & Technicians
9
0.87
9
0.95
329
31.91
297 31.26
Supervisors
4
4.94
4
5.26
20
24.69
19    25.33
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
.0      0.00
Administrative & Senior Clerical
11
1.42
13
1.78
184
23.71
180 24.73
Personnel
Skilled Sales & Service Personnel
1
5.26
1
5.00
9
47.37
8      40.00
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
1
0.97
1
0.88
12
11.65
12    10.53
Clerical Personnel
8
1.34
7
1.22
168
28.05
171 29.74
Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel
4
2.03
4
2.42
76
38.58
66   39.76
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
1
1.85
1
2.00
6
11.11
5      10.20
Other Sales & Service Personnel
10
2.65
9
2.55
129
34.22
121 34.28
Other Manual Workers
1
5.88
2
9.09
2
11.76
5      21.74
Total
81
1.32
83
1.40
1320
22.04
1317 22.19
'University Teachers includes sessional and extra-sessional appointment
s. Faculty with administrative
appointments are included among Middle an
d other
Managers, or Se
nior Managers.
Note: Data from employees who self-identifiec
on UBC's err
ployment
equity
census as members of
designated groups and who were active on th
: extract
dates
of May 3'.
, 1997
, and May 31, 1998.
Figures 4 through 6 provide an overview ofthe number of UBC's designated-group
employees in each of the 15 EEOGs. These figures provide snapshots of the
University's workforce on May 31, 1997, and May 31, 1998.
Figure 4 indicates the representation of male and female employees in all of the
EEOGs. Figure 5 shows the representation of aboriginal people and visible minorities.
Figure 6 indicates the representation of persons with disabilities—both those who
self-identified in UBC's employment equity census, as well as the number of
employees with disabilities who were on UBC's Income Replacement Plan.
The data for men and women in Figure 4 are drawn from UBC's Integrated
Information Human Resource Information System (IHRIS) and thus accurately reflect
the gender distribution of UBC's workforce. Data on the other three designated
groups—visible minorities, aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities—are
drawn from UBC's employment equity census, which relies upon voluntary self-
identification. Moreover, twenty-six percent of UBC employees have not particpated
in the census. Thus, the data on these three groups may not accurately represent
their actual numbers in the UBC workforce.
Comparison of the UBC Workforce with the Canadian Labour Force
Figure 7 shows the proportion of the four designated employment equity groups
in UBC's workforce between 1994 and 1998, as well as the proportion of these groups
in the 1991 Canadian Labour Force (the 1991 Canadian census provides the most
recent available data). A comparison of these two sets of figures indicates UBC's
progress in developing a workforce that represents the diversity in pools of potential
candidates with appropriate qualifications.
Figure 7 also shows UBC's figures and, "Under the Act Workforce (1996)," those
of other employers who report to the federal government under the Employment
Equity Act. These employers represent federally regulated, private-sector organizations and Crown corporations.
Note that the data provided by Human Resources Development Canada relate to
the number of people in the four designated groups who were actually employed.
FIGURE 6:  UBC Workforce: P
ersons with Disabilities
by EEOG
Persons with Disabilities
Persons wi
th Dis
ibilities
W
ho self-identifiec
incluc
ing employees
on IRP"
May 1997
May
998
May
1997
May
1998
Employment Equity Occupational Group
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
Senior Managers
1
3.45
1
3.45
1
3.45
1
3.45
Middle and Other Managers
12
4.00
12
3.69
15
5.00
15
4.62
University Teachers*
46
2.85
50
3.38
51
3.10
57
3.38
Professionals (excluding University
15
1.70
17
2.01
18
2.05
20
2.37
Teachers)
Semi-professionals & Technicians
32
3.17
31
3.26
49
4.83
48
5.02
Supervisors
5
6.25
5
6.58
11
13.41
10
12.82
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
0
0.00
Administrative & Senior Clerical
25
3.29
26
3.57
44
5.76
46
6.27
Personnel
Skilled Sales & Service Personnel
0
0.00
0
0.00
1
5.00
1
4.76
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
3
2.97
2
1.75
9
8.65
6
5.17
Clerical Personnel
21
3.60
14
2.44
32
5.45
25
4.33
Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel
3
1.55
4
2.40
5
2.59
4
2.40
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
3
5.56
3
6.00
5
9.26
5
10.00
Other Sales & Service Personnel
14
3.71
10
2.80
42
10.74
38
10.33
Other Manual Workers
1
7.14
1
4.35
2
13.33
1
4.35
Total
181
2.96
176
2.96
285
4.63
277
4.63
'University Teachers includes sessional and extra-sessional appo
intments. Faculty with administrative
appointments are included among
Middle ar
d other
Managers, or Senior M
inagers.
"IRP: Income Replacement Plan
Note:  Data from employees with disabil
ities who self-identifiec
on UBC's em
ployment equity census
and employees who were on the U
niversiry's
Income
Replacement PI
in on the extract
dates of May
31, 1997, and May 31, 1998.
FIGURE 7
Representation of Members of Designated Groups in th
e Canadian Labour Force
Under the Act
Canadian
Designated Group
UBC
UBC
UBC
UBC
UBC
Workforce      I
abour Force
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
(1996)
(1991)
«%
%
%
%
%
%
%
Women
51.00
51.34
51.69
51.26
51.19
44.83
45.90
Aboriginal People
1.35
1.42
1.36
1.32
1.40
1.22
3.0
Visible Minorities
20.63
20.32
21.01
22.04
22.19
9.23
9.10
Persons with Disabilities
4.94
4.83
4.83
4.63
4.63
2.67
6.50
Note: Under the Act Workforce covers both crown corporations and federally-regulated,
private sector employers.
FIGURE 8
New Tenure-track
Faculty Appointments
1986/87 to
1998/99
Total
Male
Female
#
%
#
%
1986/87
57
42
74
15
26
1987/88
89
65
73
24
27
1988/89
94
64
68
30
32
1989/90
111
87
78
24
22
1990/91
61
39
64
22
36
1991/92
92
57
62
35
38
1992/93
81
52
64
29
36
1993/94
47
25
53
22
47
1994/95
70
43
61
27
39
1995/96
54
39
72
15
18
1996/97
62
41
66
21
34
1997/98
32
13
41
19
59
1998/99
25
16
64
9
36
Total
875
583
67
292
33
rather than those who were qualified for employment. Thus, one can compare people
who were employed at UBC with people employed in the Canadian labour force. The
Human Resources Development Canada data do not allow comparison of the UBC
workforce with qualified applicant pools, which include unemployed people.
In all of the four designated groups, UBC compares favourably with other
employers under the Employment Equity Act. In addition, UBC compares favourably
with the overall Canadian labour force in the proportion of visible minorities and
women. However. UBC's proportion of aboriginal people and persons with disabilities
does not compare favourably with the proportion found in the overall labour force.
Gender Distribution of Tenure-track Faculty
Figure 8 shows the gender distribution of new tenure-track faculty appointments
from the 1986/87 academic year through 1998/99. UBC continues to meet its goal
to hire women to fill at least 35% of vacant tenure-track faculty positions. This goal
is based on the proportion of women receiving doctoral degrees from Canadian
universities. For the 1998/99 academic year. UBC hired well-qualified women into
36% of vacant tenure-track faculty positions. UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999 9
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
FIGURE 9: Gender Distribution of Full-Time Faculty by
Rank
Instructors
Tenure Track
All Ranks
Professor
Associate
Assistant
I, II
&Sr.
Subtotal
Percentage
Lecturer
Total
Percentage
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
85/86
678
35
497
85
293
130
38
45
1506
295
83.6%
16.4%
13
34
1519
329
82.2%
17.8%
86/87
687
34
471
90
291
119
41
43
1490
286
83.9%
16.1%
15
35
1505
321
82.4%
17.6%
87/88
689
35
468
94
290
116
34
39
1481
284
83.9%
16.1%
13
25
1494
309
82.9%
17.1%
88/89
689
40
451
100
304
112
34
41
1478
293
83.5%
16.5%
15
25
1493
318
82.4%
17.6%
89/90
684
41
442
102
346
126
32
41
1504
310
82.9%
17.1%
15
30
1519
340
81.7%
18.3%
90/91
688
48
425
99
356
134
32
46
1501
327
82.1%
17.9%
12
30
1513
357
80.9%
19.1%
91/92
682
52
416
103
348
153
34
42
1480
350
80.9%
19.1%
11
32
1491
382
79.6%
20.4%
92/93
673
63
410
97
332
162
34
44
1449
366
79.8%
20.2%
12
24
1461
390
78.9%
21.1%
93/94
683
68
416
99
317
162
33
44
1449
373
79.5%
20.5%
10
26
1459
399
78.5%
21.5%
94/95
692
78
417
101
295
159
30
43
1434
381
7.9%
21.0%
8
24
1442
405
78.1%
21.9%
95/96
684
85
435
109
268
146
25
46
1412
386
78.5%
21.5%
12
22
1424
408
77.7%
22.3%
96/97
697
86
431
110
255
149
25
43
1408
388
78.4%
21.6%
16
27
1424
415
77.4%
22.6%
97/98
692
98
418
128
241
142
27
41
1378
409
77.1%
22.9%
16
22
1394
431
76.4%
23.6%
98/99
686
101
386
136
216
128
25
37
1313
402
76.6%
23.4%
13
25
1326
427
75.6%
24.4%
FIGURE 10
Gender Distribution
Full-Time Faculty by Faculty
Associate
Assistant
Instructors
Professor
Professor
Professor
& Lecturers
Total
Male
Female
Male Female
Male Female
Male
Female
Male Female
Agricultural Science
18
4
15
5
3
4
0
0
36
13
Applied Science
55
10
38
16
26
14
3
6
122
46
Arts
159
30
98
46
38
31
2
11
297
118
Commerce
39
1
18
0
13
5
6
3
76
9
Dentistry
9
2
7
3
9
2
0
0
25
7
Education
33
11
25
27
15
24
3
15
76
77
Forestry
17
1
11
1
7
3
3
2
38
7
Graduate Studies
21
0
6
3
3
1
0
0
30
4
Health Sci. Coordinator
1
0
0
1
0
0
0
0
1
1
Law
17
4
7
6
1
3
1
1
26
14
Medicine
153
29
90
22
67
29
3
6
313
86
Pharmaceutical Science
10
3
6
1
6
1
1
5
23
10
Science
154
6
65
5
28
11
16
13
263
35
Total
686
101
386
136
216
128
38
62
1,326
427
FIGURE 11
Tenure-track Facu
lty
1. By Gender
1996
1997
1998
JOB TITLE
Female
Male %Female
Female
Male
% Female
Female
Male
%FemaIe
Professor
73
635
10.3%
70
660
9.6%
76
659
10.3%
Associate Professor
116
463
20.0%
128
463
21.7%
139
443
23.9%
Assistant Professor
174
316
35.5%
176
307
36.4%
169
297
36.3%
Instructor I
12
3
80.0%
9
5
64.3%
11
7
61.1%
Instructor II
2
3
40.0%
2
1
66.7%
1
1
50.0%
Senior Instructor
35
23
60.3%
35
20
63.6%
35
22
61.4%
Total
412
1443 ' 22.2%
420
1456
22.4%
431
1429
23.2%
2.  By Visible Minority
1996
1997
1998
JOB TITLE
VM
Total    %VM
VM
Total
%VM
VM
Total
%VM
Professor
48
543
8.8%
48
566
8.5%
49
577
8.5%
Associate Professor
44
466
9.4%
47
475
9.9%
48
467
10.3%
Assistant Professor
65
410
15.9%
69
412
16.7%
73
393
18.6%
Instructor I
2
14
14.3%
1
14
7.1%
1
17
5.9%
Instructor II
0
2
0.0%
0
1
0.0%
0
1
0.0%
Senior Instructor
5
52
9.6%
4
49
8.2%
5
52
9.6%
Total
164
1487
11.0%
169
1517
11.1%
176
1507
11.7%
3.  By Aboriginal
1996
1997
1998
JOB TITLE
Aborig
Total %Aborig
Aborig
Total
%Aborig
Aborig
Total
%Aborig
Professor
5
546
0.9%
6
569
1.1%
8
579
1.4%
Associate Professor
3
465
0.6%
3
473
0.6%
5
465
1.1%
Assistant Professor
4
409
1.0%
6
414
1.4%
4
395
1.0%
Instructor I
1
14
7.1%
1
14
7.1%
1
17
5.9%
Instructor II
0
2
0.0%
0
1
0.0%
0
1
0.0%
Senior Instructor
1
53
1.9%
1
50
2.0%
1
52
1.9%
Total
14
1489
0.9%
17
1521
1.1%
19
1509
1.3%
4. By Self-identified Disabi
lity
1997
1998
JOB TITLE
Dis
Total
%Dis
Dis
Total
%Dis
Professor
18
567
3.2%
19
578
3.3%
Associate Professor
14
475
2.9%
12
467
2.6%
Assistant Professor
9
413
2.2%
10
394
2.5%
Instructor I
1
14
7.1%
3
17
17.6%
Instructor II
0
1
0.0%
0
1
0.0%
Senior Instructor
2
50
4.0%
3
52
5.8%
Total
44
1520
2.9%
47
1509
3.1%
5. By Self-identified Disabi
lity (and including IRP)
1997
1998
JOB TITLE
Dis&
IRP
Total
%Dis
&IRP
Dis
&IRP
Total
%Dis
&IRP
Professor
18
567
3.2%
19
578
3.3%
Associate Professor
16
476
3.4%
15
469
3.2%
Assistant Professor
11
413
2.7%
12
394
3.1%
Instructor I
1
14
7.1%
3
17
17.6%
Instructor II
0
1
0.0%
0
1
0.0%
Senior Instructor
2
50
4.0%
3
52
5.8%
Total
48
1521
3.2%
52
1511
3.4%
Figure 9 shows the gender distribution of full-time faculty by rank. Since 1985/
86 women have increased from 16.4% to 23.4% as a proportion of all tenure-track
faculty. This represents an increase of 107 women in tenure-track positions. In the
same period, the number of men has declined by 193. The greatest gains have been
made at the ranks of Professor and Associate Professor.
As shown in Figure 10, patterns of gender distribution are dramatically different
in different Faculties. For example, Commerce and Science have respectively 10.5%
and 12% women in full-time faculty positions, Education has 50% women in these
positions.
Figure 11 shows the distribution of tenure-track faculty by rank and designated
equity group. The number of designated-equity group members among tenure-track
faculty increased between 1996 to 1998. (Unlike the data in Figures 9 and 10, which
are drawn from IHRIS, the data in Figure 11 are taken from UBC's Employment Equity
Census. Moreover, snapshot data from IHRIS and the employment equity census data
are drawn at different points in time, and the employment equity census includes
some part-time, tenure-track faculty. Thus, the number of faculty in these databases
differs.)
Salary Analysis
In 1998, UBC's Equity Office joined with the Office of Budget and Planning to
initiate a comparative study of the salaries of full-time members of the four
employment-equity designated groups—women, aboriginal people, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities—with the salaries of full-time non-designated
group men. The analysis covered five groups of employees hired between January
1991 and June 1997: Assistant Professors, Management and Professional (M&P)
staff, CUPE 2950 members, CUPE 116 members, and Non-union Technicians. Our
interest was to discover the extent to which UBC's current employment-equity
policies and practices were eliminating salary differences between designated and
non-designated group members.
Starting salaries of faculty members vary systematically according to two major
factors: years of experience and disciplinary area. We considered using age as a proxy
for years of experience, but family responsibilities may have delayed the careers of
some women faculty. Because we were looking at faculty members hired into the
entry-level rank of Assistant Professor, we believed the effects of experience should
be somewhat constant for all individuals.
Similar to starting salaries of faculty members, starting salaries of staff in M&P,
CUPE, and Non-union Technician positions depend on both level of experience and
type of job. Again, age is not a perfect proxy for years of experience. Like female
Assistant Professors, some women staff may have delayed their entry into the
workforce because of family responsibilities. As with faculty salaries, we looked at the
salaries of employees hired. In addition, because M&P, CUPE, and Non-union
Technicians are categorized in several EEOGs, we controlled for EEOG in the
regression analyses. Thus, we assumed the effects of experience would be somewhat
constant for all individuals.
Even restricting our analysis to those hired between January 1991 and June 1997,
we may have confounded those who began working at UBC after some years of work
elsewhere with those who were just beginning their careers. Thus, if our analysis
suggested that there were inequities in salaries, we would have to consider the
possibility that differences in experience explained inequities between designated-
group employees and non-designated group men.
In order to maintain the confidentiality of UBC's employment-equity census, we
only provide total numbers of designated-group employees by EEOG in this report.
Providing numbers of designated-group employees by faculty or by aboriginal, visible
minority, or disability status would violate the confidentiality of self-identification
data because the limited number of these individuals in small units could possibly
reveal their identity.
Faculty Salaries
Faculty Salaries by Sex
Excluding the Faculty of Medicine because the distinction between full-time and
part-time faculty was not clear, we examined eleven faculties and found a difference
of $4,191 between the average salary of men (N=l 15) and women (N=66) hired as full-
time Assistant Professors. We also found that the men and women were unevenly
distributed among faculties. Recently hired men tended to be concentrated in the
faculties with higher salaries—Commerce and Business Administration, Dentistry,
and Pharmaceutical Sciences. Therefore, any investigation of salary differences
between men and women must take into account the differential of starting salaries
among disciplines.
When we calculated the average ofthe differences in average salaries for men and
women in each of the eleven faculties, we arrived at the figure of $1,080. The 10 UBC Reports • April 29, 1999
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
considerable difference between $1,080 and $4,191 was explained by differences in
the distribution of Assistant Professors among faculties. Finally, a regression analysis
using both faculty distribution and gender on the salaries of Assistant Professors
found no statistical support for the hypothesis that men's salaries were higher than
women's salaries even after taking the distribution of men and women among
faculties into account.
Faculty Salaries by Visible Minority, Aboriginal, and Disability Status
We found a statistically significant differential in salary associated with persons
identifying as members of visible minority groups (N=31) among Assistant Professors.
However, this result was due entirely to one individual hired at a very high salary.
Very few newly hired Assistant Professors identified as aboriginal people or persons
with disabilities. Despite the small numbers of these hires—two aboriginal people and
three persons with disabilities—the difference could be tested for statistical significance by regression. It is important to note, however, that with such a small sample,
only very large differences would be detected as statistically significant. Both
regression analyses showed no statistically significant effects due to aboriginal or
disability status.
Management and Professional Salaries
Management and Professional Salaries by Sex
Management and Professional (M&P) staff are categorized by six EEOGs: Middle
and Other Managers, Professionals, Semi-professionals, Supervisors, Supervisors
Crafts and Trades, and Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel.
Two major determinants of M&P salaries are the type of job and the salary grade.
When categorized according to EEOGs and by sex, the average salaries for men and
for women hired into full-time M&P positions were quite similar, and the differences
were not statistically significant. The distribution of women and men among the
EEOGs also was quite similar—with one major exception: far more women than men
were hired into Administrative and Senior Clerical Personnel. Examples of jobs in this
category are Administrative Assistant, Budget Analyst, Executive Assistant, and
Senior Admissions Officer.
Controlling for EEOG category, we conducted a regression analysis to determine
whether there was an overall difference in M&P salaries. The coefficient for sex was
not statistically significant, indicating that there was no systematic difference
between men (N=163) and women (N=170) hired into M&P positions.
Salary grade determines the salary range within each M&P job. Moreover, some
employer discretion determines placement within a salary range. Thus, we also
plotted average salaries of men and women by salary grade. We found average salaries
by grade to be very similar for men and women. Thus, it appears that M&P employees
were assigned to salaries within ranges without sex bias.
Management and Professional Salaries by Aboriginal, Visible Minority, and
Disability Status
Only six persons hired as M&P staff self-identified as aboriginal people. The salary
differences were very inconsistent, and a regression analysis showed no statistically
significant results. On the basis of the largest group—four professionals—of M&P
staff who identified as aboriginal people, no salary inequities were apparent.
A regression analysis showed no evidence of statistically significant differences
in salary between M&P staff hired who self-identified as visible minorities (N=48) and
those who did not. Average salaries by EEOG for M&P staff who self-identified as
having disabilities (N=15) also showed no evidence of inequity on the basis of
disability status. Finally, a regression analysis confirmed that there was no overall
statistically significant differences between those who identified as having a
disability and those who did not.
CUPE 2950 Monthly-paid Salaries
CUPE 2950 Monthly-paid Salaries by Sex
CUPE 2950 monthly-paid staff are categorized into three EEOGs and are represented mainly in the following positions: Library Assistants. Secretaries, Clerks,
Office Assistants, Computer Operators, and Data Control Clerks. Overall, the
differences in average salaries in each EEOG showed men earning slightly more than
women. When controlling for EEOG, a regression analysis showed a statistically
significant difference of $1,210 between men and women hired into CUPE 2950
monthly-paid positions.
Salaries for CUPE 2950 employees depend upon the salary grade assigned to the
position. In each salary grade there are three steps, but distribution among the steps
does not account for much of the variability in salaries. To further investigate the
higher salaries of men, we plotted the distribution of men and women across the nine
salary grades for all CUPE 2950 positions. At salary grade 6—where the largest
number of staff are in Clerk 3 positions—men were much more likely than women to
be placed at grade 6. Of the 31 men hired, 10 (32 %) were hired as Clerk 3's. versus
13% of 263 women.
CUPE 2950 Monthly-paid Salaries by Aboriginal, Visible Minority, and Disability
Status
Only three persons hired into CUPE 2950 self-identified as aboriginal people.
Although these three individuals earned less than the average CUPE 2950 employee,
the difference was not statistically significant.
Seventy employees who self-identified as visible minorities were hired into CUPE
2950 positions, but there was no statistical evidence that their salaries were less than
those who did not identify as visible minorities. Likewise, there was no evidence of
salary inequity between the salaries of recently hired persons who self-identified as
having disabilities (N=5) and those who did not.
CUPE 116 Monthly-paid Salaries
CUPE 116 Monthly-paid Salaries by Sex
A regression analysis with EEOG and sex on the salaries of 32 women and 95 men
hired into CUPE 116 positions showed a statistically significant difference of $1,846
between men and women.
CUPE 116 Monthly-paid Salaries by Aboriginal Visible Minority, and Disability
Status
Only two CUPE 116 staff self-identified as aboriginal people, and only one CUPE
116 staff self-identified as having a disability. We did not find a statistically significant
difference between the salaries of these three individuals and those who did not self-
identify as aboriginal or as having a disability.
There was a statistically significant annual salary differential of $1,874 between
those who did not self-identify as being a visible minority and the 23 CUPE 116 staff
who self-identified as being members of a visible minority.
Non-union Technicians' Salaries
Non-union Technicians' Salaries by Sex
When controlling for salary grade for full-time employees, there was no statistically
significant difference between men (N=56) and women (N=104) Non-union Technicians.
Non-union Technicians' Salaries by Aboriginal, Visible Minority, and Disability
Status
Among Non-union Technicians hired full-time, one self-identified as an aboriginal
person and one self-identified as having a disability. We found no statistically
significant difference between the salaries of these two and others who did not self-
identify as aboriginal, visible minority, or having a disability.
When controlling for salary grade, there was no statistically significant difference
between those who self-identified as being visible minorities (N=51) and other Nonunion Technicians.
Summary of Salary Differences Among New Hires
Assistant Professors
Sex: No difference, although men and women were concentrated in different
disciplines
Aboriginal People: No statistically significant difference *
Visible Minorities: No statistically significant difference
Persons with Disabilities: No statistically significant difference *
Management and Professional Staff
Sex: No statistically significant difference
Aboriginal People: No statistically significant difference
Visible Minorities: No statistically significant difference
Persons with Disabilities: No statistically significant difference
CUPE 2950
Sex: Difference of $ 1,210
Aboriginal People: No statistically significant difference *
Visible Minorities: No statistically significant difference
Persons with Disabilities: No statistically significant difference *
CUPE 116
Sex: Difference of $1,846
Aboriginal People: No statistically significant difference *
Visible Minorities: Difference of $1,874
Persons with Disabilities: No statistically significant difference *
Non-union Technicians
Sex: No statistically significant difference
Aboriginal People: No statistically significant difference *
Visible Minorities: No statistically significant difference
Persons with Disabilities: No statistically significant difference *
* For equity groups with small numbers, only very large differences would be detected
as statistically significant.
The results of our salary analysis indicate that for recently hired employees, there
was little evidence of salary inequity due to sex, or self-identified status as an
aboriginal, a visible minority, or a person with a disability. Ofthe 20 different analyses
presented, only three showed statistically significant wage gaps, and only two, CUPE
2950 and CUPE 116, showed a significant wage gap between men and women. The
third statistically significant wage gap was between visible minority employees in
CUPE 116 and other CUPE 116 staff. The wage gaps found in these three instances
were small, but they warrant investigation, particularly with regard to the possibility
that wage differences may be explained not by discriminatory practices, but by
differences in experience between designated-group employees and others.
Recommendations
This partial salary analysis of UBC's workforce indicates that while salary equity
is becoming a common practice amongst new hires at the University, there continue
to be salary inequities for designated-group members in some UBC employee
groups. Based on this report, the President's Advisory Committee on Equity,
Discrimination and Harassment approved the following recommendations:
1. Through a review of collective agreements and implementation of a gender-
neutral job evaluation system, Human Resources address salary inequities
between men and women in CUPE 2950 and CUPE 116, and between visible
minorities and others in CUPE 116.
2. That Human Resources continue to monitor the salaries set for newly hired
individuals by regularly tracking new hires by EEOGs.
3. That the President request units with equity plans to revise them to include salary
equity for designated-group employees in positions where collective agreements
permit discretion in salary assignments. UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999 11
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
4. That the President request units that have not yet developed equity plans to do
so and, where collective agreements permit, to include in those plans salary
equity measures.
5. That UBC's Equity Office continue to promote the Equipment Accommodation
Fund for Employees with Disabilities and the Equity Enhancement Fund, along
with campus-wide training and education programs to create and maintain a
welcoming work environment for all UBC employees.
Discrimination & Harassment Report
In accordance with the University's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment,
the Equity Office works to promote good equity practices in the day-to-day activities
of academic and administrative units.
The terms "discrimination" and "harassment" refer to intentional or unintentional behaviour for which there is no reasonable justification. On the basis of
characteristics defined by the 1997 B.C. Human Rights Code, discrimination and
harassment can adversely affect either individuals or groups.
Under this code, UBC must not discriminate against students, faculty, or staff on
13 prohibited grounds, such as religion, place of origin, and sexual orientation.
Recent court decisions also have established UBC's clear obligation to maintain a
discrimination-free work and study environment. This obligation falls upon all
individuals who supervise the work or conduct of others. These supervisors could
be faculty members, administrators, or managers.
Equity Office procedures for handling discrimination and harassment complaints offer a clear, equitable approach to problem resolution. These procedures
supplement other University and extra-University mechanisms, such as those of
employee associations and unions, the courts, the B.C. Human Rights Commission,
and the Office ofthe B. C. Ombudsman.
The Equity Office organizes discrimination and harassment complaints under
five headings:
Poisoned Environment
Any conduct or comment that has the effect of creating a hostile, intimidating, or
offensive environment on the basis of personal characteristics that are protected
under the Policy on Discrimination and Harassment—for example, ethnicity,
gender, sexual orientation, disability, or age.
Quid Pro guo
Coercive sexual conduct involving rewards or threats.
Assault
Unwelcome physical contact, including fondling, touching, and the use of force.
Other Forms of Discrimination
Conduct that compromises the access, opportunity, or evaluation of an individual on the basis of personal characteristics that are unrelated to performance and
protected under the Policy.
Allegations Not Covered by the Policy
This category covers behaviour that offends human rights, but that involves a
respondent or takes place at a location not under UBC's jurisdiction, or that falls
outside the one-year time limit for reporting complaints, or that may be effectively
dealt with under other University procedures. This category also covers interpersonal conflicts not covered by human rights legislation or the Policy. Such conflicts
are classified as "personal harassment."
Complaints Received in 1998
The Equity Office provided consultation and case management assistance to
students, faculty, and staff, including administrative heads of unit, executive
members of employee associations, and members of departmental equity committees. On occasion, the Office also provided consultation to off-campus individuals
and agencies.
Complaints accepted by the Equity Office were resolved by complainants themselves, through intervention by Equity Advisors or administrative heads, or by a
collaborative process involving Equity Advisors, administrative heads, complainants, and respondents.
Many complainants who visited the Equity Office did so for only one or two sessions
and did not request an Equity Office intervention. Some reported being too fearful of
retaliation to confront respondents or to inform administrative heads. Others sought
information and advice on how they might address problems themselves.
The Equity Office categorizes complaints as "consultations" and as "cases."
"Consultations" involve providing information and advice to complainants and
administrators who then proceed to manage complaints on their own. "Cases"
involve the Equity Office in direct intervention with the parties to a complaint.
No case went forward to a formal investigation during 1998.
In 1998, the Office participated in efforts to resolve 236 complaints: 133
consultations (56%) and 103 cases (44%). Eighty-four of the complaints (36%)
involved human rights issues covered by UBC's Policy on Discrimination and
Harassment. Ofthe remaining 152 complaints, 93 (39%) concerned human rights
issues not covered by UBC's Policy: the behaviour or event was outside the one-year
limit, was covered by other University policies or procedures, or involved a
respondent not under UBC's jurisdiction. The remaining 59 complaints (25%)
concerned personal harassment involving conflicts between peers or between
supervisors and their subordinates.
Figure 12 tracks the number of complaints of discrimination and harassment
presented to the Equity Office in 1995 and 1998. Since 1995, the proportion of
complaints covered by the Policy decreased from 72% (147 out of 205) to 36% (84
out of 236), while the proportion of complaints that did not fall under the Policy
increased from 28% (58 out of 205) to 64% (152 out of 236).
FIGURE 12
Discrimination & Harassment Complaints
Covered by UBC's
Policy
1995
Out of 201 total
complaints, 147
covered by Policy
1998
Out of 2^6 total
complaints, 84
covered by Policy
Age
Disability
Ethnicity (ancestry/colour/race)
Family Status
Marital Status
Political Belief
Religious Belief
Sex/Gender
Sexual Orientation
Unrelated Criminal Offense
3                2%
8               5%
32             22%
0                 0
0                 0
5               3%
0 0
88             60%
10              7%
1 1%
1
7
15
5
0
1
1
50
4
0
1%
8%
18%
6%
0
1%
1%
60%
5%
0
Discrimination & Harassment Complaints
Not Covered by UBC's Policy
1995
Out of 2Q5_ total
complaints, 5J3
not covered by Policy
1998
Out of 2^6 total
complaints, 152
not covered by Policy
Personal Harassment
19             33%
59
39%
Behaviour covered
under other UBC
policy or procedure
19             33%
69
45%
Event outside one-
year limit
2               4%
2
1%
Respondent and/or
context not under
UBC jurisdiction
18             31%
22
14%
FIGURE 13
Context of Discrimination & Harassment Cases
January to December 1998                   athletic 1% ca/
^> ~"77^b% residential
70/
/      // A10%
ina^T
/                            //     ^^^k  non-UBC
JvlX
r)
47% \          /               J
employment \              /                           / J / /o
\.          /                           / academic
Sixty percent of complaints covered by the Policy involved sexual harassment and
gender discrimination, the leading cause of human rights problems at UBC. Next
came ethnicity, which comprised 18% of complaints covered by the Policy.
Figure 12 also shows complaints not covered by the Policy. Of these, the largest
group (45%) fell into the category of "behaviour covered under other UBC policy or
procedure." Personal harassment followed at 39%.
Figure 13 describes the contexts of the events that gave rise to complaints of
discrimination and harassment in 1995 and in 1998. The proportion of complaints
that occurred in academic contexts fell from 44% in 1995 to 37% in 1998. At the
same time, the proportion of complaints that occurred in employment contexts rose
from 40% to 47%.
Figure 14 provides a gender breakdown of discrimination and harassment
complaints. As in previous years, females were much more likely to be complainants.
FIGURE 14
Sex of Complainants and Respondents
1998
1995
female complainant
female respondent
female complainant
male respondent
male complainant
male respondent
male complainant
female respondent
female complainant
unknown respondent
male complainant
unknown respondent
0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 12 UBC Reports - April 29,1999
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
FIGURE 15
Complaints by Campus Groups
January to December 1998
26%.
support
staff
14%
faculty
administrative
head of unit/g%
management
professional
7%
11%
other/
unknown
•*
FIGURE 17
Behavioural Description of Complaints
1998
1995
Poisoned Environment
insults/slurs/unacceptable jokes 5»«
following/staring/stalking SB&rass
unwelcome verbal/written advances 53HC?
verbal/written threats Wmknns®
offensive visual material g^
Quid Pro Quo
coercive romance Ss*«
coercive sex mm
retaliation ■
Assault
unwelcome touching/fondling WSkmm
physical threat or force U^
sexual threat or force g^"
Other Forms of Discrimination
biased academic/employment decisions
exclusion or denial of access   S
systemic   ■
FIGURE 16
Positions of Complainants and Respondents
COMPLAINANT POSITION
1995
1998
Respondent Position
STUDENT
n = 97
n = 91
Administrative Head of Unit
-
-
17
19%
Faculty
43
44%
23
25%
Management & Professional
2
2%
3
3%
Student
34
35%
30
33%
Support Staff
9
9%
5
5%
Other/Off Campus
9
9%
13
14%
FACULTY
n=25
n=34
Administrative Head of Unit
-
-
6
18%
Faculty
16
64%
4
12%
Management & Professional
-
-
-
-
Student
11
28%
14
41%
Support Staff
2
8%
3
9%
Other/Off Campus
-
-
7
21%
SUPPORT STAFF
n=43
n=62
Administrative Head of Unit
-
-
10
16%
Faculty
5
12%
5
8%
Management & Professional
11
26%
16
26%
Student
4
9%
4
6%
Support Staff
17
40%
14
40%
Other/Off Campus
6
14%
2
3%
MANAGEMENT & PROFESSIONAL
n=ll
n=17
Administrative Head of Unit
-
-
4
24%
Faculty
3
27%
2
12%
Management & Professional
3
27%
6
35%
Student
-
-
3
18%
Support Staff
4
36%
2
12%
Others/Off Campus
1
9%
-
-
ADMINISTRATIVE HEAD OF UNIT
n=4
n=7
Administrative Head of Unit
2
50%
-
-
Faculty
-
-
2
29%
Management & Professional
-
-
-
-
Student
-
-
3
43%
Support Staff
2
50%
1
14%
Others/Off Campus
1
14%
0
10%      20%      30%      40%
and males were much more likely to be respondents. Complaints by females against
males dropped from 58% in 1995 to 43% in 1998, but complaints by females against
other females rose from 11% to 16 % in 1998. Although most complainants knew
the person they alleged had discriminated against them, complaints against
unknown respondents rose moderately in 1998.
Examples of complaints where the respondent is unknown would be harassment
by anonymous e-mail, notes, or phone calls. When the respondent is a department
or association, gender cannot be designated. In some complaints, administrators or
other third parties who seek assistance from the Equity Office do not reveal the
gender of the complainant or respondent.
Figure 15 shows that students continue to bring the largest number of complaints
to the Equity Office. This is not surprising, given a student population of 34,000,
compared with the numbers of support staff and faculty—the next two largest
groups bringing complaints. Between 1995 and 1998, the number of complaints
brought by students decreased from 47% to 39%, whereas the number of complaints
brought by support staff increased from 21% to 26%. Similarly, the number of
complaints brought by administrative heads of unit, faculty, and management and
professional staff also increased over this period.
Figure 16 indicates the position of complainants relative to respondents. In 1995,
faculty made up the largest number of respondents; in 1998, students made up the
largest group of respondents. Between 1995 and 1998, student complaints about
faculty decreased from 44% to 25% of all student complaints, and student
complaints about other students remained about the same. Faculty complaints
about other faculty decreased dramatically from 64% to 12% of all faculty complaints, while faculty complaints about students increased from 28% to 41% of all
faculty complaints. Support staff continued in 1998 to complain most about other
support staff.
Some complaints involve allegations against supervisors, departments, and
associations. When management and professional staff, and administrative heads
of unit were identified as respondents, it may have been because they failed to
address alleged discrimination and harassment in their departments or units.
Figure 17 categorizes complaints under the Policy on Discrimination and
Harassment. In 1998 as in 1995, one-half of complaints concerned poisoned
environment. One-third concerned insults, slurs, and unacceptable jokes. Reports
of coercive sexual conduct involving a reward or threat decreased over the three-year
period, as did reports of assaults of all kinds. Human rights allegations that
academic and employment decisions showed bias, or excluded, or denied access
increased between 1995 and 1998. During the same interval, human rights
allegations of systemic discrimination also increased.
Examples of Allegations
Of the allegations brought forward in 1998, 36% fell within the mandate of the
Policy. The following are examples.
Poisoned Environment: Insults, Slurs, Unacceptable Jokes
• A student reported that in front of the class a faculty member ridiculed a female
student who requested that the professor use gender neutral language.
• A student complained that a professor and classmates repeatedly ridiculed the
student's political beliefs.
• A student complained of anti-Americanism on campus.
Poisoned Environment: Following, Staring, Stalking
• A faculty member reported being stalked by a former student.
• A female student became concerned when a male began following her around
campus.
• A female student reported that she was being harassed and followed into her
classes by a female who was not a UBC student.
Poisoned Environment: Unwelcome Verbal or Written Advances
• A female staff member reported that a male colleague offered her a ride and then
engaged in conversation of an inappropriate, sexual nature.
• A female student complained that she received unwelcome sexual overtures from
a visiting male professor.
• A female staff member received unwanted, sexually explicit e-mail from a female
student.
Poisoned Environment: Verbal or Written Threats
• An administrator reported that a staff member sent sexually threatening e-mail
to her.
• A faculty member reported receiving a series of threatening e-mail messages from
a student.
• A student reported that another student made a verbal threat of a racist nature.
Poisoned Environment: Offensive Visual Material
• Two female students reported that a male student circulated a series of sexist
riddles that demeaned women.
• A male faculty member complained that a student association's advertisements
for a social function demeaned women.
Quid Pro Quo: Coercive Sex or Romance
• A female staff member reported that she feared for her job security after a male
supervisor made unwelcome sexual advances.
• Two female students complained that their teaching assistant attempted to gain
sexual favours from each of them. UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999 13
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
Quid Pro Quo: Retaliation for a Complaint
• A staff member reported that after she complained about her supervisor's leering,
he became hostile and demeaning.
• After complaining about a male student's sexually harassing behavior, a female
student reported that he retaliated by stealing her car.
Assault: Unwelcome Touching or Fondling
• A female student complained that at a campus function, she was subjected to a
male student's persistent and unwanted touching.
• Two female staff members complained of a male colleague brushing up against
them and others in their unit.
• A female staff member reported being sexually touched by a male colleague.
Assault: Physical or Sexual Threat or Force
• A female student reported that on a field trip she was sexually assaulted by her
former boyfriend.
• A student reported that her former spouse, now a graduate student, assaulted her
after they separated.
• A female student reported that on two occasions her male instructor grabbed her.
Other Forms of Discrimination: Biased Academic or Employment Decisions
• An employee complained that during a performance review, a support staff
member directed anti-Semitic remarks at him.
• A student complained that she received an unfair academic evaluation because
of bias against her country of origin.
Other Forms of Discrimination: Exclusion or Denial of Access
• A staff member complained he was denied opportunities for promotion because
of his country of origin.
• A student complained that she was refused accommodation on campus because
of her psychiatric condition.
• A student living on campus complained of being excluded from social activities
and feeling unwelcome because residence activities only recognized students as
being heterosexual.
Other Forms of Discrimination: Systemic
• A graduate student complained that the scheduling of a required course
interfered with her commitments as a single parent.
• " A faculty member complained that a scholarship program discriminated against
parents with young children.
Allegations Not Covered by the Policy: Personal Harassment
• A male student complained other students teased him for being anti-social.
• A staff member reported that her supervisor yelled at her and ordered her around
in a bullying manner.
• A graduate student complained that he was the target of inappropriate, rude, and
insulting behaviour from another male graduate student.
Alterations Not Covered by the Policy: Other UBC Processes
• A shop steward complained of being personally harassed by a co-worker who lost
a grievance.
• A teaching assistant complained of a professor's lack of organization of course
materials.
Allegations Not Covered by the Policy: Non-UBC Matters
• A female professor complained of being stalked by her former spouse.
• A single parent complained that her landlord was unfairly evicting her.
Complaint  Management
The following examples illustrate the role of Equity Advisors in the complaint
resolution process. These examples have been revised to ensure anonymity.
Case Study #1
An Equity Advisor collaborates with the administrative head and a respondent's
employee association to reach an informal resolution of a complaint of sexual
harassment.
An administrative head of an academic department sought assistance from the
Equity Office when two students alleged sexual harassment by a professional staff
member who served as a student advisor. The students claimed that during
employment interviews, the respondent engaged in inappropriate touching and
sexual comments. Again, at a department social function, the respondent commented in a very personal way about one female student's attire and put his arm
around the second. Both women were extremely uncomfortable with the comments
and touching.
After meeting with the two complainants, an Equity Advisor met with witnesses
who corroborated the students' allegations. The Advisor then arranged a meeting
with the department head, the respondent, and his employee association representative. Dismayed to learn of the complaints, the respondent protested that his
intentions had been misunderstood: he saw himself as a mentor and facilitator
whose friendly overtures had been misconstrued as sexual harassment. He said that
he had not known his behaviour violated the University's Policy on Discrimination
and Harassment.
The department head clarified appropriate faculty-student conduct with the
respondent, who agreed to refrain from touching students and to avoid the use of
familiar, personal, or sexual comments. The department head formalized this
agreement with the respondent by putting a summary of the meeting in his file.
Another advisor was assigned to the students. The department head and respondent
agreed that if there were no further complaints, the summary would be removed at
the end of twelve months.
Case Study #2
A case study in which an Equity Advisor and union representatives working
together resolve a complaint about unwelcome advances.
A distraught male employee and union member contacted the Equity Office to
complain that a female co-worker made him feel like a sexual object. The complainant accused the respondent of touching, telling sexist jokes, and making sexual
comments. These behaviours were neither invited nor welcome.
The complainant reported that on several occasions he told the respondent about
his discomfort and the impact of her behaviour on his peace-of-mind. According to
the complainant, the respondent did not seem to understand or to take his concerns
seriously.
The Equity Advisor contacted the respondent and asked to meet with her and her
union representative. At the meeting, the Equity Advisor informed the respondent
ofthe allegations. While the respondent agreed she had engaged in conversation of
a sexual nature, told the complainant jokes, and touched him, she was shocked to
learn the complainant had gone to the Equity Office in search of a resolution. She
claimed the alleged behaviour occurred a long time ago and that on several occasions
she had apologized to the complainant. As far as she was concerned, the matter was
closed.
The Equity Advisor explained to the respondent that her behaviour might
constitute harassment under the University's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment. The respondent apologized and agreed to keep away from the complainant.
The complainant, the respondent, and their union representatives approved the
resolution.
Case Study #3
After an Equity Advisor works with a complainant, a respondent, and their unions,
the complainant chooses to file a grievance under her collective agreement.
A distraught female staff member complained to the Equity Office that a fellow
staff member had sexually assaulted her. She had been working in a fairly quiet
part ofthe office when the respondent approached her and started to make small
talk. Suddenly, he pinned her against a wall and demanded sexual favours. She
pushed him off and ran sobbing back to her desk. A colleague took the
complainant to see the department head, and the head requested that the Equity
Office intervene.
An Equity Advisor met with the complainant, and after reviewing the details ofthe
allegation, informed her of the complaint resolution process and her options under
UBC's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment. In addition, the Advisor spoke
about due process, which required the Equity Office to present the allegations to the
respondent and to hear his response. Because both complainant and respondent
were union members, the Advisor outlined the complainant's options under her
collective agreement.
The complainant told the Equity Advisor that she wanted the respondent to take
responsibility for his actions and to apologize in writing. When the Advisor contacted
the respondent, he denied the allegations
After further discussion about the University's and the union's complaint
resolution processes, the complainant chose to pursue her complaint with her
union. The following day, she filed a grievance under her collective agreement.
Case Study #4
In this case, which involves a student who was being harassed in an off-campus
job, the Equity Office offers guidance in a situation not covered by UBC's Policy on
Discrimination and Harassment.
A student complained that in addition to making unwelcome sexual comments,
her supervisor on a part-time, off-campus job was hinting that her status in the
company would improve if she granted him sexual favours.
Although the Equity Office had no authority to deal with an off-campus employer,
the Equity Advisor listened to the student's concerns and suggested several options,
including the possibility that since her workplace had neither human resources nor
equity departments, the student take action through the B. C. Human Rights
Commission.
When the student next went to work, the supervisor made more sexual
comments. The student resigned. She revisited the Equity Advisor, asking for
assistance in filing a complaint with the B. C. Human Rights Commission. After
contacting the Commission, the student achieved a settlement through its
mediation services.
The student told the Equity Advisor she was glad she had taken action. Not only
did she gain control over the situation, she also believed she prevented similar
problems for future employees of the company.
Case Study #5
After a female international student complains that her former boyfriend, who has
no affiliation with UBC. is sexually harassing her. an Equity Advisor works with the
RCMP to stop the harassment.
A few weeks after arriving at the University, a female student ended a relationship
with a boyfriend from her home country. He was very upset and appeared
unannounced at her apartment to say that he had been ill ever since their break up.
He asked to spend a little time with her.
When the student refused and said she wanted nothing to do with him, he
appeared to become demonstrably unwell. She panicked. Fearing that she might be
blamed for his illness, she reluctantly agreed to let him rest in her apartment while
she attended classes. 14 UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
EQUITY OFFICE ANNUAL REPORT 1998
When the student returned, he was gone, but she discovered that in her
absence, he had searched her personal belongings and gained access to her e-
mail account. Soon, he began a campaign of e-mail harassment, including
humiliating and offensive messages to her friends about her family and details
of his former relationship with her. He also telephoned her friends to discover her
whereabouts.
The student informed the Advisor that the ex-boyfriend had already left the hotel
where he had been staying and that she was unsure whether he was in Vancouver
or had returned to his home country.
Because UBC's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment does not cover someone who is not a University student or employee, the Advisor offered to accompany
the student to the RCMP. In a meeting with the RCMP, the officer, the Advisor, and
the student discussed a plan of action for confronting the ex-boyfriend about his
behaviour.
By e-mail, the Advisor warned the ex-boyfriend that his actions constituted
sexual harassment and that the RCMP had been notified of his actions and required
that he contact their office immediately.
The next day, the student informed the Advisor the ex-boyfriend had profusely
apologized for his actions and promised to leave her alone.
Case Study #6
The Equity Office assists a female library staff member deal with an off-campus
library patron's unwanted sexual behavior.
The patron, who was not a member ofthe University community, sent three e-mail
messages inviting the complainant on a date. In one message, he addressed the
complainant as "blue eyes" and offered to take her to a Halloween party. In another,
he offered to send flowers. He signed all three messages, "Yours truly, Darling." The
complainant further alleged that the individual knocked on her office window late
one evening when the library was closed.
Hoping the harassment would stop, the complainant decided not to respond.
Meanwhile, she reported the e-mail invitations and after-hours incident to her
supervisor and contacted the Equity Office for advice on what else she should do.
The Equity Advisor discovered that another librarian had lodged a similar
complaint against the respondent a few months earlier. The Advisor consulted with
the complainant's supervisor and administrative head. Together, they developed a
plan to address the complaint.
With the help ofthe Equity Advisor, the complainant composed a three-part letter
to send to the respondent. The first part described the unwelcome behaviour of the
respondent towards the complainant. The second part summarized how the
behaviors impacted on the complainant, and the third part, requested the respondent to stop. It also included a warning that the University would take action if the
behaviour continued.
Upon receiving the letter, the respondent wrote to apologize for his behavior and
pledged to refrain from further harassing the complainant.
Case Study #7
A campus visitor complains he was harassed while waiting in a University
building. Although UBC's Policy does not cover visitors, the Equity Office intervenes
to resolve the matter.
A visitor to the campus described a distressing experience of racial harassment.
A member of a visible minority, the visitor was waiting in a UBC building for a friend
when five or six security guards accosted him and demanded to know his business.
The visitor was certain their conduct toward him was based entirely upon his race.
The Equity Advisor did some preliminary investigation to ascertain the sequence
of events. She learned that there had been some recent security issues in the
building, and accordingly all staff had been advised to challenge strangers not
wearing photo identification. Campus Security informed the Equity Advisor that two
security staff, not five, had approached the visitor, and that their questions had been
based on security concerns, not on skin colour.
The Equity Advisor invited the visitor to meet with her and the head of the unit
where security had accosted the visitor. The visitor declined and filed a complaint
with the B. C. Human Rights Commission, whose investigator found no basis for a
complaint of racial discrimination.
Appendices
Appendix  1
President's Advisory Committee on Equity
Martin Adamson
Faculty Association
Joost Blom
Law
Carol-Ann Courneya
Physiology
Carol Gibson
Association of Administrative
& Professional Staff
David Green
Economics
Jim Horn
Human Resources
Sharon E. Kahn
Equity Office
Leslie Kerr
Graduate Student Society
Janet Mee
Disability Resource Centre
Robert Nugent
International Union of Operating
Engineers
Dennis Pavlich (Chair)
Office of the Vice President,
Academic
Margaret Sarkissian
Equity Office
Appendix 2
President's Advisory Committee on Discrimination & Harassment
Leslie Kerr
Graduate Student Society
Robert Nugent
International Union of Operating
Engineers
Thevi Pather
International Student Services
Moura Quayle
Agricultural Sciences
Michael Shepard
Association of Administrative &
Professional Staff
Richard Spencer (Chair)
Student Services
Lisa Castle
Human Resources
Anurit Cheema
Alma Mater Society
Ethel Gardner
First Nations House of Learning
Jim Gaskell
Curriculum Studies
Derek Gregory
Faculty Association
Sharon E. Kahn
Equity Office
Fiona Kay
Anthropology and Sociology
Appendix 3
Equity Office Staff Profiles
Associate Vice President, Equity
Sharon E. Kahn, Ph.D., has been a professor of Counselling Psychology in UBC's
Faculty of Education since 1975. Through her teaching, research, and publications,
Dr. Kahn addresses the interests of scholars and practitioners in counselling theory
and practice, gender-fair issues, women's career development, and employment-
related concerns. In 1989, as UBC's first Director of Employment Equity, Dr. Kahn
inaugurated an on-going program based on policy and data analysis. In 1994, she
was appointed Associate Vice President, Equity, to direct the University's initiatives
in employment and educational equity, and prevention of discrimination and
harassment.
Equity Advisors
Wale Adeyinka is a graduate of Simon Fraser University and has been with UBC
since September, 1998. Prior to that, Mr. Adeyinka worked with the Royal Canadian
Mounted Police, the Vancouver Police, and the Provincial Police Academy as a
consultant on issues of diversity and anti-racism education. He also initiated and
implemented numerous community projects aimed at creating understanding of
and respect for diversity and promoting multiculturism and anti-racism education.
Maura Da Cruz, M.A., is a part-time Equity Advisor who works with students,
faculty, and staff to promote and co-ordinate Equity Office training and educational
programs. Ms. Da Cruz conducts awareness and skills building workshops on
UBC's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment, and manages complaints under
the Policy's informal resolution process. Ms. Da Cruz also works as Training
Administrator in the Department of Human Resources. In this capacity, she works
with the University community, program committees, and consultants to plan,
develop, implement, and evaluate training programs for staff.
Margaret Sarkissian, M.A., is a UBC alumnus with a degree in Counselling
Psychology. She was a counsellor and administrator on campus for many years
before joining the Equity Office as a full-time Equity Advisor. Her present responsibilities include developing and implementing strategies and educational programs
that support the University's Employment Equity Policy. In addition, she assists in
the implementation ofthe University's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment by
facilitating educational workshops and managing complaints of discrimination and
harassment.
Administrative Secretaries
Joan Maureen McBain has a background in administration and public service
in the fields of health and education in the not-for-profit sector. While residing in
Toronto, she served as a program director and counsellor in a pioneering treatment
facility for women with addictions. Ms. McBain joined UBC as Administrative
Secretary in 1996 and began with the Equity Office in January, 1997. As
Administrative Secretary, her responsibilities include reception duties and secretarial assistance to the Equity Advisors.
Poh Peng Wong has extensive experience in office and organizational systems.
With a background in commerce from the London Chamber of Commerce and
Industry. Ms. Wong has been with UBC since May, 1989. Presently, she oversees
office administration and provides secretarial assistance to the Associate Vice
President. Equity.
The Equity Office Annual
Report 1998 is also available
on the World Wide Web at
www.equity.ubc.ca UBC Reports • April 29, 1999 15
mm
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
RESEARCH TURNS ON KNOWLEDGE
Strategic Directions for UBC Research
Th/tiK
About If
UBC RESEARCH
Introduction
In the autumn of 1996 the UBC Executive Committee for Research began to develop
a plan to enhance research at the University. We saw as our broad goals:
• to nurture an environment in which faculty, staff, and students are encouraged
to explore new ideas and can reach their full potential
• to nourish and encourage the many forms of scholarship which contribute to
UBC's rich research traditions
• to recognize the merit of both individual, disciplinary based scholarly research
and different kinds of collaborative, interdisciplinary research
• to stimulate interest in and discussion about research across the campus and
beyond UBC
• to provide a framework for making decisions, allocating resources, and managing
change
• to demonstrate to the wider community, as well as to faculty, staff and students,
that the University has a comprehensive vision for research, developed by peers
who represent a range of disciplines.
Members of the Executive Committee for Research*
Chair: Dr. Bernard Bressler, Vice President Research
Dr. Joan Anderson, School of Nursing
Dr. Izak Benbasat, Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration
Prof. Joost Blom, Faculty of Law
Dr. David Dolphin, Dept. of Chemistry
Prof. Anthony Dorcey, Institute for Resources and Environment and School
of Community and Regional Planning
Dr. Sneja Gunew, Departments of English and Women's Studies
Dr. Martin Hollenberg, Dept. of Anatomy
Dr. Ken MacCrimmon, Peter Wall Institute
Dr. Marilyn MacCrimmon, Faculty of Law
Dr. Bruce McManus, Dept. of Pathology & Laboratory Medicine
Dr. David Robitaille, Dept. of Curriculum Studies
Dr. Indira Samarasekera, Dept. of Metals and Materials Engineering
Dr. James Zidek, Dept. of Statistics
Ex-Offrcio Members:
Ms. Susan Heming, Office of the Vice President Research
Dr James Love, Animal Care Centre
Mr. William Palm, University-Industry Liaison Office
Dr. Richard Spratley, Office of Research Services
Dr. Janet Werker, Associate Vice President Research
• Includes all members ofthe Executive Committee for Research, past and present,
who have contributed to this document.
Strategic Directions for Research at UBC
This document begins the process of setting down objectives that will bring UBC
students, staff, faculty and potential partners around the world together with
common research goals. We begin at a strong point in our institution's history. We
are already blessed with extraordinary undergraduate and graduate students. We
have a world-renowned faculty. We are known for the excellence and diversity of the
research conducted on our campus.
Collectively and collaboratively, we engage in a search for new knowledge in
activities ranging from clinical medicine and laboratory science to artistic performance and literary criticism to technology transfer and social policy development. We
have built and maintained one of the highest standings among Canadian universities. Recognizing these strengths, this document seeks to engage all of us in a
concerted effort to put research at the heart of what we do - from teaching
undergraduates to extending the frontiers of knowledge and contributing to the
welfare and economic development of BC and Canada.
Trek 2000: Think About It, a Vision for the 21 st Century, presents the following vision
and goals for The University of British Columbia:
The University of British Columbia, aspiring to be Canada's best university will
provide students with an outstanding and distinctive education, and conduct leading
research to serve the people of British Columbia, Canada, and the world.
The University of British Columbia will provide its students, faculty, and staff with the
best possible resources and conditions for learning and research, and create a
working environment dedicated to excellence, equity, and mutual respect. It will
cooperate with government, business, and industry, as wellas with other educational
institutions and the general community, to create new knowledge, prepare its
students for fulfilling careers, and improve the quality of life through leading-edge
research. The graduates of UBC will have developed strong analytical, problem-
solving and critical thinking abilities; they will have excellent research and communication skills; they will be knowledgeable, flexible, and innovative. They will
recognize the importance of understanding societies other than their own. As respon
sible citizens, the graduates of UBC will value diversity, work with and for their
communities, and be agents for positive change.
Mission Statement
Research at the University of British Columbia advances Canadian intellectual, social, cultural and economic growth through outstanding scholarship.
Vision Statement
To be one of the world's outstanding research universities.
Value Statements
These statements about our values are intended to guide our decision-making as we
implement our Research Mission and Vision.
We value individual scholarly inquiry
Therefore . . .
• we champion individual accomplishment and expression
• we encourage scholarly inquiry
• we accept the responsibility that freedom of inquiry imposes.
We value innovation
Therefore . . .
• we create and sustain an environment supportive of curiosity and originality
• we foster creative effort and breakthrough thinking
• we recognize and reward risk-taking, initiative, diligence and discovery.
We value investigative integrity
Therefore. . .
• we adhere to the highest standard of ethics
• we recognize and support all contributors to discovery
• we expect honest, accurate reporting of findings.
We value collaborative research
Therefore . . .
• we encourage openness and connectivity
• we encourage diversity and reward depth
• we support equal opportunity among disciplines.
We value excellent performance
Therefore . . .
• we conduct research that contributes to the solution of societal problems, the
enrichment of culture, and the enhancement of life in the global community
• we conduct research that addresses important issues at the frontiers of
knowledge and has a major impact on the theory and application of its subject
• we conduct research that earns international recognition and associated
benefits for the researcher and the university and society it serves.
Research turns on knowledge at UBC
Major factors that influence research at UBC are:
• human, physical and financial resources
• technology and technological change
• demographics
• competitors' activities
• general economic conditions
• specific market conditions
• the social, cultural, and political climate.
With these factors in mind, Strategic Objectives and Action Steps have been
formulated to guide initiatives aimed at fulfilling UBC's Research Mission and
realizing the Vision.
These are the areas of priority:
• create a funding base to foster innovation
• facilitate scholarly inquiry, both individual and collaborative
• assist with the integration of teaching and research
• encourage research themes
• support sustainable partnerships
• raise the profile of UBC research 16 UBC Reports • April 29, 1999
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
RESEARCH TURNS ON KNOWLEDGE
Planning for Innovation
It is critical that these strategic objectives
guide the improvement and development
of fiscal and administrative structures by
identifying and securing the human, financial, infrastructure and other resources
required to implement the Research Plan.
At the top of the list is the need for an
adequate funding base within UBC.
Objective 1
Establish and publicize a Helping UBC
Generate Excellence Fund (the H.U.G.E.
Fund), which will, as a significant source
of research funding, facilitate new research by individuals and groups, assist
with the provision of start-up funding to
attract and retain the best teacher-researchers, and provide university support for major requests to external granting agencies. This objective has two components:
• maximize the strategic use of existing
funds
• create a capital reserve.
Action steps
• The Executive Committee for Research
views Objective 1 as the key to enhancing the quality of research culture at
UBC. To make this goal a reality, the
H.U.G.E. Fund will coordinate existing on-campus sources of research
support such as Peter Wall, Hampton.
Humanities and Social Sciences, and
VPR discretionary funding. As well
new contributions will be sought from
the private, industrial and public/government donors to create the UBC
Research and Faculty Development
Endowment Fund. In addition, the
University-Industry Liaison Office will
raise the money from its equity holdings in UBC spin-off companies created as a result of the transfer of
technologies discovered on campus.
• Establish terms of reference for the
Endowment Fund and appoint granting sub-committees.
• Develop a communication plan to inform the University community about
the Endowment Fund.
• Create named awards of internationally stature
• Coordinate fund-raising with the Development Office
Scholarly Inquiry
All research, be it individual scholarly
inquiry or collaboration, depends upon the
contribution of strong individual scholars.
Whether working alone or in teams, it is
ultimately the individual researcher who
discovers new directions. The value of
individual contributions to both individual
scholarly inquiry and team endeavors must
be recognized, celebrated, and safeguarded.
Objective 2
Encourage creativity and innovation, and
safeguard their importance for individual
scholarly research.
Action step
• Review existing sources of internal
funding and, where appropriate, allocate part ofthe H.U.G.E. Fund for the
support of individual (thematic or non-
thematic) research
Objective 3
Facilitate and encourage collaborative research within and across disciplines.
Action steps
• Work with the relevant academic units
to ensure ongoing understanding of
and support for collaborative and group
research in promotion and tenure decisions.
• Provide funding for collaborative research.
• Encourage, fund and support UBC
wide 'research cafes' / meetings / col-
loquia to create synergies among researchers.
Objective 4
Strengthen incentives for celebrating, rewarding and supporting the world-class
research of faculty members, staff, and
students.
Action step
• Create 'Celebration of Research' presentation events.
Learning & Research
In addition to the celebration of creativity
and innovation in research we must also
recognize the centrality of teaching, learning, and professional development as well
as contributions toexternalprofessions and
public service. Only in this way can we
ensure the continuing revitalization of human capital our most precious resource.
UBC will continue to offer a challenging and
competitive environment to attract bright
new minds to the university in priority
areas. Mentoring will be encouraged to
facilitate professional and personal growth.
Universities play a crucial role in preparing students to succeed in a complex,
knowledge-based, global environment.
Teaching and research play complementary roles in enabling students, staff, and
faculty to think analytically, communicate
effectively and generate creative ideas.
Indeed it is often difficult to separate the
contributions of teaching and research.
Objective  5
Sustain an integrated teaching and research culture.
Action steps
• Collaborate with the Academic Plan
Advisory Committee to hold University-wide discussions on the integration of teaching and research.
• Collaborate with the relevant academic
units to ensure understanding of and
support for research/learning integration.
• Schedule events at which faculty members present research to undergraduate students.
Research Themes, Planning and
Organization
As the Executive Committee for Research
worked on this document, interdisciplinary
themes emerged as a major focus because
they have had a unifying, synergistic effect
wherever they have been tried. Such
themes, in focusing and stimulating intellectual endeavor, would help to break down
barriers between disciplines, foster connections between teaching and research,
and attract new partners and funding. The
ability of thematic research to attractfund-
ing and stimulate research has already
been demonstrated at UBC. Moreover, thematic researchfits the criteria ofthe Canadian Foundation for Innovation to support
research projects that integrate the work of
universities, hospitals and industry, and
thematic research is essentialfor both MCRI
and NCE projects.
Objective 6
In collaboration with the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies (PWIAS), establish research focus themes, which cut
across disciplines and UBC's academic
units and exemplify the university's
unique provincial, national and international research profile.
Action steps
• With input from the University community, establish criteria for identifi
cation of interdisciplinary research
themes. Seed funding from the
H.U.G.E. Fund and PWIAS may be
utilized.
• Use the research themes to drive the
fund development process.
Partnerships
The research process involves a series of
steps: research leads to new knowledge,
social & cultural insight, and practical
uses of discoveries and new technologies. Partnerships play an important role
in this cycle, fostering the development of
this new knowledge and identifying new
research questions.
UBC research projects can lead to a variety of community partnerships such as
those:
• with governments, which provide grant
funding and sometimes collaborate in
research through affiliated agencies
• with community agencies and philanthropic foundations, whichprovide human resources and research funding
• with the cultural sector (museums,
theatres, the media etc.) which provides innovative career opportunities
• withindustry (companies, businesses)
which often provides researchfunding
and may license the products or inventions resulting from research
• withinvestors and entrepreneurs, who
provide funding and launch research-
based businesses
• with schools and academic health care
centres, which conduct collaborative
research projects
• with other universities, which partici
pate in joint research initiatives
When UBC researchers work with people
in other parts of the world, a two-way
exchange of ideas occurs: we benefitfrom
cultural perspectives and information that
would not otherwise be available to us,
and our partners benefit from our perspective. This leads to the identification
of as well as solutions to new problems.
When research is conducted in concert
with others in our own country - industry,
government, universities, schools, hospitals, businesses, cultural organizations -
synergy enhances the value of individual
contributions and increases the relevance
ofthe research.
As one ofthe world's foremost research
universities, we will continue to cooperate with the public and private sectors in
building national and international partnerships.
Objective 7
Encourage formal national and international partnerships, and create processes that better enable investigators to
pursue exciting opportunities as they
Action steps
• Provide seed funding (travel, time release) from the H.U.G.E. Fund to encourage establishment of partnerships.
• Coordinate with International Liaison
Offices to establish international partnerships.
Objective 8
Establish structures and systems for
creating and sustaining multiple community partnerships.
Action steps
• Work with UBC External Relations,
UILO, and community liaison groups,
to identify the needs of external
stakeholders and to find appropriate
channels for the dissemination of UBC
research.
• Create a Community Liaison Committee to work with the Executive
Committee for Research.
Raising the profile of UBC Research
Theresearchawarenesscampaign, "Think
About It. UBC Research" was launched in
October 1997. It is designed to broaden
public awareness of the beneficial role
researchplays in people's daily lives, and
to demonstrate that research generates
knowledge that leads to new solutions,
new medical cures, builds societal values
and creates new technology.
UBC research breakthroughs will be advertised in broadcast and print media to
illustrate how specific research projects
affect individuals, communities and society so that people will come to recognize
research as a valuable part of education
and to realize that research at UBC has
far-reaching provincial, national and international effects.
The overarching goals for the UBC research awareness campaign:
• to earn the confidence and support of
the public for the University's research
role
• to create understanding of and support
for the importance of basic curiosity-
driven research
• to elevate the profile and understanding of research internally and externally
• to sustain an environment where research is actively supported on campus
and within government and industry
• to maximize the potential of all UBC research to work for the good ofhumanity.
Objective 9
Raise public awareness both on and off
campus ofthe extent and value of University research.
Action steps
• Continue the research awareness campaign.
• Expand the audience for 'Celebration
of Research' presentations to include
larger general audiences.
• Keep audiences throughout the province informed about UBC research
through faculty and student presentations and participation in key community activities.
• Take advantage of new technologies to
disseminate information about UBC
research.
Conclusion
The Executive Committee encourages
responses to this Research Turns on
Knowledge document. We hope that this
report will stimulate ideas and dialogue
on campus, and create an environment
that empowers every member of our community to achieve his or her professional
best.
Please send your
comments by e-mail to
thinkres@interchange.ubc.ca
Research Turns On
Knowledge is also
available on the World
Wide Web at:
www.research.ubc.ca UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999 17
Intellectual Grey Cup'
comes west for first time
An annual conference which has been
variously described as "a cross between
Plato's Academy and the ideal summer
camp," and "the intellectual Grey Cup of
Canada" will be held for the first time
west of Lake Couchiching, Ont. at Green
College on May 7 and 8.
The annual Couchiching Conference
provides a forum for Canadians from
many walks of life to share ideas and
opinions on important public policy issues with experts and other members of
the community.
"The Couchiching Institute on Public-
Affairs (CIPA) has long been a well-known
institute in Eastern Canada and UBC
Continuing Studies is its first official
partner." says Nichola Hall, co-ordinator
of Community Programs for Continuing
Studies.
"The goal of CIPA - West is to create our
own forum, a local experiment in which
B.C. citizens can deliberate and share
views about important choices our society needs to make," she adds.
Following two successful roundtable
discussions this spring CIPA and UBC's
Continuing Studies are staging the conference in which participants will discuss
"Individual Rights and Society's Responsibilities: Striking the Balance."
The opening evening, which takes
place May 7 from 7:30-9:30 p.m., will
feature a debate between two strong
protagonists  with  differing  views  —
Michael Walker, head ofthe Fraser Institute, and Michael Goldberg, director of
Research for the Social Planning and
Research Council (SPARC). It will be
chaired by well-known former journalist
and broadcaster Kevin Evans.
On Saturday morning at 9 a.m. a panel
of four experts in the fields of health care,
social policy, education and care of the
environment will offer thought-provoking
opinions on how these different approaches
can affect policies and program delivery.
Panel participants include: Dr. Charles
Wright, Vancouver Hospital: UBC Health
Care and Epidemiology Asst. Prof. Robin
Hanvelt: Paul Gallagher, director of policy
review of post-secondary education in
B.C.: and UBC chair of Environmental
Studies Political Science Assoc. Prof.
Kathryn Harrison. The panel will be
chaired by former B.C. minister of Municipal Affairs Darlene Marzari.
The second half of the morning will
provide an opportunity lor free-wheeling
question and debate among the panelists
and conference participants.
Lunch will be provided at noon and
from 1:30-4:30 p.m. simultaneous breakout sessions will be formed for vigorous
debate.
The fee of $95 ($85 for CIPA members)
includes a reception Friday and lunch
and refreshments Saturday. Student bursaries are available. To register, call (604)
904-5777.
New diamond library
geologist's best friend
Pat Sheahan, a Toronto-based geologist who has spent decades building up
a unique and extensive library on diamonds and their exploration, has donated it to UBC's Mineral Deposit Research Unit (MDRU).
The collection has been valued at
$500,000, but the unit's researchers
and industry partners say the gift will
grow in value and last forever.
'The Sheahan Library will be incredibly beneficial." said Wayne Hillier, vice-
president. Exploration, Ashlon Mining,
one of many firms which use and will
continue to use the resource materials.
"Because of the unknowns in diamond
exploration there is major interest in the
industry in excellent research material
such as this."
"It is a diverse collection of resources,
including theses from around the world,
important books, manuscripts, and carefully collected, detailed and documented
information in the public domain," says
Peter Bradshaw, president of First Point
Mineral Corp. and co-founder of MDRU.
Sheahan's interest in the diamond
industry was sparked when she became
involved in the diamond exploration of
James Bay in the early 1960s. She established Konsult International in 1970,
which has a global base of clients, including diamond giant, De Beers.
"I didn't want the library to become
static and now that it will be housed at
the research unit, not only will I be able
to continue to add to it, others will, as
well," Sheahan said.
The MDRU is a partnership between
the exploration and mining industry
and UBC's Dept. of Earth and Ocean
Sciences. It was formed in 1989 to provide access to the people, research and
ideas to assist mining companies in
exploration, giving members a competitive edge on industry developments.
In Memoriam
Fred Weinberg 1925-99
A multi-talented man
Metals and Materials Engineering Prof.
Emeritus Fred Weinberg died March 26
in Vancouver after a brief illness with
cancer.
Weinberg joined UBC in 1967 and
served as department head from 1980 to
1985. While at UBC, he built a strong
research program emphasizing experimental studies in solidification, crystal
growth and nuclear materials. He was
also involved in joint Arts and Engineering programs dealing with the role of
technology in society.
Throughout his career he received
numerous awards and medals and was a
member of the Royal Society of Canada.
A multi-talented man, Weinberg was
active in drawing and painting. He was
also a musician, taking up the recorder in
1953 and the flute in 1960. The soft tones
of flute or flute-guitar duets often pervaded the first floor of the Metals and
Materials Engineering Dept. during the
lunch hour.
Weinberg is survived by his wife, son,
step-son and two step-daughters, a sister and two brothers and six grandchildren.
A "Celebration of Fred's Life" will be held
on May 23 at the Leon and Thea Koerner
University Centre at 2:30 p.m. Friends
and colleagues wishing to remember Fred
may send donations via campus mail to
the Fred Weinberg Memorial Fund, c/o
Prof. Indira Samarasekera, Metals and
Materials Engineering.
Hilary Thomson photo
Leafing A Mark
Graduating class president Shirin Foroutan digs in at the annual tree
planting ceremony for UBC's 1999 graduating class. UBC president
Martha Piper congratulated the group of graduates gathered at the
intersection of Thunderbird Boulevard and East Mall to witness the
planting of a honey locust tree. Each year the graduating class
donates a tree to the university before Spring Congregation which
takes place this year from May 26 to June 2 at the Chan Centre for
the Performing Arts.
Filmmakers, scholars
focus on women's view
Members of the filmmaking community and academics from 15 countries
met at UBC recently to view films made by
women and look at issues facing women
filmmakers and critics at a conference
called Women Filmmakers: Re focusing.
Co-sponsored with Simon Fraser University's School for the Contemporary
Arts and Women's Studies Dept., the
conference attracted more than 300
attendees.
'This was a unique event," says Valerie
Raoul, director of UBC's Centre for Research in Women's Studies and Gender
Relations, co-organizers of the event. "It
brought together filmmakers and academics   for   the
first  time   in  a       	
combined conference and film festival and proved
to be a successful
collaboration between the two
universities and
the community."
Academics
from universities
in Europe, Asia,        	
Australia    and
North America presented papers on topics such as representations of femininity, gender and race and multicultural
issues.
The conference took place over two
weekends. The first weekend looked at
Europe and the history of filmmaking.
The second focused on post-colonial contexts and documentary filmmaking.
A theme running throughout the conference was the difficulty women filmmakers face in getting their work distributed to a wide audience, says Raoul.
Funding is hard to get and distribution through movie theatres is costly, she
says. Many women abandon feature
projects or documentary films of their
'Pursuing an artistic vision
in the extremely harsh and
competitive realm of
filmmaking can be
discouraging."
— Asst. Prof. Sharon McGowan
choice to produce films for television.
Many films discussed at the conference portray issues facing individuals
who come from two cultures.
Indo-Canadian filmmaker Deepa
Mehta gave a master class for film students and local filmmakers.
Mehta's recent film, "Fire." met with
riots when screened in India. It deals with
a lesbian relationship between two Indian women and their struggle with oppressive social values.
"It was exciting to view acclaimed and
provocative work — some of which was
not previously available here," says Asst.
Prof. Sharon McGowan of the Theatre.
Film and Creative
       Writing   Dept.,
who  moderated
the class.
"Pursuing an
artistic vision in
the extremely
harsh and competitive realm of
filmmaking can
be discouraging,"
says McGowan,
who is a filmmaker herself. "It
was inspiring for our students to hear and
see the success of these filmmakers."
Although financial and political challenges make it difficult for young filmmakers to distinguish themselves, Canadian films are respected everywhere,
she adds.
Thirty undergraduates and nine graduate students are enrolled in the film program at UBC.
Women in Film and Video (Vancouver), Alliance Francaise Vancouver and
the Goethe Institut Vancouver helped to
support the event. UBC's Continuing
Studies, English Dept. and Women's
Studies Programme were also involved in
organizing the conference. 18 UBC Reports • April 29, 1999
News Digest
The Council for Advancement and Support of Education (CASE)
and the Canadian Council for the Advancement of Education
(CCAE) are seeking nominations for 1999 Canadian Professors of
the Year.
Established in 1981, the award recognizes faculty for their
achievements as teachers, particularly their dedication to undergraduate teaching.
Each award recipient will receive $5,000, a citation and national
recognition.
Past winners of the award include Commerce Prof. Peter Frost.
Deadline for nominations is May 24. To receive copies of the
nomination form contact Susie MacDonnell, CCAE National Office
at(416)410-2248ore-mailbase?8onramp.ca. For more information
about the award, visit www.case.org/avvards or www.stmarys.ca/
partners/ccae/ceae.htm.
UBC's long-term commitment to energy and environmental
efficiency has been recognized by B.C. Hydro. The university has
been given a Power Smart Excellence Award for the creation of the
UBC Sustainability Office and for the training of sustainability coordinators in each department on campus.
The mission of the office is broad and aimed at developing an
economically viable and environmentally responsible campus
through consideration of ecological, economic and social issues in
strategic planning and development and operations.
For more information, including campus consumption meters,
check the office's Web site at http://www.sustain.ubc.ca.
The Ruth Wynn Woodward Chair in Women's Studies
and the
Women's Studies Department
Simon Fraser University
present
Summer Institute 1999
Trafficking in Women:
The Ugly Face of Globalization
with Farida Akhtar
acclaimed activist for women's rights in Bangladesh
June 8-11 9:30-1 p.m.
Harbour Centre Campus
515 W. Hastings St.Vancouver
Registration Fee: $200
SFU students: $100
for further information call 291 -3333 or visit our Web
site http://sfu.ca/womens-studies/
BENEFIT AUCTION!
Sunday, June 6, 1pm
Westin Bayshore
To Support Prevention Services for Women
Over 500 auction items! Via Rail tickets • 5 day
Twin Anchors Shuswap houseboat charter for up to 10
people • Luxury vacation, magnificent Stuart Island,
gourmet meals, guided fishing, Big Bay Marina • 6 days
at the Pinnacles, Silver Star Mountain • Hill's Health
Ranch: 4 days, meals, massage, spa • 2 weeks on
Christina Lake • Over 100 vacations • cherry wood table
set • balloon rides • Pitney Bowes laser fax • silk pyjamas
• chocolates • whale watching • Persian carpets • carved
nesting Chinese dragons • youth theatre school • Bentall
Centre year fitness membership • down quilt •
entertainment • furniture • dining • antiques • Inuit
sculpture • jewellery • sports • cruises • art: Onley •
Average • Picasso • Smith • Davidson • Point • Matisse
• Morrisseau • Scherman • O'Hara • Shives • Kandinsky
• Granirer • Riopelle • Durer • Bateman • Jarvis • Evrard
• Hurtubise • Patrich • Bachinski • Chagall • Petterson •
Xiong • Audubon • Tousignant • Marshall • Whistler •
Rembrandt • MUCH MORE!
Admission free. Viewing: 10am. Wonderful bargains
Absentee bids & credit cards accepted
Art Preview: May 15 - June 5, 2735 Granville, HSBC
Information & catalogue:P1D Society, 684-5704
Classified
The classified advertising rate is $16.50 for 35 words or less. Each additional word
is 50 cents. Rate includes GST. Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to the UBC Public Affairs Office. 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park Road,
Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1, accompanied by payment in cash, cheque {made out to UBC
Reports) or journal voucher. Advertising enquiries: UBC-INFO (822-4636).
The deadline for the May 20 issue of UBC Reports is noon, May 11.
Accommodation
POINT GREY GUEST HOUSE  A
perfect spot to reserve
accommodation for guest
lecturers or other university
members who visit throughout
the year. Close to UBC and other
Vancouver attractions, a tasteful
representation of our city and of
UBC. 4103 W. 10th Ave..
Vancouver, BC, V6R 2H2. Call or
fax 222-4104.
TINA'S GUEST HOUSE Elegant
accommodation in Point Grey
area. Min. to UBC. On main bus
routes. Close to shops and
restaurants. Includes TV, tea and
coffee making, private phone/
fridge. Weekly rates available.
Call 222-3461. Fax: 222-9279.
GREEN COLLEGE GUEST HOUSE
Five suites available for
academic visitors to UBC only.
Guests dine with residents and
enjoy college life. Daily rate $54
plus $ 14/day for meals Sun-Thurs.
Call 822-8660 for more information and availability.
BAMBURY   LANE      Bed   and
breakfast. View of beautiful B.C.
mountains, Burrard inlet and city.
Clean, comfortable. Use of living
room, dining room, and kitchen.
Min.toUBCshopsandcity. Daily,
weekly and winter rates. Call or
fax 224-6914.
GAGE COURT SUITES Spacious
one BR guest suites with equipped
kitchen, TV and telephone.
Centrally located near SUB,
aquatic centre and transit. Ideal
for visiting lecturers, colleagues
and families. 1999 rates $85-$121
per night. Call 822-1010.	
PENNY FARTHING INN 2855 West
6th. Heritage house, antiques, wood
floors, original stained glass. 10 min.
to UBC and downtown. Two blocks
from restaurants, buses. Scrumptious
full breakfasts. Entertaining cats.
Views. Phones in rooms. E-mail:
farthing@uniserve.com or call 739-
9002. 	
B  &  B  BY  LOCARNO  BEACH
Walk to UBC along the ocean.
Quiet exclusive neighbourhood.
Near buses and restaurants.
Comfortable rooms with TV and
private bath. Full breakfast.
Reasonable rates. Non-smokers
only please. Call 341-4975.
CAMILLA   HOUSE   Bed   and
Breakfast. Best accommodation
on main bus routes. Includes
television, private phone and
bathroom. Weekly reduced
rates. Call 737-2687. Fax 737-2586.
ST.  JOHN'S  COLLEGE   GUEST
Rooms. Private rooms, located
on campus, available for visitors
attending UBC on academic
business. Private bathroom,
double beds, telephone,
television, fridge, and meals five
days per week. Competitive
rates. Call for information and
availability 822-8788.	
ALMA BEACH B&B Beautiful,
immaculate, bright rooms with
ensuite in elegant, spacious
home. Two blocks to Jericho
Beach/Vancouver Yacht Club.
Gourmet breakfast. Central
location to downtown/UBC. N/S.
Call 221-0551.
Accommodation
THOMAS GUEST HOUSE 2395 W.
18th Ave. Visitors and students of
UBC are most welcome. 15 min.
to UBC or downtown by bus.
Close to restaurants and shops.
Daily rates from $50 to $100.
Please call and check it out at
737-2687,
Accommodation
TRIUMF HOUSE Guest house with
homey, comfortable environ-ment
for visitors to UBC and hospital.
Located near the hospital.
Rates $40-$65/night and weekly
rates. E-mail: housing@triumf.ca or
call 222-1062^_
BEAUTIFUL FURNISHED view house.
Avail. July 31 '99-Jan. 2 '00. East
Vancouver. lOmin. downtown and
30 min. UBC. BR, guest room and
study. Gardener, cleaning lady inc.
N/P. N/S. $1250 plus util. E-mail:
sdavis@sfu.ca or call home 255-
7033; office^l^SS.
ENGLISH COUNTRY GARDEN B&B
Warm hospitality awaits you at
this centrally located view home.
Large rooms with private baths,
TV, phones, tea/coffee, fridge. Full
breakfast, close to UBC,
downtown, and bus routes. 3466
W. 15th Ave. Call 737-2526 or fax
727-2750.	
LONDON, ENGLAND (Hamp-
stead) Beautiful 1 BR apartment.
Fully furnished. Excellenttransport,
views, very quiet. Avail. June
21 '99-May '00 (negotiable)
£850/mo. plus util. E-mail:
weirTer@sabbaticcil.netkonect.co.uk
or call (0171) 794-9624.
CLOSE TO UBC (3825 W. 19th)
Upper floor of a pleasant,
furnished house with 2 BR, large
kitchen/L/R. Avail. July '99-'00.
Util./cable inc., N/S, N/P. E-mail:
altintas@mech.ubc.ca or call
822-5622.	
FACULTY OR VISITING FACULTY
1 BR apartment with spectacular
mountain and harbour view on
Kit's point. $875/mo. inc. parking,
heat and hydro. Damage
deposit req. Avail. June 10-Sept.
10'99. Call 731-0727.	
FOR RENT Spacious furnished 1
BR basement suite. Quiet, large,
cozy, knotty cedar L/R. Private
entrance, shared laundry and
garden, South Granville location.
Near bus to UBC or parking avail.
$750/mo. inc. util. dnd cable. N/
S. N/P please. Avail. May 1. Call
or leave msg. 261 -7153
Next deadline:
noon, May 11
FOR RENT Main floor of
comfortable home in Dunbar
near UBC and Pacific Spirit Park.
Deck and private yard. Avail.
June 1. Term min. 3-12 mo.
possibly longer. Max. two
responsible N/S professional
adult. $ 1500/mo. plus 1 /2 half util.
Cal[Richard 228-9207.
KITSILANO CHARACTER HOME
available June and July. Fully
furnished. H/W floors, 3 BR, 1
office, 2 bath, large L/R, D/R and
kitchen and nice garden. Near
beach, shops, UBC and
downtown. $1950 inclusive. Call
731-3967.
WEST POINT GREY furnished
house with view. 3 BR, 1.5 bath.
Across from park with playground. Five min. drive/bus to
UBC. Two blocks to bus, shops,
restaurants. Avail. July '99-June
'00. N/S. $2200/mo. E-mail
begley ©commerce, ubc.ca;
Web: http:://24.113.50.87; call
228-9965.	
HOME SHARE Two furnished BR,
private bath, luxurious peaceful
setting. Prefer N/S mature female
faculty/grad student(s). Avail,
immediately. South Surrey. UBC -
50 min. Vancouver transportation
avail. M-F to June 30. $50O-$700/
mo. Call 572-8813.
House Sitter
MARRIED PROFESSIONALS no kids
or pets, in Vancouver area
between July 1 '99 and June 30
'00. Willing to consider housesitting
arrangement for faculty on
sabbatical leave. If interested e-
mail: icudoc@brunnet.net or call
506-454-6567.
Services
TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH 5 day/
40 hr TESOL teacher certification
course (or by correspondence
Jun. 23-27, Sept. 22-26, Nov. 24-
28). 1,000s of jobs available NOW.
FREE information package, toll
free (888) 270-2941 or (403) 438-
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INCOME TAX PREPARATION Call
Ed Jackson 224-3540.
Please
recycle  —
Bob Uttl, Ph.D.
Statistical consulting
Research design, analysis, & interpretation
Structural equation modeling
Experiments, clinical trials, surveys, imaging
Voice: 604-836-2758   Fax: 604-836-2759
Email: buttl@ibm.net
http://www.neurexis.com UBC Reports ■ April 29, 1999 19
Bruce Mason photo
Make Mother's Day
Wheeling out a barrow full of treasures is Friend of the Garden (FOG) Liz Howard.
A growing tradition on the Lower Mainland is UBC Botanical Garden's Ninth
Perennial Plant Sale on Mother's Day, Sunday, May 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Ten
thousand choice plants propagated by FOGs and staff will be on sale at bargain
prices. FOGs number over 150 and donate more than 30,000 hours of time every
year. Admission to the Botanical Garden is free and UBC's plant introduction for
1999, Clematis "Lemon Bells," (in the front left of the barrow) will be available at
the sale which takes place at 6804 Southwest Marine Drive. Call 822-9666 for more
information.
Innovations in Molecular Biophysics
A PETER WALL INSTITUTE FOR ADVANCED STUDIES EXPLORATORY WORKSHOP
"Protein-Based Memories and Associative Processors"
Robert R. Birge, Syracuse University
9:00-9:40
"Following Transcription by E. coli RNA Polymerase One Molecule at a Time"
Carlos J. Bustomante, University of California, Berkeley
9:50-10:30
"New Probes of Protein Structure, Interaction and Function"
Brian T. Chait, Rockefeller University
11:10-11:50
"Electron Tunneling in Biological Molecules"
Harry B. Gray, California Institute of Technology
1:10-1:50
'Direct Force Measurements of Specific and Nonspecific Protein Interactions"
Jacob Israelachvili, University of California, Santa Barbara
2:00-2:40
"Learning About Apoptotic Mechanisms from NMR Structural Studies"
Gerhard Wagner, Harvard University
3:20-4:00
"The Science and Engineering of Protein Folding Energy Landscapes"
Peter G. Wolynes, University of Illinois
4:10-4:50
LJ
«\v"'Mr
Lectures:   6 May 1999
Posters: 5-6 May 1999
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, Room 2 and Lobby
Information and free registration:
http://www.pwias.ubc.ca/fp2/blades.htm
University of British Columbia
People
by staff writers
Three UBC students were among the top 10 in the 1999
Canadian Association of Physicists (CAP) Undergraduate Prize exam.
First place was won by Yaroslav Tserkovnyak, a fourth-
year honours Physics student. Michael Forbes, a third-year
honours Physics and Computer Science student placed third
overall and fifth place went to Trevor Lanting. a third-year
Physics and Astronomy student.
The competition was open to all undergraduate students in
Canada with an interest in physics.
c
ommerce and Business
Administration Prof.
' Izak Benbasat is the
new editor-in-chief of Information Systems Research (ISR).
one of the top two international
research journals in its field.
ISR is a publication of
INFORMS, the premier international society for academics and
professionals in operations
research, management sciences
and information systems.
Benbasat, who is CANFOR
professor of management
information systems, was
formerly a senior editor of the
other top research journal in the field. Management Information Systems Quarterly.
Benbasat
Geography graduate student Victoria Long is
the winner of the best individual term paper in the Environmental Adaptation Research
(EAR) Group Research Paper award
from the Sustainable Development
Research Institute.
Long won for her paper "Climate Change Impact Assessment:
Fraser and Mekong Delta Regions."
The best group effort goes to
Karen Ageson, Geoff Taylor and
RebeccaTummon, fourth-year students in the Environmental Science/Environmental Studies program for their joint paper, "Impacts of Climate Change on Corn
Crop Yields in the Lower Fraser Valley. "The awards each come
with a $250 prize.
Long
Geography Prof. Emeritus Walter Hardwick was
honoured in Toronto recently by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of
Toronto (OISE/UT) for his significant contributions to
education in Canada.
As B.C. deputy minister for Education, Science and
Technology from 1976 to 1980, Hardwick was recognized for
expanding the community college system and for setting up
institutions offering opportunities in areas such as distance
learning and art education. Hardwick was responsible for
the creation of the Knowledge Network and served as its
chair for eight years.
3747 W, 10th Ave.
(10th and Alma)
Vancouver, B.C.
VARSITY COMPUTERS
Serving Mncoiratr since "87
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• Free estimates in shop
• Drive-in service. Full
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• Toshiba pentium system
with CD ROM & Sound
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FAX (604) 222-2372
Alan Donald, Ph.D.
Bio statistical Consultant
Medicine, dentistry, biosciences, aquaculture
101-5805 Balsam Street, Vancouver, V6M 4B9
264 -9918 donald@portal.ca 20 UBC Reports • April 29, 1999
Longtime staff help create community
Marking 25 years of service
Margaret Sarkissian
by Hilary Thomson
Staff writer
Commitment to building community
is a theme that runs through Margaret
Sarkissian's life on and off campus.
As an adviser in the Equity Office,
Sarkissian works with employment and
education equity and discrimination and
harassment issues at UBC.
"UBC is my community," says
Sarkissian. "Equity work is really community-building work. We want to make
this university an inclusive and supportive community for everyone."
A UBC alumna, she started her campus career after graduating with a BA.
She signed on as a recruiter in the personnel department but soon discovered
that her interests were in counselling.
She transferred to the Student Counselling Centre, at the same time pursuing a
MEd through UBC's Counselling Psychology program.
For the next 12 years. Sarkissian
worked as a counsellor helping students
deal with issues ranging from career planning to serious personal problems.
Meredith
Her involvement with the student community continued with jobs as director of
undergraduate programs for the Faculty
of Commerce and director of the UBC-
Ritsumeikan Academic Exchange Program.
She joined the Equity Office when it
was set up in 1994.
"There is no cookbook approach to working with harassment and discrimination
issues." says Sarkissian. "They are incredibly complex and challenging to resolve."
One ofthe most rewarding parts ofthe
job for Sarkissian is facilitating equity
issues workshops for faculty, staff and
students. Energizing, stimulating and fun
is how she describes this part of the job.
Her concern for community building is
also evident in her personal life. As president of a community centre association,
Sarkissian helps develop community programs. She volunteers at a weekly community meal designed to provide restaurant
skills training for at-risk youth and a sense of
community for the seniors, families, single
and homeless people who attend.
Sarkissian
Merry Meredith
by Susan Stern
Staff writer
Twenty-five years ago Merry Meredith
was manually pasting pockets in books
as a library assistant. Today, as graphics
supervisor for UBC Library, all of
Meredith's publications and signs for the
university libraries are electronically produced on her Macintosh computer.
"As fast as I learn something they
bring out something else,"says Meredith.
"Myjob is more interesting and challenging because I have to keep up with new
ideas and new software continuously."
Meredith holds a degree in Art History
and also studied illustration and design
at the Emily Carr Institute of Art and
Design. Since her career at UBC began in
1974, she has worked in various positions in the library — from circulation to
cataloguing — before becoming graphics
supervisor in 1989.
Paul Willing
by Bruce Mason
Staff writer
"I've always wanted to be a farmer and
for 25 years this is part of what I've
managed," shouts Paul Willing as he
strides through the sheep paddocks, oblivious to the bleating chorus of some of
his 150 charges. "You think they would
kill themselves the way they run around,
but I keep an eye out."
"Always loved hockey too, and I bet I'm
the only UBC person whose picture is in
the Hockey Hall of Fame," he adds, while
simultaneously bottle-feeding four lambs.
"It's actually a photo of me and my wife
with our family — the caption reads,
'Hockey is for kids of all ages.'"
In the evening and on weekends Willing has refereed hockey games for decades and plays defence for the Old Birds
Hockey team.
At UBC, his busy day as the farm
manager for Animal Science starts at
7:30 a.m. when he feeds the sheep, plans
for lambing and performs myriad other
chores. The closed flock is used for teach
ing, and pregnant ewes are studied before being returned to the paddocks.
He first set foot on the UBC campus in
1964 as an Engineering student on scholarship, fresh from the family dairy farm on
southern Vancouver Island. He switched
to Agriculture before dropping out in 1966
to earn enough to buy his own farm.
By 1974 he was "farm hunting" around
the small Vancouver Island community
of Port Alice when he heard the call.
"UBC was looking for a manager ofthe
farm on campus and I got the job," he
recalls. "It was much different then; I
was in charge of a large staff of swine,
beef, mink, dairy and sheep technicians.
Now I'm on my own with the sheep and a
few dairy cows."
His son Leo earned a degree in Microbiology and is just completing his second in
Education at UBC. Daughter Sandra is finishing her third year in Arts and plays on the
women's varsity hockey team. Son Ben is in
third year Agricultural Sciences and president of the faculty's undergraduate society.
"Sheep are considered stupid and I
suppose they are, compared to humans,"
Meredith works on special projects
with librarians and staff, primarily in
Koerner Library. One of her projects was
to produce publicity for the Information
Connections program which teaches students to negotiate the vast world of information in print or on-line.
"I like illustrating and detail and I'm
always interested in a quality product,"
she says.
As well as creating the graphics for the
UBC Library Web page Meredith collaborated with ITServices on the design ofthe
I Files, a newspaper for students containing useful information about the library
and computers.
"Everybody is great to work with and
that makes it easy for me to work under
pressure," she says. "I've made many
good friends and I enjoy working on the
campus. There have been enough changes
that it doesn't feel like I've been 25 years
in the same place," Meredith says.
Willing
he says as scratches the ears of a "rascal"
marked #9152. "They're also affectionate
and responsive and conduct themselves
better than some people I see. It's the
gentle soothing environment that makes
mine the best job at the university."
71 staff
lauded for
longtime
service
UBC's 25 Year Club welcomes 71
new members for 1999.
Club members — staff who have
worked on campus for a quarter-
century — will join UBC President
Martha Piper at a celebratory dinner
on May 13 at the Totem Park Ballroom.
New members include:
Agricultural Sciences: Retha
Gerstmar, Kathy Shynkaryk • Anaesthesia: Elaine Dawn • Animal
Science: Paul McRae Willing • Biotechnology Laboratory: Darlene
Crowe • Bookstore: Wendy True-
love • Botanical Garden: Ronald
Rollo, Thomas Wheeler • Botany:
Robert Kantymir • Chemistry: Martin Carlisle, Guenter Eigendorf,
Zoltan Germann, Brian Greene •
Civil Engineering: Susan Harper •
Commerce: Nancy Hill • Continuing Studies: Linda Fung, Pauline
Gensick, Libby Kay • Dermatology
Division: Remedios Gumboc • Disability Resource Centre: Catherine
Mead • Education: Carol Kelly •
Electrical Engineering: David
Fletcher • Equity Office: Margaret
Sarkissian • Financial Services:
Lucy CC Chiu, Maria Miu, Nancy
Toung • Food Services: Peter
Cunningham, Chee Ngan Lai • Forestry, Dean's Office: Charles Lai •
Health Care and Epidemiology:
Ronnie Sizto • Health, Safety and
Environment: Ron Aamodt, Mumtaz
Lakhani • Housing and Conferences: Lucia Bodt, Marinus
Hooymans • Institute for Resources
and Environment: Isgo Nercessian
• ITServices: Anne Shorter • Library: Cipriano Ambegia, Balbir
Aulakh, Gaylia Cardona, Peter
Edgar, Rowan Hougham, Ivy Lee,
Richard Melanson, Merry
Meredith, Caroline Milburn-Brown,
James Swartz, Jean Y.J. Tsai, Seta
Yeterian • Mechanical Engineering:
John Richards • Microbiology:
Michael McClymont • Mining and
Mineral Process Engineering: Sally
Finora • Music: Isabel Da Silva •
Nursing: Teresa Rostworowski •
Obstetrics and Gynecology: Theresa
Yang • Parking and Transportation/Campus Security: Philip Chee
• Physics and Astronomy: Alan
Cheuck, Ole Christiansen • Physiology: Joseph Tay • Plant Operations: Alain Albert, Adolf Becker,
Frederick Biddle, Mary Blair, David
A. Coe, Rolf Kullak, Linda Y.F.
Low, Terrill Stanton, Hans
Tautscher • Political Science: Nancy
Mina • Research Farm Oyster River:
Niels Holbek • Research Services:
Shirley Thompson* Student Health
Services: Rhoda Ree.

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