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UBC Reports Mar 16, 1977

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ubc
reports
Vol. 23, No. 5, March 16, 1977. Published by Information Services, University of B.C., 2075
Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5. ISSN 0497-2929. J. A. Banham and Judith
Walker, editors.
Winners of three of UBC's top scholarships for 1976-77 put their best foot
forward for the UBC Reports camera. Left to right are: John Henderson,
Commerce 4, winner of the $1,500 Sherwood Lett Memorial Scholarship; Lynn
Petersen, Rehabilitation Medicine 4, who received the $750 Amy E. Sauder
Memorial Scholarship; and Preston Wiley, Physical Education 4, winner of the
Harry Logan Memorial Scholarship valued at $750.
Musical events on campus
SUNDAY, MARCH 20
2:30 p.m.     DOCTOR OF MUSICAL ARTS RECITAL. Vance Hoy, piano, plays Music of
Mozart, Prokofieff, Schubert and Chopin. Recital Hall, Music Building.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23
12:30 p.m.     NOON-HOUR  CONCERT. Jack Mendelsohn, cello: and  Dale  Reubart,  piano,
perform   Music  of   Beethoven,   Schumann  and  Debussy.   Recital   Hall,   Music
Building.
THURSDAY, MARCH 24
12:30 p.m.     FACULTY    RECITAL.   Carol    Jutte   and   Margot   Ehling,   piano,   play   Piano
Duets of Satie, Mozart, Schubert and Stravinsky. Recital Hall, Music Building.
FRIDAY, MARCH 25 and SATURDAY, MARCH 26
8:00 p.m. UBC OPERA THEATRE presents Rusalka by A. Dvorak. This Canadian
premiere features singers from the UBC Opera Theatre and is accompanied by
the UBC Symphony Orchestra. Old Auditorium.
Two contributed
much to UBC
Two well-known members of the
UBC community — Dr. Philip Vassar
of the Faculty of Medicine and Percy
Fryer, head bookbinder in the UBC
Library for 25 years — died recently.
Nearly 300 colleagues and friends
took part in a memorial gathering at
Cecil Green on March 2 for Dr.
Vassar, who was a member of the
Department of Pathology. He died
suddenly on Feb. 27 at the age of
52.
A native of London, England, Dr.
Vassar received his medical degree
from the University of London. He
did graduate work in pathology in
the U.S. He was a research
pathologist at the Royal Cancer
Hospital in London until 1956, when
he came to Vancouver as a surgical
pathologist at the Vancouver General
hospital and a clinical instructor in
UBC's medical school. He was
appointed an assistant professor in
1959 and full professor in 1965.
Dr. Vassar had an international
reputation for his work in cancer
pathology and was also regarded as a
outstanding teacher by students in
the Faculty of Medicine. A memorial
fund for Dr. Vassar is being
established and contributions should
be sent to the UBC pathology
department.
Mr. Fryer was head bookbinder in
the UBC Library from 1951 until his
retirement in November, 1976. He
too was a native of London where he
apprenticed as a bookbinder and
learned the craft of fine hand binding
as well as the techniques of
production binding. He emigrated to
Canada in 1949 and was employed
by the Queen's Printer in Victoria
before joining the UBC Library.
Under Mr. Fryer's direction, more
than 300,000 UBC books were
rebound. The memorial book listing
the names of all UBC students who
served in both World Wars, on display
in the lobby of the War Memorial
Gymnasium, is an example of his skill
in fine binding.
Mr. Fryer died at his Vancouver
home on March 1 at the age of 65.
Sports
RUGBY - It's World Cup time again
for UBC's Thunderbird rugby club. This
year they meet Long Beach State
University for the trophy on Thursday,
March 24, at 12:45 p.m. in
Thunderbird Stadium. Two days later
on Saturday, March 26, the 'Birds face
the University of California at Santa
Barbara at 2:30 p.m., also at
Thunderbird Stadium. The art of
commun icating
the sciences
Victor Doray, the head of the
Department of Biomedical
Communications in the Faculty of
Medicine, was vastly amused.
It had just been suggested to him
that the revolution of the past few
decades in the use of audio-visual
techniques was something new to the
health sciences.
"Look," he said, leaning forward in
his chair in his basement office in the
campus Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre, "some of the oldest
images known to man are medical
images that attempt to depict what
happens   in   the   human   body.
"You'll find embryonic medical
illustrations in prehistoric cave
paintings and in the art of aborigines.
Some of the rarest and most beautiful
books ever printed, including some by
Leonardo da Vinci, were concerned
with the human body and medical
subjects. The first organized schools of
medicine in the medieval period had
artists and illustrators associated with
them.
"No, our craft may have become
more sophisticated in the last 30 years
with the growth of new technology,
but audio-visual aids have always been
part of the health sciences. We come
by our craft honestly."
Ask Vic Doray to summarize the
activities of his department in 1975-76
and he'll tell you that 69 per cent
of the time it served the Faculty of
Medicine on campus and at the
Vancouver General Hospital, served
other health sciences areas 21 per cent
of the time, and spent the balance —
10 per cent — providing services and
advice to other UBC faculties and
outside groups.
The department's 20-member staff
— split half-and-half between UBC and
the VGH — produced 269 drawings,
701 graphs, 11 special exhibits, 21,800
slides, 14,300 photographic prints,
5,200 feet of movie film for 65 films,
2/UBC Reports/March 16, 1977
and made 90 videotapes that involved
7,880 hours of audio-visual and
television engineering.
The material was produced for a
wide range of people and purposes,
including UBC doctors and other
health professionals; hospital residents,
interns and patients; students, both
graduate and undergraduate in
medicine, dentistry, rehabilitation
medicine, pharmaceutical sciences,
nutrition and social work; and for a
variety of health professionals
practising throughout B.C. who, in
turn, used the material for the
education of patients and the general
public.
Example: Shortly before being
interviewed by UBC Reports, Vic
Doray was furiously busy drawing a
series of illustrations for a surgeon
who had developed a  new operating
technique and who wanted to use the
illustrations for a presentation he was
making to his colleagues.
The same drawings will be used to
illustrate an article in a medical journal
and when converted to other forms —
slides or photographs perhaps — for
the education of medical students.
"It might take a surgeon two or
three pages of type to explain a new
technique if only words are used,"
says Mr. Doray. "A set of photographs
or illustrations help to illuminate the
subject and eliminate printer's ink.
And in converting the illustrations for
other purposes a lot of people benefit
in the long run." Drawn by
Bruce Stewart,
former Staff Artist,
Biomedical Communications
Biomedical Communications' huge
collection of material is also
constantly expanding. "We take
photographs of 12 patients every day
at the request of health professionals
who want to document that patient's
progress. The photographs and other
audio-visual material are used at
weekly meetings of health
professionals (called "rounds" in
medical jargon) where a doctor will
explain the patient's condition, what is
being done to treat the patient, and
will also seek the advice of his peers on
future treatment."
Service to students is also a
significant aspect of their work.
"About a decade ago, the medical
students came to us and asked what
we had that could be used to enhance
their education," Mr. Doray said. "At
that time we had a collection of
80,000 slides and we began to look at
the collection in terms of producing
self-instructional material in the form
of slide shows and audio tapes. There's
a wide range of material now available
to students in every area of the health
sciences."
Even hospital patients aren't
isolated from the products of the
department.
"We recently produced a slide-tape
presentation for patients who have
experienced kidney failure and are in
hospital for renal dialysis, which
involves a frightening and complex
piece of machinery for cleansing the
blood of impurities.
"The slide-tape show we've
developed is placed in a light, compact
unit about the size of a small television
set, placed on the patient's bedside
table, and all the patient has to do is
press a button and the presentation
starts automatically.
"We think it's an honest,
straightforward description of their
condition and the method of treating
it. It's designed to allay patient fears
and help them adjust to their new
situation.
"The presentation has had one
unexpected and positive side effect. A
hospital administrator told me that
hospital workers — the women who
serve meals to patients, for instance —
were fascinated by the show and after
seeing it said they understood for the
first time what was happening on the
ward. So you never know who's going
to be educated by one of our
productions."
Thanks to grants from the P. A.
Woodward Foundation and the federal
LIP program, the biomedical
communications department is also
expanding its efforts in the field of
community education in association
with the UBC Department of
Psychiatry.
The department has produced 80
hours of health science TV
programming on such topics as
coronary care, child-rearing and
sports-related injuries.
Mr. Doray is also enthusiastic
about the self-education process which
his department has been encouraging.
"Faculty members and students in the
health sciences can make use of the
department's facilities to make their
own slide-tape shows. After all, they're
the ones who best know the
requirements of their fellow students
or faculty members and the other
publics they serve."
Example: The department recently
videotaped a four-hour surgical
operation. Immediately following the
procedure, the surgeon came to the
biomedical communications
department and spent six hours
reviewing the tape and deciding which
parts of it he wanted for a 20-minute
segment of highlights for a
presentation the next day to a medical
meeting. He received five minutes of
instruction on a videotape editing
machine, which the surgeon operated
himself to produce the 20-minute film.
The department is also an integral
part of the Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre completed in 1972.
It's the central building in UBC's
Health Sciences Centre for the training
of undergraduate students in the
health sciences. Prior to completion of
the IRC, the biomedical
communications department was
housed at the VGH.
The wired world of the IRC — the
walls of the building contain miles of
cable — allow Vic Doray's department
to provide audio-visual services to five
major classrooms and 14 seminar
rooms through 44 projecting devices
located in the basement headquarters
of the department or scattered
through the IRC.
"We played a major role in the
design of the IRC to enable it to
utilize advances in the state of the
audio-visual art," he said. "We've been
told the building is the most heavily
booked teaching unit in Canada and
the primary reason is the built-in
facilities for using audio-visual
material. We've also had 5,000 visitors
to the building, many of them people
from other institutions who are
contemplating construction of similar
facilities."
Vic Doray and his colleagues have
also produced some award-winning
work. In 1975, the department won
first prize and a cash award of $2,500
for a 20-minute film entitled Shelley,
about a girl who was born blind. In
1976 the department won first prize
in an international audio-visual media
competition for a program on
diabetes, made in co-operation with
the Canadian Diabetic Association,
which has since ordered 100 copies
of the slide-tape program for patient
education.
Individual members of the
department have also received awards.
Fred Herzog, head of the photo/cine
division, received three awards for still
photography at the same meeting that
gave the department the award for its
presentation on diabetes, and he was a
major contributor of photographs to a
book on Vancouver given to delegates
to the 1976 Habitat meetings in
Vancouver. NEXT WEEK AT UBC
Notices must reach Information Services, Main Mall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5 p.m. Thursday of week preceding publication of notice.
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
SATURDAY, MARCH 19
8:15 p.m. Prof. Immanuel Wallerstein, Distinguished
Professor of Sociology, State University of New
York, Binghampton, speaks on The Modern
World System. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
SATURDAY, MARCH 26
8:15 p.m.    Hon.    Jules    Deschenes,    Chief   Justice,   Quebec
Superior  Court,  speaks on  Politics and the Rule
of  Law.  Lecture  Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre.
3:45 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
12:30 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 21
12:30 p.m. CLASSICS LECTURE. Prof. Walter Burkert,
University of Zurich and University of California
at Berkeley, on Myth and Ritual: Structural
Theories and Historical Perspectives. Room 106,
Buchanan Building.
CANCER RESEARCH SEMINAR. Wally Thomas,
Hematology Unit, VGH, on Immunotherapy in
Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. Library, Block B,
Medical Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m. METALLURGY SEMINAR. Dr. M. Cross. British
Steel Corp., England, on Mathematical Modelling
of the Induration Process of a Grate-Kiln-Cooler
Pellet Plant. Room 308, Metallurgy Building.
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE SEMINAR. Prof. D.
Wehrung, Commerce and Business Administration,
UBC, on Risk Attitudes of Canadian and
American Businessmen. Room 321, Angus.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. R.
Strachan, graduate student. Mechanical
Engineering, UBC, on Acoustic Radiation from
Hydraulic Piping. Room 1215, Civil and
Mechanical Engineering Building.
ART EXHIBITION of the work of Education
students majoring in Art. Continues Monday until
10 p.m.; Tuesday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 5
p.m. Art Gallery, Student Union Building.
, MARCH 22
GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR. Prof. Leonard
B. Schapiro, London School of Economics and
University of London, England, on Recent
Developments in Soviet Politics. Room 106,
Buchanan Building.
BOTANY SEMINAR. Dr. R. W. Allard,
University of California at Davis, on Components
of Selection in Various Life-Cycle Stages in Plant
Populations. Room 3219, Biological Sciences.
HISPANIC LECTURE. Prof. Charles Aubrun,
director, Institut d'Etudes Hispaniques, on Social
Aspects of the Quijote: The New and Old
Economic Order.  Room 202,  Buchanan  Building.
1:30 p.m. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. R. C.
Button, Crown Zellerbach, on Applications of
Computer Control in the Forest Products
Industry. Room 418, Electrical Engineering.
3:30 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS
COLLOQUIUM. Prof. Heinz-Otto Kreiss, New
York University and Uppsala University, Sweden,
on Numerical Methods for Problems with
Different Time-Scales. Room 1100, Mathematics
Building Annex.
OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. G. Samuels,
Oceanography, UBC, on Mixing Budget of the
Strait of Georgia. Room 1465, west wing.
Biological Sciences Building.
4:30 p.m. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. E. Ainscough,
Massey University, New Zealand, on Bio-Organic
Research at Massey University. Room 250,
Chemistry Building.
ACADEMIC WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION. Beverley
Green discusses Developments in Cell Biology.
Mildred Brock Room, Brock Hall.
8:00 p.m. ZOOLOGY SEMINAR. Prof. A. J. Cain, Zoology,
University of Liverpool, England, on The
Enigmatic Species of Cepaea. Room 2000,
Biological Sciences Building.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23
12 noon PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR.  Dr. H. C. Fibiger,
Neurological Sciences, UBC, on Catecholamines
and Central Reinforcement Mechanisms. Room
114, Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
12:30 p.m. ZOOLOGY NOON-HOUR TRAVELS. Jeff Green
and Chris Perrin, Animal Resource Ecology, UBC,
on Reflections of a Yukon Summer. Room 2000,
Biological Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m. STATISTICS WORKSHOP. Prof. Stephen E
Feinberg, Applied Statistics, University of
Minnesota, on Victimization and the National
Crime Survey: Problems of Design and Analysis.
Room 321, Angus Building.
4:00 p.m. GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY SEMINAR.
Leigh Hunt Palmer, Physics, SFU, on Computer
Graphical Animation of the Gravitational N-Body
Problem. Room 260, Geophysics Building.
4:30 p.m. BIOCHEMICAL SEMINAR. Prof. Fred M.
Richards, Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry,
Yale University, Conn., on Chemical Approaches
in the Study of Membrane Proteins. Lecture Hall
4, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
SLAVONIC STUDIES SEMINAR. Prof. Leonard
Schapiro, London School of Economics, discusses
Turgenev. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr.
John Addicott, Zoology, University of Alberta,
Edmonton, on Competition in Patchy
Environments: Aphids on Fireweed. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building.
8:00 p.m. SENATE MEETING. Free tickets for interested
members of the University community are
available from Frances Medley, 228-2951. Board
and Senate room, Old Administration Building.
THURSDAY, MARCH 24
12:15 p.m. BIOMEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS media show.
This week's films are Crisis Intervention, Ecology
of Time in Psychiatry and Art Therapy. Room
B8, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
12:30 p.m. GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR. Prof. A.
Geoffrey Woodhead, fellow, Corpus Christi
College, Cambridge, on Cursing and Swearing:
Oaths and Imprecations in Ancient Greece. Room
104, Buchanan Building.
CELL BIOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Tom Grigliatti,
Zoology, UBC, on Organization of Transfer RNA
Genes in Drosophila. Room 2321, Biological
Sciences Building.
APPLIED        MATH        AND        STATISTICS
COLLOQUIUM.      Prof.      Michael      Rubinovitch,
Northwestern    University   and   Israel    Institute   of
Technology,   on   Some  Probabilistic   Models for a
Data     Communication     System.     Room     2449,
Biological Sciences Building.
4:00 p.m.    PHYSICS    COLLOQUIUM.    Dr.     L.    C.    Woods,
Mathematics,    Oxford    University,    on    Onsager's
Reciprocity     Relations.     Room     201,     Hennings
Building.
8:00 p.m.     AGRICULTURE      FORUM.      Prof.      Benno     P.
Warkentin,   Soil   Science,   McGill   University,   on
Food   and   Agriculture   in   a   Conserver   Society.
Lecture       Hall       1,      Woodward      Instructional
Resources Centre.
FRIDAY, MARCH 25
2:30 p.m. CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR. Frank Di
Salvo, Bell Laboratories, New Jersey, on Charge
Density Waves in Layered Compounds. Room 318,
Hennings Building.
3:30 p.m. COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. Dr.
Robert Goldstein, Commerce and Business
Administration, UBC, on The Impact of
Computers on Individual Privacy — and the
Impact of Privacy Laws on Computers. Room
326, Angus Building.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. R.
Gililova on Electrochemical Production of
Manganese Dioxide from Low Grade Manganese
Ores.  Room 206, Chemical  Engineering Building.
3:45 p.m.
4/UBC Reports/March 16, 1977

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