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UBC Reports Nov 24, 1976

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 SPECIAL COLUBTHW*
A letter from
Pres. Kenny
on tuition fees
President Douglas T. Kenny
wrote to provincial Education
Minister Patrick McGeer on Nov. 17
expressing concern about the
possibility of a tuition-fee increase
at UBC next year. This is the text
of President Kenny's letter:
Dear Mr. Minister:
I have recently received many
expressions of concern from
students of this University about
the possibility that tuition fees may
be increased next year. I share the
students' concern. As you know,
my personal philosophy has always
been that student fees should be
kept low, in order to make higher
education accessible to as many of
the people of this province as
possible. Any significant increase in
fees would, in my opinion, make it
very much more difficult for many
qualified students to attend
university.
At the same time, I am also
concerned about maintaining
academic standards at UBC. High
accessibility to low quality
education is to no one's benefit,
neither the students nor the
province.
I am therefore writing to urge in
the strongest terms that you and
your colleagues in government give
full consideration to these factors
when making your decision about
next year's grants to the
universities. Specifically, I hope
that such factors as summer
employment opportunities for
students, the availability of student
aid, and providing maximum
accessibility to higher education
will figure importantly in your
deliberations. I hope too that you
will agree about the importance of
maintaining high academic
standards at our universities.
I appreciate that this province is
in a period of economic restraint
when the resources available to
government are limited, but I hope
that the constraints of the present
will not lead to decisions which
could damage the future of our
province. The quality of that future
depends greatly on the universities
and our students.
Cordially yours,
Douglas T. Kenny
President
reports
Vol. 22, No. 41, Nov. 24, 1976. Published by Information Services, University of B.C., 2075
Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5. ISSN 0497-2929. J. A. Banham and Judith
Walker, editors.
Jim Banham photo
Fourth year science student Mark Buhler finds it pays to have a long reach when
you go searching for bargains at the UBC Bookstore's annual book event in Brock
Hall. Better be quick however. The event ends Saturday (Nov. 27). Hours are 10
a.m. to 9 p.m. weekdays and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
Senate asks for means
to protect lecturers' freedom
The University should be better
prepared to deal with disruptions of a
public talk than it was during recent
disturbances of lectures given by
visiting South African speaker Harry
Schwarz, Senate agreed at its meeting
on Mov. 17.
With that in mind, Senate asked the
UBC administration "to explore
procedures whereby recurrence of
disruptions that violate the academic
freedom of lecturers and audiences on
this campus can be prevented or
speedily terminated when they do
occur."
All three of Mr. Schwarz's public
talks given on campus last month were
seriously disrupted by a group
chanting slogans and waving placards.
Dr. Peter Suedfeld (Psychology),
who proposed the motion, told Senate
that although that body had already
passed a unanimous resolution at its
previous meeting condemning such
disturbances, "people who organize
and   conduct   such   disruptions   don't
really particularly care about our
verbal expressions of support for
academic freedom and free speech. We
need to go further," he said.
The administration is to report
back to Senate after exploring means
of ensuring freedom of speech at
public talks on campus.
Several senators expressed concern
that the methods used to stop
disruptions may prove to be, as Dr.
Roland Gray (Education) expressed it,
"more dangerous and more disruptive
to the public peace . . . than the
heckling and the verbal disruptions
that take place."
However, Senate agreed that the
University should explore what means
are available for curbing such
disruptions in case of future problems.
New supplemental regulations
Amendments to supplemental-exam
regulations proposed by the Faculty of
Arts    were    approved    at    Senate's
See Senate, p. 2 Senate (cont'd.)
November meeting and will go into
effect in the next academic year.
The amendments, Arts dean Dr.
Robert Will told Senate, are part of a
general movement in the Faculty of
Arts toward having the supplemental
reflect the reduced importance of the
final examination as a means of
assessing a student's performance
throughout the year.
The new regulations restrict the
writing of a supplemental exam for
Arts students to those students who
have an average of 60 per cent in all
other courses taken during the session.
Students now have merely to pass a
certain number of courses in the same
session.
Under the new regulations,
supplemental exams will only be
available in Arts courses in which the
final exam counts for 40 per cent or
more of the grade on the course. They
will stand as a substitute for the final
exam and carry the same weight as the
original final in calculation of the
course grade. The numerical grade on
the supplemental exam in some cases
now constitutes the entire score for
the course on a student's transcript.
And, so that students will be aware
of which courses will not be offering
supplemental exams, information on
which courses will have a supplemental
exam will be published in the Schedule
of Courses at the beginning of each
session.
Special Ed. program approved
Senate has approved a new five-year
program in special education which
will train students to teach a wide
range of mildly-handicapped children.
The program, a major in special
education leading to the B.Ed.
(Elementary)   degree,   is  designed   to
serve students who will work in
schools, supplementing the regular
teacher in classes with
mildly-handicapped pupils.
There is a growing trend in schools
to include children with mild
handicaps in the regular classroom
rather than placing them in special
classes, explained John Andrews, dean
of Education, when contacted after
the Senate meeting. Yet often, the
regular classroom teacher has neither
the time nor the knowledge to deal
adequately with their problems.
At present, students training to be
regular elementary classroom teachers
have been able to take a concentration
in special education courses along with
their normal courses. However,
according to Dean Andrews, "it's
simply not been enough specialization
to make it worthwhile."
Students taking the diploma
programs in special education offered
by UBC for the past several years
receive training to work with
severely-handicapped children.
The new program will also train
students to work in Learning
Assistance Centres throughout the
province where mildly-handicapped
pupils can receive special attention for
their problems. These centres are now
staffed by people who have little or no
training in special education, Dean
Andrews said.
Most of the courses needed for the
new program are already offered in the
Faculty of Education, although seven
new courses will be offered for the
fifth year. The program will begin in
September of 1977 with a capacity of
about 30 students.
Students interested in the program
should contact Dr. Stanley Perkins,
chairman of the Department of Special
Education.
The music box
MONDAY, Nov. 29     >>
8:00 p.m.; and {
TUESDAY, Nov. 30
12:30 p.m. ■>
TUESDAY, NOV. 30
8:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 1
12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, DEC. 2
12:30 p.m.; and
FRIDAY, DEC. 3
8:00 p.m.
FRIDAY, DEC. 3
12:30 p.m.; and
SATURDAY, DEC. 4
8:00 p.m.
COLLEGIUM    MUSICUM    perform     Music    of    the
Renaissance. Recital Hall, Music Building.
AN EVENING OF CHAMBER MUSIC with student
small ensembles. Recital Hall, Music Building.
LECTURE RECITAL by Prof. Hans-Karl Piltz, Music,
UBC. Music of J. S. Bach for the Solo Violist with guest
artists James Fankhauser, tenor, and Elizabeth Wright,
harpsichord. Room 113, Music Building.
UNIVERSITY CHORAL UNION directed by James
Schell performs Music of Vittoria, J. S. Bach and
Rachmaninoff. Recital Hall, Music Building.
UNIVERSITY SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA directed by
Douglas Talney performs Music of Mahler, Wagner and
Beethoven. Old Auditorium.
Successful
"Canadian Literature (quarterly, $8
per annum. University of British
Columbia, Vancouver), now in its
17th year, is by far the most
important journal on the subject of
Canadian writers and writing ever
to have been produced in this
country. . . . The success of this
journal is largely a result of the
efforts of one man — its editor, the
amazing George Woodcock." —
Canadian author Morris Wolfe,
writing in Content, Canada's
national news media magazine,
August, 1976.
George Woodcock, who's now in
the process of editing the 71st issue of
Canadian Literature, says the past 17
years have been as much of an
education for him as they have been
for readers of the magazine.
Dr. Woodcock freely admits that
when he was approached to serve as
editor of the journal he was far from
being an expert in the field of
Canadian literature.
Today he regards himself as an
expert in that discipline, largely
because Canadian Literature has over
the years published a comprehensive
survey of Canadian writing from its
17th-century beginnings in
Newfoundland to contemporary
novelists and poets.
The success of the magazine also
reflects a coming of age of Canadian
literature, Dr. Woodcock believes.
"The rise of literary criticism within a
country usually means that there
exists a body of mature literature that
reflects that country's cultural values.
In England, literary criticism made its
appearance about the time of the
Restoration when there was a body of
literature in a variety of forms to
enable the critic to take a longer view.
Similarly, in the United States, when
American literature came into its own
there appeared an Edmund Wilson to
write about it critically."
The idea of publishing a magazine
about this country's literature took
shape in the mid-1950s among groups
in the UBC English department and
the Library. Dr. Woodcock, who was
then teaching full-time in the English
department, says he came to the
University with the idea that his
background in editing might be used
to publish a magazine of some sort.
"My lack of background in
Canadian literature made me a little
hesitant about taking on the editing of
the magazine when I was approached,"
Dr. Woodcock says, "but I eventually
decided to accept the challenge. We
got     a     small     subsidy    from    the
2/UBC Reports/Nov. 24, 1976 UBC magazine now 17 years old
University and a grant from the Leon
and Thea Koerner Foundation, and I
began to learn about Canadian
literature as I went along, as it were.
"Initially, we functioned as a sort
of cottage industry," Dr. Woodcock
recalls. "I did the editing from my
academic office in the English
department, Inglis Bell carried on
promotion from his Library office,
and after the magazine was printed it
was prepared for the mail in the
depths of the Library by Basil
Stuart-Stubbs, who's now UBC's chief
librarian."
Not the least of Dr. Woodcock's
problems in those days was finding
qualified contributors to write the
magazine's review and critical articles.
"I had to badger people to write for us
in the early days," he says, "the point
being that we were asking for criticism
from people who'd never written
anything of that sort in their lives."
In the first three or four years of
the magazine's existence, it managed
to review almost every book of any
literary  interest published in Canada.
Then, in the mid-1960s, Canada
experienced an explosion in the field
of publishing which Dr. Woodcock
says was due to two factors —
technological advances that made
possible an increase in the number of
small Canadian presses, coupled with
an upsurge in Canadian nationalism.
"This explosion forced Canadian
Literature to become much more
selective in reviewing books, while
continuing our other goal of compiling
an on-going literary history of
Canada," Dr. Woodcock says.
One aspect of the publishing
explosion of the 1960s that interests
Dr. Woodcock is the revival of poetry,
both spoken and written. "Every
culture has a tradition of oral poetry,"
he says, "and as a literary form it
appealed to the counter culture of that
time because it was possible to be
respectably irrational in verse. The
term 'poetic licence' really does have
some validity in that context and
poetry became a symbol of rebellion
against rationalism and excessively
academic values.
"Unfortunately, many of the poets
of that period tended to write verse
ithat sounded good but looked
dreadful on the printed page."
Today, Canadian Literature is a
firmly established literary journal that
receives annual grants from the Canada
Council as well as a small continuing
grant    from     UBC.     "Grants,"     Dr.
DR. GEORGE WOODCOCK
Woodcock says, "just about cover the
costs of distributing the magazine,
while the balance of our $30,000
budget, which pays for printing, is
made up from subscriptions and
advertising."
The problem of obtaining good
critical writing has also solved itself
over the years. "Initially," Dr.
Woodcock says, ''we were
commissioning three-quarters of the
reviews and critical articles. Today, we
receive unsolicited articles and I now
find myself in the position of rejecting
material that I would have accepted 15
years ago. Right now I have a stockpile
of material that will see me over the
next two years."
He agrees that one of the benefits
of publishing the magazine has been to
stimulate serious critical writing in
Canada. "I've been surprised to find
how many creative writers, and
particularly poets, are also good
critical writers," Dr. Woodcock says.
"Margaret Atwood, Louis Dudek,
Douglas Jones — all poets — have been
our best critical writers over the years.
For some reason that escapes me,
fiction writers simply don't go in
much for criticism."
The magazine has always paid its
contributors for their articles,
beginning at the rate of $3 per page
and rising to $5. "It's no more than
token payment for their efforts," he
says, "and no one should count on
growing rich writing for Canadian
Literature."
The magazine now has a circulation
of some 2,500, about 65 per cent of
the copies go to institutions and the
balance to individuals, most of them
academics or writers. "It's interesting,
too, that 27 per cent of our circulation
goes to institutions and individuals
outside Canada — 18 per cent in the
United States and 9 per cent to other
countries. I think this means that
outside Canada there are a
considerable number of people who
are aware that the literature of Canada
is worth taking note of," says Dr.
Woodcock.
Critics themselves have come in for
a lot of criticism over the years, but
Dr. Woodcock belipves they serve a
valuable purpose in the spectrum of
literary studies.
"The essential role of the critic is
that of a mediator between the reader
and the writer," Dr. Woodcock says.
"The critic, because he is a
professional and has insights into the
work of writers, is able to make the
way smoother for the reader.
"I don't think critics have much
influence in forming imaginative
literature, but there is a certain
amount of interaction between writers
and critics. I've found, as a writer, that
the comments of a responsible critic
can be very valuable. They enable
writers to see their work through
another's eyes and to get some idea of
where they're going wrong or how
they might improve their work."
On the whole, says Dr. Woodcock,
Canada and the world would be a
poorer place if Canadian Literature
had never appeared on the scene. "I
think it's given a sharper focus to
Canadian writing and created an outlet
for responsible and serious literary
criticism in Canada. Certainly, over the
years, I've noted an improvement in
the quality and an increase in the
quantity of criticism of Canadian
literature."
It's obvious, too, that George
Woodcock believes that in the long run
his little magazine will have the effect
of improving the quality of creative
literature produced by Canadian
novelists and poets.
UBC Reports/Nov. 24, 1976/3 NEXT WEEK AT UBC
Not ices must reach InformationServices, Main Mall North Ad min. Bldg.,by mail, by 5 p.m. Thursday of week preced ing publ icat ion of notice.
FINE ARTS GALLERY.
Exhibit of works by British sculptor Eduardo
Paolozzi. Continues until Dec. 11. Tuesday
through Saturday, 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Basement, Main Library.
LOST AND FOUND.
The campus Lost and Found is located in Room
208, Student Union Building. Hours are 11 :30 a.m.
to 1:30 p.m. and 3:00 to 4:00 p.m. Monday
through Friday.
MONDAY, NOV. 29
12:30 p.m. GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR. Martin Best,
troubadour, gives a lecture-demonstration on
Shakespeare and Song. Frederic Wood Theatre.
CANCER RESEARCH SEMINAR. Bob Whiting,
Cancer Research Centre, UBC, on Studies of Metal
Carcinogenesis in Cultured Human Cells. Library,
Block B, Medical Sciences Building.
3:45 p.m. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. H.
Villalobos, mechanical engineering graduate
student, UBC, on Work Measurement Techniques.
Room 1215, Civil and Mechanical Engineering
Building.
4:30 p.m. CANCER CONTROL SEMINAR. Prof. Herbert
Galliher, Industrial and Operations Engineering,
University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Mich.,
discusses When Should a Healthy Woman Have Her
Next Pap Smear? — A Cost-Benefit Answer.
Second floor conference room. Cancer Control
Agency of B.C.,  2656 Heather St.
TUESDAY, NOV. 30
9:00 a.m. OBSTETRICS LECTURE. Dr. J. J. Bonica,
Department of Anesthesiology and Anesthesia
Research Center, University of Washington,
Seattle, on Recent Advances in Obstetrical
Anesthesia. Lecture Hall B, Vancouver General
Hospital.
11:30 a.m. LIBRARY SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. Dr. and Mrs.
G.P.V. Akrigg discuss their books on British
Columbia place names.  Room 835, Main Library.
12:30 p.m. HISPANIC LECTURE. Prof. German Bleiberg,
Spanish, Vassar College, N.Y., on Don Quijote and
the Galley Slaves. Room 202, Buchanan Building.
4:30p.m. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. F. Aubke,
Chemistry, UBC, on Transition Metal Fluorides
and Fluoro-sulfates. Room 250, Chemistry
Building.
8:00 p.m. CUSO Conflicts in Development series. Alternate
Models of Development — A Look at China and
Cuba. Room 202, Buchanan Building.
WEDNESDAY, DEC. 1
12:30 p.m. PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Ernest Puil,
Pharmacology, UBC, on Electro-micropharm-
acology of Neurons in the Central Nervous System
— Actions and Interactions of Neurotransmitters.
Room 221, Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS WORKSHOP.
Dr. W. G. Warren, Western Forest Products
Laboratory, Vancouver, on Revisiting Some
Common Problems in Applied Statistics. Room
321, Biological Sciences Building.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Dr.
Stuart Cavers, Chemical Engineering, UBC, on
Liquid-Liquid Spray Column Sampling. Room 206,
Chemical Engineering Building.
4:00 p.m. GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY SEMINAR.
Dr. D. Oldenburg, Physics, University of Alberta,
on Interpretation of Direct Current Resistivity
Measurements. Room 260, Geophysics Building.
BIOCHEMICAL DISCUSSION GROUP. Dr. John
Colter, Biochemistry, University of Alberta, on
Molecular Anatomy of and Transformation of
Cultured Cells by BK Virus. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
4:30 p.m.     ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr.
Mercedes Foster, Museum Vertebrate Zoology,
University of California, Berkeley, on Odd Couples
in Manakins: A Study of Social Organization and
Co-operative Breeding in Chinoxiphia linearis.
Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
6:00 p.m. TUMOR BIOLOGY STUDY GROUP. Dr. G.
Gudauskas and Dr. H.K.B. Silver, Cancer Control
Agency of B.C., on Use of Combined Gas
Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry in Cancer
Chemotherapy and The Clinical Significance of
Tumor Antigens. Second floor conference room,
Cancer Control Agency, 2656 Heather St. S3.50
includes dinner.
7:30 p.m. CANADIANS FOR HEALTH RESEARCH.
Keynote speaker Dr. John Dirks, Medicine, UBC,
on Medical Research and Excellence of Clinical
Care - Special Needs in B.C. Room 301 A,
Vancouver Public Library, 750 Burrard St.
8:00 p.m. BIOMEDICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Dr.
David Chiu and Art Ridgway, BCIT, on The
Biomedical Electronics Program at BCIT. Salons B
and C, Faculty Club.
THURSDAY, DEC. 2
12:30 p.m. ASIAN STUDIES LECTURE. S. Y. Tse, Library,
Asian Studies Div., UBC, on The Art of Chinese
Calligraphy. Room 106, Buchanan Building.
12:30p.m. HABITAT FILM PREVIEW by the Centre for
Human Settlements, a weekly series of national
films from the Habitat conference. Discussion
following films led by Dr. Peter Oberlander. Room
B79, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
1:00 p.m. NORTHWEST COAST ARTISTS AND
CRAFTSMEN. Francis Williams, Haida artist,
discusses his work. Orientation Centre, Museum of
Anthropology.
2:30 p.m. CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR. J. H. Davis,
UBC, on 55Mn Nuclear Resonance from Domains
and Domain Walls in MnFe204. Room 318,
Hennings Building.
3:45p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS
COLLOQUIUM with Dr. J. K. Lindsey,
Anthropology and Sociology, UBC. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. T. A. Cahill, Physics,
University of California, Davis, Calif., on Evidence
for Primordial Superheavy Elements. Room 201,
Hennings Building.
4:30 p.m. BIOMEMBRANE GROUP SEMINAR. Prof. Watt
W. Webb, Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell
University, on Physical Organization of Transport
Processes on Mammalian Cell Surfaces. Anatomy
Lecture Theatre, Block B, Medical Sciences
Building.
9:00 p.m. BEYOND THE MEMORY OF MAN. M. Chiarenza,
R. Holdaway and A. Pacheco discuss Pilgrimage
Literature. Channel 10, Vancouver Cablevision.
FRIDAY, DEC. 3
9:00 a.m. PEDIATRICS GRAND ROUND. Dr. Leonard
Pinsky, Pediatrics, McGill University, Montreal, on
Making Sense of Male Pseudohermaphroditism.
Lecture Hall B, Heather Pavilion, VGH.
3:30 p.m. FINANCE AND INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS
WORKSHOP. Prof. Bruno Solnik, Institut
Europeen de Recherches Superieures en
Management, Brussels, Belgium, on A Note on
Some Parity Conditions Encountered Frequently
in International Finance. Room 325, Angus
Building.
SATURDAY, DEC. 4
8:15 p.m. VANCOUVER INSTITUTE. Dr. Roger Gaudry,
University of Montreal, on Science Policy and the
Future of Research in Canada. Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
4/UBC Reports/Nov. 24, 1976

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