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UBC Reports Nov 17, 1976

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Vol. 22, No. 40, Nov. 17, 1976. Published by
Information Services, University of B.C., 2075
Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5.
ISSN 0497-2929. Judith Walker, editor.
ubc reports
Audio-visual collection offers new
directions for teaching, research
Prof. Peter Oberlander, the pro tern
director of UBC's new Centre for
Human Settlements, believes the
University committed a considerable
act of faith in agreeing to serve as
custodian for the hundreds of
audio-visual presentations shown at
last summer's Habitat conference.
He also believes that the material
now in the hands of the University
offers an extraordinary opportunity
for exploring new directions in the use
of audio-visual materials for teaching,
research and public education.
Late in May UBC announced the
creation of a Centre for Human
Settlements to act as the custodian for
the 10,640 audio-visual items. They
make up the 240 presentations that
were made by the 140 countries that
participated in the United Nations
Conference on Human Settlements —
commonly referred to as Habitat — in
Vancouver in May and June.
"The Habitat conference," Dr.
Oberlander says, "has to be seen as
one of a series of UN-sponsored events
on specific issues rather than
discussions of abstract issues on a
grand scale.
"In the late 1960s it became
obvious that the UN, as an
action-oriented organization, had to
cut across the specialized interests of
its offshoot organizations, such as the
Food and Agriculture Organization
and the International Labor
Organization, and set in motion a
series of theme-specific meetings.
"The result was conferences on the
natural environment in Stockholm,
food in Rome, population in
Bucharest, women in Mexico City,
human settlements in Vancouver and,
next year, water in Buenos Aires.
"At Stockholm, we argued that the
next UN conference ought to concern
itself with the way in which the
countries of the world are attempting
to solve problems of human
settlement, such as housing, urban
blight, sewage disposal, energy — the
whole range of problems that man
encounters as he uses the environment
more densely and intensively.
"Canada also proposed that the UN
should use such a conference as a
means of breaking away from the print
PROF. PETER OBERLANDER
medium and employ audio-visual
presentations," Dr. Oberlander says.
"At most international meetings,
delegates are drowned in paper. Much
of it simply doesn't get read and most
of it gets shipped back to its point of
origin after the conference and is
destroyed.
"An audio-visual presentation has
some obvious advantages — it breaks
the language barrier to some extent
and when each of the presentations is
transferred to a videotape cassette it
can be carried around in your back
pocket or easily shipped to any part of
the world, where it can be shown on
closed-circuit TV to a select audience
or on a local or national television
network."
The UN accepted this approach for
the Habitat conference and also
endorsed the concept that the
audio-visual presentations should
emphasize solutions to problems
involving human settlements rather
than dwelling on the ills of the world.
"It wasn't until a couple of months
before the conference opened," says
Prof. Oberlander, "that the Canadian
Habitat secretariat realized that it
would have a unique collection on its
hands and that at the very least it
ought to be kept together after the
meeting so that it would be a
continuing asset.
'There were suddenly a whole host
of problems to consider — what
machinery should be set up to deal
with the presentations and what form
should they be in to allow for global
access by those countries who
contributed to the collection."
There were other complications.
"No one knew what the collection
would be like in terms of method of
presentation, whether each item would
be in the form of slides, film or
videotape cassettes. There is also very
little expertise available for
cataloguing and maintaining a purely
audio-visual library and, finally, no
one at that point was prepared to give
any guarantees about space needs and
financing," says Prof. Oberlander.
"So the University, as an act of
faith, offered to act as custodian for
the collection, provided the UN was
prepared to leave it here and vest the
international copyright of the material
in UBC, and provided the federal and
provincial governments were prepared
to give assurances of financial
support."
UBC set up its Centre for Human
Settlements and on June 12
representatives of the UN, UBC and
the federal and provincial governments
signed an interim agreement vesting
the audio-visual materials in UBC until
the end of this year and assuring the
University of substantial funding.
Prof. Oberlander said he expects
that the UN General Assembly will
shortly approve an agreement naming
UBC as custodian of the material for
five years.
Since acquiring the material, UBC
has begun the long and difficult
process of assessing all presentations —
films, slides and videotapes — and
preparing an inventory of the
presentations as a first step in the
production of an annotated catalogue
that will include an evaluation of each
presentation.
"We've also put a lot of effort into
coming to grips with distribution of
the material and who is to pay for that
Please turn to Page Two
See CENTRE Reunion of women veterans benefits
Mrs. Helen Dunbar is a different
type of veteran.
First of all, her grandson
received an "honorary degree"
from UBC before he was born.
And although she served in the
Women's Division of the Royal
Canadian Air Force during the
London blitz in the Second World
War, she rejects the natural reaction
many of us have of wishing others
could somehow experience the bad
times we went through ourselves.
"The war was awful and I hope
young people today never have to
go through something like that
themselves," Mrs. Dunbar says.
"I hope they never know what it
was like."
Mrs. Dunbar, of UBC's Copy and
Duplicating Centre, was chairman
of an organizing committee for a
reunion at UBC this summer of
women    who    served    during    the
HELEN DUNBAR
Second World War in the RCAF
and Royal Air Force. She and other
women veterans spent three years
organizing the event.
The reunion was such a success
that the group is donating its
surplus of $16,000 to local causes
- $5,000 to the Canadian Cancer
Society, $5,000 to the Canadian
Arthritis and Rheumatism Society,
$4,000 towards UBC bursaries for
cadets, and $2,000 to UBC's Crane
Library for the blind.
"Cancer, arthritis and
rheumatism are major diseases now
afflicting veterans," Mrs. Dunbar
says. "Some women we served with
couldn't attend the reunion because
they were crippled or had fallen
victims of cancer.
"The donations to UBC are to
help young people who have a
connection with the forces and to
help the handicapped."
CENTRE
Continued from Page One
aspect of the centre's operations," Dr.
Oberlander says, "because the UN has
insisted on open access by the
countries who made presentations.
"We've had a great deal of help in
this regard from the National Film
Board, which is working out the
operational details of how we go about
lending and selling the material over
five continents."
The centre has already started
circulating some material. "We've
responded to any reasonable request,"
says Dr. Oberlander. "Some of the
films have been shown in Europe and
Asia and to select student audiences at
UBC. We've also begun Thursday
noon-hour showings, followed by
discussions, in the Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre, where
the collection is housed."
A whole spectrum of uses for the
Habitat presentations can be
envisioned.
"The UN emphasized to Habitat
participants that it wanted audio-visual
presentations that dealt with solutions
— what participants were doing to
solve problems related to water,
sewage, housing, transportation,
energy and the associated problems
involving the poor, the unskilled, the
migratory and the dispossessed.
Problems that many countries have
tried to solve with greater or lesser
success.
"I   can  see  courses   in geography,
political     science,     economics,
engineering and planning utilizing the
material    to    illustrate    social    and
2/UBC Reports/Nov. 17, 1976
economic change on a global basis and
leading to comparative analysis," says
Prof. Oberlander.
A more complex and exciting use
of the material is to use it to illustrate
the "state of the art" in a wide variety
of areas. "The films could illustrate
how various problems are being solved
under different social, economic and
political conditions in terms of
construction techniques,
wind-generated power, new-town
policies, irrigation problems, to name
only a few.
"One could look at housing
progress on a global basis in terms of
how it is handled in poor countries, in
centrally planned economies and in
industrialized societies."
Ultimately, because the
presentations will be on videotape, it
will be possible to build a whole new
set of presentations. "From many
tapes, one will be able to take out all
the material on water or on land use
and create a new set of videotapes
showing what is happening in these
areas in various parts of the world."
Prof. Oberlander said discussions
are being held with the Provincial
Educational Media Centre, which
develops audio-visual materials for
B.C. schools, with a view to using the
centre's collection throughout the
province.
"We're also working with our own
Centre for Continuing Education in
the development of programs that
could be shown anywhere in B.C. The
public will have a new way of looking
at old problems with this material,
which will be supplemented by a
discussion led by trained people."
The centre is governed by a board
of management chaired by Dean Peter
Larkin, of the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, who emphasizes that the
presence of the collection at UBC will
not mean any new degree or training
programs.
"The centre is an organization that
will provide a service to existing
disciplines at UBC," says Dean Larkin.
"It will also draw to this University
students and scholars from all over the
world who will utilize a unique
collection of material."
Dean Larkin said one of the main
concerns of the board of management
has been drawing up a realistic budget
for the future operations of the centre.
The current agreement between UBC,
the UN and the federal and provincial
governments calls for the federal
government to match the combined
contributions of UBC and the
provincial government. Recently, the
federal government provided $40,000
to enable the centre to carry on its
current work.
At a recent meeting of the board it
was agreed that the centre should
initiate three campus programs to
make specific use of the audio-visual
collection immediately.
Early in January the centre will
start a public screening and discussion
program jointly with the Centre for
Continuing Education on four themes
— environment, water, transportation
and governance.
In addition, the centre will hold an
invitational seminar on the topic
"Arable Land: the Appropriate Use of
a Scarce Resource." This will bring
25-30     leading     academics    and JBC groups
Although organizing the reunion
was a women-only affair, a number
of honorary memberships in the
RCAF's Women's Division were
made to a number of men who
helped make the event a success,
including Ted Leather of Traffic
and Security, Ray Herbert of the
Faculty of Law, President Emeritus
Norman MacKenzie, and UBC
Chancellor Donovan (VI iHer.
About her grandson:
Mrs. Dunbar's daughter, Mrs.
Laurie Quist, was pregnant when
she received her BA degree in 1972.
When Allen McGavin, then UBC
chancellor, noticed her condition
during the Congregation ceremony,
he said that he admitted both her
and her unborn child into the
graduate body of the University.
Ceremonies director Malcolm
McGregor later had an honorary
degree made up for young Julian.
professionals to UBC to evaluate
Habitat recommendations in this field
in relation to a pressing B.C. issue.
During the next term the centre
will also initiate a scholar-in-residence
program to bring specialists to the
campus for a month or more to review
the audio-visual library from special
points of view and to assess its
relevance for Canadian development
policies.
The first scholar-in-residence will be
sponsored jointly by the centre and
the School of Community and
Regional Planning under the theme
"Land: the Canadian Delegation's
Position at the UN Conference; a
Comparative Analysis of Ideas and
Ideals."
In the final analysis, Prof.
Oberlander believes that the centre's
collection could provide an
opportunity for moving in new
directions in the use of audio-visual
materials.
"For some 400 years, civilization
has been the lucky recipient of the
benefits of Gutenberg's press," he
says. "The first book he printed was
the Bible. It meant copying a
document that had been handed down
in hand-lettered form for the previous
2,000 years.
"In a sense, we are in the same
position now with the new electronic
technology. We have yet to find ways
and means of producing for the new
technology that are commensurate
with the opportunities it offers.
"That's the real opportunity this
material offers us. The possibilities for
teaching and research at UBC are
incalculable."
know your campus
This is the first of a series of articles on major campus buildings that will
appear in UBC Reports. The series is designed to inform members of the
University community about the history and occupants of some of the 391
buildings on the Point Grey campus. Readers who have uncommon or
anecdotal information about any UBC building are invited to send it to the
editor of UBC Reports:
UBC's old Civil Engineering
Building on Agricultural Road just
west of the Bookstore got a new
name this week. From now on it
will be known as the COMPUTER
SCIENCES BUILDING.
Built in 1950 at a cost of just
over $1 million, it originally housed
all the departments of the Faculty
of Applied Science and was
intended to grow to four times its
present size.
Instead, the University decided
to provide individual facilities for
the various engineering departments
on a site to the south centred on
the intersection of the Main Mall
and Stores Road.
Over the years, other UBC
operations moved into the building.
The first intruder in the mid-1950s
was the Computing Centre with its
first-generation machine. Today,
the centre boasts one of the most
advanced systems in Canada — an
IBM 370 Model 168 system. In
1967 an addition was built on the
west end of the building's north
wing to provide space for students.
The centre annually provides
services to more than 3,000
students and faculty members. The
next intruder in the building was
the Department of Computer
Science, which was organized in
1968.
Over the summer of '76 the
Department of Civil Engineering
and the office of the dean of the
Faculty of Applied Science vacated
the building for new quarters in the
recently    completed    Civil    and
Mechanical Engineering Building to
the south.
Renovations are now underway
in the building to provide suitable
space for the Computing Centre,
which will centralize its staff on the
fourth floor, and the computer
science department which will
occupy the second and third floors.
The basement floor of the building
is being taken over completely by
the Computing Centre to provide
additional user space.
Most of the classroom space in
the building will remain as it is,
including the building's largest
lecture hall, Room 200, which seats
210 persons.
As the former home of UBC's
Gears, the building was often the
scene of tumult, particularly during
Engineering Week. The building's
lecture halls and corridors have
been the scene of numerous water
fights and other encounters
between Engineers and rival Aggies
and Foresters. Presumably, those
days are gone forever.
the music box
SUNDAY, NOV. 21
8:00 p.m.    UBC OPERA WORKSHOP. French Tickner directs Music of Verdi. Mozart,
Moors and Salieri. Old Auditorium.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 24
12:30 p.m.    NOON-HOUR CONCERT. John  Rapson, clarinet, and Robert Rogers,
piano, play Music of Schumann, Hindemith and Glick. Recital Hall, Music
Building.
THURSDAY, NOV. 25
12:30 p.m.    UNIVERSITY SINGERS. James Fankhauser conducts Music of Scarlatti,
Schutz, Praetorius and Healey. Recital Hall, Music Building.
8:00 p.m.    ALUMNI CONCERT SERIES. Music of Beethoven, Chopin and Franck.
Recital Hall, Music Building.
FRIDAY, NOV. 26
8:00 p.m.    UNIVERSITY SINGERS. James Fankhauser conducts Music of Scarlatti,
Schutz, Praetorius and Healey. Recital Hall, Music Building.
UBC Reports/Nov. 17, 1976/3 NEXT WEEK flTUBCl
Notices must reach I nformation Services, Main Mall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5 p.m. Thursday of week preceding publicationof notice.
L
FINE ARTS GALLERY. Exhibit of works by British sculptor
Eduardo Paolozzi. Continues until Dec. 11. Tuesday through
Saturday - 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Basement, Main Library.
LOST AND FOUND. The campus Lost and Found is located in
Room 208, Student Union Building. Hours are 11 :30 a.m. - 1:30
p.m. and 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.
SUNDAY, NOV. 21
3:00 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY. Dr. Alan
Sawyer, Fine Arts, UBC, on Pre-Hispanic Andean
Musical Instruments. Rotunda Lounge, Museum of
Anthropology.
MONDAY, NOV. 22
12:30 p.m.    CANCER     RESEARCH     SEMINAR.     Dr.     Jim
Hudson, Medical Microbiology, UBC, on In Vitro
Models for Latent Herpes Virus Infections.
Library, Cancer Research Centre, Block B, Medical
Sciences Building.
3:45 p.m. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. W.
Edwards, graduate student, Mechanical
Engineering, UBC, on Simultaneous Heat and Mass
Transfer in Wet Wood Particles. Room 1215, Civil
and Mechanical Engineering Building.
4:00p.m. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE SEMINAR. Prof. T.
Var, Faculty of Economics and Commerce, Simon
Fraser University, on Optimal Investment Policy
for the Tourism Sector: Single and Multiple Period
Analyses. Room 321, Angus Building.
4:30 p.m. CANCER CONTROL AGENCY SEMINAR. Dr.
Bruce. Douglas, Cancer Control Agency, on
Rationale and Results of Superfractionation
Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme. Second
floor conference room, Cancer Control Agency of
B.C., 2656 Heather St., Vancouver.
8:00 p.m. IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Denis Burger,
University of Oregon Medical School, on
Characterization of Transfer Factor. Salon B,
Faculty Club.
TUESDAY, NOV. 23
4:30 p.m. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. D. G. Clark,
Chemistry, UBC, on Triosephosphate Isomerase:
Isolation of Isozymes and Chemical Modification
as a Structural Probe. Room 250, Chemistry
Building.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 24
12:00 noon DENTISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. Ravindra M. Shah,
Oral Biology, UBC, on Teratological Safety
Evaluation of Drugs. Room 388, Macdonald
Building.
12:30 p.m. HISPANIC AND ITALIAN STUDIES LECTURE.
Prof. Olga Ragusa, Department of Italian,
Columbia University, on Pirendello's Six
Characters in Search of an Author. Room 202,
Buchanan Building.
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. E. R.
Anderson, Pharmacology, UBC, on Effects of
Lithium and Other Cations on Rabbit Platelet
Aggregation. Room 221, Block C, Medical Sciences
Building.
2:30 p.m. APPLIED MATHEMATICS SEMINAR. Dr. R. C.
Riddell, Mathematics, UBC, on Planetary Models in
Ptolemy, Copernicus and Kepler. Room 202,
Mathematics Building.
3:30 p.m. STATISTICS WORKSHOP. Dr. Arthur Ralph
Hakstian, Psychology, UBC, on Inferential
Procedures with Multiple Correlations. Room 321,
Angus Building.
4:00 p.m. HEALTH CARE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
RESEARCH SEMINAR. Dr. Mark Elwood, Health
Care and Epidemiology, UBC, on Approaches to
the Etiology of Congenital Malformations. Room
146, Mather Building.
4:30 p.m. ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. W.
Clark, Animal Resource Ecology, UBC, on
Dispersal, Spatial Heterogeneity, and the
Population Dynamics of Spruce Budworm. Room
2449, Biological Sciences Building.
THURSDAY, NOV. 25
12:30 p.m.    CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS. Habitat
film   preview.   Three  films from   Latin  America.
Discussion led by Prof. Peter Oberlander. Room
B79, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY STUDIES
COMMITTEE LECTURE. Prof. Joseph Meeker,
Athabaska University, Edmonton, on Wooing
Worlds: Charming Science and Scientific Art.
Room 229, Geography Building. Prof. Meeker will
also hold a workshop on Reflections on the Public
Conceptions of Science and Technology at 3:30
p.m. in the Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR. Prof. H. W.
Janson, Institute of Fine Arts, New York
University, on Images of the Human Soul. Lecture
Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
SLAVONIC STUDIES LECTURE. Dr. Andrew
Donskov, University of Waterloo, on The Peasant
in Tolstoy's Thought and Writings. Room 2238,
Buchanan Building.
1:00 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY. Roy Vickers,
Tsimsia n artist, describes h i s work.
Orientation Centre, Museum of Anthropology.
2:30 p.m. CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR. Dr. N. J.
Stone, University of Oxford, England, on Ion
Implantation: A Boon or a Bane for Sample
Preparation? Room 318, Hennings Building.
3:30 p.m.     CHEMICAL     ENGINEERING     SEMINAR.     A.
Watanabe, Nara Women's University, Japan, on
Electrocapillary Emulsif ication and Spinning.
Room 206, Chemical Engineering Building.
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS
COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Fausto Milinazzo,
Mathematics, University of Victoria, on The
Saffman Turbulence Model Predictions for the
Inhomogeneous Two-Dimensional Mixing Zone
Between Two Fluids. Room 2449, Biological
Sciences Building.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. H. Meyer, Physics,
Duke University, on Solid H2 at High Pressures.
Room 201, Hennings Building.
8:00 p.m. CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS. Habitat
film preview. Dr. H. Peter Oberlander of the Centre
will lead a discussion on a series of films on The
Public Interest in Private Land. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
9:00 p.m. BEYOND THE MEMORY OF MAN. Prof. Robert
Jordan, English, UBC, on The Pilgrim in
Literature: Chaucer. Channel 10, Vancouver
Cablevision.
FRIDAY, NOV. 26
9:00 a.m. PEDIATRICS GRAND ROUNDS. Prof. Sydney
Segal, head, Division of Maternal, Fetal and
Neonatal Medicine, UBC, on Pediatrics in China.
Lecture Room B, Heather Pavilion, Vancouver
General Hospital.
10:00 a.m. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY STUDIES
COMMITTEE. Prof. Joseph Meeker, Athabaska
University, Edmonton, on The Planning and
Implementation of Science and Technology
Studies Programs. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
3:30 p.m. COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. David
Kirkpatrick, Computing Science, Simon Fraser
University, on Recognizing Graph Properties from
Adjacency Matrices: A Survey of Recent
Developments. Room 326, Angus Building.
SATURDAY, NOV. 27
8:15 p.m. VANCOUVER INSTITUTE LECTURE. Prof. H.
W. Janson, Institute of Fine Arts, New York
University, on The Role of Chance in Artistic
Creation. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre.
4/UBC Reports/Nov. 17, 1976

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