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UBC Reports Jan 14, 1976

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 Habitat
head seeks
commitment
Habitat: What Is It and Why Hold
It?
Enrique Penalosa of Colombia,
secretary-general of Habitat, answered
both of these questions in detail last
week when he spoke to an overflow
audience in Lecture Room 1 of the
Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre.
He said the idea for Habitat, the
United Nations Conference on Human
Settlements which will be held in
Vancouver May 31 to June 11, came
from the UN Conference on the
Environment held in Stockholm in
1972. Habitat was approved by the
UN in 1973.
Mr. Penalosa, a world authority on
agrarian reform and administrative
manager of the Inter-American
Development Bank, said human
settlement and human environment
are the two faces of the same coin.
Human settlements, he said, could also
be called man-made environment.
He said that in the next 25 to 30
years, men will need as many
settlements as we have now, because
the world population explosion cannot
be checked in that time.
"I hope that a hundred years from
now the population of the world will
be stabilized," he said, "but the next
25 to 30 years will be a period of the
highest increase in population in
history."
Mr. Penalosa said that what
mankind does between now and the
turn of the century will determine the
style of life for centuries.
He said the process of change from
a rural world to an urban world is
irreversible, but could be planned.
That, he said, was the "why" of
Habitat.
Mr. Penalosa then made it clear that
Please turn to Page Two
See HABITAT
Hardwick's new post
reflects policy shift
The appointment of UBC's Prof.
Walter Hardwick as deputy minister of
education reflects a major
reorganization within the provincial
Department of Education that will
result in "many changes in policy and
developments" in months to come.
That was how Dr. Patrick McGeer,
minister of education in the new
Social Credit government, summarized
his "first major announcement in the
field of education" at a news
conference  in Victoria last Thursday.
The choice of Dr. Hardwick as
deputy minister. Dr. McGeer said, was
based on his "outstanding
qualifications" as a leading urban
geographer, "but mostly because of his
tremendously wide experience in the
field of education."
Dr. Hardwick, a UBC faculty
member since 1959, has already begun
meetings with the senior staff of the
Department of Education on the
preparation of education budget
estimates for the coming fiscal year.
He   plans   to   take   up  his  duties   in
Victoria full-time on Jan. 20.
Three associate deputy ministers
will report to Dr. Hardwick.
The new associate deputy minister
for finance and administration is Jack
Fleming, who has been deputy
minister of education since 1973.
Dr. McGeer said that in his new
post Mr. Fleming would develop
financial and statistical systems for the
department, which spends "between a
quarter and a third of the total
provincial monies."
The education financial system, Dr.
McGeer said, "is literally in the dark
ages, and we're going to jerk it out of
that and into the 20th century."
Mr. Fleming's new position would
involve a drop in salary, Dr. McGeer
said, but he emphasized that the move
was "no demotion. This is a major
challenge for him; he's going to serve
the government and the people in a far
Please turn to Page Two
See POLICY
NEW HOME for UBC's priceless collection of Indian artifacts, Museum of
Anthropology is nearing completion on old Fort Camp site. Night view through
huge sea-facing windows shows first totem poles set up in Great Hall. FAMILIAR FACES in new setting, Dr. Patrick McGeer (left) and Dr. Walter
Hardwick face Victoria press conference at which Dr. McGeer, B.C.'s new minister
of education, announced Dr. Hardwick's appointment as his deputy.
POLICY
Continued  from   Page   One
more effective way than in the past."
The other two associate deputy
ministers are Andy Soles
(post-secondary education) and Joe
Phillipson (schools).
Dr. Hardwick, commenting on Mr.
Fleming's new position, said that at
present everything the department
knows is "after the fact. The kind of
quarterly reporting and other things
that one would expect in an enterprise
of that scale is not within the
competence of the machinery that
now exists."
Asked his priorities as deputy
minister, Dr. Hardwick said he was
looking forward to "doing a whole
series of things." He specifically
mentioned his interest in taking
post-secondary education into the
Interior of the province and he said he
had some "fairly clear notions about
what I call performance, particularly
in the basic skills that people need to
live in a competitive world."
He added that he was not a
"centralist" who envisaged a return to
"the rigid hierarchical system" of the
past.
Asked about the future of Notre
Dame University in Nelson, Dr.
Hardwick said that question would be
one for a policy decision by the
government.
Dr. McGeer said the future of Notre
Dame would be discussed, "but I
would right now give categorical
assurance to the students of Notre
Dame that, whatever decisions are
reached, their future will be taken into
2/UBC Reports/Jan. 14, 1976
consideration in such a way that their
academic investment will not be
jeopardized."
Some other comments by Dr.
McGeer:
Expansion of Regional
Colleges: "Expansion will continue
within the financial capability of the
government; we're going to expand
education as much as possible because
we consider it the number one
investment in people."
The Universities Council:"We
haven't had a chance to look into the
operations of the Universities Council,
to study their report and the
implications of it."
Housing for Students: "If the
question is 'Will educational dollars be
used for housing?' the answer is no.
Housing dollars will come from
housing."
Dr. McGeer also repeated his earlier
statement that the federal
government's anti-inflation guidelines
will apply to salaries in the educational
system. "We're going to try to have
the federal program work," he said,
"and if it's to work there can't be
exceptions."
11^%^% Published by the University
111(1 of    British    Columbia   on
^l^l^l Wednesdays and distributed
^^ ^^ ^^ free. Jim Banham, editor.
REPORTS judith Walker, staff writer.
Production assistants — Bruce Baker and Anne
Shorter. Send letters to the Editor to
Information Services, Main Mall North
Administration Building, UBC, 2075 Wesbrook
Place, Vancouver, B.C.  V6T  1W5.
Moliere farce
updated
The Freddy Wood Theatre opens
the new year with its production of
Scapino!, a free adaptation of a
Moliere play written in 1671. Moliere's
comedy about moon-faced lovers,
meddling servants and mistaken
identities is translated into 20th
century slapstick in this production, a
Broadway success last season.
The play is directed by Richard
Ouzounian and stars Wayne Robson as
Scapino. Performance opens tonight
and runs to Jan. 24, every evening
except Sunday. Curtain time, 8 p.m.
Tickets are available in Room 207 of
the Frederic Wood Theatre or by
calling 228-2678. Admission, $4;
students, $2.
Talks continue
with engineers
Negotiators for the University and
Local 882 of the International Union
of Operating Engineers met briefly
with provincial mediator Ken Albertini
Monday, as contract talks continued.
The 27-member local includes 14
powerhouse engineers and 13
maintenance mechanics. The union's
contract with UBC expired at
midnight Dec. 31.
The University agreed Monday to
provide certain financial information
to the union, based on anti-inflation
guidelines. Another meeting is
expected later this month.
The union originally sought a
27-per-cent salary increase, plus
extensive improvements to fringe
benefits. UBC offered a wage-and-
fringe package of 8 per cent.
HABITAT
Continued from Page One
Habitat is a political conference, not a
technical conference. He said the
technology to solve the problems of
human settlements is already available,
but the political commitment is
lacking.
Dr. Peter Oberlander, chairman of
UBC's President's Committee for
Habitat, said the appearance of Mr.
Penalosa marked the start of a
Distinguished Lecturers Series related
to Habitat.
Earlier, President Douglas Kenny
had announced that the University had
received a $20,000 grant from the
federal government to arrange such a
lecture series. THE MUSIC BOX
THURSDAY, JAN. 15
8:00 p.m. FACULTY RECITAL.   Paul Douglas, early flutes; Dale Reubart, early
keyboard; John Loban, violin; Hans-Karl Piltz, viola; Eugene Wilson, cello
and gamba; Robert Jordan, guitar, in The Flute from the Renaissance to
the Boehm  System, with   music by Praetorius, Hotteterre, Handel,
Mozart, Hummel and Donizetti.
FRIDAY, JAM. 16
8:00 p.m. FACULTY   RECITAL. John  Rapson, clarinet; Dale Reubart,  piano;
Hans-Karl Piltz, viola; and Joanne Dorenfeld, soprano, perform Music of
Brahms, Mozart, Berg and Spohr.
SATURDAY, JAN. 17
8:00p.m. VANCOUVER CAMERATA. Paul Douglas, musical director; Sharon
Krause, piano; and Frederick Geoghegan, organ, in co-operation with the
Vancouver Philharmonic Society, play Music of Albinoni, Hoist, Barber,
Vivaldi and Mozart.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 21
12:30p.m. TRIO VICTORIA. Robin Wood, piano; Sydney Humphreys, violin; and
Jim Hunter, cello, play Music of Brahms.
y^AII performances held in the Recital Hall, Music Building.  ^
Students vote Jan.28
UBC students will have eight names
to choose from when they go to the
polls on Wednesday, Jan. 28, to elect
two student representatives to the
Board of Governors.
On the same day, students in four
UBC faculties will elect representatives
to Senate and the entire student body
will elect five senators at large. Students
representing seven other UBC faculties
on Senate have been elected by
acclamation.
Advance polls for both elections will
be held on Jan. 27 in the common
blocks of the Place Vanier, Totem Park
and Walter Gage residences. Polling
booths will be set up at 11 campus
locations on Jan. 28.
Candidates   and   those  elected   by
acclamation are shown below (incumbents are indicated by asterisks):
BOARD OF GOVERNORS
(Two to be elected)
Herb Dhaliwal, Commerce 4; Bonnie Geddes,
Arts 1; Monica Jones, Arts 3; Basil Peters,
Applied Science 3; Richard A. Murray*,
Applied Science 4; Dave Theesen, Commerce
4; David Van Blarcom, Arts 4; Geoffrey
Webb, graduate student in Chemistry.
SENATE
(Total  of  17 to  be  elected  -  12 as
representatives  of faculties,  plus five
senators at large.)
Faculties in which elections will be held and
the names of candidates are:
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCES  - Susan E.
Hoyles,   Sandy   McFarlane;   APPLIED
SCIENCE   -   Bill   Low,   John   Swainson;
GRADUATE STUDIES - David Fuller, Don
Poy;   LAW   -   Gordon   Funt*,   William   S.
Clarke.
Elected   as   faculty   representatives  by
acclamation:
ARTS - Bill Broddy; DENTISTRY - Gabriel
Gedak;   EDUCATION   -  Joan  Blandford*;
FORESTRY  -  Hans Buys;  MEDICINE   -
John  B.   Le  Huquet; PHARMACEUTICAL
SCIENCES - Robin J. Ensom; SCIENCE -
Robert Salkeld.
Nominees for senator at large are:
Bernard Bischoff, graduate student in
Philosophy; Bill Black, Applied Science 2;
Dick Byl, Law 1; Joanne Clifton, Arts 2; Bev
Crowe, Arts 3; Peter D. Fairey, Commerce 2;
Brian Ferstman, Arts 2; Keith Gagne*,
Applied Science 3; Brian Higgins*, Law 1;
Dave Jiles, Arts 2; Trevor Jones, Arts 2;
Christie June), Arts 3; David MacKinnon, Arts
3; Lorelee Parker, Arts 2.
New rules soon
New library loan regulations will go
into effect on Monday, Jan. 19, for all
library users. The new regulations
allow all users to make use of
extended loan periods and provide for
stricter penalties on overdue material
requested    by    another   borrower.
SPORTS MENU
WRESTLING - The UBC wrestling
team meets the University of Puget
Sound on Jan. 16 in the War Memorial
Gymnasium, 2 p.m.
BASKETBALL - The UBC Jayvees
host two visiting teams this week in
the War Memorial Gym. Puget Sound
Bible College is here Jan. 16, and the
following night the Jayvees play
Vancouver Community College.
Games start at 7:30 p.m. each night.
ICE HOCKEY - The University of
Saskatchewan is here this week for
two games against the Thunderbirds in
the Winter Sports Centre. They play at
8 p.m. Jan 16 and 2 p.m. Jan. 17. The
UBC Jayvees also see action at the
Winter Sports Centre, meeting SFU at
3:15 p.m. Jan. 18.
FIELD HOCKEY - A field hockey
tournament will be held in the Armory
Jan. 18, running from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
GYMNASTICS - The UBC women's
gymnastic team hosts Seattle
University in Gym G of the Physical
Education Centre Jan. 17,2 p.m.
Talk back to
your TV with
CableClass
UBC begins a new experiment in
livingroom learning next Tuesday with
CableClass.
As part of a non-credit UBC
Continuing Education program, every
Tuesday from 9 to 10 p.m. for 13
weeks, Cable 10 will telecast an
episode of "The Ascent of Man,"
Jacob Bronowski's personal view of
man's growth to self-knowledge, with
a 10-minute introduction by a
distinguished UBC professor.
Then for eight of the episodes,
seminars featuring the previous night's
faculty member will be held
Wednesdays either at the Vancouver
Public Library during the day or at
UBC in the evening.
"This format could be the basis for
wraparound credit courses and new
means of delivering a university
education beyond the confines of the
UBC campus," said former director of
Continuing Education Walter
Hardwick, now deputy minister of
education, who engineered the pioneer
venture.
Because Cable 10, the community
information channel of Vancouver
Cablevision, is paying for the televised
portion of the course, CableClass is an
inexpensive opportunity for UBC to
test a possible method of delivering
education programs to people who
can't get to the UBC campus.
The fee for those who wish to attend
the seminars is $30. For more
information and registration, call
Continuing Education, 228-2181.
Green series
brings experts
Four experts in their fields will be
visiting UBC during January, courtesy
of the Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting
Professorship Fund.
Drs. Gunnar and Rosemary
Dybwad, specialists in the field of
mental retardation, noted linguist
Prof. Noam Chomsky and medievalist
Dr. Michael Sheehan will all address
UBC audiences during their stays on
campus.
The first lecturer, Dr. Gunnar
Dybwad of Brandeis University, will
speak at 12:30 p.m. tomorrow
(Thursday) on "Trends in the
Protection of Children's Rights," in
Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
Saturday night he will address the
Vancouver Institute on "International
Developments in the Social
Rehabilitation of the Handicapped" at
8:15 p.m. in Lecture Hall 2, IRC.
UBC Reports/Jan. 14, 1976/3 THIS WEEK
AND NEXT
Notices must reach Information Services, Main Mall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5 p.m. Thursday of week preceding publication of notice.
THURSDAY, JAN. 15
12:30 pm.
3:45p.m.
4:00 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
FRIDAY, JAN.
9:00 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
FINE ARTS ILLUSTRATED LECTURE. Lionel
Thomas, of UBC's fine arts department, discusses
Design in the Space Age: From Cavemen to Outer Space
Colonies. Room 104, Lasserre Building
LOCALrTALElMf READING SERIES, sponsored by
the Library, features Toby MacLennan, of UBC's fine
arts department, reading from her works. Orientation
room, lower level, Sedgewick Library.
GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR LECTURE. Dr.
Gunnar Dybwad, a professor of Human Development at
Brandeis University, Mass., discusses Trends in the Protection of Children's Rights. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
BOARD OF GOVERNORS OPEN MEETING. Board
and Senate room, old administration building.
APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM.
Prof. D. Hurley, Department of Mathematics, University of Western Australia, speaks on The Induced Polarization and Transient Electromagnetic Responses of Highly Conductive Ore-Bodies. Room 1100, Mathematics
Building Annex.
WESTWATER COMMITTEE ON AIR
POLLUTION. Dr. David Bates, dean of Medicine, on
Effects of Oxides of Nitrogen on Experimental Animals
and Humans. Room G65-66, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr. j. Edvich, electrical
engineering department. University of Denver, discusses
Applications of the Josephson Effect. Room 201,
Hennings Building.
BIOMEMBRANES GROUP SEMINAR. Dr. Rod
Capaldi, Institute of Molecular Biology, University of
Oregon, talks on Cytochrome- c Oxidase: The Structure
of an Energy-Transducing Protein. Lecture Hall 5,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
WESTWATER PUBLIC LECTURE. Mark Sproule-
Jones, University of Victoria, and Ken Peterson, West-
water Research Centre, UBC, speak on Pollution Control in the Lower Fraser: Who's in Charge? MacMillan
Planetarium, 1100 Chestnut Street, Vancouver.
16
PAEDIATRICS LECTURE. Gillian Turner, specialist
pediatrician, Prince of Wales Hospital, Randwick, Australia, lectures on X-Linked Mental Retardation. Lecture Room B, Heather Pavilion, Vancouver General
Hospital.
UNIVERSITY LECTURE SERIES. Thomas Keneally,
Australian novelist, speaks on The Earth's Worse End?
Split Consciousness in Australian Writing From the First
Fleet to the Present. Room 204, Buchanan Building.
KOERNER LECTURE. Prof. Thomas Reiner, regional
science department, University of Pennsylvania, speaks
on Integration in Development Planning: National,
Regional, Urban. Room 102, Lasserre Building.
SIGMA XI MEETING. Prof. Douglas Beder, of UBC's
physics department, talks on New Excitement in Particle Physics. Salons B and C, Faculty Club.
SATURDAY, JAN. 17
8:15p.m. THE   VANCOUVER   INSTITUTE.    Dr.   Gunnar
Dybwad, professor of human development at Brandeis
University, Mass., talks on International Developments
in the Social Rehabilitation of the Handicapped. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
MONDAY, JAN. 19
12:30p.m. CANCER  RESEARCH CENTRE.   Peter Candido, of
UBC's biochemistry department, givesa progress report
on Studies on the Structure of Chromatin in Developing
Trout Testes. Library, Block B, Medical Sciences Bldg.
3:30p.m. MECHANICAL  ENGINEERING  SEMINAR.   Dr.  H.
Vaughan, of UBC's mechanical engineering department,
talks on Computer Aided Design of Shell Structures.
Room 106, Mechanical Engineering Annex.
TUESDAY, JAN. 20
4:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. A.J. Merer, of UBC's
Department of Chemistry, on Infra-Red Spectroscopy
of Free Radicals Using Laser Resonance Techniques.
Room 250, Chemistry Building.
CUSO INFORMATION NIGHT. Film showing of
CUSO - Papua New Guinea. Rooms 402-404, I nterna-
tional House.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 21
12:35p.m. FREESEE   FILM SERIES  presented by the dean of
women's office. The first in a series of five 50-minute
films produced by the BBC is The Ascent of Man, Part
II: The Ladder of Creation. Auditorium, Student
Union Building.
3:30 p.m. STATISTICS WORKSHOP.    M. DeGroot, Department
of Statistics, Carnegie-Mellon University, speaks on
Optimal Matching: How to Repair a Broken Random
Sample. Room 321, Angus Building.
4:00p.m. GENERAL   AND   APPLIED   SYSTEMS  WORK
SHOP. Geoffrey Scudder, of UBC's zoology department, discusses Evolution: Problems with the Process.
Penthouse, Angus Building.
8:00p.m. SENATE MEETING.   Thirty tickets for the visitors'
gallery are available and must be applied for at least 24
hours in advance of the meeting by calling Mrs. Frances
Medley, Clerk to Senate, 228-2951. Senate meets in the
Board and Senate Room of the Main Mall North Administration  Building.
Special open Board meeting to hear briefs tomorrow
UBC's Board of Governors will hold-
a special open meeting tomorrow from
12:30 to 2:30 p.m. in the Board and
Senate room of the old administration
building   where   it   will   hear   briefs
4/UBC Reporti/Jan. 14,1976
submitted    by    members   of   the
University community.
Those wishing to attend the
meeting should call Mrs. Sheila
Stevenson, 228-2127.
UBC's Senate will meet Wednesday,
Jan. 21, at 8 p.m., not tonight as
announced last week. Thirty tickets
are available for that meeting through
Mrs. Frances Medley, 228-2951.

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