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UBC Publications

UBC Reports Jan 23, 1980

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Array SWMIAL COUECTlONf
Agriculture, Forestry expand outreach programs
UBC's two renewable-resources faculties — Agricultural Sciences and
Forestry have begun a massive expansion of their continuing education
programs.
Highlights of the program include:
• The signing last week of agreements between UBC and Prince
George's College of New Caledonia
and Kelowna's Okanagan College for
the use of facilities at the Interior centres where credit and non-credit agri
cultural sciences courses will be given;
• Establishment of advisory committees in various areas of the province to assist recently appointed directors of continuing education in
both of the UBC faculties; and
• Development by the Faculty of
Forestry of the first university-level
correspondence courses in forestry, including one that involves production
of 15 60-minute lectures on cassette
tapes.
UBC's president, Dr. Douglas Kenny, was in Prince George on Thursday
(Jan. 17) for the signing of a formal
agreement between UBC and the College of New Caledonia, which is cooperating with UBC by providing administrative services and classroom
space for an expanded agricultural
sciences continuing education program.
The following day (Friday, Jan. 18)
dean of Agricultural Sciences Warren
ili
Volume 26, Number Z. Jan. 23, 1980. Published by Information Services, University of B.C., 2075 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1VV5, 228-3131. Jim
Banham and Judith Walker, editors. ISSN 0497-2929.
Mr
New campus music group — the UBC bagpipe band —
will give its first public performance Friday (Jan. 25) for
patients in the campus Extended Care Unit in UBC's
Health Sciences Centre Hospital. Associate professor of
Germanic Studies Dr. Edward Mornin, extreme left, was
the instigator of the pipe band which is currently looking
for drummers. Contact Dr. Mornin at 228-5140 if you're
interested.   Pipers are,  left  to right after  Dr.  Mornin,
Richard Bernstein, a graduate student in Chemistry;
Bruce Thompson, Education 4; Jennifer Belanger, a
graduate student in Education; Peter White, Science 4;
and Ruth Tremaine, Agricultural Sciences 4. The
coming-out concert Friday takes place on an appropriate
date — it's Robbie Burns Day, which commemorates the
birth of the great Scottish poet in 1759.
Right to view final exams approved
UBC students have won the right to
view their marked, final exam paper
with course instructors despite protestations that the move attacks the integrity of the examination process.
A student-sponsored motion on the
accessibility of marked exam papers
was approved at the January meeting
of Senate held last week. Department
heads are charged with ensuring that
the policy is carried out, provided that
students submit a written application
requesting that they be allowed to
view the paper with the course instructor.
Both Doug Watts, the student
senator who sponsored the motion,
and President Douglas Kenny, who
chairs Senate, agreed that there were
a number of procedural difficulties
connected with the new policy that
must be ironed out before it can be
implemented.
President Kenny, at the conclusion
of the debate, told Senate that "someone in the administration is going to
have to work out the details' leading
to the implementation of the motion.
Mr. Watts, in a written rationale
submitted with his motion, said the
writing of an exam, "if truly to be an
educational process," must be
followed by students learning what
they did not understand in the course
material.
Pointing out that in many courses
the final exam is the only evaluation of
a student's work, the rationale posed
two questions: "How can that evaluation be useful to a student if the only
feedback is a single number?' and "In
courses where other exams are written, why should the student be
allowed free access to mid-term and
Christmas exams (and) then be told
that it is not allowed for a final exam?"
The rationale said that presently
students are unable to see their
marked final exam papers before
making a decision on whether to appeal a mark. As a result, students cannot reasonably be expected to argue
whether they were justly treated
"when they have not seen how their
examination was marked."
The wording of the motion had
been left open purposely, the rationale
said, "to allow flexibility in its implementation" and to provide for the
student to submit a written request so
that only those who are serious about
seeing their papers will do so.
In the debate that followed introduction of the motion, senators opposed to it made the following points:
Please turn to page 2
See SENATE
Kitts was in Kelowna to sign a similar
agreement with Okanagan College,
which has several learning centres in
the Okanagan Valley.
Prof. George Winter, an agricultural economics specialist, is heading up
the expanded continuing education
program in Agricultural Sciences with
the assistance of Graham Drew, who
was recently seconded to the faculty
from UBC's Centre for Continuing
Education, where he headed up the
centre's resource industries program
for more than 20 years.
Prof. Winter said his faculty will begin instruction almost immediately in
Prince George in basic courses in soil
and animal science and agricultural
economics. Three lV£-unit courses
will be offered initially by UBC and
local experts. A one-day non-credit
symposium on northern agriculture is
also planned for March 15.
He said the possibility of establishing in Prince George a centre for the
study of agriculture in the far north
will also be explored at the sympo>"-
um.
Additional courses will be offered
by Agricultural Sciences in the Interior later this year, building on the ones
to be offered in the first six months of
this year. He said the extent of the
UBC  offerings  will   depend  on  how
Watch for these
You should be seeing these stickers on light switches around cam
pus these days. They're all part of
UBC's energy conservation campaign which encourages UBC people to be aware of how they can
join in the fight to keep our energy
bill down.
The stickers are intended to remind people to turn off lights when
they're leaving classrooms and offices on campus. UBC's energy bill
this year will amount to more than
$3,500,000, more than twice what
it was in 1971.
much money is available in the coming fiscal year.
"We'd like to be able to make concrete plans for the next five years,"
Prof. Winter added, "but at the moment we have no definite commitment
of funds."
The faculty has also appointed individuals to aid in the organizing of programs in both Prince George and
Kamloops, where the faculty is close to
signing a third agreement with Cariboo College. UBC graduate Walter
Carlson has been named to assist the
UBC program in Prince George and
UBC assistant professor of plant science Dr. Michael Pitt will perform a
similar function in Kamloops, where
the faculty offered its first credit
course last summer.
Prof. Winter said the courses to be
offered in the Interior reflect the dominant agricultural concerns of each
area. He paid tribute to the principals
of each of the colleges, whom he said
had been very co-operative and helpful in planning the expanded UBC
programs.
He added that the local advisory
committees established in Prince
George, Kamloops and Kelowna represented a broad section of the professional community and included local
fanners, college representatives and
employees of Agriculture Canada and
the B.C. Ministry of Agriculture.
The Faculty of Forestry's expansion
plans are based on a feasibility study
Please turn to page 2
See FORESTRY UBC reports
page 2
Jim Banham photo
Glass dome in the roof of UBC's Museum of Anthropology was removed
last week to allow seven-foot-high
sculpture weighing more than three
tons to be lowered into place. Sculpture depicts the Haida Indian legend
of the creation of man symbolized by
raven discovering man in' a clam
shell. A small version of the sculpture (right), carved by artist Bill
Reid (and photographed by Selwyn
Pullan), was used as a model for the
larger work created by Vancouver
artist George Norris and Gary Eden-
shaw, from the Queen Charlotte Islands. Finishing touches will be put on the sculpture by Reid and assistant
Jim Hart before the work is unveiled sometime in the spring. The sculpture
was commissioned by Dr. Walter Koerner, a former chairman and member
of UBC's Board of Governors, who with his wife, Marianne, gave UBC a valuable collection of Indian art now housed in the museum.
FORESTRY
Continued from page 1
commissioned last summer and carried out by Industrial Forestry Service
located in Prince George.
The firm provided UBC with specific guidance on the demand for credit
and non-credit courses for approximately 3,000 foresters, forest engineers and forest technicians in the
province and on methods of delivery
and presentation of courses.
Prof. Donald Munro, who has been
named director of off-campus and
continuing education in the forestry
faculty, said his first priority is the development of correspondence courses
through the Guided Independent Study Centre of UBC's Centre for Continuing Education.
He said the professional people interested in continuing education
courses in forestry were widely scattered throughout the province, which
would make it difficult for them to attend a weekend lecture course in an
Interior location.
As a result, he said, the faculty had
decided to develop correspondence
courses which could be mailed to individuals interested in upgrading their
professional qualifications.
He said the faculty's correspondence courses would be the equivalent
of courses offered to full-time students
on the UBC campus and would count
toward completion of a UBC degree.
"It's anticipated," Prof. Munro said,
"that by September, 1981, it should be
possible for a student to complete the
first two years of the five-year professional program at any of the major
colleges in the province and that at
least one of the three remaining years
can be completed by independent study through enrolment in the courses
prepared for distance delivery."
A total of five forestry courses at the
200 and 300 levels are currently being
prepared as correspondence courses
and four others are being considered
for development.
"So far as we know," Prof. Munro
said, "these UBC courses are the first
university-level correspondence courses in forestry offered anywhere. One of
them is somewhat experimental and
involves tape recording 15 60-minute
lectures on cassette tapes, which students will be able to listen to on a recording and playback unit in their
own homes and which will be supplemented by a reading list supplied as
part of the course."
Singers on tour
The University Singers from UBC's
Department of Music have been taking their talents throughout the province this month, their third annual
Alumni Association-sponsored tour.
The group of 30 students have been
giving evening concerts to audiences
in Duncan, Nanaimo, Courtenay,
Port Alberni, Parksville and Chilli-
wack under director James Schell of
UBC's music department. As well,
they held workshop sessions with local
school choirs in Chilli wack, Nanaimo
and Comox.
SENATE
Continued from page 1
• Procedures already exist in
general University regulations and
through the Senate standing committee on student appeals that enable
students to review their final exams
with instructors;
• Many exams are marked on a
team basis and implementation of the
motion would involve "committee
discussion and deliberation" between
students and faculty members, many
of whom are not available following
final exams in the spring because of
commitments elsewhere;
• Implementation of the motion
would result in a move away from the
"more challenging, subjective type of
question to very precise, objective
questions over which .there can be no
debate"; and
• Final exam marks for many UBC
courses represent only a fraction of the
final grade assigned to a student's
work because essays and mid-term exam marks are also taken into account.
Law professor Charles Bourne, opposing the motion, said that "talk
about justice seems to me to be quite
misplaced." The correction for an injustice is not to go and badger a professor about a mark, which he said attacked the integrity of the examination system.
"Let's not fool ourselves," he continued, "to think the student is interested      in      furthering      his
education I've been exposed to this
and the purpose of the exercise is to
persuade you to change your mark."
Prof. Paul Gilmore, head of the
computer science department, said in
endorsing the aim of the motion that
the existing formal appeal procedures
don't really serve the purpose of the
motion, "which is really to attempt a
somewhat more flexible option for
students."
Dr. C.E. Amerding, principal of
Regent College, who also supported
Mr. Watts's motion, said the principle
is one that deserved Senate support,
"that is, what we say in response to a
student's examination, we are willing
to defend."
*     *     *
UBC's Senate has voted to establish
a watchdog committee that will conduct an "ongoing review of the situation regarding statistics courses on
campus."
The recommendation to establish a
sub-committee on statistics under the
standing Senate committee on curriculum was one of seven contained in
the report of an ad hoc Senate committee established in January, 1979, to
investigate the proliferation of
statistics courses at UBC.
The sub-committee will be responsible for updating the separate listing of
courses on probability and statistics
that appears in the UBC calendar of
courses, and will be empowered to require a full rationale from faculties
and departments for introductory
courses offered above the 300 level.
The sub-committee will also be empowered to require a full justification
for the retention of existing, low-
enrolment introductory statistics
courses and would encourage
faculties, schools and departments to
seek ways of reorganizing their curricula to make use of other, existing
statistics courses.
Last week's Senate meeting saw a
number of changes approved in UBC's
admissions policies and curriculum.
Among the changes in admission
are a formal restriction in enrolment
for the Bachelor of Landscape Architecture program to 20 students in first
year for this and the next academic
years, due to delays in the funding of
the program; a change in the listed
academic requirements for admission
to the Faculty of Law; and a change in
the calendar statement on advancement from one year to the next which
recognizes the unique nature of the
Licentiate in Accounting program.
The change in admission requirements for the Faculty of Law merely
brings the written regulations more
closely in line with practice, Law Dean
Kenneth Lysyk explained to Senate.
Although the requirements were
changed from an overall standing of
not less than 60 per cent to not less
than 65 per cent, Dean Lysyk said that
the mean of average grades for students entering first year Law is now
78.81 per cent. Over the last five
years, only 14 students out of 1,200
have been admitted to the faculty with
overall averages below 70 per cent.
Students can also now be given a conditional offer of acceptance into the
faculty while they are in their third
year of undergraduate work.
The January Senate meeting is typically one when changes in curriculum
and proposals for new courses come
forward for approval for the coming
academic year. Among the many
changes approved were:
• A new calendar entry regarding
the Faculty of Arts English composition requirement to make clear to
transfer students that they will be
treated on the same basis as students
who have completed English 100 at
UBC. To qualify for bachelor's degrees within the Faculty of Arts, students must obtain credit for English
100 or Arts One and must pass the
English Composition Test. Students
who haven't passed the composition
test will be able to write it during registration week, or during the December and April exam period. Those
who anticipate difficulty passing the
test will be advised to enrol in the Centre for Continuing Education's remedial English course, as the Basic Composition Workshop is no longer offered
by the Department of English.
• An overhaul of the first-year program in the Faculty of Law, allowing,
among other thing, for more emphasis
on criminal and constitutional law,
and integration of legal writing practice with existing courses rather than a
separate course as it now stands.
Changes to the second- and third-year
curriculum will be developed in time
for the academic year 1981-82.
• A new Physical Education curriculum which broadens the theoretical base of knowledge required of
B.P.E. graduates. Three composite
introductory courses will be required
of first year students in P.E. and
courses in the second- and upper-level
years will be based on these theory
courses. Six new courses will be added
altogether and several courses now offered will be changed.
In presenting to Senate the Curriculum Committee's proposals this year,
Dr. Jon Wisenthal, chairman of the
committee, noted that there were no
proposals for new programs. He suggested this might be because of the realization among faculty members that
funding for new programs was at a
minimum.
Enrolments up
Statistics Canada has released
figures which show that enrolments at
Canadian universities for 1979-80
have increased. In September, 1979,
an enrolment decline was predicted.
The preliminary figures released
last month show a 1.3 per cent increase in full-time enrolment and a
5.4 per cent increase in part-time
enrolment. The most significant increases were at the undergraduate
level, according to the Statistics
Canada figures.
UBC's daytime winter session enrolment is up from 22,676 last year to
23,161 for the 1979-80 session, an increase of 485 students or 2.1 per cent.
This year's undergraduate enrolment
is up 1.3 per cent, while graduate
enrolment is up by 7.2 per cent. UBC reports
page 3
Nine of the 12-member executive of the UBC student
chapter of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers,
which has won an Award of Excellence from the institute,
pose for the UBC Reports camera. Left to right are: chapter treasurer Bruce Veale, a third-year student; chapter
president Hector Trip, fourth year; Engineers' Ball model
chairman Raymond Ma, fourth year; second-year student
Jim Banham photo
Al Strang; social co-ordinator Richard Chew, fourth year;
Tea Cup Bowl chairman Gordon Springate, third year;
Engineers' Ball decoration chairman Don Olson, fourth
year; chapter secretary Dennis Wiebe, third year; and
Lyle Whittmore, a third-year student and the chapter's
first vice-president.
UBC is big name in chem eng field
UBC is very big in the chemical
engineering world these days.
Consider:
• Prof. Norman Epstein, a
member of the UBC faculty since
1951, is the new president of the
3,500-member Canadian Society of
Chemical Engineering; and
• The UBC student chapter of
the American Institute of
Chemical Engineers has been
awarded a 1979 Award of Excellence by the institute for
"outstanding achievement in activities relating to furthering the
goals of professionalism and
chemical engineering among
students in our discipline."
The award to the UBC student
chapter is one of 11 made annually
by the institute on a regional basis.
A total of 131 student chapters are
eligible for the awards.
The award of excellence was actually made to the 85 students who
were enrolled in UBC's chemical
engineering program during
1978-79, when the chapter executive was headed by fourth-year
student Ron Reid, who received his
degree last spring.
However, the 1979-80 chapter
president, Hector Trip, also a
fourth-year student, says the
chapter stands a good chance of
getting a second award of excellence in 1980 because of the
continuing level of student activity.
The activities of the chapter are
roughly divided into professional,
community service and social activities.
The 1978-79 award-winning
group organized field trips to industrial sites in Vancouver, Trail
and Alberta. The latter trip, which
lasted a week, included visits to oil
refineries, petrochemical plants
and a gas plant. Last year, four
members of the UBC class attended the annual regional
meeting of the institute in Montana, where one of them read a
paper to the student delegates.
Norman Epstein
The chapter also meets regularly
to see films of chemical engineering processes and to hear speakers
representing the engineering profession .
In terms of community service,
the chem. eng. chapter played a
leading role in organizing the annual Tea Cup Bowl which pits
female students in Nursing and
Home Ec. against one another in a
noon-hour "fall classic" football
game.
Chemical engineer Henry Gno
was chairman of the Tea Cup
game in 1978-79, and succeeded in
doubling to a record $2,030 the
money collected before and during
the game for charities that aid
crippled children and muscular
dystrophy sufferers. Another
chemical engineer, Ted Hansen,
was chairman of this year's event.
The 1978-79 group also played a
large role in the operations of the
Engineering Undergraduate Society and built a working model of an
electrolytic cell for the desalination
and purification of seawater for the
annual Engineers' Ball and the
1979 Open House.
The student chapter also
organized an annual "Doughnut
Day," when interested visiting high
school students are counselled
about the chemical engineering
profession.
Students are also involved in the
affairs of the department and
several were elected to joint
faculty-student committees of the
Faculty of Applied Science dealing
with curriculum, library and safety-
Students from the chem. eng.
department fielded teams for such
intramural sports activities as soccer, flag football, the Arts '20
relay, basketball, baseball and
volleyball and staged a wide variety
of social gatherings throughout the
University year.
Prof. Epstein, the new president
of the Canadian Society of
Chemical Engineering, has a long
history of association with the UBC
student chapter, serving as its
counsellor from 1954 to 1968. (The
position is currently occupied by
Prof. Janis Lielmezs.)
A native of Montreal, Prof.
Epstein is a graduate of McGill
University in Montreal, where he
received the degrees of Bachelor
and Master of Engineering, and
New York University, where he was
awarded the degree of Doctor of
Engineering Science in 1953. He
was a lecturer and part-time instructor at both McGill and New
York University while carrying out
graduate work.
A prolific author, Prof. Epstein
has been active in a number of professional organizations and has
been the recipient of some of
Canada's top research awards, including a senior research
fellowship from the National
Research Council and a Killam
Research Fellowship.
Lecture
series set
Goal reached as fewer donors give more
Results   of  the   United   Way   cam
paign of the fall are now in and tabulated and       we've reached our goal!
In fact, this year's goal of $100,000
for the annual fund drive has been
surpassed. Faculty, staff and students
have given or pledged $108,000 which
will go to support 76 agencies which
offer "human care" services to people
in the Lower Mainland.
Although the UBC United Way
committee had hoped this year to in
crease the number of donors among
faculty and staff on campus, that
number is down, to 673 from last
year's 773. Students donated $25,000
to the campaign, including proceeds
from the Shrum Bowl football game
between UBC and SFU. Faculty and
staff donated $83,000.
UBC's research administrator, Dr.
Richard Spratley, has called for
nominations for the 1980 Prof. Jacob
Biely Research Prize, which carries
with it a cash award of $1,000.
The prize is awarded annually to a
UBC    faculty    member    for    distin
guished research recently accomplished and published. Details of the
method of nomination are available
from Dr. Spratley's office in the Old
Auditorium or by calling 228-3652.
Deadline for submission of nominations and supporting material is Feb. 8.
The first of three lectures on aging,
sponsored by the UBC President's
Committee on Gerontology, will take
place today (Wednesday, Jan. 23) in
Lecture Hall 3 of the Woodward
Building.
The talks on aging are one of three
major lecture series that begin on the
UBC campus during the month of
January.
Prof. John Hogarth of UBC's Faculty of Law opens the aging lecture
series today at 12:30 p.m. with a talk
on "Issues of Mandatory Retirement."
Prof. Edith McGeer of Neurological
Sciences speaks on Feb. 15 at 12:30
p.m. on "Neurotransmitters in the
Aging Brain," and the final talk will
be given March 12 at 12:30 p.m. by
Pharmaceutical Sciences research
associate Douglas Danforth, whose
topic is "Drugs and the Elderly-How
Compatible Are They?"
A series of eight noon-hour lectures
on the topic "Canada at Midlife
Crisis," sponsored by the Departments
of History and Political Science,
begins on Jan. 31. University of
Toronto historian Craig Brown leads
off the series in Room 104 of the
Buchanan Building on the topic
"Leadership in Canada."
In subsequent weeks until March 27
speakers will discuss such topics as nationalism and separatism in Quebec,
the Canadian economy and energy
policy, and political parties and the
survival of Canada.
Speakers in the series include
University of Toronto historians
Michael Bliss and Ramsay Cook and
political scientists Donald Smiley of
York University and Donald Meisel of
Queen's University.
One of Great Britain's leading
judges will begin the spring series of
free public lectures sponsored by the
Vancouver Institute at UBC.
Sir George Baker, now past-
president of the family division of
England's High Court of Justice, will
give the Dal Grauer Memorial Lecture
on Jan. 26 — the first of 10 Saturday
night talks which will take place in
Lecture Hall 2 of the Woodward
Building beginning at 8:15 p.m.
The series, which will continue until
March 29, includes talks by outstanding teachers visiting UBC as Cecil H.
and Ida Green Visiting Professors.
Other speakers include: Canadian
poet and critic Eli Mandel, who speaks
on "A Poet's World" on Feb. 9;
Chinese historian and archeologist
Hou Jen-chih of Peking University,
who speaks on ruined cities of Inner
Mongolia on March 8; Dr. Richard
Weinshilboum of the Mayo Clinic in
Rochester, Minnesota, whose topic on
March 22 is "The Chemistry of the
Brain"; and Sir Andrew Huxley of
University College, London, England,
who speaks on old and new discoveries
in muscle physiology on March 29.
A brochure listing all Vancouver
Institute spring lectures is available
from Information Services, 228-3131.
Grads must apply
No application, no degree.
That's the word this week from the
Registrar's Office, which reminds students who expect to graduate this
spring that they must submit Application for Graduation cards.
If you're in Arts, Commerce, Education or Science a card will be mailed
to you. Graduating students in all other degree programs except Graduate
Studies can obtain cards from faculty
offices. Students in Grad Studies can
obtain the cards from their advisors.
Deadline for submission of the cards
to Mrs. Rosina Kent in the Registrar's
Office Feb. 15. UBCalendar
UBC CALENDAR DEADLINES
Events in the week of:
Feb. 3 to Feb. 9 Deadline is 5 p.m. Jan. 24
Feb. 10 to Feb. 16 Deadline is 5 p.m. Jan. 31
Send notices to Information Services, 6328 Memorial Road (Old Administration Building), Campus. Further information is available at
228-3131.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
SATURDAY, JAN. 26
Rt. Hon. Sir George Baker, Royal Courts
of Justice, London, on Family Law.
SATURDAY, FEB. 2
Prof.  Geoffrey  Parker,   Modern  History,
University of St. Andrews, on Conscience
and Power: Philip II of Spain, History
and Legend.
Both lectures at 8:15 p.m., Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
SUNDAY, JAN. 27
8:45 a.m. CONTINUATION OF CONFERENCE on Process
Thought and Aesthetics which began Friday evening.
Speakers and programs continue all day, adjourning
Monday at 12:15 p.m. Vancouver School of Theology.
For further information call George Hermanson at
224-3722. No admission charge.
1:30 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY. Northwest coast
Indian students present a program on the traditional uses
of the cedar tree. Repeated at 2:30 p.m. 6393 Northwest
Marine Dr.
7:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS. Wor
ship at Vancouver School of Theology, Chapel of the
Epiphany.
8:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS Lecture. Bernard Lee and Marnie Dilling on Illustration of
Charles Ives. Art Gallery, Student Union Building.
MONDAY, JAN. 28
12 noon CANCER RESEARCH SEMINAR.  Dr    PS.  Rennie,
research scientist, Cancer Endocrinology, Cancer Control
Agency of B.C., on Androgen-Receptor Dynamics in
Rat Prostate. Lecture Theatre, B.C. Cancer Research
Centre, 601 W. 10th Ave.
12:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS
presents Job, a monodrama by John Stuart Anderson. Art
Gallery, Student Union Building.
2:30 p.m. INFORMATION SYSTEMS TASK FORCE presents
four open forums this week, to give people a chance to
react to themes now under consideration by this group.
The first forum is on University Information Systems
for the Eighties — An Overview. Room 201, Computer
Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m.   GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES COLLOQUIUM. Dr. J.C.
Home, University of South Carolina, Columbia, on Applications of Deposition a 1 Model in Coal Exploration
and Mine Planning. Room 330A, Geological Sciences
Centre.
COMPUTING CENTRE LECTURE. The first in a
series of six lectures on Introduction to Computing by A)
Fowler of the UBC Computing Centre. Room 200, Computer Sciences Building.
APPLIED MATHEMATICS SEMINAR. Dr Martin
D. Kruskal, Program in Applied Mathematics and
Astrophysical Sciences and Mathematics, Princeton
University, on Exact Integrability of Benjamin-Ono
Equation. Room 203, Mathematics Building.
COMMERCE/ECONOMICS SEMINAR. William
Rogerson, California Institute of Technology, on
Economic Efficiency and Contract Law. Room 351,
Brock Hall.
3:45 p.m. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Dr.
J.P. Duncan, Mechanical Engineering, UBC, on The
Curved Folding of Sheet Metal. Room 1215, Civil and
Mechanical Engineering Building.
4:00 p.m. BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Rajiv Nayar,
Biochemistry, UBC, on Phospholipids as Adjuncts to
Ca + +-stimulated Release of Chromaffin Granules.
Implications for the Mechanism of Exocytosis in vivo.
Lecture Hall 3, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
ASTRONOMY SEMINAR. Dr. Jean Eilek, National
Radio Astronomical Observatory, Charlottesville, Va., on
The Saga of Particle Reacceleration in Radio Galaxies.
Room 318, Hennings Building.
TUESDAY, JAN. 29
12 noon MONEY TALKS, a series of free noon-hour lectures
presented by UBC's Centre for Continuing Education.
The second in this series is RRSPs: Retirement Options,
with Gil Munro, CLU, insurance broker. Robson Square
Media Centre, 800 Hornby St. in downtown Vancouver.
12:30 p.m. FREESEE FILM SERIES presents a six-part series on
Civilization with Kenneth Clark. This week's film is The
Smile of Reason. Auditorium, Student Union Building.
Free.
FOUR FACES OF IRAN. The second in a four-part
series of illustrated lectures. Dr. Hanna E. Kassis,
Religious Studies, UBC, on Isfahan: Masjid-i-Jami' and
Cognate Architecture. Room 104, Lasserre Building.
PHILOSOPHY LECTURE. Charles Hartshorne,
University of Texas, on Grounds for Believing in God.
Room 157, Law Building.
ETHNOMUSICOLOGY LECTURE. Lou Harrison,
guest composer-lecturer, on Some Aspects of the Influence of Non-Western Music in 20th-century Composition: the Past and Future. Room 113, Music
Building.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS
presents Baroque Concert with Hunt and Becky Beyer
and Jeffory Campbell. Art Gallery, Student Union
Building. At 3:30 p.m. Rona Murray reads her poetry.
TUESDAY, JAN. 29 continued
2:30 p.m. INFORMATION SYSTEMS TASK FORCE forum on
Commitments and Encumbrances — a By-Product of
Personnel and Purchasing Systems. Room 201, Computer Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m. SPECIAL MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr M.
Kruskal, Program in Applied Mathematics and
Astrophysical Sciences and Mathematics, Princeton, on
Surreal Numbers. Room 104, Mathematics Building.
OPTIMIZATION SEMINAR. Dr. J.M. Bismut, Paris,
on Control of Filtering Equations, Continued. Room
203, Mathematics Building.
OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. Dr. A. Gillam, post
doctoral fellow, Oceanography, UBC, on Humic
Substances — Some Recent Developments. Room 1465,
west wing, Biological Sciences Building.
4:30 p.m. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. Ray Andersen,
Chemistry and Oceanography, UBC, on Marine Natural
Products — An Ocean of Organic Chemistry? Room
250, Chemistry Building.
6:00 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY free identification
clinic. Bring your collectibles. 6393 Northwest Marine
Dr.
7:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS
presents the film Who Has Seen the Wind. Auditorium.
Student Union Building. Admission, JI.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30
12 noon        PHARMACOLOGY    SEMINAR.    Dr.    Burton    H
Goldstein, Oral Surgery, UBC, on Topical Therapy for
the Lovebug. Room 114, Block C, Medical Sciences
Building.
12:30 p.m. NOON-HOUR CONCERT. Esther Glazer, violin, plays
Music of Ben Haim and Ysaye. Recital Hall, Music
Building.
SLAVONIC STUDIES LECTURE. Jan Solecki on Advances and Frustrations in Economics and Politics
(USSR). Room 102, Buchanan Building.
HABITAT SERIES on Ghana's Settlement System:
Can It Be Planned for Comprehensive Development?
Prof. P, Austin Tetteh, dean, Faculty of Architecture,
University of Science and Technology at Kumasi, Ghana,
and visiting Scholar-in-Residence, UBC's Centre for
Human Settlements, on Rural Change. Room 107,
Lasserre Building.
2:30 p.m. INFORMATION SYSTEMS TASK FORCE forum on
Timeliness — the Need and its Consequences. Room
201, Computer Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS
presents Alyana Scott, a potter, at work in the conversation pit, Student Union Building.
STATISTICS WORKSHOP. Dr. Howard Stauffer,
Mathematics, UBC, on Distributions for Fraser's
Spatial Statistics (Measuring Spatial Distribution in
Forestry). Room 310, Angus Building.
GEOPHYSICS SEMINAR. Dr. Herb Dragert. Pacific
Geoscience Centre, on Repeated Precise Gravity
Measurements on Vancouver Island. Room 260,
Geophysics and Astronomy Building.
HISTORY SEMINAR. R. Craig Brown, History,
University of Toronto, on The Canadian Historical
Biography. Room 1299, Buchanan Tower.
4:00 p.m. BIOCHEMICAL SEMINAR. Dr. R.S. Hodges,
Biochemistry, University of Alberta, on The Use of Synthetic Peptides in the Study of Structure-Function
Relationships in Muscle Proteins. Lecture Hall 6,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
DRAMA
A Midsummer's Night Dream by William Shakespeare begins
Wednesday, Jan. 23 at 8 p.m. and continues until Saturday, Feb. 2 (excluding Sunday). Frederic Wood Theatre. Admission, $5; students and
seniors, $3. For reservations call 228-2678 or drop by Room 207 of the
Frederic Wood Theatre.
MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT
Mussoc presents Sweet Charity from Thursday, Jan. 31 to Saturday,
Feb. 9. at 8:30 p.m. Old Auditorium. Previews, Tuesday, Jan. 29 and
30 at 8:30 p.m.; student matinee on Thursday, Feb. 7, at 12:30 p.m.
Tickets, $4; students $3.50 (Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday), from
the A.M.S. Business Office or Vancouver Ticket Centre.
SKATE UBC SPRING SESSION
An eight-week program begins on Saturday. Feb. 2. Children and
adults are put into groups according to age and skill. Skating lessons,
$16.00; advanced free style, $29.00; power skating and hockey skill
development, $35.00. For further information, call 228-5995, 9 a.m. to
1 p.m., Monday to Saturday.
EXERCISE CLASS
Faculty and staff exercise class (men and women), term 2, meets in
Gym E, Osborne Centre, Mondays, Wednesdays, Fridays; 12:30 to 1:05
p.m. Instructor: Prof. S.R. Brown. Admission free. Locker and towel
service available for a fee. For information, call 228-4479.
FINAL ORAL EXAMINATIONS FOR THE
DEGREE OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY
Listed below are scheduled final examinations for the degree of Doctor
of Philosophy at the University. Unless otherwise noted, all examina
tions are held in the Faculty of Graduate Studies Examination Room,
General Services Administration Building. Members of the University
community are encouraged to attend the examinations, provided they
do not arrive after the examination has commented.
Monday, Jan. 28, 3:30 p.m.: LARRY HUTCH1NS, Chemistry; The
Surface Catalyzed Racemization of 1,1' - Binaphthyl. (Room 225,
Chemistry Building)
Tuesday, Jan. 29, 10:30 a.m.: JAMES SMITH, Chemistry; A Conformational Study of 5-Fluorouracil Labelled Escherichia Call 5SrRNA.
(Room 225, Chemistry Building)
Thursday, Jan. 31, 2:30 p.m.: EDWARD LAWRENCE MATHIE,
Physics; Intermediate Energy Pion Production.
WEDNESDAY, JAN. 30 continued
4:30 p.m.   COMPARATIVE  LITERATURE COLLOQUIUM.
Dr. Karl Zaenker, Germanic Studies, UBC, on A
Counterpoint of Serenities: The String Quartet in
Novels by A. Huxley, Th. Mann and R. Baumgart.
Penthouse. Buchanan Building.
7:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS
presents Faye Mulder with music in the Art Gallery, Stu
dent Union Building.
INTERNATIONAL FOLK DANCING in the Upper
Lounge, International House. Beginners, 7:30-9:30 p.m.;
intermediate dancing, 9:30-11 p.m. Everyone welcome.
For information, call 224 0226 or 228 3653.
THURSDAY, JAN. 31
12:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS Lecture. Charles Hartshorne on What is Beauty? Art
Gallery, Student Union Building.
UBC CONTEMPORARY PLAYERS, with co directors
Stephen Chatman and Eugene Wilson, perform Music of
Barkin, Harrison and Benjamin. Recital Hail, Music
Building.
HISTORY LECTURE (with slides). General James L.
Collins, chief of military history, Department of Army,
Washington, on Two Centuries of Civilian Opposition
to Wars Fought by the U.S. Army, 1775-1975. Room
102, Buchanan Building.
CANADA AT MIDLIFE CRISIS, a series of free public
lectures by some of the most distinguished thinkers on the
Canadian condition. The first in the series is Craig
Brown, History, University of Toronto, on Leadership in
Canada. Room 104, Buchanan Building.
LAW STUDENTS ASSOCIATION Film Committee
presents I Am An Old Tree, a 1974 film on Cuba. Rooms
101/102, Law Building.
ACADEMIC WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION session on
Trip to China, with slides and narration by Pat Valen
tine, School of Nursing, UBC. Non-members welcome.
Rooms G41-42, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
PLANT SCIENCE SEMINAR. Dr R.J Rennie,
Agriculture Canada, Lethbridge, on Nitrogen Fixation
Associated With Spring Wheat. Room 342, MacMillan
Building.
2:30 p.m. PHYSICS CONDENSED-MATTER SEMINAR. Iain
Calder, Northwestern University, on Sound Propagation
in Superfluid 3 He-B. Room 318, Hennings Building.
INFORMATION SYSTEMS TASK FORCE forum on
Standards — the Key to Unity. Room 201, Computet
Sciences Building.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM with John Eldridge. UBC.
Room 201, Hennings Building.
7:30 p.m. SPANISH LANGUAGE EVENING at the Coffeeplace.
International House.
8:00 p.m. YOUNG ALUMNI CLUB presents an evening of relax
ing live music. Full facilities. Final year and graduate
students may join. Continues until 12 midnight at Cecil
Green Park. Information at 228 3313.
FRIDAY, FEB. 1
11:30 a.m. HEALTH CARE SEMINAR. Dr Malcolm Weinstein
director of Health Planning for the Vancouver Health
Department, on Community Health Planning in the
Vancouver Health Department. Room 106. Mather
Building.
DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE SEMINAR. Dr. N
Auersperg, Anatomy, UBC, on Phenotypic Variation
Among Malignant Tumors. Room 15, Centre for
Developmental Medicine. 811 W. 10th Ave.
12:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS
presents the film Joy of Bach. Auditorium, Student
Union Building.
1:00 p.m. ADULT EDUCATION SEMINAR. Marion Dank and
Gayle Smythe on Adult Literacy and Reading Instruction. Adult Education Department, 5760 Toronto Road.
MEDICAL GENETICS SEMINAR. Dr R.B. Lowryon
Delivery of Genetic Services in Southern Alberta. 4th
floor conference room, Health Centre for Children. Vancouver General Hospital.
2:00 p.m. POLICY SEMINAR. Suresh Lakshman Konda, School
of Urban and Public Affairs, Carnegie-Mellon University,
on Forecasting Organizational Manpower Costs:
Vacancy Versus Markov Models. Penthouse, Angus
Building.
2:30 p.m. GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES LECTURE. Dr Friedrich
Liebau, University of Kiel, West Germany, on Crystal
Chemistry of the Silicates. Room 330A, Geological
Sciences Centre.
3:00 p.m. METEOROLOGICAL AND OCEANOGRAPHIC
Lecture. Michael Glantz, National Centre for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colo., on The Value of
An EI Nino Forecast: A Social Science Perspective.
Room 147, Geography Building.
3:30 p.m. MATHEMATICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr Carl Riehm
McMaster University, on A Problem in Quadratic Forms
that Arises from Analysis. Room 1100, Mathematics
Building Annex.
FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS Discussion on The Created Creator: The Image of God in the
Artist, Art Gallery, Student Union Building.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Park Reil
ly, University of Waterloo, on Parameter Estimation
When There is Error in All the Variables — With Applications to Vapour-Liquid Equilibrium, etc. Room
206, Chemical Engineering Building.
LINGUISTICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr Richard De Ar
mond. Literature, Languages and Linguistics. SFU. on
The Intransitive Nature of Have. Room 2225,
Buchanan Building.
7:30 p.m. FESTIVAL OF RELIGION AND THE ARTS. Clos
ing worship. Vancouver School of Theology, Chapel of
the Epiphany.
8:00 p.m. ICE HOCKEY. UBC Thunderbirds vs. the University of
Calgary.   Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
SATURDAY, FEB. 2
2:00 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY presents a
"touchable" exhibit for the visually handicapped. Participation by appointment. Call 228 5087.
8:00 p.m.    ICE HOCKEY. UBC Thunderbirds vs. the University of
Calgary.   Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
DUTCH-BELGIAN    CARNIVAL    at     International
House. Phone 228-5021 for details.
1 +
Poat Canada
PoattgapMd    RvKMy*
Third  Troisftms
2027
Vancouver, B.C.

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