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UBC Reports Oct 8, 1987

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 6\
TJBC Archives Serial
Library expansion
uigently needed
Graduate student Margaret Liptay searches the crowded stacks of UBC's Main
Library.
Critics tear apart
UBC athletic review
by Jo Moss
The findings of a presidential task force on
athletics and sport services are shortsighted
and ludicrous, according to a substantial
number of university critics.
The task force review, made public two
weeks ago, was condemned for not making
radical changes and failing to provide any
direction.
"It reflects a lack of understanding of what
goes on," said Robert Morford, Director of the
School of Physical Education and Recreation.
He said the review was an opportunity for
the University to undertake changes to create
"the best possible environment."
'They missed it," Morford said.  'They
failed to understand the complexity of the
situation and the overlap of the two
departments (Physical Education and
Recreation, and Athletic and Sports Services)."
Other people echoed his concerns that the
task force rushed the report through without
adequate investigation. They say it failed to
determine the most important issue—the
direction athletics and sports services should
take.
Barbara Schrodt, a 31-year veteran of the
Physical Education department, said at the
heart of the matter is the nature of sport tn
Canadian society. She said it's imperative the
University issue a mission statement on the
role of athletics at UBC.
"Ifs a philosophical problem, not a
management problem," Schrodt said.
Morford agreed: 'They never examined the
object of what they wanted to control. The
task force had a golden opportunity to
examine the role of athletics at this university,"
Morford said.
Morford and others want the UBC Athletic
and Sports Services Department to be
integrated into the School of Physical
Education and Recreation. The two-already
share facilities, equipment, a building, and
some staff.
He said other Canadian universities prevent
commercialism in college sports and preserve
the educational focus with a combined
operation.
The task force disagreed and
recommended Athletic and Sports Services,
and Physical Education and Recreation should
operate as separate departments. It said a
streamlined management system and stricter
accounting would facilitate that operation.
"Under these recommendations, the
Director of the School of Physical Education
and Recreation will be involved in the day-today operation of athletics through a special
advisory committee to this office," said task
force chairman and vice-president of Student
and Academic Services K.D. Srivastava.
But many people said those
recommendations do not begin to address the
deeper issues involved.
Some critics also say the watchful and
benevolent eye of the President's office will not
keep commercialism out of intercollegiate
sports.
Others differ. Charles Slonecker, head of
the Men's Athletic Committee, said he agrees
with the task force decision "under the present
circumstances."
"It's my impression that the University is
served better by two people serving two
departments," he said. 'That may change in
the future. It's not a clear cut decision."
See Critic P. 2
by Lorie Chortyk
Time is running out for UBC's Library.
A report issued last month on library needs
said space for books and other collections has
already run out in most of the library's 21
branches, and by 1991 only the Law and Asian
Studies Libraries will have room for new
acquisitions.
"We've reached the point where we're
either going to have to stop buying books or
put material into storage, where it's
inaccessible to students," said Dr. Jonathan
Wisenthal, who chaired the committee that
prepared the report. "Both these options
would be disastrous for the library and the
university."
The committee recommends that a new
210,000 sq. ft. building be constructed at the
corner of Main Mall and Agricultural Road to
house the Science, Mathematics, Special
Collections, Map, Fine Arts and Music libraries,
as well as the Wilson Recordings Collection.
This site was designated for a new library by
the Board of Governors in 1985.
Wisenthal said he hoped the $27 million
needed for the building could be raised
through the university's major fundraising
campaign which begins next year.
Wisenthal said the situation is doubly
urgent because of a 1985 agreement between
the University and Mr. David Lam, a Vancouver
businessman who donated $1 million towards
a management research library. The
agreement states that UBC will complete
construction of a new building for the library by
the end of 1991.
"We're going to have to act fast to meet this
commitment," he said.
Graham Argyle of UBC's Facilities Planning
Office said construction of the building would
take between two and three years, depending
on the type of contract involved.
The David Lam Library will be part of a
Management Research Centre, a new facility in
the Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration that will use approximately
33,000 ofthe 140,000 net assignable sq. ft. in
the building.
In addition to the management research
library, which will be the focal point of the
centre, there will be several research bureaus,
a management conference centre and a
management placement service for
researchers, government, labour and the
business community.
The commerce faculty is raising the funds
for its section of the building.
A contentious issue surrounding the new
library is the demolition of the Bus Stop Coffee
Shop, a historical building located on the site.
Graduate student Alexis Smith was one of
the coffee shop's regular customers who
signed a petition last year protesting the move.
"I dont see why the library can't be built
somewhere else. The Bus Stop is one of the
few places on campus that isn t cold and
impersonal—the waitresses know the
customers, it's like a neighbourhood gathering
place," she said. "I dont think that
atmosphere will be recreated, even if a new
coffee shop is built."
The committee has recommended a new
food service outlet be built at the front of the
adjacent Henry Angus Building on Main Mall.
Although the committee's top
recommendation is for the 210,000 sq. ft.
building, the report also outlines an alternative
option for a smaller building on the Main Mall
site combined with expansion of the North and
South wings of the Main Library off East Mall.
Wisenthal said the problem of library space
is not a new one, and that ten years of delay
has led to the present crisis.
"We've been looking at this problem for the
past decade and an earlier proposal to expand
the library was approved by all levels of the
university," he said. 'The proposal then went
to the Universities Council of B.C., where it
was never formally accepted or rejected —
they just sat on it and nothing was ever done."
The report is now in the hands of President
David Strangway, the President's Advisory
Committee on Space Allocation, the Board of
Governors, and organizers of the university's
fundraising campaign.
ii
We're heading for a cliff9 - Strangway
By Debora Sweeney
UBC President David Strangway said the
University is heading for a cliff, and could go
over the edge unless a major infusion of
capital comes from both government and the
private sector.
The capital, $205 million, is needed to
construct what Strangway calls the "unfinished
campus." The major building campaign is
outlined in a Needs Report the University
presented to the provincial government earlier
this month.
Strangway is encouraged that the
provincial government requested the report,
which outlines the problems of a substantial
backlog of construction and the need for new
research facilities.
According to the report, what UBC needs
most is a University Services Centre, with a
price tag of $11.4 million. The building would
house the Physical Plant facilities, many of
which- are located in the temporary World War
II huts which the Workers Compensation
Board and the fire department have
condemned as serious safety hazards." The
Centre would also house other administrative
services.
The other major priorities are the Library
expansion and a $40 million Forestry Sciences
building.
The report outlines several other projects
which address the immediate space needs of
the University and the need for more labs and  "
expansion to meet rapidly changing
technology. They are listed alphabetically,
from Advanced Materials and Process
Development Laboratories, to a Studio
Resources Building and include:
• Chemical Engineering: An example of
the lack of space felt in teaching and research
laboratory shortages, chemical engineering
involves hazards and crowding makes it
virtually impossible to maintain safety
standards.
• Concert Hall: Would replace the Old
David Strangway, UBC President
Auditorium, constructed as a temporary
building in the 1920's. It would have a 1,400
seat capacity.
• Studio Resources Building: Would
provide studio space for the Fine Arts, Music
and Theatre departments. The departments
have had to spread widely and inefficiently
across campus into temporary and substandard buildings.
"We're a modern university trying to
compete for facilities, for equipment, for
people, for lab facilities, in fields that are
changing rapidly," said Strangway, "and we
cant do it with buildings that were temporary
40 years ago."
Strangway said while UBC remains a first-
rate university, its prestigious status will take a
turn for the worse if the building needs are not
met soon.
Combined with the $137 million needed to
fund a serious backlog of maintenance
projects, the whole-sale upgrading of the
University adds up to more than $342 million.
While Strangway admits coming up with
that kind of money appears to be a Utopian
dream, he said the situation is a crisis and
must be dealt with as soon as possible.
"For a modern university that's going to be
competitive, competitive on behalf of the
province, these facilities are absolutely
necessary," he said.
The University will begin a marketing survey
within the next few weeks, to investigate which
projects the private sector would support.
That information will form the basis of a major
fund-raising campaign. iaiisS sovifbtA DStf
■k *   y       *   *   *
s»
Tragedy of polio returns to haunt victims
By Debora Sweeney
Polio, the most devastating epidemic to hit
a generation of North Americans, is a ghost
returning to haunt its victims.
Vera Wilks was 14 when she contracted the
disease in 1953 and the doctors said she
would never walk again.
After years of therapy, she proved them
wrong. Wilks danced, played tennis and drove
a bus for a living.
A year and a half ago, she suddenly had
trouble walking.
"My toes would drop when I was walking - .
- I'd worn a brace to stop that 30 years ago,"
she said. "I stopped jazz dancing and had to
cut down on tennis. I took naps after work
because I was always tired. Finally, I had to
quit work."
Vera found out she has Post Polio
Syndrome, which appears to be a progression
of the disability that had incapacitated her
when she was a teenager. She is one of
hundreds of British Columbians between the
ages of 30 and 70, all with histories of polio,
who have come forward with the symptoms of
Post Polio Syndrome: muscle weakness,
fatigue, muscle and joint pain, respiratory
difficulty and susceptibility to cold.
Faculty from the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine at UBC and the G.F. Strong
Rehabilitation Centre are working to give
people like Vera Wilks a chance to get their
lives back on track. They are looking for Post
Polio Syndrome sufferers to sign up for a
clinical trial, which will get underway in
January.
"We're saying to these people, you've got a
problem," said Dr. Cecil Hershler, a specialist
in physical medicine, "so how can we manage
you optimally so you can function and have
self esteem, a nice quality of life, feel good
Vera Wilks' leg exercises are monitored by UBC's Rehab. Med. team, clockwise from
left, Donna Maclntyre, team leader Dr. Elizabeth Dean, Dr. Cecil Hershler and
Jocelyn Ross.
about yourself and be able to handle the
activities of daily living?"
Hershler said the big question mark around
Post Polio Syndrome is, should therapists work
people to their fullest capacity to strengthen
their muscles, or should they prescribe less
exercise?
The most popular theory about the
syndrome is the first bout of polio resulted in
the death of nerve cells. It meant the nerve
cells that were left over had to go to work
double-time, resulting in more stress on
ligaments and joints because muscles were
working beyond their capacity.
"You have people who as children, had
severe polio," said Hershler. 'They're in bed
for two years or so. They get out of it, they go
back to school, they cope through their youth
and get involved in tremendously active
occupations. It's devastating for them when
they come in and tell us they cant do what
they were doing six months ago."
Hershler is working with Dr. Elizabeth Dean
who heads the team, Donna Maclntyre and
Jocelyn Ross. Dean's expertise is in aerobic
performance, Maclntyre specializes in muscle
testing and training, and Ross' expertise is in
physiotherapy.
They are hoping to find out whether a
general conditioning program will improve the
strength that people need to perform the
activities of daily living.
"I dont know whether this is a question of
curing polio or whether it's a question of
managing it," said Dean. "We have done
some preliminary work already, looking at the
effect of a modified aerobic training program,
and we've found some dramatic improvement
in the small number of patients we've
examined so far."
The clinical trial will take that work further.
It will include an aerobics program, a muscle
training program, and a combination of those
programs. As well, a control group will be
established, whose members will eventually
move into the training programs. The UBC
team wants to recruit 80 people who have Post
Polio Syndrome to take part in the clinical trial.
'There are several studies which only have
analyzed the effects of Post Polio Syndrome
on muscles because patients complain of
muscle fatigue and muscle pain," said Dean.
"In this study, we're looking at the
cardiorespiratory function of the patient as well,
so we'll come up with the whole picture."
Vera Wilks is one person who is hoping the
findings will be significant.
"It's possible I'll be in a wheelchair forever,"
she said, "but as long as you see some signs
of hope, you keep going."
Critic from P. 1
Head of the task force, K.D. Srivastava,
UBC's Vice-president on Student and
Academic Services, said the task force had
realized there was no ideal solution to the
situation.
"With the problems of divided jurisdiction
on the administration of facilities, for example,
which involve both departments as well as
other boards of management, the task force
felt some central action had to be taken. And
the University has to work closely with the AMS
in this area because of existing, formal
contractual agreements."
Dr. K.D. Srivastava
"The task force couldnt solve all the
problems of athletics and terms of reference
were quite restricted for that reason," he said.
He said he has received support from many
university faculty on the task force report.
According to Srivastava, there will be further
detailed analysis of the sports programs and
their funding.
He added that UBC President David
Strangway is currently working on a mission
statement for the University. "I think it would
include the role of athletics at UBC," he said.
Schrodt said the situation is terribly
complex. "The whole problem is an
emotionally-laden one. Some of us know the
whole story and have very strong views. No
one can possibly be bias-free," she said.
The uproar created by the review report led
to two special meetings of the Women's
Athletic Committee. Committee chairman and
Education professor Thelma Cook said WAC
members and others are concerned that
student input into athletic and sport services
will be lost under the task force
recommendations.
The task force report advocated a
strengthened University Athletic Council
integrate the roles of the WAC and MAC.
Srivastava said there was "no question of,
abolition".
'The committees cannot be defunct until
the Board of Governors abolishes them. They
may continue to exist as sub-committees," he
said. "Ifs up to the UAC how they want to
seek input from student committees into the
athletic programs."
In both the MAC and WAC, student
representatives hold the controlling vote.
Although the task force allows Alma Mater
Society student representatives on the new
UAC, many people say the AMS is too far
removed from the student athlete situation.
"With the UAC as the sole policy-setting
body, students input has diminished. It should
be preserved and enhanced," Cook said.
Worried students held an open forum last
Friday in the War Memorial Gym. The meeting
focused on the new role of the UAC and future
student participation.
Srivastava said several students have
already approached him with their concerns
since the report appeared. "My door is open
to students and I'm interested in knowing what
the student body feels about the report's
recommendations," he said. "If the students
want to change their representation on the
UAC, they can. They can create committee
structures that provide the strong input from
students."
Director of Sports Services Bob Hindmarch
said the lack of facilities was his biggest
problem, and the task force didn't address it.
"We have tremendous participatory
programs, and the worst facilities in the
country," Hindmarch said, adding that the
need to raise funds for new facilities must be a
high priority for the University.
Women's Athletic Director Joanne Jones
agreed.
'The lack of facilities for a campus this size
is ridiculous. Ifs a crucial issue," she said.
While recognizing that the task force did
not go far enough in its report, some people
said that the review at least brought some
issues out into the open.
"People have had a chance to say what
they think, everything is up front and in the
public domain," said Hindmarch. "Ifs cleared
the air. Thafs a good thing."
Recommendation from the task force report
must win approval from UBC's Board of
Governors before they can be implemented.
Srivastava said the recommendations will go
"piecemeal" as more information is received
from students.
People
Ufford heads campaign
One of Canada's top fundraisers has joined
UBC to assist in its upcoming fundraising
campaign.
Peter Ufford has extensive experience in
organizational development work with nonprofit organizations. His clients have included
the United Way of Canada, the Red Cross and
the Canadian National Institute for the Blind as
well as other top philanthropic associations.
A native of London, Ontario, Ufford, 39, will
play a key role in the campaign as consultant
to the President on external affairs. He will
also assist with coordination of the areas of
Development, Community Relations, Alumni
Affairs, Ceremonies and Government
Relations.
UBC President David Strangway said he was
very pleased to announce Ufford's
appointment.
Metallurgist
wins award
Using innovative methods to solve
industrial problems has won metallurgist Keith
Brimacombe the $75,000 Manning Principal
Award.
A pioneer in his field, Brimacombe has
successfully applied mathematical models and
computer analysis to complex industrial
processes used by Canadian metals
producers. By working closely with real
problems in industry, he has demonstrated  '
that mathematical models can control and
optimize smelting processes to produce
superior quality products.
In doing so, Brimacombe has probably
contributed more than any other Canadian
professor to solving basic problems in the
metallurgy industry.
One early application of his research
improved the process of continuous casting of
steel. He has since worked on areas ranging
from rotary kilns to copper converting, slag
reduction, coke production and gas injection.
Much of his research is done on-site.
A staunch advocate of the benefits of
university and industry cooperation,
Brimacombe has undertaken joint research
with over 30 North American companies
including Alcan and Cominco.
The Manning Principal Award recognizes
outstanding talent in creating and developing
new procedures or products which benefit
Canadian society.
Prof. Edward Jull of UBC's electrical
engineering department was elected vice-
president of the International Union of Radio
Science (URSI) when it met recently in Tel
Aviv, Israel. URSI was founded in 1919 to
promote international collaboration in the field
of radio science.
Dr. Sydney M. Friedman, professor
emeritus of Anatomy, has been awarded the
1987 Distinguished Achievement Award by the
Canadian Hypertension Society. The award
recognizes outstanding work in the field of
hypertension over many years by a senior
investigator.
Prof. George Gau, chairman of the Urban
Land Economics Division in the Faculty of
Commerce, has been selected as a Fellow of
the Homer Hoyt Institute. The institute
supports development and advancement in
the field of real estate and land economics.
Gau is the second Canadian ever to be named
a Fellow in the institute's history.
When the UN General Assembly meets in
New York later this month, Peter Oberlander,
Director of the Centre for Human Settlements
will be there as advisor to the Canadian
delegation.
The Assembly will consider resolutions
dealing with the International Year of Shelter
for the Homeless and the future agenda of the
UN Commission on Human Settlements.
Canada's presentation was made earlier
this week.
octobw M to»o»f»tt I
2     UBC REPORTS October 8,1987 III!*:
J^ecA: Beach exposes
more than just skin
Dr. Wilbert Danner combs Wreck Beach for the coins, cans and bottles nude sunbathers
leave behind.
by Debora Sweeney
UBC geologist Wilbert Danner spends a lot
of time in the summer at Wreck Beach.
He doesnt take a stitch of clothing off and
pays little attention to the nude sunworshippers
sprawled in the sand. He makes his way
carefully around them, his hands clutching a
green garbage bag, his eyes darting up and
down the beach.
Danner is searching for money — coins
dropped in the sand as sunbathers take-it-
all-off,' and for the beer cans and bottles they
leave behind.
He is probably the best-educated
beachcomber in the province, applying his
expertise in the principles of sedimentology to
finding the coins which are often half-buried in
the sand.
Volunteers get personal satisfaction
by Jo Moss
Personal satisfaction keeps people like
UBC Nursing professor Alison Rice
volunteering at a United Way funded agency.
"When you think about being' a volunteer,
on the surface it sounds like it would be a
one-way effort—your time, energy and
expertise going to the organization," Rice said.
"In fact it's not one-way at all. You get a lot
out of it personally."
Rice should know. She has volunteered at
the Vancouver clinic of the Planned
Parenthood Association of B.C. for 11 years.
Planned Parenthood is an international
organization with branches across Canada.
The Vancouver clinic is one of 16 in the
province.
Located at Vancouver General Hospital, it
has one paid staff person—the clinic coordinator. Rice is one of 45 active volunteers.
Without them, the clinic couldn't operate.
With the motto of 'every child a wanted
child', the clinic provides education sessions
on birth control, clinical services for
contraceptives, and offers pregnancy
counselling.
"Our goals are to provide unbiased
information about family planning and sexuality
so that people can make an informed
decision," Rice explained. "Sometimes it's
hard for as to go along with the decision. But
we do."
Last year Planned Parenthood sponsored
workshops and conferences that reached
20,000 parents, students, doctors, nurses,
teachers, counsellors, clergy, and others
throughout the province.
Rice said people like herself volunteer to
make sure these kinds of services are
available.
CUPE issues
challenge
The Canadian Union of Public Employees,
Local 116 has challenged other campus
groups to match or beat its $1,000 donation to
UBC's United Way campaign.
The money is earmarked for the Children's
Hospital, but Local president Ken Andrews
said the challenge is to motivate people to
donate to any organization funded by the
United Way.
Andrews has offered to sponsor lunch for
two people as one of the prizes in the UBC
campaign draws.
The Early Bird Draw will be held October 19
at 12:30 next to the United Way thermometer
on Main Mall. In the event of bad weather, the
draw will move to Sedgewick Library foyer. All
donor pledges received by the office of
Financial Services by October 15 will be
eligible for prizes.
The final draw is scheduled for November
4.
UBC's campaign committee has received
more than 50 letters of appreciation from
organizations such as The Arthritis Society and
the Vancouver Food Bank acknowledging
UBC's donations in last year's fundraising
drive.
"From one perspective the whole issue is a
political one," she said. 'The services we offer
should be part of our health care system. But
they're not."
Rice said part of the problem lies in whose
responsibility it is to provide this kind of
education.
"Governments think that stuff belongs in
the family. But most Canadians think it
belongs in the schools. It's pretty obvious lots
of people don't have the information."
Rice said her commitment to the
organization "goes in waves. Some evenings
the last thing you want to do is drag yourself
off to the clinic. But when you get there it's
always enjoyable."
Her feedback from clients is often
immediate and direct.
"It happens a lot that women come back
and say thank you and that they feel great. I
- think because they make a point of saying it,
it's a different encounter for them than they
have had elsewhere in the health care system.
That makes me feel good."
Not all the volunteers at Planned
Parenthood are professionals, and a medical
background is not a criteria to qualify.
'Thafs one of the things I like about it,"
Rice explained. 'There is a mix of people,
there isn't the traditional hierarchical
relationships. It's very egalitarian. People
value each other and everyone's input is
encouraged."
Alison Rice
Study shows friends
do more than family
by Lorie Chortyk
Single working women have a better
chance of surviving breast cancer than married
women.
And it's the support of friends, not family,
that increases their survival rate.
These are the findings of a study
conducted by Dr. Nancy Waxier-Morrison, a
professor of sociology and social work at UBC,
and Dr. Greg Hislop of the B.C. Cancer Control
Agency. The team followed the lives of 180
women diagnosed with breast cancer over a
period of four years to study why some women
survived the disease and others didn't
They found that emotional and
psychological factors had a large effect on the
physical health of the patients.
"Once we controlled for the medical factor
— how serious the diagnosis was ~ we found
that women who lived the longest had four
things in common," said Waxier-Morrison.
'They were unmarried, working, had a lot of
friends and they considered their friends very
supportive."
Waxier-Morrison suspects that family
members are less helpful because they're often
so terrified of losing their loved one they can't
offer the kind of support needed.
'They're dealing with their own reaction to
the situation, and often the woman has to be
the strong one in the family to help her
husband and children cope," she said.
Waxier-Morrison said working probably
helps women because it increases the network
of people who can help them deal with the
illness.
"The most supportive people were those
who would talk abouttne situation in a
sympathetic but non-dramatic way, offer
suggestions and provide information on what
to expect.
"Part of the anxiety of breast cancer is a
fear of the unknown," said Waxier-Morrison.
"In a typical office situation, when the word
spreads about a woman's illness someone will
approach her at the xerox machine and say 'I
went through this two years ago, do you have
any questions?' or someone will know
someone else who had the disease and a
network of people who can provide
information and advice grows."
According Browen Mears, a UBC
anthropology doctoral student who interviewed
some of the women involved in the study, the
most helpful support came from women who
had been through the same situation.
"Some of their most memorable and helpful
conversations took place with a complete
stranger in the waiting room of the Cancer
Control Agency," she said.
Waxier-Morrison urges women who have
been diagnosed with breast cancer to share
their problem with friends. And she said
friends and family can offer the best support
by acknowledging the illness in a concerned
but positive way and providing practical
information to ease the patient's fears.
Waxier-Morrison and Hislop are about to
begin another large-scale study which looks at
both men and women with cancer. One of the
things they hope to discover is whether
psychological factors that affect survival for
women are also important for men.
So far, Danner has collected more than
$1,100 in coins, in spite of the fact he does not
compete with the "old guys with the metal
detectors" who prowl the beaches in the early
hours of the morning. He goes to Wreck
Beach because it is a nude beach.
"With all those people taking all their
clothes off, more coins drop out," he said.
Danner knows the action of ocean waves
tends to wash finer materials away from the
shoreline, leaving heavier pebbles behind.
Among those pebbles, he finds coins. He said
the best time to comb the beach is after a
storm.
"The sand blows around and the coins lag
behind," Danner said. "With the sun coming
up, you watch in the direction of the sun and
the coins flash up at you. I got $5.25 here on
Saturday morning."
When it gets too cold for people to doff
{heir clothes at the beach, Danner moves to
the UBC parking lots.
"In parking lots, people who are pulling
their keys out of their pockets, often drop
coins," he said. "The coins fall onto the
pavement and the analogy there is that ifs a
vertical dropping of material. In geology, we
have that where rocks melt down in ice bergs."
Danner said people often dont bother to
bend down arid look for their coins when ifs
dark, wet, or snowing.
"Ifs a real bonanza when we've had a
couple of weeks of snow and it melts," he said.
"You can find a lot of money there."
Danner also focuses his search for coins
around parking metres.
"People drop coins as they're feeding the
parking metres," he said. "If the metres are
surrounded by bushes, thafs rapid
sedimentation because the coins are quickly
buried out of sight."
Danner doesnt find only coins.
Sometimes, he finds dollar bills. He said the
wind picks up misplaced dollar bills and
deposits them around the edges of parking
lots.
"Ifs like a sand dune in a desert," he said.
Danner also collects bottles and cans from
campus parking lots. So far, he has raised
$5,000.
"You run over a bottle in a parking lot and
you think what a waste and ifs ruining my
tires," Danner said, "so I decided to go and
pick them up."
Danner admits his preoccupation might
sound odd to some people. In fact, when he
told the Geological Society of America that he
wanted to present a paper on his findings at its
annual meeting last year, he thought he would
be turned down.
"I wrote up the abstract and thought they
probably wouldnt consider it because they'd
think it was too stupid," said Danner. "But
sure enough, they sent me a reply saying the
abstract was scheduled for the meeting."
Danner"s talk was scheduled for the
afternoon of the last day of the conference, so
he thought nobody would attend. He was in
for a surprise — the room was packed.
'They said it was the most interesting paper
we had at the whole meeting," said Danner, "a
couple of weeks later, I got a copy of a science
review from Washington, D.C. and they had
reviewed it."
Danner has raised a total of more than
$6,000 from his bottle, can and coin
collections. But, he isn't interested in keeping
the money for himself.
This month, he established a bursary fund
for his geology students — the students
receive the interest from the total sum. David
Rhys, a third-year student and Martin
Andrews, a fourth-year student are sharing the
bursary this year. Danner said both students
have been doing exceptional field work.
AMS plaque set
The Alma Mater Society will host a
ceremony which recognizes the major
contribution students have made to the growth
of UBC.
The AMS plans to place a bronze plaque
on the Cairn in front of Brock Hall, which will
list the capital building projects students have
initiated and funded since 1963. They include
the Winter Sports Centre, the Student Union
Building and the Aquatic Centre.
The Cairn ceremony will take place on
Wednesday, Oct. 21 at 5:30.
UBC REPORTS October 8,1987     3 MARCH 31, 1987
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Re
• !•
rt of the
Vice President,
Administration
and Finance
The audited financial statements are a public document. Copies of the University's audited financial
statements have been provided to each University
Department and the University Library. For those
interested in more information than provided in these
highlights, please refer to the copy in your department.
Table 1 describes the activities in each of five of the
six separate funds involved in the financial life of UBC
during the 1986-87 fiscal year. Excluded is the Student
Loan and Endowment Principal Fund. The concept of
fund accounting organizes transactions so that revenues and their related expenses are accounted for in
separate funds in accordance with objectives specified
by donors, limitations and restrictions imposed by
sources outside the University, and determinations
made by the Board of Governors.
GENERAL PURPOSE
OPERATING FUND
The revenue and expenses used in the general
operations of the University are in this fund. The
University ended the 1986-87 fiscal year with a deficit
of $.5 million after provision for an inter-fund transfer
of $.1 million from the Specific Purposes Fund and
appropriations for the year of $1.0 million. The deficit
is not a structural deficit and is a first charge against
income in 1987-88. There was an increase in operating
income over 1985-86 of $7.0 million resulting primarily
from an increase in Provincial grants of $6.3 million.
Total expenses at $222.5 million were up $6.2 million
with $3.4 million of the increase attributable to salaries
and benefits. The cost of utilities decreased significantly
($1.1 million) due to efficiencies realized from a new
energy management programme, a milder winter, and
a rate decrease applicable to natural gas.
SPECIFIC PURPOSES FUND
The revenues and expenses used for projects stipulated by donors, and income earned on the Endowment Principal Fund are included in this fund. Trust
fund revenue was $19.7 million and Endowment Fund
revenue was $16.9 million for a total of $36.6 million.
With expenses of $21.7 million and a $2.5 million
interfund transfer, the year-end balance was $27.9
million, $12.3 million higher than last year. At the
commencement of 1986-87 the investment management of the endowment fund was transferred to
professional money managers. The 1986-87 endowment fund revenue of $16.9 million represents an
increase of $7.3 million over 1985-86.
SPONSORED RESEARCH FUND
Included are funds specifically identified for research
grants and contracts or related activities as provided by
government granting agencies, research institutes and
UBC SPECIAL REPORT-SEPTEMBER ISSUE 1987
other public and private agencies. Revenue increased
from $59.6 million in 1985-86 to $65.3 million this year.
The $5.7 million increase is accounted for by increases
in Natural Science and Engineering Research Council
grants of $6.2 million, Medical Research Council grant
increases of $2.5 million and other less significant
variations.
ANCILLARY ENTERPRISES FUND
Ancillary enterprises provide goods and services to
the University community and are expected to operate
on a break-even basis. Included are the Bookstore,
Food Services, Student Housing and Conferences,
Oyster River Farm, Parking, Health Sciences Parkade,
Tennis Centre, Athletic and Sport Services, UBC Press
and Satellite Communications. This year the fund has
been increased by the addition of Media Services and
the Education Measurement Research Group. Revenue
increased by $1.1.3 million (31.0%) to $47.8 million.
Expenses increased to $43.8 million. Of the $11.3
million increase in revenue $5.4 million is attributable
to Student Housing and Conferences. This significant
increase which created a $4.0 million surplus was due
primarily to short-term accommodation revenue generated during the summer months as a spinoff from Expo
86 and revenue from a one year lease arrangement
between, the University and the Expo 86 corporation.
The majority of the surplus will contribute to the
Acadia Phase III Family Housing project scheduled for
completion in September, 1988.
CAPITAL FUND
The capital fund consists of gifts, grants, interest and
authorized capital borrowing received for the purpose
of acquiring capital assets including those pertaining to
ancillary enterprises. $15.9 million of the revenue and
expenses are offsetting' amounts which relate to
servicing the debt on long-term debenture funding for
completed buildings and other past capital projects
financed by the Provincial government. The loan funds
of $8.7 million were provided primarily for Housing
(Acadia Park Phase II) and Parking (B Lot) capital
projects. The loans will be repaid from future operating
revenues of these agencies over the next 15 to 20 years.
COMBINED FUNDS
The total revenue and expenses of all five funds are
shown by object of revenue and expenses. The total
revenue for all funds was $405.0 million, up $33.0
million. Total salaries and benefits were $247.2 million.
All expense objects increased over 1985-86 except
furniture and equipment which decreased $3.2 million,
utilities $0.3 million, renovations and alterations $4.0
million, scholarships, fellowships and bursaries $0.2
million, and building contracts $8.1 million.
Table 2 shows the source and distribution of general
purpose operating funds over the past five years. After
a 4-year decline from 84.8% in 1982-83 to 79.7% in
1985-86 in the proportion of revenue from Province of
B.C. grants, there is a modest increase to 80.0% in
1986-87. The increase in the proportion of expenses
attributable to Administration reflects the University's
commitment to major new computer systems such as
Financial Records, Student Information and Alumni/
Development.
Table 3 shows a comparison of the Total General
Purpose Operating Expenses by object of expense for
the five years 1982-83 to 1986-87.
Table 4 shows the change in total Sponsored
Research Funds since 1982-83.
Table 5 shows the source and distribution of
Sponsored Research Funds.
GENERAL
A new general ledger and accounts payable (Financial Records) system was installed in 1986-87 which
provides users with on-line enquiry, commitment
accounting, departmental cost centres, roll-up reports,
and financial reporting on grant periods. A Student
Information system is in the process of development
and will allow students to register using touch-tone
telephone and voice response technology commencing
in early 1988 with the spring and summer sessions. A
new Alumni/DevelQpment system implemented August 1, 1987 provides for a centralized donor database
and the incorporation of a pledge system. Theplanning
for a Human Resources System which includes Budgets, Personnel and Payroll will commence in January,
1988.
Future capital projects include the development of 77
units for family housing (Acadia Park Phase III - $7.0
million) scheduled for completion in September, 1988,
a Parkade ($6.3 million) scheduled for completion in
August, 1988 accommodating 1,125 vehicles and 125
surface parking spaces to replace the existing Student
Union Building lot facility which has 492 spaces and
the purchase of a new telephone system ($4.8 million)
to be financed out of the current level of general
purpose operating funds allocated for telephone equipment rental and maintenance. Recently the Minister of
Advanced Education and Job Training announced
funding for a $16.4 million Chemistry/Physics building.
During the year Acadia Park Phase II was completed.
A.B. Gellatly
Vice-President, Administration and Finance TABLE 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN UNAPPROPRIATED   FUND BALANCES FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1987 (thousands of dollars)
Revenue and other additions:
Government grants and contracts
Government of Canada
Province of British Columbia
Other governments
Foreign governments
Student fees
Bequests, donations and non government grants
Sales and services
Income from investments
Loans
General
Purpose
177,229
40,640
572
3,054
221,495
Expenses and other deductions:
Salaries - Academic
95,301
Student service
5,667
Staff
63,509
164,477
Benefits
20,012
Travel, field trips, moving
3,135
Library acquisitions
5,274
Operational supplies and expenses
16,121
Furniture and equipment
3,462
Utilities
8,239
Renovations and alterations
566
Scholarships, fellowships and bursaries
3,537
Professional fees
2,212
Cost of goods sold
-
Debt servicing
-
Building contracts
-
Internal cost recoveries
(   1,054)
External cost recoveries
(   3,464)
222,517
Transfers and appropriations:
Expended from prior years' appropriations
1,319
Interfund transfers
133
Appropriations for the year
(   1,035)
417
Net increase (decrease) during the year
(      605)
Unappropriated Fund balance, beginning of year
58
Unappropriated Fund balance, end of year
($    547)
Specific
Sponsored
Ancillary
Totals
Purposes
Research
Enterprises
Capital
1987
1986
$      3,173
$    44,990
$
$
$     48,163
$    39,394
9,867
5,187
-
23,168
215,451
204,667
45
137
-
-
182
150
1,234
1,504
-
-
2,738
1,777
152
-
909
-
41,701
39,995
5,155
13,399
-
1,218
19,772
22,647
-
63
46,563
-
47,198
37,436
16,945
-
318
596
20,913
13,671
-
-
239
48,029
8,708
33,690
8,947
405,065
110,965
12,267
36,571
65,280
11,515
372,004
4,149
108,662
3,070
7,970
-
-
16,707
15,691
4,154
15,045
12,956
80
95,744
90,305
11,373
34,530
12,956
80
223,416
214,658
626
2,122
1,070
3
23,833
23,244
1,560
3,966
-
5
8,666
7,220
317
388
-
-
5,979
5,590
1,007
12,838
5,469
3,471
38,906
30,150
1,652
6,328
700
1,830
13,972
17,210
180
542
1,356
46
10,363
10,659
254
119
1,416
2,226
4,581
8,572
3,343
542
-
-
7,422
7,660
1,271
727
-
1,498
5,708
4,673
-
-
15,473
-
15,473
13,608
-
-
5,312
15,912
21,224
19,589
-
-
-
8,245
8,245
16,318
160
894
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
(   3,464)
384,324
(   3,634)
21,743
62,996
43,752
33,316
375,517
.
570
4,000
5,889
6,490
(   2,564)
(   1,520)
(   1,599)
1,722
(   3,828)
(   1,662)
-
-
(   3,898)
(   4,927)
(   5,949)
(      227)
( 10,882)
(   8,821)
(   5,889)
(   2,564)
(   1,520)
(   1,061)
12,264
764
(      650)
147
11,920
(   4,574)
15,657
14,616
911
2,419
33,661
38,235
$ 27,921
$ 15,380
$      261
$   2,566
$ 45,581
$ 33,661
TABLE 2 SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING FUND FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31,1983 TO 1987
Source
Province of B.C. - Grants
Student Fees - Credit
Student Fees - Non-credit
Other
Distribution by Function
Academic and Associated Academic Services
Library
Student Awards and Services
Administration
General
Plant
Overhead Recovered on Research
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
%
%
%
%
%
80.0
79.7
81.2
83.9
84.8
15.4
15.3
14.1
11.5
10.6
3.0
3.2
2.9
2.8
2.1
1.6
1.8
1.8
1.8
2.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
72.1
73.2
72.9
73.4
73.3
7.5
7.3
7.5
7.6
7.4
2.6
2.6
3.0
2.5
3.1
5.3
4.3
4.2
4.2
4.1
1.2
.7
.7
.6
.5
11.8
12.3
12.2
12.0
11.9
(0.5)
(0.4)
(0.5)
(0.3)
(0.3)
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
TABLE 3 SUMMARY COMPARISONS OF TOTAL GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING EXPENSES 1982-83 TO 1986-87
Operational
Furniture
Student
Sub
Travel &
Library
Supplies &
Equipment &
Academic
Service -
Staff
Total
Benefits
Total
Field Trips
Acquisitions
Expenses
Utilities
Alterations
Total
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
1986-87
42.8
2.5
28.5
73.8
9.0
82.8
1.4
2.4
8.1
3.7
1.6
100.0
1985-86
43.7
2.5
28.4
74.6
9.1
83.7
1.1
2.3
5.2
4.3
3.4
100.0
1984-85
44.0
2.3
29.1
75.4
9.1
84.5
1.1
1.9
5.7
4.1
2.7
100.0
1983-84
45.1
2.4
29.2
76.7
9.0
85.7
1.1
1.9
6.2
3.3
1.8
100.0
1982-83
44.4
2.3
28.2
74.9
8.3
83.2
1.2
2.0
7.9
2.9
2.8
100.0
TABLE 4 TOTAL SPONSORED RESEARCH FUNDING
(thousands of dollars)
1982-83
1983-84
1984-85
1985-86
1986-87
Amount
48,010
54,906
63,096
59,619
65,280
TABLE 5 SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH FUND FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31,1983 TO 1987
Source
Government of Canada
Province of British Columbia
Other governments and agencies
Total governments
Individuals, business, foundations
Other
Distribution
Salaries and benefits
Travel and field trips
Operational supplies and expenses
Equipment
Other
1987
1986
1985
1984
1983
%
%
%
%
%
68.9'
62.6
69.6
67.9
67.5
7.9
9.2
7.7
10.0
10.0
2.5
2.8
2.2
2.3
2.2
79.3
74.6
79.5
80.2
79.7
20.5
24.9
20.1
19.4
19.6
.2
.5
.4
.4
.7
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
——■•
■"■^
■"■■"
~"~
^^^
58.2
56.7
56.6
58.0
58.2
6.3
6.1
5.9
6.2
6.3
20.4
18.1
17.7
18.2
17.6
10.1
13.1
13.7
13.0
12.7
5.0
6.0
6.1
4.6
5.2
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
UBC SPECIAL REPORT-SEPTEMBER ISSUE 1987 '.».
^•"
New training scheme
helps safety record
UBC has improved its track record in
safety.
The number of employees involved in
industrial accidents has dropped this year,
from 229 to 179 in the January-July period.
The drop may be a result of new training
programs initiated by UBC's Occupational
Health and Safety Office.
Two courses on chemical safety offered this
year proved so popular that requests came in
from off-campus and affiliated organizations to
participate. The courses were coordinated by
UBC's chemical safety officer, Lyn Peters.
"We covered how to transport and store
chemicals, chemical waste disposal, how to
clean up a chemical spill and how to
extinguish flammable liquid fires," said Peters.
"After the one-day lecture session we divided
people into small groups for hands-on
emergency training."
Training was provided by representatives
from the health and safety office, chemistry,
chemical engineering, electrical engineering,
pharmaceutical sciences and the UEL Fire
Department. 124 people from 38 departments
participated in the program.
'The frightening thing about industrial
accidents, particularly wfth hazardous material,
is that the only difference between a small
accident and a fatality is pure luck," said
Peters. "All the elements for disaster are
there."
One of the dangers in a university setting is
the diversity of materials technicians and other
lab workers come in contact with.
"Lab technicians handle everything from
hazardous chemicals to biological wastes to
radioactive by-products," said Peters. "If an
accident occurs, people tend to panic and a lot
of times they do things that make the situation
worse."
Peters said workers are often reluctant to
report laboratory accidents because they're
afraid of repercussions.
'They don't realize that nobody wants to
point a finger at them. We want to know
what's happening out there in the labs so we
can prevent others from making the same
mistakes."
Last year close to 400 employees were
involved in accidents, resulting in 4,480 lost
working days and $276,957 in wage
compensation.
Seeing how others play
key to racial harmony
by Jo Moss
Learning East Indian dances or trying out
an Inuit blanket toss game at school can teach
children a lot about racial harmony, said UBC
Physical Education professor Moira Luke.
According to Luke, incorporating games of
different countries into elementary school
physical education classes can help children
understand and appreciate cultural differences.
And that goes a long way towards meeting the
needs of Canada's multicultural society, Luke
said.
While some elementary teachers are
already adapting subjects like history and art to
reflect different cultural contributions to our
society, Luke said physical education has been
neglected.
Even the federal Multiculturalism
Directorate, which endorses a multicultural
focus in other classroom curriculum, until
recently left physical education off its list. Luke
said that was a big mistake.
"Physical education is ideally suited to
introduce the concepts of multiculturalism .
because it is a non-language activity," she
explained. That can be an important factor in
cities like Vancouver where more than eighty
different languages are represented in the
schools.
Until this year, Luke was involved in the
Multicultural Teacher Education Program in the
Faculty of Education, where she encouraged
future elementary school teachers to adapt the
very traditional content of classroom materials.
"If you want to teach a throwing game, for
example, it doesn't have to be basketball. It
can be a game that has its roots in another
culture," Luke said.
"Children also learn important social skills
in physical education such as cooperation and
sharing. It helps them develop positive
attitudes towards activity and an active
lifestyle."
According to Luke, UBC was one of the first
places to develop a multicultural program in
the Faculty of Education.
i
4
u
CO
Prepared for the worst ... Chemistry stores manager George Gunn, left, and John Ellis
display emergency clean up equipment.
Does Johnny
the drive to
Parents who have endured 6 a.m. drives to
the skating rink and tantrums over piano
lessons may soon find out if it was all
worthwhile.
Drs. Richard Young and John Friesen of
the Faculty of Education's counselling
psychology department have entered the
second phase of a study which looks at how
Wood collection largest in Canada
The unusual hardwood floor in a Gastown
building scheduled for demolition caught a
Vancouver architect's attention.
And UBC's forestry faculty helped her
identify it.
"The floor was made of Australian
eucalyptus which is quite valuable now," said
Robert Kennedy, Dean of Forestry and curator
of the largest catalogued collection of wood
samples in Canada.
"That kind of wood was imported in the
1890's because it was very hard and resistant
to abrasion."
Totalling more than 10,500 specimens, and
representing every major timber producing
country in the world, the wood collection was
established in collaboration with Forintek
Canada Corporation, a private forest industry
Dr. Robert Kennedy
research organization.
About two-thirds of the collection is at
UBC. The rest is located in Forintek's two
laboratories, on campus and in Ottawa.
For forestry consultants, importers,
scientists, craftsmen, architects and others the
wood collection can be an invaluable resource.
"An importer may have heard about a
certain sort of wood in another country, but
only know it by it's common name," Kennedy
explains. "Not only can we identify if for him,
we can show him a specimen."
"We welcome people bringing in queries,
we wish we had more," Kennedy said. "It is a
working collection, but not enough people use
it. It's not well-known."
The collection is extensive in scope.
There's commercial wood, non-commercial
wood, hardwood, softwood, heavy wood, light
wood, rare wood, curiosity pieces and exotic
^specimens. Pernambuco, a Brazilian species,
is used for violin bows that sell for up to
$1,000.
A computer-compiled index lists each
specimen by family, genus, species, color,
density and the geographio area of growth. It
also gives up to six common names.
The earliest wood samples in the collection
date from the 1930's. Each year gifts from
foreign laboratories and institutions, and from
faculty returning from overseas assignments
swell the number.
Kennedy says more are needed.
"Because of the nature of wood, we need
as many pieces as we can get to determine
variance in the species," he said. Anyone with
wood specimens to donate will receive a
labelled collection of commercial Canadian
wood species in return.
appreciate
the rink?
successful parents are in influencing their
children's development and career decisions.
"Most parents are very concerned about
preparing their children for the future, and we
know that families do have an overwhelming
influence in the area of career development,"
said Young. "We're attempting to find out
exactly what it is that motivates and
encourages children so that parents will have a  ^
better idea of how to help them."
Young and Friesen interviewed 207 parents
in phase one of the study to identify incidents
that parents felt had been important in
preparing their child to make a career choice.
The 1,700 incidents documented ranged from
driving their children to extra-curricular
activities to saving money for their child's
education.
Incidents were divided into categories and
subcategories for analysis. These included
structuring the environment, interaction with
the child and instrumental support.
"Structuring the environment would be
activities such as encouraging a child to join
clubs or take lessons, providing a quiet study     J^
space or transferring the child to a school that
the parents felt was superior," said Young.
"In the interaction category we listed
incidents that involved giving advice or
feedback and providing emotional support for
the child.
"Under instrumental support we focused on
materials and supplies provided by parents to    ^
help the child."
Young said most parents seem quite happy
to let their children make their own career
choices.
"We haven't found any evidence to support
the idea that parents are pushing their children
to become, say, doctors or lawyers." ,
The researchers moved into phase two of      A
the study this summer.
"We've taken 80 of the most common
incidents described in the first part of our study
and asked 150 parents and 150 young people
aged 18 to 25 to rank them in order of
importance and likelihood of occurrence.
"This should tell us whether or not incidents     _;
that parents perceived as meaningful really did      i
have an influence on children," said Young.
He hopes the study will provide new and
helpful information for parents.
6     UBC REPORTS October 8,1987 t"
Computer helps bedside manner
*     by Jo Moss
Future, doctors might turn to a bedside
computer to figure out how much fluid a
patient needs.
UBC chemical engineering professor Joel
Bert is developing computer software that
could handle such a job, and his work could
h    ultimately save the lives of burn patients.
Bert prodfices mathematical models of
physiological systems—computer programs
that can be used to simulate how body
systems work. He and colleague Bruce
Bowen are investigating how fluids move from
one part of the body to another, research that
may eventually help to save the Hyes of burn
r    patients.
"We're trying to define, mathematically, how
fluids in the body behave, how they move from
the bloodstream to the tissue and back," Bert
explained.
"Ifs the opposite of the traditional, scientific
reductionist approach which looks at a small
part of the body in detail. I'm interested in the
^   generalist approach, how the larger system
operates and how all those small pieces of
information fit together."
Controlling body fluids is a critical issue in
treating burn patients. "When the skin is
burned, body fluids leak out and the skin takes
on quite different properties," Bert said.
"We're looking at what happens in
*"   resuscitation. How the body behaves when
fluids are given to a burn patient to replace
those that are lost."
According to Bert, current clinical treatment
of burn patients is based largely on medical
experience, with little theoretical foundation.
Bert's simulation model will help to change that
by explaining how fluids transfer in the body.
When completed, it may assist health
professionals in knowing when to give patients
fluids and what kinds of fluids they should be.
"We've put into the model all the accurate
information that we can find about the situation
of fluid transfer, how the blood pressure
changes, what happens to proteins in the
blood, and so on," Bert said. "Ifs a simple
approach to the problem, but ifs the most
complicated one we can do right now."
By simulating this biological sequence of
events, Bert can make a prediction as to how
the body will behave. That prediction can be
validated by clinical tests.
Four years ago, Bert began to collaborate
with Dr. Rolf Reed and clinical researchers at
the University of Bergen in Norway, one of the
Dr. Joel Bert
few places in the world where scientists are
engaged in related clinical research.
"Without the clinical trials, the computer
model would be pure speculation," Bert
explains. "Our collaboration is absolutely
essential to make the model relevant. Clinical
experiments confirm what the mathematical
simulation predicts will happen."
"In the process of developing the model,
we also get a really clear picture of what's
known and what's only speculated. We can
pinpoint areas that need further study, areas
that people working in a clinic with burn
patients dont see." The Norwegian research
team can provide him with some of that
information.
As more is discovered about how the
factors relate to each other, Bert updates his
mathematical model.
The use of computers in the medical setting
is still a long way off. Ifs taken Bert years of
research to get this far. But local doctors who
treat burn patients are interested in his work.
"We cannot characterize human beings
simplistically, but at least this model is a first
step," he said.
"What's needed is increased funding for
research projects like these from both levels of
government," Bert says. His project is
currently funded by research grants from
NSERC, NATO and more recently, the
Norwegian Science Council.
"Computer simulated models will never
replace clinical judgment, but they will help
doctors to follow things that may not be quite
obvious," Bert said.
Bert has more than an academic interest in
his research. Two of his children were
severely burned in tent fire several years ago.
"That wasn't the reason I got into this line of
research, but it does give me a different
perspective," Bert says.
UBC Calendar from P. 8
Hispanic and Italian Studies Seminar
The Staging of Plays in the corrales de commedias.
Prof. John E. Varey, Principal, Westfield College,
University of London. Room B320, Buchanan Building.
3:30 p.m.
1987 Ecoloy-Resource Ecology Seminar
Non-Darwinian Evolution: Saltatory Shifts in Breeding
Systems and Morphology. Dr. Paul Hebert, Biology
Department, Universityof Windsor. Room 2000,
Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. 22
Psychiatry Lecture
Psychophysiological Correlates of Pain Control: Results
of Transcultural and Laboratory Investigations. Dr. W.
Larbig, University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen, West
Germany. Room 2NA/B, Psychiatric Pavilion, HSCH. 9
Medical Grand Rounds
Hemopoietines and Therapeutic Possibility in
Hematologic and Inflammatory Disease. Dr. John
Schrader, Director of Biomedical Research, UBC.
Room G279, Lecture Theatre, Acute Care Unit, HSCH.
12 noon.
I.A.E.S.T.E. Meeting
information meeting for The International Association
for The Exchange of Students for Technical Experience.
Janet Land, Acting Director, Co-operative Education
Programs. Room 1204, Civil & Mechanical Engineering
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Cecil & Ida Green Visiting Professor
The Continuing Role of Botany in Medicine. Prof. E.
Arthur Bell, Director, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew,
England. Room 114, IRC. 12:30 p.m.
English Colloquium
The Scarlet Letter: Symbolist Techniques and The
Search for the Facts. Prof. W.F. Hall. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
Psychology Colloquium
In Vivo Electrochemical Studies of The Effects of
Antipsychotics and Neuropetides on Dopamine Release.
Or. Charles Blaha, Psychology, UBC. Room 2510,
Kenny Building. 4 p.m.
Biotechnology Laboratory Seminar
Two Dimensional NMR as a Probe of Structural
Homology Applied to Mutants of Cytochrome c. Dr.
Gary Peilak. Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford
Universtiy. Lecture Hall 3, IRC. 4 p.m.
Finance Seminar
Portfolio Separation, Aggregation and The Equilibrium
Rate of Return in a Recursive Economy: Theory and
Tests. Prof. P. Buserand R. Green (Carnegie-Mellon).
Room 419, Henry Angus Building. 4 p.m.
Economics Labour Workshop
The Comparative Statics of the Ward-Domar Labour-
Managed Firm: A Profit Function Approach. Hugh
Neary, UBC. Economics Conference Room 910,
Buchanan Tower. 4 p.m.
Continuing Ed Evening Lecture
the Latest from Loch Ness: a Review on the Recent
History of the Loch Ness Monster Investigations and a
Report on the July 1987 Conference of the International
Society of Cryptozoologyin Edinburgh. Dr. Paul Le
Blond, Oceanography, UBC. $8, students $5. For
information call 222-5261. Lecture Hall 3, IRC. 8 p.m.
Collegium Musicum Ensembles
John Sawyer, Ray Nurse, Morna Russell, directors.
Sponsored by School of Music. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 8 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 23
Health Care & Epidemiology Rounds
Glaucoma: Approaching Costs of Management. Dr.
Robin Cottle, Former MHScstudent, Health Care &
Epidemiology. For information call 228-2773. Room
253, Mather Building. 9 a.m.
Social Work Conference
In Whose Interest and For What Purpose? Prof. Ben
Carniol, Social Work, Ryerson Polytechnic. $15,
students $7. For information call 228-2578. Chapel,
Vancouver School of Theology. 9:30 a.m. -6 p.m.
Collegium Musicum Ensembles
John Sawyer, Ray Nurse, Morna Russell, directors.
Repeat of Oct. 22. Sponsored by School of Music.
Free. Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Hispanic and Italian Studies Lecture
The Spanish Court Theatre in the Seventeenth Century
(with slides). Prof. John E. Varey, Principal, Westfield
College, Universityof London. Room A100, Buchanan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Medical genetics Seminar
Report on American Society of Human Genetics
Meeting. Parentcraft Room, Main Floor, Grace Hospital,
4490 Oak St.  1 p.m.
Regional Mass Spectrometry Discussion .
Group
Analytical Techniques in Environmental Investigations.
Dr. H.W. Hanssen, B.C. Ministry of Environment. 3650
Wesbrook Mall, B.C. Research Building. 2 p.m.
Chemical Engineering Seminar
An Introduction to Laser-Doppler Velocimetry. Mr. V.
Atwal, Graduate Student. Coffee at 3:15. Room 206,
Chemical Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
Economic Workshop
Topic (TBA). Bengt Holmstrom, Yale. Room 351, Brock
Hall. 4 p.m.
Public Lecture on Psychology
Lies of Love. R.D. Laing and Andrew Feldmar. $15.
Pre-registration required. For information call 733-
4256. Room 100, Scarfe Building. 8 p.m.
Lifestyle Programs/Continuing Ed Lecture
The Shaman- Archetype of the Healer. Dr. Jess
Groesbeck, Psychiatrist, Universityof Utah. $8,
students $5. Lecture Hall 6, IRC. 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, OCT. 24
Lifestyle/Programs/Continuing Ed Workshop
Shyness. Dr. Lynn Alden, Psychology, UBC. $40.
Bring lunch. Lecture Hall 1. IRC. 9:30 a.m. - 3:30 p.m.
Lifestyle Programs/Continuing Ed Workshop
The Myth of the Wounded Healer. Dr. Jess Groesbeck,
Psychiatrist, Universityof Utah. $50(includes lecture
on Oct. 23). For information call 222-5238. Room 2N
A&B, Psychiatric Unit, HSCH. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
NOTICES
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Saturday, Oct 24
Botany And The Survival of
Mankind. Or. E. Arthur
Bell, Director, Royal
Botanic Gardens, Kew,
England.
Saturday, Oct 31
New Approaches to Old
Diseases.
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. Free. 8:15 p.m.
Office for Women Students Workshops
'Coping with Campus' Follow-up - Mature Students
Support Group. Every Tuesday, now through Dec. 15.
Room 223, Brock Hall (Women Students' Lounge). 12:30
-1:30p.m.
Avoiding Procrastination. Mondays, Oct. 19 and 26.
Buchanan Penthouse. 12:30p.m.
Career Building Now. Thursdays, Oct. 22 through Nov.
26. Room 223, Brock Hall. 12:30.
Assertiveness for Women - Basic. Tuesdays, Oct. 27
through Nov. 10. Room 106A, Brock Hall. 12:30p.m.
Creative Techniques for Reduction of Stress and
Anxiety. Thursdays, Nov. 12 through 26. Room 106A,
Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Free but registration required. For information call 228-
2415.
Science for Peace Lecture Series
Nuclear War: Political and Scientific Issues. Michael
Wallace, Political Science, UBC. Every Monday, now to
December. Room 318 Hennings. 12:30 p.m.
Museum of Anthropology
The Literary Heritage of Hinduism. Exhibition of sacred
Hindu texts discussing the significance of Spiritual
Knowledge. Until November.
The Hindu Divine. Six independent exhibitions explore
some of the many ways in which abstract concepts of
the Absolute are depicted in Indian life through
bronzes, stone sculptures, popular art and everyday
objects. Aseventh exhibition discusses Hindu, Sikh,
and Islamic religious expressions in Vancouver. Until
November.
Museum admission: Adults $2.50, children, seniors,
students $1. For more information, call 228-5087.
Japanese Archery
Kyudo Club Vancouver. For information call Mr.
Gonnami, 228-2427 or M. Karibjanian, 255-6560.
International House, Lower Lounge. Tuesdays. 7:30
p.m.
Varah to
head CICSR
UBC's fledgling Centre for Integrated
Computer Systems Research has a director at
last.
Computer Science professor James Varah
has been appointed to the post effective
September 1.
Thirty faculty members representing six
research groups in three departments are
involved in CICSR's collaborative efforts.
"The underlying thread throughout is
interdisciplinary state-of-the-art computer-
based research," Varah said.
A three-pronged effort of the departments
of Computer Science, Electrical Engineering
and Mechanical Engineering, CICSR is an
umbrella organization that also provides a
focus for university contact with organizations
in the public and private sector.
"Ifs a way to maintain better industrial
relations and better contact with government
agenbies," Varah said.
With recent funding from the provincial
governmenf s Centres of Excellence program,
CICSR has finally become fully operational
after three years of planning. Varah said they
will be able to hire 10 faculty members over
the next three years, increasing the scope and
epth of computer-related research taking
place on campus.
"With this enterprise underway, I would say
that UBC will rank as one of the top four
Canadian universities in this area," Varah said.
The three-year government funding covers
equipment and infrastructure costs in addition
to salaries.
According to Varah, future plans for CICSR
include construction of a new building to
house the Computer Science department and
CICSR operations close to the McLeod
(Electrical Engineering) building. But that
project wont get off the ground under current
funding.
"We hope to eventually get money for a
new building," Varah said.
As a temporary measure, one of his first
tasks will be to rearrange laboratory space to
foster coordination between CICSR
researchers.
'There's also room for industrial affiliation
and collaboration," Varah said. "Ifs clear that
the provincial government thinks it is an
important area of development and they want
the industrial liaison part as well," he said.
A UBC alumnus (B.Sc. 1963) Varah, 44,
earned a M.Sc. and Ph.D. from Stanford
University before joining UBC as associate
professor in 1971. He was head of the
Computer Science Department from 1984 until
last month.
Language Exchange Program
This program is for those interested in learning foreign
languages or in exchanging a foreign language for
English. Call International House between 9 a.m. and 5
p.m. Monday- Friday at 228-5021.
Theatre Department Play
Summer, a European play by Edward Bond, directed by
Bruce Dow as an MFA Thesis production. Admission
free but reservation required. For information call 228-
2678. Oct. 13-17. Dorothy Somerset Studio. 8p.m.
Continuing Education Lecture Series
Living with High Performance Athletes. 3 Tuesdays,
Oct. 13-27. $35. For information call 222-5238.
Lecture Hall 4, IRC. 7:30 p.m.
Continuing Education Lecture
Health Care Update. 5 Tuesdays, Oct. 20 - Nov. 17.
Various speakers. $25, $5 single lecture. For
information call 222-5238. Robson Square Media
Centre, 800 Robson. 12 noon.
Essay Skills Workshops
Nancy Horsman, Office for Women Students, UBC.
Free to UBC students. For information call 228-2415.
Thursdays, Oct. 22, 29 and Nov. 5. Buchanan B212.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
Computing Centre Non-credit Courses
The Computing Centre is offering a series of free non-
credit courses during October and November, primarily
for members of the university community using facilities
of the Computing Centre. For information call 228-
6611.
Thea Koerner House Graduate Student
Centre
Fireside Lounge lunch service 11:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. (M-F);
Lounge open 11:30 a.m. - 11:30 p.m. (M-Th), Friday 'til 1
a.m.; Monday: Video Nights- 8 p.m.; Wednesday: Music
Nights - 8 p.m.; Friday: Dance Parties - 8 p.m. Everyone
welcome!
Badminton Club
Faculty, Staff and Graduate Student Badminton Club
meets 8:30 p.m. and Fridays 7:30 p.m. (except Oct. 16 &
23) in Gym A of the Robert Osborne Sports Centre. For
information call Bernie 228-4025 or 731-9966.
UBC REPORTS October 8, 1987     7 UBC Calendar
MONDAY, OCT. 12
Japan Film Series
Ikebana- Art of Flower Arrangement and Music of
Modern Japan. Films from the Consulate General of
Japan. Sponsored by the Institute of Asian Research.
Free. For information call 228-2746. Auditorium, Asian
Centre. 12:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT. 13
Botany Seminar
Systematicsand synthetic thought in biology-an
example from Carex. William Crins, Botany, UBC.
Room 2000, Biological Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Seminar
New Cycloaddition Chemistry. Professor Michael Jung,
Chemistry, University of California, Los Angeles,
California. Refreshments from 12:30 p.m. prior to
lecture. Room 250, Chemistry Building. 1p.m.
Chemical Engineering Seminar
Determination of Crystallization Kinetics from batch
Experiments. Dr. N.S. Tavare, Chemical Engineering,
University of Manchester Institute of Science &.
Technology, Manchester, England. Coffee at 3:15 p.m.
Room 206, Chemical Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
Computing Centre Seminar
Introduction to the FPS-164/MAX. Registration
required. Forms are available from Computing Centre
General Office (CSCI420). Room 308, Computer Science
Building. 2:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar
Feeding Biology of Thecate Heterotrophic
Dinoflagellates. Dr, D. Jacobson, DOUBC. Forfurther
information, call Dr. Steve Calvert at 228-5210. Room
1465, Biological Sciences Building. 3:30 p.m.
Research Centre Seminar
Albinism - Recent Advances.  Prof. Barrie Jay, Clinical
Ophthalmology, University of London, U.K.  Room 2J38,
Children's Hospital, 4480 Oak Street, Vancouver. 4 p.m.
U/l Liaison Office and PATSCAN, UBC
Library Patent Service Seminar
Current Trends in Patenting Process in Canada and
Abroad, and Opportunities for Inventors at UBC. Gerald
Oyen, Law, UBC and Peter Graham, Canadian Patent
Office. Free. For information call 228-5404. Lecture
Theatre 1, IRC. 7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 14
Pharmacology & Therapeutics Seminar
Structure-Activity Relationship of Conformationally
Restricted Excitatory Amino Acids in the Rat Spinal
Cord, in Vitro. Mr. O. Magnuson, Physiology, UBC
Room 317, Basic Medical Sciences Building, Block C
12 noon.
Early Childhood Education Research
Colloquium
The Parent-Toddler Project at the Child Study Centre.
Dr. Glen Dixon, Coordinator, ECE, Ms. A. Kasting,
Research Associate. For information call 228-5232.
Room 203 Ponderosa F. 12 noon.
School of Music Noon-Hour Series
Faculty Chamber Recital. Admission by donation.
Recital Hall. Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Forestry Seminar
Application of Molecular Genetics to Forestry. Dr.
Sederoff, USDA Forest Service, Berkeley, California.
Free. For information call 228-2507. Room 166,
MacMillan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Geography Colloquium
Hydroelectricityin Norway: Changes in Attitudes and
Values Towards a Resource. Prof. Just Gjessing,
Geography, Universityof Oslo. Room 201, Geography
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Economic Workshop
Learning Through Price Wars: An Exercise in
Uncovering Supergame Strategies. Margaret Slade,
UBC. Room 351, Brock Hall. 4 p.m.
Marketing Workshop
Marketing Decision Support System. Prof. Gordon
Wright, Purdue University. Henry Angus Penthouse. 4
p.m.
1987 Ecology-Resource Ecology Seminar
Negative, Neutral and Positive Effects of Cyclones
(Hurricanes) on Coastal Plant and Animal Populations:
Short and Long Term Effects. Dr. Ian Poiner, Cleveland
Marine Laboratories, Brisbane, Australia. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Student Health Services Lecture
Learning More About Aids. Dr. Michael Rekart,
Director, STD Control, Ministry of Health, BC. Free.
For information cati 228-7011. Shrum Lounge,
Commons Block, House Vanier. 7 p.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. 15
Psychiatry Lecture
Memory Assessment in the Aged. Dr. David Crockett,
Division of Psychology, Department of Psychiatry,
HSCH. Room 2NA/B, Psychiatric Pavilion, HSCH. 9
a.m.
UBC Reports is published every second
Thursday by UBC Community Relations
6328 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1W5, Telephone 228-3131.
EdItor-ln-Chlef: Margaret Nevin
Editor: Don Whiteley
Layout: Jo Moss and Linda Coe
Contributors: Jo Moss, Lorie Chortyk,
Debora Sweeney.
Fitness tester Alison MacCuloch takes the measurements of Canuck team member Raimo
Summanen in the J.M. Buchanan Exercise Science Laboratory.  More than 60 Canuck
veterans and rookies spent a day in the lab recently to undergo preseason medical and
fitness testing.
Office for Women Students/Leon and Thea
Koerner Foundation Seminar
An Uncommon Wealth of Women. Maureen McTeer,
Rosemary Brown, Dame Nita Barrow, Ann Medina,
Louise Rose. For information call 228-2415.
International House. 9:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Medical Grand Rounds
Update on Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma. Dr. J. Connors,
Cancer Control Agency of B.C. Room G-279, Lecture
Theatre, Acute Care Unit, Health Sciences Centre
Hospital. 12 noon.
Political Science Lecture
The Commonwealth, Sanctions and South Africa. Prof.
Jarru3s Mayall, International Relations, London School
of Economics. Room A102, Buchanan Building. 12:30
p.m.
Forestry Burgess Lane Lecture
Resolving Conflicts in Multiple Resource Use. Dr.
Dennis Dykstra, Forestry, Northern Arizona University.
Room 166, MacMillan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Centre for Policy Studies In Education
Seminar
Contending Ideologies of Education in South Africa. Dr.
Kogila Adam-Moodley, Social and Educational Studies.
For information call 228-2593. Room 123, Ponderosa
Annex H. 2 p.m.
Psychology Colloquium
Smiles when Lying. Dr. Paul Ekman, Psychology,
University of California, San Francisco. Room 2510,
Kenny Building. 4p.m.
Neuroscience Discussion Group
Arginine Vasopressin: New Roles in Brain for an Old
Hormone. Dr. Quentin J. Pittman, Medical Physiology,
Universityof Calgary. For information call Dr. Steven       .
Vincent at 228-7039. Lecture Hall 1, IRC. 4p.m.
Economics Labour Workshop
Collective Agreement Coverage and the Union Wage
Impact in Canada. Craig Riddell, UBC. Room 910, 9th
floor, Buchanan Tower. 4 p.m.
Biotechnology Laboratory Seminar
Comparison of Genetic Mechanism in Gymnosperms
and Angiosperms: A Progress Report. Dr. Ronald
Sederoff, Forestry, North Carolina State University.
Lecture Hall3, IRC. 4p.m.
Institute of Asian Research Seminar
Indonesia: Legal Aid and Social Change. Prof. Daniel S.
Lev, University of Washington. Free. For information
call 228-3814. Room 604, Asian Centre. 4:30 p.m.
French Seminar
Le Portrait de Voltaire, ou les methodes de la critique
d'attribution. Prof. Frederick Deloffre, 18th Century
French Literature, Sorbonne University, Paris.
Sponsored by Committe rfn Lectures. Room B-216,
Buchanan Building. 7 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 16
Health Care & Epidemiology Rounds
Playing Chicken atthe B.C. Games. Dr. Peter Riben,
Dr. Timothy Ng, Dr. Carolyn Pirn, Residents, Health
Care & Epidemiology. For information call 228-2773.
Room 253, Mather Building. 9 a.m.
Finance Seminar
Moral Hazard and Limited Liability... Implications for the
Theory of Firm. Prof. J. Brander and B. Spencer. Henry
Angus Penthouse. 3:30 p.m.
Audiology & Speech Sciences Seminar
The Evolution of Language and Handedness. Prof.
Peter MacNeilage, Linguistics, University of Texas. For
information call 228-5591. Room 100, Buchanan A.
12:30 p.m.
French Lecture (In English)
The Research in Human Sciences: Problems & Methods
(Some considerations). Pfof. Frederic Deloffre, 18th
Century French Literature, Sorbonne University, Paris.
Sponsored by Committee on Lectures. Room D-244,
Buchanan Building. 12:30p.m.
School of Music Noon-Hour Series
Contemporary Players. Stephen Chatman, Eugene
Wilson, directors. Free. Recital Hall, Music Building.
12:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar
Recent Advances in Ophthalmic Genetics. Prof. Barrie
Jay, Moorfields Eye Hospital, University of London.
Parentcraft Room, Main Floor, Grace Hospital, 4490 Oak
Street. 1 p.m.
Llngulstlcs/Audlology & Speech Sciences
Seminar
Acquisition of Vowels: Ontogeny Recapitulates
Phylogeny. Prof. Peter MacNeilage, Linguistics,
University of Texas. For information call 228-5591.
Room 324, Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
International Conference, Literature as Film
Sponsored by the Department of Germanic Studies,
UBC and the Goethe-Institute, Vancouver. For
information call 228-6403 or 732-3966. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.
Chemical Engineering Seminar
Modern Chemical Analysis for Chemical Engineers. Dr.
K.C. Teo, Lecturer. Coffee at 3:15. Room 206, Chemical
Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
Humanities & Sciences Programs
Transformations: a theatrical piece based on six folk
. tales. Nan Gregory and Melanie Ray in collaboration
with David Petersen. Sponsored by Centre for
Continuing Education. $8. For information call 222-
5261. The Epiphany Chapel, 6050 Chancellor Blvd. 8
p.m. - »
SATURDAY, OCT. 17
Professional Development Seminar
Effective Management Styles - Getting Results with
People. Tom Champoux, Vice President, Effectiveness
Institute. $90; $70 for AAPS members. Sponsored by
UBC Assoc, of Administrative Professional Staff and
Personnel Services. For information call 228-5778.
Grad Centre Ballroom. 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
International Conference, Literature as Film
Sponsored by the Department of Germanic Studies,
UBC and the Goethe-Institute, Vancouver. For
information, call 228-6403 or 732-3966. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 9 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Continuing Education Seminar
Hollywood Explained: An in-Depth Look at the Movie
Industry. Mark Litwak, journalist, screenwriter,
television producer and attorney. $102 including lunch.
.For information call 222-5261. Lecture Hall 1, IRC. 9
a.m. -4 p.m.
Lifestyle Programs
REST - The Reduced Environmental Stimulation
Technique. Dr. Peter Suedfeld, psychologist and Dean
of Graduate Studies, UBC. $35. For information, call
222-5238. D.T. Kenny Building. 10 a.m.
Calendar Deadlines
For events in the period October 25 to November 7, notices must be submitted on
proper Calendar forms no later than 4 p.m. on Wednesday, October 14 to the
Community Relations Office, 6328 Memorial Road, Room 207, Old Administration
Building.  For more information, call 228-3131.
MONDAY, OCT. 19
Japan Film Series
Films from the Consulate General of Japan. Sponsored
by the Institute of Asian Research. Freeadmission. For
more information call 228-2746. Auditorium, Asian
Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Science for Peace Lectures
Understanding Strategic Doctrine. Prof..Michael
Wallace, Political Science, UBC. Room 218, Hennings
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Seminar
NonclassicalOrganometallic Chemistry and Catalysis at
Actinide Centers. Prof. Tobin Marks, Chemistry,
Northwestern Universty, Evanston, Illinois. Room 225,
Chemistry Building. 2:30 p.m.
IAM - Applied Mathematics Seminar
Numerical Solution of Viscous Flow in a Branching
Channel Using Boundary Fitted Coordinates. Dr. Stuart
Bramley, Mathematics,. University of Strathclyde,
Glasgow. Room 229, Math Building. 3:45 p.m.
Biochemical/Medical Genetics Discussion
Group Seminar
Molecular Analysis of the Human Y Chromosome:
Mapping the Limits ofthe Pseudo Autosomal Region
and Candidate Sequences for the Sex Determining
Gene. Dr. Paul Goodfellow, The Imperial Cancer
Research Fund Laboratories, London, England. Lecture
Hall4, IRC. 3:30 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar
The Extragalactic Distance Scale. Prof. Bob Schommer,
Rutgers University. Coffee at 3:45 p.m. Room 260,
Geophysics 8, Astronomy Building, 4 p.m.
Biochemical Discussion Group Seminar
Structure-function Studies of hemopoietic Growth
Factors by peptide Synthesis. Dr. Ian Clark-Lewis,
Biomedical Research Centre, UBC. Lecture Hall4, IRC.
4:30 p.m.
UBC Film Society Film presentation
Raging Bull. Tickets $2. Hotline 228-3697. SUB
Theatre, SUB. 7and 9:30p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT. 20
Botany Department
Cecil and Ida Green Lecture: The Possible Ecological
Significance of Plant Secondary Compounds. Arthur
Bell, Kew Gardens, England. Room 2000, Biological
Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Geological Sciences Seminar
Earth and its Life: Systems Perspective. Dr. J. Veizer,
University of Ottawa. Room 330A, Geological Sciences
Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Faculty Development Seminar
Effective Use of the Overhead Projector. Mr. Don
Stevens, Education Media Centre, UBC. For
information call 222-5272. Room 2449, Biological
Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Seminar
Rational construction of Molecular Metals. Prof. Tobin
J. Marks, Chemistry, Northwestern University,
Evanston, Illinois. Refreshments from 12:30 p.m. prior
to-lecture. Room 250, Chemistry Building. 1p.m.
Oceanography Department
Direct Observations of Vertical Heat and Buoyancy Flux
in a Well-developed Thermohaline Staircase: The C-
SALT Experiment. Dr. R. Lueck, Chesapeake Bay
Institute, The Johns Hopkins University. For
information call 228-5210. Room 1465, Biological
Sciences Building. 3:30 p.m.
Geological Sciences Seminar
Mineral Evolution. Dr. J. Veizer, University of Ottawa.
Hotel Georgia. 4 p.m.
Statistics Seminar
Investigation on Methods of Statistical Pattern
Recognition. V. Pikelis, Institute of Mathematics 8.
Cybernetic, Lithuania S.S.R., Academy of Science.
Room 102, Ponderosa Annex C. 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 21
Pharmacology & Therapeutics Seminar
Paradoxical Hypertension Associated with Beta-
blockers. Mr. R.Tabrizchi, Pharmacology &
Therapeutics, UBC. Room 317, Basic Medical Sciences
Building, Block C. 12 noon.
institute of Asian Research Seminar
Contemporary Developments in the Pacific Rim. Dr.
C.L. Hung, Universityof Calgary. Free. For information
call 228-4686. Room 604, Asian Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Forestry Seminar
Dry Belt Douglas-fir and the Spruce Budworm. Mr.
Alan Vyse, RPE, Ministry of Lands, Kamloops. Free.
For information call 228-2507. Room 166, MacMillan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
School of Music Noon-Hour Series
Alexandra Browning, soprano; Robert Rogers, piano.
Admission by donation. Recital Hall, Music Building.
12:30 p.m.
Oceanography Department Seminar
Interactions of Juvenile Cod and Haddock About a
Frontal Region on Georges Bank. Dr. I. Perry, Dept. of
Fisheries and Oceans, St. Andrews, N.B. For
information call 228-5210. Room 1465, Biological
Sciences Building. 3:30 p.m.
Continued on P. 7
1
-J
8     UBC REPORTS October 8, 1987

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