UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Reports Sep 22, 1976

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcreports-1.0118418.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcreports-1.0118418.json
JSON-LD: ubcreports-1.0118418-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcreports-1.0118418-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcreports-1.0118418-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcreports-1.0118418-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcreports-1.0118418-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcreports-1.0118418-source.json
Full Text
ubcreports-1.0118418-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcreports-1.0118418.ris

Full Text

 Vol. 22, No. 33, Sept. 22, 1976. Published by
Information Services, University of B.C., 2075
Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5.
Judith Walker, editor.
More than
just a Summer Job
For most of us, it was a
rotten summer. All that
rain does tend to dampen
spirits.
But for more than 500
UBC students, it may just
have been one of the most
rewarding summers of
their careers. The students
pictured on these pages
(see over) are part of the
provincial government's
seasonal employment university program, engaged
in that rarity in summer
jobs — discipline-oriented
employment.
The program, open to
university students in third
year or higher, was funded
through the provincial
Department of Labour.
Each project was supervised by a member of faculty or staff.
More than $1 million
was available to students
at UBC, one of three universities in B.C. participating in the program.
Photos by John Morris.
^ftSfe*J»»
SPECIAL eGLLECTIOMi
Fitness laboratory in the War Memorial Gym
was used in a summer study by Physical
Education students Doug and Nancy
Dunwoody.
Byard MacLean
(above), graduate
student in civil
engineering, worked
on a summer research
project developing
chemical methods for
removing trace metals
from Lower Mainland
sewage. He's shown
collecting a water
sample from the
Annacis Island sewage
treatment plant.
Agricultural Sciences
student Dave Pekkala
(left) manned the
''Hort-line" all
summer answering
citizen enquiries on
how to grow plants
and how to remedy
the various diseases
that afflict them. This won't hurt a bit, says UBC nurse Pat Jones as
she takes a blood sample from young Kanchan
Bakshi as part of nutrition study of East Indian
children conducted under the supervision of Dr.
Indrajit Desai, of the UBC home economics
school. HomeEccer Maureen Wright stands by to
help.
Rory Lindsay was one of 75 UBC law students who put
their academic training to good use providing free legal
advice to citizens in all parts of the province. He's shown
counselling a client in Nelson.
Medical student Ken Burns was
one of 42 budding doctors who
spent the summer getting
first-hand experience in patient
care by assisting practising
doctors in centres throughout
B.C. Ken, who was associated
with a Kamloops physician,
examines an incubator baby at
Royal Inland Hospital.
Earthquake simulator in
UBC's civil and mechanical
engineering laboratories
was part of a project to
test various materials
under stress. Dr. R.A.
Spencer, right, and student
Bob Drabik are shown
below preparing for an
experiment.
Autistic children, who have emotional and learning
problems, had a ball this summer through a program at
Jericho Hill School run by students from UBC's School
of Physical Education and Recreation.
2/UBC Reports/Sept. 22, 1976 Senate
UBC's Senate has asked its standing
Committee on Continuing Education
for a detailed evaluation of the
Winegard report.
The report, released this month,
recommends that Simon Fraser
University be given responsibility for
providing degree-completion programs
in non-metropolitan areas of the
province.
Senate called for an evaluation after
an hour-long discussion last
Wednesday of the Report of the
Commission on University Programs in
Non-Metropolitan areas. The report
was prepared at the request of the
provincial government by Dr. William
Winegard, a former president of the
University of Guelph.
In the course of the Senate debate,
various speakers said Commissioner
Winegard has ''grossly
underestimated" the cost of his
proposals and that he had rejected the
advice of his nine-member advisory
panel, while others felt that criticism
of the report at this point might spoil
UBC's chances of being involved in the
future delivery of academic programs
in the interior of the province.
Prof. Donald MacDougall, who
chairs Senate's Committee on
Continuing Education and was a
member of Dr. Winegard's advisory
panel, said the commissioner chose to
reject the advice contained in a UBC
brief which recommended establishment of University Centres at each
community college in the Interior as
the best method of making
degree-level education available to
more people.
The University Centres proposed by
UBC would be operated by one of the
three existing public universities,
"preferably in co-operation with the
community colleges."
The Winegard report recommends
that a multi-campus university be
established by 1990 to serve
non-metropolitan areas of B.C.; that
the new university begin as a
separately funded division of Simon
Fraser University with headquarters in
Vernon in the Okanagan Valley and
four small University Centres in Prince
George, Kamloops, Kelowna and
Nelson; that SFU be given to the end
of this year to accept or reject the
proposal; and that a new university be
started in 1977 if SFU rejects the
proposal.
Prof. MacDougall reviewed the
report's   main   recommendations   and
added that the one really serious
criticism that must be directed against
the report is "that it is not the best
way of meeting the needs of the
people resident in the Interior."
He said the UBC submission was
prepared on the basis that the needs of
the Interior would be best met if the
resources of the three public
universities were exploited. "In my
view, Dr. Winegard has chosen to
throw a very heavy burden on Simon
Fraser University and it would
probably mean that the services and
the programs available to the people in
the Interior would be more limited
than they would have been under the
UBC proposal," Prof. MacDougall told
Senate.
President Douglas Kenny, who said
he hoped a "considered evaluation" of
the report would be available for the
next meeting of Senate, went on to
say that Dr. Winegard had "grossly
underestimated the cost of the
enterprise" in terms of both capital
and operating costs.
Earlier in his remarks. President
Kenny said the report had a large
number of unknowns, especially for
the Faculty of Education. He
specifically referred to UBC's Native
Indian Teacher Education Program,
which operates four decentralized
teacher-training centres in the
province. "Dr. Winegard does not
address himself to that, nor to many
other considerations that bear on our
involvement in higher education," the
president said.
Jindra Kulich, acting director of
UBC's Centre for Continuing
Education and the other UBC member
on the advisory panel, said the
proposals made by Dr. Winegard
would "provide a political solution to
the part of the province where most of
the political pressure is coming from —
the Okanagan region."
He said that people in the northern
part of the province who submitted
proposals to the commission said over
and over again that if there is to be
any solution for them, it is not a
physical campus in the Okanagan.
"They would much prefer to go to
Vancouver than to the Okanagan," he
said.
Mr. Kulich added that certain parts
of the province can only be served
through independent study by
correspondence and "the Winegard
report has not solved that problem."
Dean John Andrews, of the Faculty
of Education, said he was "as
disappointed as anyone in the result of
the Winegard commission report." He
said there were already developing
"various kinds of pressures from the
interior of the province and from the
Department of Education itself to see
that the Winegard commission's
recommendations are not, in fact,
implemented."
He continued: "It seems to me at
the moment we have more to lose by
protesting than we have by expressing
a willingness to become involved and
sitting back to wait for the judgment
of what at this moment is not up to
us."
Dean Andrews said UBC had "lost
in a very significant way ... and I think
we will not improve the substance of
our case at this time by protesting too
much."
A profit of $108,039 by UBC's
Bookstore in the last fiscal year will be
the subject of a report to Senate at its
October meeting by President Douglas
Kenny.
President Kenny volunteered to
make the report after a student
senator at Senate's September meeting
termed the profit "outrageous."
The Bookstore is one of several
"ancillary services" operated by the
University which include food and
housing services and the health service
hospital in the Wesbrook Building.
UBC's financial statements for the
fiscal year ended March 31, 1976,
show the Bookstore had sales revenue
of $3,367,533 and expenditures of
$3,259,494. The Bookstore's net
operating margin for the year, which is
also shown in the financial statements
as being reserved for future
development, amounted to $108,039.
Student Senator Gordon Funt said
he though the Bookstore had made a
profit of $120,000 in the previous
fiscal year and asked if that money
was being spent on Bookstore
development. (The UBC financial
statements for the fiscal year ended
March 31, 1975, show the Bookstore
had a net operating margin of
$119,358, which was shown as being
reserved for future development.)
President Kenny, who chairs Senate
meetings, said he would take Mr.
Funt's question under advisement and
report back to the next meeting "as to
where that profit originates and where
the money goes."
UBC Reports/Sept. 22, 1976/3 NEXT WEEK AT UBC
Notices must reach Information Services, Main Mall North Ad min. Bldg., by mail, by 5 p.m. Thursday of week preceding publication of notice.
FACULTY AND STAFF EXERCISE CLASS. Men
and women. Class meets five times a week from
12:30 to 1:05 p.m. at Gym B, south campus P.E.
complex. Call Recreation U.B.C, 228-3996, for
information.
SUNDAY, SEPT. 26
2:00p.m. ARTISTS AND CRAFTSMEN OF THE NORTHWEST COAST. Peter Macnair, curator, B.C. Provincial Museum, discusses The Legacy, an exhibit of
contemporary northwest coast art visiting the
Museum of Anthropology until Oct. 1. Regular
admission is charged. Museum of Anthropology,
Northwest Marine Drive.
MONDAY, SEPT. 27
12:30p.m.  CANCER RESEARCH CENTRE SEMINAR.
Barbara Pope, Microbiology, UBC, on Non-Specific
Suppressor Cells in Tumor-Bearing Mice. Library,
Cancer Research Centre, Block B, Medical Sciences
Building.
3:30p.m. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE SEMINAR. Prof. F.
Granot, Commerce and Business Administration,
UBC, on A Parametric Primal Algorithm for Discrete
Chebyshev Linear Approximation. Room 321,
Angus Building.
3:45p.m. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Dr.
Geoffrey W. Vickers, Mechanical Engineering, UBC,
on Hydraulic Circuits: All You Really Wanted To
Know But Were Afraid To Ask. Room 1215,
Mechanical Engineering Building.
4:00 p.m. BIOCHEMICAL DISCUSSION GROUP SEMINAR.
Dr. Derek Baisted, Department of Biochemistry and
Biophysics, Oregon State University, Corvallis, on
The Enzymatic Glucosylation of Membrane Sterol:
Interrelationship of the Glucosyltransferase and
Nucleoside Diphosphatase Activities. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
4:30 p.m. PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Lowell Langille,
Zoology, UBC, on Vertebrate Cardiovascular Fluid
Dynamics. Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
TUESDAY, SEPT. 28
12:30p.m.     PHARMACEUTICAL  SCIENCES LECTURE:   Dr.
John Cobby, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of
Toronto, on Some Aspects of the Pharmacokinetic
Properties of Diethyldithiocarbamate, A Metabolite
of Disulfiram. Lecture Hall 3, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR. Prof. Harry
Hinsley, St. John's College, Cambridge, England,
gives the second of two lectures on Peace and War
Since the 18th Century. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
Notices:
7:30p.m. BADMINTON CLUB. New faculty and staff members welcome. Club meets Tuesday and Friday
evenings from 7:30 to 11:00 in Gym A, Thunderbird
Sports Centre.
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 29
4:00 p.m.     GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY SEMINAR. Dr.
R. Allan Freeze, Geological Sciences, UBC, on Predictive Simulation of the Subsidence of Venice.
Room 260, Geophysics Building.
4:30 p.m. ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr.
C.S. Holling, Institute of Animal Resource Ecology,
UBC, onPredationDoesNot Rule The World. Room
2449, Biological Sciences Building.
7:30 p.m. FOLK DANCING is held every Wednesday from
7:30 to 10:30 p.m. It is free, open to anyone on or
off campus, and beginners are welcome. For further
information, call M. Snider, 224-0226, or R.
Spratley, 228-8415. International House.
8:30p.m. FACULTY CLUB Eighteenth Annual General
Meeting. Ballroom, Faculty Club.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 30
12:30p.m. AUDIO-VISUAL PRESENTATION by faculty
members of the art education department. Faculty
of Education. The first in the series is on The Multicultural City as a Resource for Arts Education.
Room 100, Scarfe Building.
POETRY READING by Earle Birney. Sponsored by
the creative writing department, the League of
Canadian Poets and the UBC Lectures Committee.
Room 106, Buchanan Building.
3:30p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Frank Stenger, Mathematics, UBC, on
Galerkin Method of Solution of Differential and
Integral Equations. Room 2449, Biological Sciences
Building.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. R.W. Siegel, Materials
Science Division, National Laboratory, Argonne,
III., on Experimental Studies of Vacancies in Metals.
Room 201, Hennings Building.
SATURDAY, OCT. 2
8:00p.m. DISCO DANCING in The Pit. Music supplied by
CITR radio disk jockeys. Continues until 12:30 a.m.
Admission free. Student Union Building.
8:15 p.m. VANCOUVER INSTITUTE LECTURE. Prof. Harry
Hinsley, St. John's College, Cambridge, England,
and Green Visiting Professor, on The Future of the
European Common Market. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
'-■taU-.CrtHttl^-a
■■' **S1..-T. -*.-.'*'.*.<*
The Institute of Applied
Mathematics and Statistics is again
offering its free statistical consulting
service to UBC faculty and students
for academic projects. Coordinators
this year are Dr. B. Morrison,
228-3791, and Dr. A.J. Petkau,
228-4673. Call them for further
information.
• * •
4/UBC Reports/Sept. 22, 1976
The Fine Arts Gallery's exhibition
of paintings by Jack Darcus opened
yesterday (Tuesday) and will continue
until Oct. 16. The gallery, located in
the basement of the Main Library, is
open from 10:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.,
Tuesday through Saturday.
The  AMS Art Gallery,  located  in
the    Student    Union    Building,    is
currently exhibiting photographs and
texts documenting the historical role
of the Japanese in B.C. "The Japanese
Canadians, 1877-1977" continues
until Sept. 29. Beginning Sept. 27, the
gallery will also exhibit works of art
from the Brock Hall Collection, a
permanent art collection of the UBC
student body. The gallery is open from
11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. Monday
through Friday.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcreports.1-0118418/manifest

Comment

Related Items