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UBC Reports Mar 17, 1976

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 srBnmc«'Fr*",iV
REPORTS
HAVE A GOOD ST. PATRICK'S DAY!
Vol. 22 No. 11, March 17,1976/Vancouver
V .
Winner of the Robert Gaul Memorial
Trophy as UBC's top male athlete in
1975-76 is Kelvin Wood, a graduate
student in the Faculty of Applied
Science. Mr. Wood has captained
UBC's field hockey team for several
years and was on the Canadian team
that won a silver medal at the 1975
Pan-American Games.
UBC's president, Dr. Douglas
Kenny, spoke to the Vancouver
Institute on March 13 on the topic
"The University on the Frontier."
His talk described B.C. as a frontier
society and UBC as an institution
on the intellectual frontier, the land
of new ideas and new knowledge.
Here are excerpts from the latter
part of his speech.
...The university is like a frontier
society in that it too has the problem of reconciling its past with its
future. It too must struggle to keep
in touch with the realities and
values of the past in order not to
become too exclusively preoccupied with a possible future, and
thus lose touch with the reality of
here and now.
Just as in B.C. there is a tension
between the values of the old
country and the exciting and often
raw values of the new society, so
too there is in the university that
same kind of tension. In both cases,
a successful society or institution is
only achieved by giving each its
due, by allowing tradition and
dreams to co-exist and interact.
In the university, we need the
wild-eyed researcher caught up in
his or her far-out, apparently
impossible, seemingly irrelevant
questions. But we also need the
apparently old-fashioned, traditional professor, involved in his or her
re-living and re-examining of seemingly archaic, dead languages, cultures and ideas. To both, their subjects are frontiers, which they can
make real and alive and useful to us
through what they tell us of their
discoveries. They keep us in touch
with our past and our future, and
thus with  ourselves and what we
are.
What, then, can provide the
means of preserving and encouraging a balance, a productive interaction between the old and the
new? The answer, I believe, is to be
found only in values. If these two
ways of living and working are
brought to understand that there
are common values which can guide
them both, to which both owe
loyalty, then a way of working together successfully can be found.
But to find agreement on these
values is not always easy, particularly when there is an apparent conflict between the values which
inspire two kinds of society. The
values of the frontier are often
tough ones: independence, material
success, practicality, individualism,
innocence, equality, outspokenness.
The values of an older civilization
seem at first quite different: continuity, stability, sociality, civility,
sophistication, subtlety, patience,
sympathy, standards. It is only by a
resolution of these values, however,
that a society can discover itself
and create something worth having.
And it is to the resolution of these
values that a university is dedicated.
It has often been said—and cannot be said too often—that a university is dedicated to learning. That is
the fundamental reason for our
existence. It has also been said, and
is equally true, that the most important means for learning is freedom. The ultimate value, then, is
truth; the value which makes possible the attainment of truth is freedom. This single fact must guide
not only universities but societies,
Please turn to Page Two
See FRONTIER Dorothy Slade can make color work for you on IMC's color copier
This copier is colorful!
STUDENTS! Want to put a little
pizzazz into that term paper by using
color in bar graphs, statistical tables or
illustrations?
FACULTY MEMBERS! Why not
consider enlivening your lectures by
converting your black-and-white
overhead transparencies into glorious
living color?
In short, why not color your work
by making use of the new color Xerox
copier recently installed at UBC's
Instructional Media Centre in Hut B7
on the East Mall.
IMC director Tom Whitehead says
the new color copier offers a whole
new dimension in copying for
educational purposes. Pertinent
information in charts, graphs and
statistical tables can be highlighted,
and the need to underline or circle
important   information   is eliminated.
Color  transparencies   for overhead
projection can also be created on the
new machine, either from
black-and-white illustrations or from
colored originals.
The machine can also copy 35 mm
color slides and enlarge them to a
maximum of 8V2 by 11 inches.
And all this for 65 cents a copy or
$1.15 for each overhead transparency.
The Xerox copier uses three basic
colors — red, blue and yellow. With a
little button-pushing, however, these
three colors can be combined to
generate a seven-color range.
For the best results, it pays to plan
ahead, however. The IMC has a
qualified operator who's prepared to
advise you on the best way of
preparing material you want
color-copied. If it's an uncomplicated
question you can probably get the
answer by calling the IMC at local
4771
THE MUSIC BOX
THURSDAY, MARCH 18
12:30 p.m. UNIVERSITY  CHORAL   UNION.   James   Fankhauser  directs Bloch
Sacred Service and Dvorak Te Deum. Old Auditorium.
FRIDAY, MARCH 19
8:00p.m. UNIVERSITY   CHORAL   UNION.    James   Fankhauser   directs Bloch
Sacred Service and Dvorak Te Deum. Old Auditorium.
SUNDAY, MARCH 21
8:00p.m. UBCSTAGEBAND.   Sharman King directs Music of lanMcDougall.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24
12:30p.m. NOON-HOUR  CONCERT.   Geoffrey  Rutkowski,  cello;  and  Melinda
Coffey, piano, play Music of Franck and Hindemith.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25
12:30 p.m. WIND  CHAMBER   ENSEMBLE.    Loren  Marsteller  directs  Music of
and 8:00 p.m.      Persichetti, Rachmaninoff and Lalo.
All performances, unless otherwise specified, held in Recital Hall, Music Building.
2/UBC Reports/March 17, 1976
Frontier
Continued from Page One
old and new. And this single equation of value provides the means for
reconciling the apparently contradictory values of the new and the
old, of the frontier and the "old
country."
Freedom, in short, is the catalytic value to which the others relate.
The seeming contrast between the
uninhibited individualism of the
frontier and the mutual responsibility of the older, stable society lies
in freedom seen as everyone's right,
not just that of the strong or the
swift.
The key to the reconciliation of
the apparent opposites of a new
frontier and an old civilization lies
essentially in a common dedication
to values. More specifically, the
affirmation and practice of certain
basic values is absolutely essential if
the frontier and the university on
the frontier are to co-exist, survive
and grow.
That is what it is all about, finally. Values. Freedom to be different
and the civilized tolerance of differences. Competition in a context of
co-operation and deep concern for
others. Curiosity for the truth and
the courage of honesty coupled
with civility. It is not enough simply to strive for accomplishment or
learning, one must also recognize
others' rights to strive.
And that is probably the most
important function the university
can perform. To serve as a place
where values are emphasized and
lived by, as an example to society
at large. As a place where some
freedom from the practical pressures of everyday life allows time
and opportunity for more than a
passing thought to such things.
That is why the presence of the
university on the frontier is essential. Not merely to remind a new
society of the value of older things.
Not merely to serve as a kind of
frontier city in itself. But to be a
home for the values which make it
possible for the old and the new to
interact, a place where our young
people can learn the best of both
these worlds so they can help build
the best of both these worlds into
the life of the province.
Finally, if this University is to
serve its highest purpose, it must in
a certain sense be B.C.'s own frontier. Out here on Point Grey, we
hope, can be found that view of
horizons we all need to see if we are
to move, with a rich awareness of
where we came from, towards what
we can become. Sports Menu
f ROWING - Season gets underway
Saturday for UBC rowers with an invitational meet beginning at 7:30 a.m.
on Coal Harbor at Stanley Park. Races
continue until 12 noon. Participating
Pacific Northwest universities include
Washington, Oregon State and Puget
Sound.
TENNIS - UBC Invitational Tennis
Tournament begins Monday at 5 p.m.
in the campus Armory. Play will continue until Sunday, March 28. On
March 23-26, play begins at 7 p.m.,
and on March 27 and 28 at 8 a.m.
New members of UBC's Board of
Governors are Pearley R. Brissenden,
left, well-known Vancouver lawyer,
and Ian Greenwood, right, of
Kelowna, general manager of B.C. Tree
Fruits and Sun-Rype Products Ltd.
Both new governors are UBC
graduates. In making the
appointments, the provincial
government also announced the
termination of appointments of Clive
Lytle and Bing Wing Thom.
Increase stops
Calendar mail
Increases in postal rates have forced
the registrar's office to stop mailing
UBC calendars overseas.
Registrar Jack Parnall has sent a
memo to all academic administrators
asking them not to request that
calendars be sent overseas or suggest to
correspondents that calendars will be
mailed to them.
The memo says the major problem
will arise with overseas students
planning to enter the Faculty of
Graduate Studies. Mr. Parnall suggests
that departments that have brochures
detailing their graduate offerings send
them instead of calendars. A
lightweight version of calendar
information useful for overseas
students is being developed.
■ ■■A4fe        Published  on Wednes-
■ ■■■I days and distributed
Hn W\_§ free by the Department
""^^ of Information Services
REPORTS 0f tne University of British Columbia, 2075 Wesbrook Place,
Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5. J.A. Banham,
editor. Judith Walker, staff writer. Production assistants, Bruce Baker and Anne
Shorter.
lots of
clients for
legal clinic
8 a.m. Phone call from Mrs.
Brown who says her husband has just
beaten her up again. Arrange to meet
her downtown in an hour. Back at
the University for a 10:30
appointment. Break for lunch, then
read through background cases tor 3
p.m. interview.
Not an average day for your
average student. But for the 12
students enrolled in the UBC Legal
Clinic in the Faculty of Law, this
could very well be an average day.
The UBC Legal Clinic, established
last September, operates as a regular
law office with a small number of
senior students working as lawyers
for half of the University year. A
clinical professor and two staff
counsel supervise.
"Taking the regular course load is
a very different experience from
having a client who is your
responsibility," says Jim Taylor, an
associate Law professor who has
organized the clinical legal education
program. "It adds a sense of
professional responsibility to their
law school training." Each student is
responsible for about 20 files.
"In coming in contact with actual
clients, the students begin to realize
how laws can affect the lives of
individuals and are also given an
appreciation of the complexity of
human problems and the realization
that, in many situations, the law may
provide only a limited solution to a
client'sproblem."
Although courses with a clinical
flavor have been offered for a couple
of years in the law faculty, the idea
of students working full time in a
legal clinic is a relatively new one,
and one that has not met with
complete approval from some law
faculty members.
Butclinical legal education of this
nature is being offered in more and
more schools across Canada.
"There is a good argument to be
made that we are duplicating the
articling system" (where students
serve for one year in a law firm after
graduation), says Mr. Taylor. "But
what distinguishes this from the
articling experience ... is the
emphasis on self-analysis and
interpreted experience."
Sensitivity to people is an
important part of the training, says
Mr. Taylor. Knowing the law is not
always enough. "The total system of
legal education does not always
provide training in developing
interviewing and negotiating skills
and sensitivity to clients. We don't
see the damage that lawyers with
poorly trained skills do," he
emphasizes.
Critical analysis by fellow
students and supervising lawyers is
an integral part of the program, with
seminars held all day Monday and
Thursday evenings.
The students handle cases dealing
with a full range of legal
problems-from criminal charges,
minor financial claims, complaints
against department stores to family
crises and divorce problems. Many of
their clients are people directly
related to the University
community, especially students.
Many clients are referred to them
from several professionally staffed
Vancouver legal aid projects.
The program meshes well with
the Law Students' Legal Advice
Program, a non-credit, voluntary
program run by UBC Law students
in the evenings for the past six or
seven years. Because students in this
extracurricular program cannot
represent any of their clients in
court, they often refer clients to the
Legal Clinic where students can take
cases to court.
The Legal Clinic is located in the
Faculty of Law, although it hopes to
move off-campus when funding
permits, and is open to the public
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday to
Friday, and 9 a.m. to 12 noon
Saturday. The clinic's phone number
is 228-5911.
UBC Reports/March 17, 1976/3 THIS WEEK
AND NEXT
THURSDAY, MARCH 18
9:00a.m. PSYCHIATRY CONFERENCE. The speaker is Dr.
Magda B. Arnold, Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting Professor. Lecture theatre. Health Sciences Centre Hospital.
12:30p.m. FILM SERIES: Parts 11 and 12 of Alistair Cooke's
America. Lecture Hall 3, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre.
INTERNATIONAL LAW STUDENTS FILM: Freedom
Railway. Room 102, Law Building.
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM.
Dr. M.S. Howe, University of Cambridge, on Aerodynamic Theory of the Flute. Room 1100, Mathematics
Annex.
4:00p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. B. McKivon, University of
Chicago, on Studies of Jupiter's Magnetosphere From
Pioneer 10 and 11 Space Probes. Room 201, Hennings.
8:00p.m. CONTINUING EDUCATION LECTURE. Donald
Soule, Theatre Arts, UBC, on The Telling of the Tale.
Lecture Hall 1, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. $4; students, $3. 228-2181.
9:30p.m. BEYOND THE MEMORY OF MAN. Evan Kreider,
Music, UBC, on Music. Ch. 10, Vancouver Cablevision.
FRIDAY, MARCH 19
9:00a.m. PAEDIATRICS GRAND ROUND. Dr. R. Hill, Dr. P.
Gofton, Dr. A. Tingle, UBC, on HLA Antigen and Arthritis. Lecture Room B, Heather Pavilion, VGH.
12:30p.m. KOERNER LECTURE. Prof. Horst Gerson, Netherlands Institute for Art History, on The Young Rembrandt. Room 102, Lasserre Building.
2:30p.m. COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SEMINAR. Dr. David Bond, Department of Consumer
and Corporate Affairs, Ottawa, on The Problems of
Patent Reform. Penthouse, Angus Building.
REGENT COLLEGE STALEY LECTURE PROGRAM.
Dr. Geoffrey W. Bromiley, Fuller Theological Seminar,
Pasadena, Calif., on Herder: The Humanity of Scripture.
Chancellor Building, 6050 Chancellor Blvd. First of a
series of five lectures. Call Regent College, 224-3245 for
information.
3:30p.m. COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Earl D.
Sacerdoti, Stanford Research Institute, Calif., on A
Structure for Plans and Behavior. Room 326, Angus.
SATURDAY, MARCH 20
8:15p.m. THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE.A lecture-music com
bination with Harry and Frances Adaskin. Auditorium,
MusicBuilding.
MONDAY, MARCH 22
10:30a.m. RECREATION LECTURE. Peter Sargent, architect,
Leisure Research Unit, Leeds, England, discusses
Leisure Facilities. Room 25, War Memorial Gymnasium.
12:30p.m.     FINE ARTS FILMS: Andy Warhol and Roy Lichte
stein (B&W, 30 minutes), and Lichtenstein in London
(color, 20 minutes). Room 102, Lasserre Building.
CUSO   FILM  SERIES:  Cuba:  Battle of  10 Million.
Room 201, Geography Building.
CANCER RESEARCH CENTRE. Ann Worth, Cancer
Control Agency of B.C., on Epidemiology and Clinical
Biology of Cervical Carcinoma. Library, Block B, Medical Sciences Building.
2:30p.m. PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES LECTURE. Dr.
David Lalka, Medical School, University of Texas, San
Antonio, on Pharmacokinetic Aspects of the Treatment
of Ventricular Arrhythmias. Lecture Hall 1, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
3:30p.m. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. D. Poon,
Mechanical Engineering graduate student, UBC, on
Statics and Dynamics of Neutrally Buoyant Inflatable
Structures. Room A106, Mechanical Engineering
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM.
Prof. Gene Golub, Computer Science, Stanford University, Calif., on The Generalized Conjugate Gradient
Method with Applications to the Solution of Partial
Differential Equations. Room 1100, Mathematics
Annex.
4:00p.m. BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. CA. Pasternak, St.
George's Hospital Medical School, University of London, England, on Membrane Assembly during the Cell
Cycle. Lecture Hall 3, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
ASTRONOMY AND SPACE SCIENCE SEMINAR.
Prof. R.A. Helliwell on Whistler-Mode Waves in the Magnetosphere. Room 318, Hennings Building.
4:30p.m. CANCER CONTROL AGENCY SEMINAR. Dr. B.G.
Douglason Changes in Cell Cycle Time Duringand After
Fractionated Radiation to Skin. Cancer Control Agency
of B.C., 2656 Heather St.
PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. J. Hinke, Anatomy,
UBC, on Heterogeneity of Monovalent Ions in Muscle:
Compartmentalization, Binding, and Micro-Donnan
Distribution. Room 2449, Biological SciencesBuilding.
5:00p.m. DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY LECTURE. Dr. Max
Palayew, Jewish General Hospital, Montreal, on Intrathoracic Manifestations of Histoplasmosis. Lecture
Room B, Heather Pavilion, VGH.
TUESDAY, MARCH 23
11:30a.m. RESOURCE POLICY AND MANAGEMENT Workshop. Dr. David B. Brooks, Department of Energy,
Mines and Resources, Ottawa, on Canadian Energy Policy: As Seen From the Office of Energy Conservation.
Room 125, Angus Building.
12:30p.m. WOODWARD VISITING LECTURER. Dr. Charles
Kindleberger, Economics, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, on The International Monetary System:
Lessons of the Past. Room 102, Buchanan Building.
4:30p.m.     CHEMICAL   ENGINEERING   SEMINAR.   Dr.   A.P.
Watkinson, Chemical Engineering, UBC, on Heat Transfer in a Direct Fired Rotary Kiln. Room 206, Chemical
Engineering Building.
CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. W. Cullen, Chemistry,
UBC, will speak. Room 250, Chemistry Building.
5:00p.m. DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY. Dr. Max Palayew, Jewish
General Hospital, Montreal, on Tour Through the G.I.
Tract. Lecture Room B, Heather Pavilion, VGH.
7:30p.m. CUSO INFORMATION NIGHT. Rooms 402-404,
International House.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 24
12:30p.m.     PHYSICS   AND   GEOPHYSICS   LECTURE.   David
Strangway, Toronto, on Lunar and Planetary Evolution.
Room 201, Hennings Building.
2:30p.m.     CHEMISTRY SEMINAR.  Dr.  R.N. Jones, Chemistry
Division, National  Research Council, Ottawa, on The
Infrared Spectra of Thin Films. Room 225, Chemistry
Building.
3:30 p.m.     STATISTICS WORKSHOP. A. Marshall, Mathematics,
UBC, on Multivariate Life Distributions.  Room 321,
Angus Building.
MEDIEVAL STUDIES LECTURE. Round tablediscus-
sion. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
4:30p.m.     ANIMAL   RESOURCE   ECOLOGY   SEMINAR.   Dr.
Michael Soule, Biology, University of California at San
Diego, La Jolla, on Genetic Variability and Character
Displacement in Island Populations. Room 2446, Biological Sciences Building.
8:00 p.m. HUMANITIES LECTURE AND DISCUSSION. Prof. D.
Susan Butt-Finn, Psychology, UBC, on The Creativity
of Virginia Woolf: A Psychological Interpretation.
Salons B and C, Faculty Club.
WOODWARD VISITING LECTURER. Dr. Charles
Kindleberger, Economics, Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, on The International Monetary System:
Dilemmas of the Future. Room 102, Buchanan
Building.
THURSDAY, MARCH 25
9:00a.m. PSYCHIATRY CONFERENCE. The speaker is Prof. G.
Morris Carstairs, Vice-Chancellor, University of York,
England. Lecture theatre, Health Sciences Centre Hospital.
12:30p.m. PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES LECTURE. Dr. H.C.
Fibiger, Psychiatry, UBC, on Central Catecholaminergic
Systems in Learning and Memory. Room 365, Cunningham Building.
GREEN VISITING PROFESSOR PUBLIC LECTURE.
Dr. Magda B. Arnold, Social Sciences Division, Spring
Hill College, Mobile, Alabama, on Motives Make the
Man — Or Woman. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
Notices must reach Information Services, Main Mall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5 p.m. Thursday of week preceding publication of notice.
4/UBC Reports/March 17, 1976

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