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UBC Reports Oct 4, 1990

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 UBC Archives Serial
Great Trekker gala honors Berton
By GAVIN WILSON
Of the multitude of honors and awards Pierre
Berton has won during his long and celebrated
career, the Great Trekker Award was, in some
ways, the most unexpected.
"Back in the days when I was a student at
UBC, if you had told me I would be awarded this
honor, I would have laughed," he said. "If you
had told some of my professors, they would have
cried their eyes out."
The well-known author and broadcaster, who
admits he was "not the ideal student" when he
attended UBC from 1939 to 1941, was feted by
about 600 alumni, faculty, staff and students at a
gala dinner and dance at the Hotel Vancouver
Sept. 27.
He was honored for achieving eminence in his
field and for his contributions to the university
and community.
The dinner highlighted Thursday's kick-off of
UBC's 75th anniversary Homecoming, a week of
ceremonies, honors, reunions and sports events.
"I had a wonderful time at UBC," Berton said.
"I learned a great deal there, though not always in
class. The extracurricular activities at a university
are sometimes just as important, sometimes more
so."
"They were the happiest years of my life and
the great thing was, I knew it at the time."
Kurt Preinsperg, who as Alma Mater Society
President presented the award to Berton, said the
author's genius is to show the gripping human
drama behind historical events.
"Canadians have learned more about Cana-
Ex-Ubyssey reporter and longtime journalist Pierre Berton pounds the keyboard of an old
Underwood typewriter, battered fedora at the ready, at a display of memorabilia at the Great
Trekker A ward gala dinner
dian history from Pierre Berton than from an
army of academic historians," he said.
Berton paid tribute to his wife, Janet Berton,
for her many years of love and support. They first
met when both worked at the university's student
newspaper, the Ubyssey.
The evening was also a tribute to the award's
namesakes, the original Great Trekkers who, in
1922, marched to support their demands for completion of the Point Grey campus.
Berton saluted the legacy of student participation and initiative the Trekkers left to UBC.
"In 1939, when I first arrived, Brock Hall was
being built, and I was impressed to hear that much
of the money for construction had been raised by
the students themselves," he said.
President David Strangway introduced the
seven original Trekkers who attended the dinner,
calling them "men and women of determination
and vision ...who identified the indescribable spirit
of UBC."
"Their actions galvanized the students, faculty
and the community at a seminal moment in the
university's history. Their achievements are an
important yardstick by which we can measure our
own accomplishments," he said.
Great Trekker Evelyn Story Lett (BA '17, MA
'26) and AMS Great Trekker Award winner Cecil
Green, cut the university's 75th anniversary birthday cake.
Earlier in the day. about 65 members of the
classes of 1917 to 1926 re-lived the Great Trek, a
bus ride along the original route from Downtown
Vancouver to Point Grey.
They also attended the Fall Ceremony, where
Cecil Green and Walter Koerner were awarded
the Chancellor's Medal by UBC Chancellor Leslie
Peterson. It is only the second time the medal has
been awarded.
Honorary degrees were presented to Beverley
McLachlin, a Justice of the Supreme Court of
Canada who was a law professor at UBC for four
years, and Howard Petch, a UBC alumnus who
recently retired as president of the University of
Victoria.
Also at the ceremony, Evelyn Lett presented
the AMS with the graduation photograph of her
late husband, UBC alumnus and former Chancellor Sherwood Lett, and a manuscript copy of his
biography.
Mel Reeves, director of the Alumni Association, presented William Webber with the
association's Faculty Award for his outstanding
service to the community.
Fee payment formula breaks
recreation building deadlock
By GAVIN WILSON
A new fee payment formula has
broken the student recreation facility
deadlock.
Under a plan approved by the
university's Board ofGovernors, students will have the option of paying an
annual $40 fee to support the new facility.
The fee, proposed by the
University's Athletic Council, comes
into effect next September.
"There are lot of students who want
to contribute to the facility and there
are lots of students who don't. This
proposal accommodates both groups."
said student board representative Tim
Bird, who added he was a strong supporter of the project.
Plans for the facility had been de
layed by on-again, off-again student
support. Students voted in favor of
contributing to the $10 million sports
complex in one referendum, against it
in another. There were low voter turnouts at each poll.
"There's absolutely no consensus
Inside
CHIEF LIBRARIAN: Newly
appointed University Librarian Ruth Patrick faces a host
of challenges. Page 2
KRAJINA CHAIR: The B.C.
government has established
a new chair in silvics and
silviculture in honor of
Vladimir Krajina. Page 6
HEALTH SCIENCES WEEK:
Total patient health care is a
focus of Health Sciences
Week Oct 14-20. Page 8
i:%
i
■?
Income passes
half billion
UBC's income has passed the half-
billion dollar mark for the first time.
The university's total income from
all sources totals $529 million in this
year's budget, Bruce Gellatly, Vice-
President, Administration and Finance,
told Senate.
It is the first time the university's
income has surpassed $500 million.
Last year's total income was $470
million.
Full statement details are available
in the 1990 UBC Financial Statements,
published as an insert in this issue of
UBC Reports.
The statements show that the
university's income includes a $219
million general purpose operating
grant, $86.4 million in sponsored research funding, $65.7 million for capi-
See SCHOLARSHIPS on Page 2
among the students," Bird said.
At a lengthy meeting the night before the board's decision, the AMS
student council passed a resolution
giving conditional support to the athletic council plan.
K.D. Srivastava, Vice-President,
Student and Academic Services, said
he could accept some, but not all, of
the students' conditions.
"I have absolutely no problem
making sure that there is lots of student
input," said Srivastava. "I support the
need for student participation at all
levels."
Council announced its intention to
strike a committee to work with Srivastava.
Bird said there was concern that the
recreation fee would set a precedent,
effectively becoming a "hidden tax"
on students whenever funds for new
facilities were needed.
But President David Strangway and
Srivastava said the university is empowered to impose such fees specifically for recreation and athletic facilities and services.
Under the plan, graduate and full-
time undergraduate students will pay
$40 each year if they choose, while
undergraduates registered for less than
nine units will pay $4.50 per unit annually.
The fee will be in effect for five
years. A review during the 1995-96
See COMPLETION on Page 2
High school grades
indicator of success,
UBC study finds
By GAVIN WILSON
High school grade point average
is the single best predictor of success in first year studies at university, a UBC study shows.
But Dan Birch, Vice-President,
Academic, told Senate that it is only
useful when predicting the performance of students entering university
directly from high school.
"It is a notoriously bad predictor
for those students who are returning
to their studies at a later time." he
said.
The study will give university
faculties information that could be
used for admission criteria. Birch
said a better knowledge of performance indicators could help reduce
the failure rate among first year students.
UBC currently bases admission
from high school on an average of
nine subjects taken in both Grades
11 and 12.
"This study shows there is no loss
of accuracy if we used Grade 12
English and the three best Grade 12
courses other than English," he said.
In Arts, the percentage of students failing declines with increasing entry GPA from more than 20
per cent at the low end to about five
per cent for students with entry
GPAs above 3.35.
The trend is even more pronounced in Science, where there is
a failure rate of more than 40 per
cent in the lowest GPA ranges and
only two per cent for the top 25 per
cent of students.
Grade 11 marks are not as good
predictors, except for those students
at the upper end of the spectrum,
the study showed.
Birch suggested Grade 11 marks
could be used to grant earlier admission than is currently available
to a small, select group of students.
College grade point averages are
"very much less accurate measures
of success," Birch said.
Students transferring from colleges to UBC do about as well as
continuing UBC students, but their
college grades are less accurate
predictors of university achievement.
There are significant failure rates
even among those with high entry
GPAs, Birch said.
The study was conducted by
Walter Sudmant. Manager, Institutional Research and Planning. UBCREPORTS Oct4.1990       2
Photo by Media Services
The UBC letter people help Dean Jim Richards, chair ofthe 1990 campus United Way campaign, kick off the
annual fundraiser. A goal of $240,000 has been set for this year's drive which runs until the end of October.
Recruiting effort pavs off
Grad enrolment up 10 per cent
Both graduate and international
undergraduate student enrolments are
up significantly from last year, Registrar Richard Spencer told Senate.
While overall enrolment at the university is up about four per cent, the
number of graduate students is up about
10 per cent over last year, to 4,281
students, he said, quoting preliminary
figures.
Total undergraduate enrolment is
up three per cent to 22,620 students, at
the time of the Senate report.
This includes 390 international
undergraduate students enroled this
year, an increase of 45 per cent over
last year.
International undergraduate students still represent only a small fraction — 1.7 per cent — of total undergraduates at the university, up from
about one per cent last year, Spencer
said.
The increases in graduate and inter
national undergraduate enrolments reflect efforts made to recruit students
from both groups. The university's strategic plan called for increased enrolments in both groups.
The strategic plan says the univer
sity should increase the number of
graduate students to at least 6,000. It
also recommended that international
students should make up between four
and six per cent of the total undergraduate enrolment.
Annual meeting
of Killam Trusts
slated for UBC
Completion date
not decided
Continued from Page 1
session will determine whether it
should be continued.
Completion date for the recreation
facility has yet to be determined.
Bob Wyman, board member and
chair of the university's fund raising
campaign, said he was "delighted" the
facility would now be going ahead.
Contributions made to the recreation facility will be matched dollar-
for-dollar by the provincial government.
UBC is playing host to the annual
general meeting of the Killam Trusts,
Oct. 3-5, as part of the university's
75th anniversary celebrations and in
honor of the 25th anniversary of Killam Fellowships at UBC.
"We're very pleased to welcome
the Killam trustees and Killam representatives from other institutions to
UBC this year," said Dean John Grace
ofthe Faculty of Graduate Studies.
"The intent of the Killam Trusts is
to ensure advanced study in a diversity
of academic fields. The fellowships
that are being awarded at UBC this
year live up to the spirit of Izaak and
Dorothy Killam's wishes."
Thirty-eight fellowships have been
awarded for the 1990 academic year,
including 21 faculty fellowships, which
are divided into eight senior and 13
faculty research fellowships. Ten new
fellowships have been awarded at the
postdoctoral level and seven at the pre-
doctoral level.
The Killam Fellowships, established from the estate of Dorothy J.
Killam, are awarded at a number of
universities and institutions across
Canada. Since 1967, the trusts have
awarded more than $65 million to about
2,700 scholars.
B.C. doubling
its contribution
for KAON factory
Scholarships
total $10 million
Continued from Page 1
tai improvements, $63.4 million in
revenue from ancillary enterprises
(such as the Bookstore, Food Services
and Student Housing and Conferences), $57 million in student fees and
$30.8 million in trusts and endowments.
Getlatly also said university scholarships now total $10 million, up 15
per cent over last year.
The B.C. government has doubled
its original contribution to the proposed
KAON factory at TRIUMF to $236
million — one-third of the $693 million needed to build the facility on the
UBC campus.
Premier Bill Vander Zalm made the
announcement at a special event at the
Vancouver Trade and Convention
Centre, organized by the Friends of
KAON, EBCO Industries, Science
World and the provincial government.
Vander Zalm called the KAON
factory, "B.C.'s number one project."
With international contributions of
$200 million, the KAON proposal
needs only a funding commitment from
Ottawa before going ahead.
The federal government is expected
to make a decision on its funding for
the project before the end of the year.
The KAON project, a medium-energy particle accelerator for the study
of sub-atomic physics, would be constructed at the existing TRIUMF facility.
A feasibility study released earlier
this year said the project would create
up to 17,000 person-years of employment and generate up to $1.1 billion of
industrial activity during construction
alone.
New chief librarian
faces mission
with confidence
By GAVIN WILSON
New technologies, disintegrating
collections and a space shortage so
severe that many books are now in
storage instead of on the shelves.
These are just some of the challenges facing UBC's new University
Librarian, Ruth Patrick.
Patrick, who took her new position
Aug. 1, will also oversee the first major expansion of library space in many
years. It is a mission she faces with
confidence.
"We already have a very good library resource here. The collections
are outstanding and the library staff
have an excellent reputation for their
dedication and service," she said.
"I'm looking forward to working
with them to re-design the library and
put together a plan to provide the best
library services we can, with the available resources."
The problems faced at UBC are
common to the great research libraries
in North America. (The UBC library is
the second largest research library in
Canada and in the top third of the 100
largest on the continent.)
"We are growing at a rate of 90,000
items a year and we don't have the
space to put them on the shelves," said
Patrick. "We have to expand into new
technologies while still taking care of
all the previous centuries' worth of
information and knowledge."
Materials are now being put into
storage in four major areas across
campus, a fifth is being sought and
compact shelving is used wherever
possible. To help ease the space crunch,
many materials are acquired on microforms.
"But one solution brings accompanying problems," said Patrick. "We
don't have the proper environment here
to keep microforms from disintegrating overtime."
The main library building, while
picturesque, is poorly designed and not
up to the demands of the Information
Age.
"This building is dysfunctional," she
said. "It's impossible to keep materials
clean."
Patrick
The 65-year-
old core of the
building has
been added to
over the years,
but now lacks
adequate electrical and phone
lines for the installation of new
computer systems.
A partial solution is the proposed
new library building, which will link
the main library with Sedgewick Library. Preliminary plans call for a four-
storey building — its lower two floors
underground—of about 130,000 gross
square feet.
Construction of the $26.3 million
building is expected to begin in early
1993.
Patrick is a Saskatchewan native
who did her first undergraduate year at
UBC. A graduate of the Library Science doctoral program at the University of California, Berkeley, she has
more than 18 years of university and
related experience as a professional
librarian.
For the last seven years she served
as Dean of Library Services at the
University of Montana's flagship Missoula campus. She has also worked at
Wayne Sate University in Michigan.
Patrick will use her expertise to draft
a strategic plan for the library.
In October, she said, library staff
"begin the process of developing a
consensus, defining the library's mission, its organizational values and vision for the future."
Patrick hopes to have a prepared
document completed — with input
from deans, faculty, students, administrators and library employees — by
the end of the year.
"I was pleased to see that the president places a high priority on the importance of the library in the UBC Strategic Plan," she said.
"He expressed high expectations for
the university and the library. This is a
wonderful opportunity to respond to
that challenge."
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Please call for more information.
UBC Media Services Photography 228-4775 UBC REPORTS Oct. 4.1990
Photo by I .any Scherban
West German President Richard von Weizsacker (second from left) ended a pre-reunification state visit to Canada with a tour ofthe Museum of Anthropology on Sept. 21. He is seen here viewing BillReid's The Raven and
the First Men along with MOA Curator Marjorie Halpern (left) and UBC President David Strangway
Binkley appointed Dean
of Faculty of Forestry
By CONNIE FILLETTI
Clark Binkley, former professor of
Forest Resources Management at Yale
University, has been appointed Dean
of UBC's Faculty of Forestry. The appointment is effective from September, 1990 to June, 1996.
Binkley, 40, replaces Robert Kennedy who served as Dean of Forestry
for six years.
"Dean Binkley's distinguished academic career, combined with his expertise in the areas of resource management and environmental studies, are
tremendous assets that both the university and the Faculty of Forestry will
benefit from," said UBC President
David Strangway.
Beginning his teaching career at
Yale in 1978, Binkley remained with
the university until his UBC appointment in July.
"The Faculty of Forestry at UBC
has the opportunity to become the best
in the world," said Binkley.
"We have excellent faculties in such
related areas as science, commerce and
the arts, strong commitment ofthe university, and excellent support from the
province as typified by the new $40
million Forest Science Centre. Our
challenge is to realize this opportunity."
Binkley is a member of several na-
Binkley
tional organizations including
the American
Association for
the Advancement of Science
and the Society
of American
Foresters. In
addition, he is a
member of the
National Academy of Sciences Panel on Policy Implications of Greenhouse Warming.
Binkley has served as a consultant
to a large number of forest products
firms, governmental agencies and private conservation groups. In 1985 he
worked at the International Institute
for Applied Systems Analysis in Lax-
enburg, Austria, on a forest sector project.
He has lectured at many major
North American universities, as well
as those in Finland, Sweden, West
Germany and the Soviet Union. He
currently serves as a consultant to the
World Bank on forest products, marketing and trade aspects of the forthcoming World Bank Forest Policy.
His area of research is the application of economics to problems arising
in public and private management of
forest resources.
He is also an authority on the population dynamics of the endangered
North American whooping crane.
Binkley is a graduate of Yale where
he received his doctorate in Forestry
and Environmental Studies in 1979.
He studied applied mathematics
during his undergraduate years at Harvard, graduating cum laude in 1971.
He also received a Master of Science
degree in Engineering from Harvard in
1976.
Brink made
Officer of Canada
Plant Science Professor Emeritus
Vernon Brink was named an officer of
the Order of Canada earlier this month.
Brink was recognized for his wide-
ranging contributions to groups and
organizations dedicated to natural history and conservation.
He has received numerous awards
and acclaim for his contributions to the
establishment of Kluane National Park
in the Yukon, Prairie Grassland Park
in Saskatchewan, Minnekhada Regional Park in Port Coquitlam and
Pacific Spirit Regional Park. He has
also been involved in the Skagit River
conservation group and VanDusen
Botanical Gardens.
Brink joined UBC as an instructor
in the Department of Agronomy in
1940. He received both his bachelor
and master's degrees at UBC.
Special 75th Anniversary
Issue of BC Asian Review
A 380-page journal of graduate research, the
BC Asian Review includes a history of the
department, research articles and translations
by UBC students, alumni and faculty.
Copies are available for $12.00 from the Dept.
of Asian Studies, Room 403, Asian Centre.
Counselling Psychology
Colloquium
"Migration Stress"
Dr. Anita Mak
Date: Thursday, October 11,1990
Time: 12:30 to 1:30 p.m.
Place: Room 102, 5780 Toronto Rd., UBC
Everyone Welcome!
For information call 228-5259
Berton receives
Trekker award
By RON BURKE
A spectacular sea of formal wear and period costumes adorned a festive
gathering of what can only
be described as UBC royalty
at the Hotel Vancouver last
Thursday evening.
The annual Gala Great
Trekker Dinner and Dance
was the occasion, this year's
version having the extra dimension of the university's
75th anniversary celebrations.
The Great Trekker Award is
presented annually to a
graduate for service to the
community
and eminence
in his or her
field.
This year's
recipient
is author '
and
broadcaster Pierre
Berton, class of
'41, and notorious Ubyssey
Tuesday editor
and lecture-
skipper during his days
as an undergraduate. In accepting the
award, Berton stressed the
importance of students gaining the maximum benefit
from their extra-curricular activities while at university.
Berton's after-hours pursuits included romancing
Ubyssey Friday editor Janet
Walker, whom he subsequently married and who accompanied him to the dinner. Berton credited her with
much of his success.
Other members of the
head table included President David Strangway and
Mrs. Alice Strangway and
Chancellor Les Peterson and
Mrs. Agnes Peterson. B.C.
Lieutenant-Governor David
Lam, in attendance with Mrs.
Dorothy Lam, encouraged
UBC to develop a new generation of Great Trekkers who
would lead the university's
foray into the Pacific Rim.
The head table was not
without its fun-seekers, either.
Alumni Association Executive
Director Deborah Apps and
husband George Apps were
conspicuous in their merriment and general enjoyment level.
Also unaware of the no-
fun-at-formal-events bylaw
were Peig McTague, chair of
the Gala Dinner and legal
beagle with Norton, Stewart
and Scarlett, and AMS President Kurt Preinsberg.
Favorite son status for the
evening was probably a toss-
up between Pierre Berton
and long-time UBC benefactor Cecil Green, co-recipient of the 1984 Great
Trekker Award with Mrs. Ida
Green.
But the sentimental favorites had to be the veterans
of the original Great Trek of
1922. The trekkers present
were: Mrs. Sherwood Lett,
class of' 17 and recipient of
the 1965 Great Trekker
Award; Mrs. Constance
Adams, class of '23, who
came all the way from England for the dinner; Ted Arnold, class of '27, who made
the trip from New Jersey; Dr.
Joseph
^ania, class
of '26;
Arthur    Gordon, class of '27;
Joyce McDonagh,
who joined the trek
as a 15 year-old, first-
year   student;   and
Harry Warren, class of
'26 and 1968 recipient
of the Great Trekker
Award.
trekkers are slowing
down a little, though:
Mrs. Lett, 93 years
young, only attended
three Homecoming functions last Thursday and then
performed the honors with
Cecil Green during the cutting of UBC's 75th birthday
cake; Ms. McDonagh, at 83,
enjoyed the evening and
then, when it was time to
go, simply hopped into a
cab; and Dr. Warren admits
that he has cut back his daily
office hours at UBC — now
he only works from 9 a.m. to
3:30 p.m.
Was there something in
the water that day in 1922?
We should all have their
energy.
BC ASIAN REVIEW 75TH
ANNIVERSARY ISSUE
A special double issue of
the BC Asian Review is now
available from the Department of Asian Studies.
In honor of the university's
75th anniversary, the
review's feature piece is
Glowing Coals: The first
twenty-five years of the
Department of Asian Studies
at The University of British Columbia, by department
head Daniel Overmyer.
Other highlights include
retrospectives on four recently retired faculty members and 15 research articles
and translations by UBC students, alumni and faculty.
The review, 380 pages of
literature, commentary and
UBC history, is available for
$12 in Rm. 403 of the Asian
Centre. UBC REPORTS Oct 4.1990
October 7 -
October 20
TUESDAY, OCT. 9   j
Women's Centre
First formative group meeting to provide
support/friendship/community for older
women. Bring iunch, coffee provided.
SUB 130 at 12:40pm. Call 228-2163.
Lectures in Modern Chemistry
Vanadium Bromoperoxi-
dase From Marine Algae:
Bromination vs. Oxidase
Activity. Dr. Allison Butler,
Chemistry, U. of California.
Chemistry B250 at 1pm.
Refreshments at 12:40pm. Call 228-3266.
Chemistry Departmental
Seminar
Thin Filament Proteins From Cardiac And
Smooth Muscles. Dr. Alan Mak, Biochem.,
Queen's U., Waterloo, Ont. Chemistry
D225 at 10:30am. Call 228-3266.
Oceanography Seminar
Climate And Fisheries: Cause And Effect, Long And Short Term Patterns And
Processes. Gary Sharp, NOAA Center
for Ocean Analysis and Prediction, Monterey, California. BioSciences 1465 at
3:30pm. Call 228-2317.
Medical Genetics Seminar
Mitochondria: The
Genome And Beyond.
Implications For Human
Disease. Dr. Lome Clarke,
Clinical Fellow, Med. Gen.,
University Hospital,
Shaughnessy site.    Hennings 202 at
8:30am. Call 228-5311.
Institute of Asian
Research Seminar
International Relations.
The Role Of Japan In The
World Economy. Prof.
Hideo Sato, Dean of the
College of International
Relations, U. of Tsukuba,
Japan.   Asian Center 604 at 12:30pm.
Call 228-5480.
WEDNESDAY,OCT. 10|
UBC/AMS Computer Show '90
Computing For The 90s. SUB Ballroom,
from 10am-5pm. Call 228-3465/3456.
Wednesday Noon Hour
Concert Series
Ellis Wean, tuba and Rena Sharon, piano.
Admission $2. Music Recital Hall at
12:30pm. Call 228-3113.
Law Guest Lecture
Chinese Legal Studies.
Recent Developments In
China's Foreign Trade And
Investment Law. Prof.
Zhang Yuejiao, Division
chief, Treaties/Law, (Mof-
UBC Reports is the faculty and
staff newspaper of the University
of British Columbia. It is published every second Thursday by
the UBC Community Relations
Office, 6328 Memorial Rd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1W5.
Telephone 228-3131.
Advertising inquiries: 228-4775.
Director: Margaret Nevin
Managing Editor: Steve Crombie
Contributors: Connie Filletti,
Paula Martin, Jo Moss and
Gavin Wilson.
4\     Please
€>w    recycle
CALENDAR DEADLINES
For events in the period Oct. 21 to Nov. 3 notices must he submitted by UBC faculty or staff on proper Calendar forms no later
than noon on Wednesday, Oct. 10 to the Community Relations Office, 6328 Memorial Rd., Room 207, Old Administration
Building. For more information call 228-3131. The next edition of UBC Reports wil be published Oct. 18. Notices exceeding 35
words may be edited.
Oceanography Seminar
ert) PRC. Moot Court Room, Curtis 176
at 2:30pm. Call 228-4780.
Geography Colloquium
Pingos Of The Western Arctic Coast,
NWT. Dr. J. Ross Mackay, Geog., UBC.
Geography 201 at 3:30pm. Call 228-3268.
Biotechnology Laboratory
Seminar
Mobile Elements In Maize:
Molecular And Practical
Consideration. Dr. Peter
A. Peterson, Agronomy,
Iowa State U. of Science/
Technology. IRC #5 at
4pm. Call Dr. John Carlson at 228-4733.
Ecology/Resource
Ecology Seminar
Rocky Intertidal Food Webs: The Role Of
Environmental And Biotic Factors In Their
Regulation. Bruce Menge, Oregon State
U. BioSciences 2449 at 4:30pm. Call
228-2731.
Orthopaedics/Grand Rounds
The Role Of The Gamma Nail In Hip Fractures. Chairman: Dr. R. N. Meek. Eye
Care Centre Auditorium at 7:30am. Call
875-4646.
THURSDAY, OCT. 11 j
Cecil And Ida Green Lecture
HHaH- General Lecture. Environ-
jffe^fl mental And Dietary Car-
ii £^mm cin°9ens And Tne Causes
Vnttl 0f Cancer-     Dr-  Bruce
^^^^^M Ames,    Chairman,    Bio-
^*"^^^ chemistry, U. of California,
Berkeley. Co-sponsored by Burgess Lane
Memorial Professorships. MacMillan 166
at 12pm. Call 228-5675.
Pharmacology Seminar
Neurotransmitters And Signal Transduction In Basal Ganglia. Dr. Steven Vincent,
Psychiatry, UBC. Friedman Lecture Hall
B from 11:30-12:30pm. Call 228-2575.
Psychiatry Academic
Lecture Program
Psychiatric And Psychosocial Concomitants Of Recent Political And Socioeconomic Changes In East Germany (GDR).
Dr. Erhard Schier, Head Physician and
Vice-director, Neuropsychiatric Hospital
For Children/Adolescents, Karl Marx-U.,
Leipzig (GDR). Detwiller 2NAB, University Hospital, UBC Site from 8-9am. Call
228-7325.
Psychology Colloquia
When Gulliver Travels: How The Social
Context Affects Self-Appraisals. Dr. Jon-
athon Brown, U. of Washington. Kenny
2510 at 4pm. Call 228-2755.
Physics Colloquium
Atomic Engineering Of
Metallic Structures By Molecular Beam Epitaxy.
Bretislav Heinrich, Director, Surface Science Laboratory, Simon Fraser U.
Hennings 201 at 4pm. Call
228-3853.
Economics Departmental
Seminar
Estimating Limited Dependent Rational
Expectations Models. Hashem Pesaran,
Trinity College, Cambridge. Brock 351
from 4-5:30pm. Call 228-2876.
Philosophy Fall
Colloquium Series
Epistemological Time Asymmetry. Steven Savitt, Philosophy, UBC. Buchanan
D336 at 12:30pm. Call 228-3292.
UBC Symphonic Wind Ensemble
Martin Berinbaum, director. Free admission. Old Auditorium at 12:30pm. Call
228-3113.
Vancouver Opera Ensemble
:»>«'.'hv:-i|hu  Lecture Presentation Of
■-iy -; jj.g   Handel's  Alcina.     Free
admission. Music Recital
Hall at 12:30pm. Call 228-
3113.
UBC/AMS Computer Show 90'
Computing For The 90s. SUB ballroom,
from 10am-5pm. Call 228-2465/3456.
Student Health
Outreach Program
Healthy Eating Clinic.
Four-weeks. Topics include healthy food choices,
eating on the run, cooking
for one and hidden fats in
foods. Student Counselling, Brock 200. Call 228-7011.
Breast Self-Exam
Teaching Clinic
Presented by Student Health Outreach
Program and the Canadian Cancer Society. Learn in a private and confidential
setting. Faculty, staff and students welcome. Student Health Services, Main floor
334, University Hospital, UBC Site. Walk-
in or for an appointment, call 228-7011.
FRIDAYjOCTJ2j
Burgess Lane Memorial
Professor Lecture
g«.->»5j Lectures In The Faculty Of
Forestry. Oxidative DNA
Damage And Aging. Dr.
Bruce Ames, Biochemistry,
U. of California, Berkeley.
Co-sponsored by the Cecil
and Ida Green Visiting Professorships.
IRC #6 at 12:30pm. Call 228-5675.
Agricultural Economics Seminar
International Coffee Agreement Export
Quota And Indonesia: Welfare Impacts
And Rent Seeking. Mary Bohman, Visiting assistant prof., AgriEcon, UBC. Ponderosa Annex D117. Call 228-4382.
Fisheries/Aquatic Science
Seminar Series
Behavioural Tradeoffs In Naturally Oc-
curing Golden Shiner Populations. Mark
Johannes, York U., Toronto. BioSciences
2361. Call 228-2731.
Chemical Engineering
Weekly Seminar
Gaseous Phase Particulate Fouling Of
Plate Heat Exchangers. Dr. Jean-Michel
Grillot, Docteur de L'lnstitut Polytechnique
de Grenoble. ChemEngineering 206 at
3:30pm. Call 228-3238.
Philosophy 1990
Joint Colloquium
Democracy And Its Philosophical Rivals: Theories
Of The State. Philip
Resnick, Political Science,
UBC. Buchanan Penthouse at 3pm. Call 228-
3292.
UBC Contemporary Players
jiw-   i      k;  Stephen   Chatman   and
J Geoffrey Michaels, direc-
■~.;.    j7 tors.      Free  admission.
'     ?  Music   Recital   Hall   at
.^.^ji  12:30pm. Call 228-3113.
UBC Symphonic Wind Ensemble
UBC School of Music: Martin Berinbaum,
director. Freeadmission. Old Auditorium
at 8pm. Call 228-3113.
SATURDAY, OCT. 13 j
Distinguished Artists Series
Arditti String Quartet. Admission: Gen-
eral,$15; students/seniors, $7. Prelude
lecture at 7:15pm., concert at 8pm. Music
Recital Hall. Call 228-3113.
JJO^JDj^OCT^Sj
In The Spotlight
Outstanding Students In Concert. Free
admission. Music Recital Hall at 12:30pm.
Call 228-3113.
Fifteenth Annual Dr. John F.
McCreary Lecture
Politics, Pathology And The
Public's Health.    Dr. An-
  drew Lawrence Pipe, as-
^/jiz^J^t sistantprof.,Cardiothoracic
Surgery, U. of Ottawa Heart
Institute, Ottawa Civic Hospital. Sponsored by Continuing Education in the Health Sciences. IRC #6 from
12:30-1:30pm. Call 228=2801.
Mechanical Engineering 598
Seminar
Vibration Analysis And Design Of Sub-
structured Systems. Malcolm Smith, Ph.D.
student, Mech. Eng., UBC. Civil/Mechanical Engineering 1202 from 3:30-4:30pm.
Call 228-6200.
Economics Departmental
Seminar
Have Postwar Economic
Fluctuations Been Stabilized? Francis Diebold, U.
of Pennsylvania. Brock
351 from 4-5:30pm. Call
228-2876.
|*frr*J!Mn»l
wj&4»«m-tii
Astronomy Seminar
New Developments In The Radio Patrol
Project. Dr. Philip Gregory, UBC. Geophysics/Astronomy 260 at 4pm. Call 228-
4134/2267.
TUESDAY, OCT. 16 j
Medical Genetics Seminar
Cancelled (ASHG meeting).
Lectures In Modern Chemistry
The Extractive Metallurgist
In An Emerging World Of
Materials. Prof. Keith Bri-
macomb, Chemical Engineering, UBC. Chemistry
B250 at 1pm. Refreshments from 12:40pm. Call
228-3266.
Anthropology/Sociology Lecture
Arts, Science Or Politics: A Turning Point
In Hunter-Gatherer Studies? Prof. Richard
B. Lee, Anthropology, U. of Toronto. Anthropology/Sociology 207/9 from 11:30-
1pm. Call 228-2756.
Density Driven Flows: With
Application To The Gulf Of
Arabia. Salil Dos, Mathematics, Simon Fraser U..
BiolSciences 1465 at
3:30pm. Call 228-2317.
Office for Women
Students Seminar
Time Management. Penny Lusztig. Exercises in goal setting and task prioritizing. Brock 204D from 12:30-2:20pm. Call
228-2415.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 17
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
"Tim "'*ne Pain,ul Knee Relace-
ment. Chairman: Dr. C. P.
Duncan. Eye Care Center
Auditorium at 7:30am. Call
875-4646.
Economics Departmental
Seminar
Disagreement Point Monotonicity, Transfer Responsiveness And the Egalitarian
Bargaining Solution. Walter Bossert, UBC.
Brock 351 from 4-5:30pm. Call 228-2876.
Applied Mathematics Seminar
Plateau Fractions For A Model Of Bursting Electrical Activity In Pancreatic Beta-
Cells. Dr. Mark Pernarowski, Postdoctoral Fellow, Applied Math., U. of Washington, Seattle. Math 229 at 3:45pm. Call
228-4584.
Geography Colloquium
Climate Change: From
Uncertainty To International Convention. Dr Gordon McBean, Geog., UBC.
Geog. 201 at 3:30pm. Call
228-3268.
Ecology/Resource
Ecology Seminar
Food Competition And Predation: An Integrated Picture Of Grasshopper Communities. Gary Belovsky, U. Of Michigan.
BioSciences 2449 at 4:30pm. Call 228-
2731.
Women and Development Study
Group Lecture
From Trash to Treasure: The Mobilization
Of Housewife Activists. Dr. Harriet Rosenberg, Director, Health/Society Program,
York U. Geography 223 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 228-5875.
Public Lecture
Justice And The Poor. Dr.
N. Wolterstorff, Philosophical Theology, Yale Divinity
School. Sponsored by the
Graduate and Faculty
Christian Forum/Murrin
Fund. IRC #2 at 4:30pm. Call 228-2728.
Wednesday Noon Hour
Concert Series
John Loban, violin and Ailsa Zaenker,
piano. Admission $2. Music Recital Hall
at 12:30pm. Call 228-3113.
jmURSDAYj^CTJBj
Leslie L. Schaffer
Forestry Lecture
The Lodgepole Pine In Sweden. Dr. Stig
Hagner, Dir. of Forestry Operations,
Svenska Cellulosa Aktiebolaget, SCA.
Free admission. MacMillan 166 from
12:30-1:30pm. Call 228-2507.
Philosophy Fall
Colloquium Series
The Free Market Philosophy: Alternative
Perspectives On Unionism, Monopoly,
Capitalism, Equal Pay, Environmentalism
and Much Much More. Walter Block of
the Fraser Institute. Buchanan D336 at
12:30pm. Call 228-3292. THE    UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
19 15-1990
ANNIVERSARY
PROPOSED ACTIONS
REGARDING SAFETY
AND OTHER ISSUES
PARTICULARLY AFFECTING
WOMEN ON THE UBC CAMPUS
As President, I took the initiative
early this year to meet with about 80
people, mostly women faculty, staff
and students, in small focus groups,
to identify issues of particular concern to women. Out of those meetings and further consultation I have
identified a number of steps which
have been and will be taken to enhance the environment for all members of the UBC community and
especially for women. These steps
will be elements in a larger strategy
to which I have assigned a very high
priority.
1. Issues of priority
and organizational
structure
1.1 I have created the office
of Advisor to the President on
Women's Issues and Gender Relations. The position will be posted
immediately and the person appointed will report through the Vice
President Academic and Provost.
Not only will this new office play a
key role in developing policies and
procedures, but it will provide us with
a capacity for responding to individual concerns.
2. Issues related to
the physical
environment (physical
safety issues centre
largely around
parking, lighting and
on-campus patrols.)
2.1 I have asked the Vice
President Administration and Finance to prepare a comprehensive
plan for the development of parking
policies, practices and facilities de-
19 15-1990
signed to enhance safety and security. A draft plan is now the focus of
broad consultation on campus. It
includes the construction of parking
structures close to the campus core,
special provisions for night time parking, enhancement of shuttlebus service, and an increase in the number
of strategically placed parking attendants.
2.2 We will establish a systematic program forthe improvement
of campus lighting over the next three
years. Such improvements will be
charged to the budget for public
works and renovations.
2.3 I have asked the Department of Occupational Health and
Safety to add issues of personal
safety to the mandate of the 83 local
safety committees. In addition, I intend to create a President's Advisory
Committee on Safety and to ensure
the regular reporting or incidents so
that the development of policies and
procedures will be informed by current knowledge of difficulties arising
on the campus.
2.41 have asked the Department
of Student Health Services, in conjunction with the Sexual Assault Service of the Department of Family Practice, to publicize information about
help from trained crisis intervention
professionals for people who have
been assaulted or molested
3.   Issues of
employer/employee
relations
3.1 We plan to address
those matters of particular concern
to female staff, e.g. developmental
leaves and the impact of maternity
leave on career advancement.
4.   Issues of policy
and the social
environment
4.1 The Sexual Harassment Policy appears to be working well for the
purpose intended. The effectiveness
of the policy will be monitored and I
will increase the budget from two
half-time officers (1 FTE) to one full-
time and one part-time officer (1.7
FTE) to enable the office to earn' out
its educational mandate though
seminars and workshops.
4.2 We will maintain the recently
adopted policy of striving for non-
sexist language in communications
from the President's Office. We will
continue to encourage other units by
providing materials which set out
issues and provide helpful approaches for gender-inclusive language. We will pursue consideration ^ *Ko adoption of a University
policy .    .he matter.
4.3 We will work for the establishment of policies and practices designed to reinforce tolerance and
understanding and to eliminate discrimination from the working and
learning environment. For example,
I have established a Task Force on
Racism, chaired by the Director of
Multicultural Liaison, to recommend
policies and practices best suited to
UBC.
5.   Issues of
curriculum and other
academic matters
5.1 The Vice President Academic and Provost will consult with
each faculty to encourage curriculum development designed to enhance the understanding of gender
relations and to foster understanding
and equality.
5.2 Support will be provided for the
establishment of a centre to foster
research and education within and
across faculties in women's studies
and gender relations.
5.3 Priority is being given to funding the development and offering of
an enhanced program in women's
studies.
6.   A wareness of the
UBC Community
6.1 Leadership and standard setting by all in a position of authority
and influence to provide clear direction to others about what is and what
is not acceptable behaviour at UBC
is needed, and I intend to work with
administrators at UBC to develop a
policy statement to record UBC's
commitment of respect for all individuals, including those who have
been disadvantaged by society's past
practices and prejudices.
O
19 15-1990
ANNIVERSARY
ANNIVERSARY THE    UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
19 15-1990
ANNIVERSARY
Report of the Vice-President
Administration and Finance
1989-90
The audited financial statements are a
public document. Copies of the
University's audited financial statements
have been provided to each University
Department and the University Library. For
those interested in more information than
provided in these highlights, please refer
to the copy in your department.
Table 1 describes the activities in each
of five of the seven separate funds involved in the financial reporting of UBC
during the 1989-90 fiscal year. Excluded
are the Student Loan Fund and Endowment Principal Fund. The concept of fund
accounting organizes transactions so that
revenues and their related expenses are
accounted for in separate funds in accordance with objectives specified by donors,
limitations and restrictions imposed by
sources outside the University, and determinations made by the Board of Governors.
GENERAL PURPOSE
OPERATING FUND
The revenue and expenses used in the
general operations of the University are
accounted for in this fund. The University
ended the 1989-90 fiscal year with a surplus of $.2 million after provision for interfund transfers of $.3 million and appropriations for the year of $5.9 million. There
was an increase in operating income over
1988-89 of $32.7 million resulting primarily from increases in Provincial grants of
$22.3 million, student fee credit course
revenue of $4.2 million and non credit
course revenue of $4.0 million. Total expenses at $278.5 million were up $29.5
million with $21.8 million of the increase
attributable to salaries and benefits.
SPECIFIC PURPOSES FUND
The revenues and expenditures for projects stipulated by donors and income
earned on the Endowment Principal Fund
are included in this fund. Trust fund revenue was $18.4 million and Endowment
Fund investment income was $12.4 million for a total of $30.8 million. This is a
decrease in total income of $1.2 million
from 1988-89. Total expenses decreased
by $10.7 million, with $4.5 million of the
decrease attributable to salaries and benefits, $2.8 million attributable to furniture
and equipment and $2.2 million attributable to renovations and alterations. A
portion of the decrease in both income
and expenses is due to the transfer of the
Centres for Excellence from the Specific
Purposes Fund to the General Purpose
Operating Fund. The furniture and equipment and renovations and alterations expenses have returned to a normal level
this year. The unusual increase in these
expenses last year was the result of the
creation of the new Biotechnology Centre.
SPONSORED RESEARCH
FUND
This fund includes amounts specifically
identified for research grants and contracts
or related activities as provided by government granting agencies, research institutes
and other public and private agencies.
Revenue increased from $80.1 million in
1988-89 to $86.4 million this year. The
$6.3 million increase is accounted for by
increases in Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council grants of $1.4
million, Medical Research Council grants
of $1.7 million, Province of British Columbia Health Care Research Foundation
grants of $1.8 million, Business and Industry donations of $1.6 million and other
less significant variations both positive and
negative. Schedule 5 to the Financial
Statements provides additional details.
ANCILLARY ENTERPRISES
FUND
Ancillary enterprises provide goods and
services to the University community and
are expected to operate on a break-even
basis. Total income for the ancillary enterprises was $63.5 million, an increase of
14.6% over 1988/89. Included are the
Bookstore, Food Services, Student Housing and Conferences, Oyster River Farm,
Parking Services, Health Sciences Parkade, Tennis Centre, Athletics and Sport
Services, UBG Press, Media Services and
the Educational Measurement Research
Group. In 1989 90 the administrative
charge of 1.5% of sales and services generated $928,000 of revenue to the General Purpose Operating Fund. The charge
partially covers the cost of university services not specifically billed to the ancillary
enterprises such as Purchasing, Personnel Services, Financial Services, Occupational Health and Safety and Security.
CAPITAL FUND
The capital fund consists of gifts, grants,
interest and authorized capital borrowing
received for the purpose of acquiring capital assets including those pertaining to
ancillary enterprises. Capital fund revenue increased by $13.4 million. This increase is due in part to an increase of $6
million in the matching grant from the Provincial government for the major fund-raising campaign, the receipt of a $4 million
prepaid lease payment and a $2.6 million
increase in donations from Business and
Industry. Building contract expense decreased by $8.8 million as a result of a
decrease in the number of ongoing capital
projects in progress during the year. This
expense is expected to increase in the
next five years as major capital projects
are initiated. These capital projects will be
funded substantially through the proceeds
of the Major Fund Raising Campaign currently underway.
COMBINED FUNDS
Table 1 shows the total revenue and
expenses of all five funds by object of
revenue and expenses. Total revenue for
all funds was $529.3 million, up $59.4 million from last year. Total salaries and
benefits were $305.4 million, an increase
of $22.6 million.
Table 2 shows the source and distribution of General Purpose Operating funds
over the past five years.
Table 3 shows a comparison of the
Total General Purpose Operating Expenses by object of expense for the five
years 1985-86 to 1989-90.
Table 4 shows the change in total Sponsored Research funding since 1985-86.
Table 5 shows the source and distribution of Sponsored Research funds.
GENERAL
The University of British Columbia is
celebrating its 75th anniversary this year.
In order to properly mark this occasion
events have been scheduled for the entire
year. The 3 main events are Open House
which was held in early March, Discover
Summer which was a series of events
presented from May through to August
and Homecoming scheduled for late September and October and the early part of
November.
The University's "A World of Opportunity" campaign which began in January
1988 is progressing very well. At the mid
point of the campaign, more than $150
million in cash and pledges has been raised
from individuals, organizations, corporations and governments at all levels, including $75 million from the Provincial
Government Matching Gifts Program. The
pledges will be collected over the next six
years with the matching gifts from the
Provincial Government collected in annual
installments of $12 million. Still, many of
UBC's priority projects are not fully funded.
With the encouragement of our donors,
Government and those wishing to give to
UBC, the UBC Major Campaign continues
in order to achieve its goal. The campaign
funds will provide the facilities, scholarships, endowed chairs and equipment
required for academic distinction.
The portion of the new Student Information System which affects the Student
Records, the financial accounting records
and Award processing will be implemented
by February 1991. In the Spring of 1991,
the new grading policy and online marking
system will be completed. The course
scheduling component of the Student
System will be implemented in October
1990, in time for the 1991 Summer Session. The first phase of the Integrated
Human Resources Information System will
be implemented in the fall of 1991. This
phase will include payroll processing,
benefits administration, appointments and
human resources information for faculty,
staff and students. In 1991, Purchasing
will be implementing a new Material Management System which includes a new
purchasing system, a fixed assets component and an interface with the Financial
Records System. In October 1990, Plant
Operations will have successfully implemented their new Maintenance Management System to replace the old Work-In-
Process system.
During the past year, construction has
been completed on the following projects:
the David Lam Asian Garden Centre, the
Children's Day Care Centre, the Child
Study Centre, an addition to the Museum
of Anthropology, the Cecil Green Park
House Upgrade and a temporary facility
for the Disability Centre. Construction will
begin on four projects associated with the
University's five year capital plan and the
UBC Campaign. These are the David
Lam Management Research Centre, including a major Food Services facility
($11.6 million), the Student Services
Centre, with a permanent Disability Centre
facility ($8.5 million), the University Services Building ($12.1 million) and the West
Parkade, which will accomodate 1200 cars
($10.1 million). Two additional projects
will also be under construction soon. One
project is a laboratory facility ($6.5 million)
for researchers funded by the National
Centres of Excellence. The other project
is a joint venture with Ritsumeikan University of Kyoto, Japan for a new student
housing facility at UBC ($7.5 million).
The UBC Real Estate Corporation, a
wholly owned subsidiary of the university,
has begun active development of the
Hampton Place project. This project will
provide for market housing on campus in
the form of townhouses and apartments.
Site servicing was completed at the Wesbrook Mall and 16th Avenue location in
the early spring of 1990. The principal
objective of the Corporation is to take responsible and pragmatic steps to make
good use of the University's vacant land to
improve UBC's long-term capital and endowment programs which, in turn, help
contribute to a stronger financial base for
education in British Columbia.
In the summer of 1989 the university
assumed control of the Cedar Lodge Society. The Society's directors and the University are currently working closely to
develop a strategy to best utilize the
Society's Cobble Hill retreat on Vancouver
Island. The strategy will maintain the
Society's tradition for assisting in the treatment of the mentally handicapped.
During the past year the University has
developed a Faculty Housing Assistance
Program which will include downpayment
assistance and an innovative mortgage
design. A study is also underway to determine the feasibility of some form of multi-
unit faculty housing facility to be constructed on the campus.
The 1989-90 fiscal year also saw the
commitment to a capital preservation policy for the University's endowment funds.
The past twenty years of volatile and high
inflation have had an erosive effect on the
purchasing power of endowment income.
The new policy, expected to be finalized in
early 1991, is intended to protect the endowment funds for future generations while
also allowing the maximum funds possible
to be spent on current projects. TABLE 1
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN UNAPPROPRIATED FUND BALANCES
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1990
(thousands of dollars)
General Purpose
Specific
Sponsored
Ancillary
Operating
Purposes
Research
Enterprises
Capital
Totals
1990
1989
Revenue and other additions:
Government grants and contracts
Government of Canada
$     -
$ 3,599
$ 53,698
$     -
$   -
$ 57,297
$   54,955
Province of British Columbia
Base Operating
214,622
-
434
-
215,056
194,540
Designated
4,561
9,399
9,952
50,998
74,910
66,993
Municipalities
-
2
35
-
37
16
Other governments
-
67
145
-
212
227
Foreign governments
-
711
1,594
-
2,305
2,648
Student fees
57,470
86
-
1,201
-
58,757
50,410
Bequests, donations and non-government grants
-
4,457
20,443
6,543
31,443
25,404
Sales and services
1,303
-
131
61,465
4,008
66,907
54,946
Income from investments
4,974
12,463
-
784
3,155
21,376
14,970
Loans
-
-
-
-
999
999
4,818
282,930
30,784
86,432
63,450
65,703
529,299
469,927
Expenses and other deductions:
Salaries - Academic
115,053
6,234
15,110
-
-
136,397
127,327
- Student service
7,028
3,641
8,833
-
-
19,502
17,808
-Staff
79,614
4,105
18,979
15,498
853
119,049
109,608
201,695
13,980
42,922
15,498
853
274,948
254,743
Benefits
25,333
774
2,824
1,415
98
30,444
28,122
Travel, field trips, moving
5,120
1,963
5,864
757
116
13,820
11,578
Library acquisitions
6,070
397
430
-
-
6,897
6,537
Operational supplies and expenses
22,981
1,179
18,626
6,058
1,397
50,241
48,633
Furniture and equipment
6,898
999
9,024
1,005
3,087
21,013
18,198
Utilities
7,406
210
866
1,489
461
10,432
10,802
Renovations and alterations
1,169
61
57
2,539
4,472
8,298
6,908
Scholarships, fellowships and bursaries
5,038
4,180
777
-
-
9,995
8,681
Professional fees
3,688
1,402
1,803
-
4,602
11,495
10,020
Cost of goods sold
-
-
-
24,539
-
24,539
21,219
Debt servicing
-
-
-
6,922
18,923
25,845
23,723
Building contracts
-
-
-
-
14,199
14,199
22,969
Internal cost recoveries
-2,395
188
1,279
928
-
-
-
External cost recoveries
-4,468
-
-
-
-
-4,468
-4,447
278,535
25,333
84,472
61,150
48,208
497,698
467,686
Transfers and appropriations:
Expended from prior year's appropriations
1,752
-
-
-
-
1,752
13,629
Interfund transfers
-310
(6,103)
628
-64
1,268
-4,581
-2,840
Appropriations for the year
-5,914
-
-
-1,835
-13,935
-21,684
-15,018
-4,472
(6,103)
628
-1,899
-12,667
-24,513
-4,229
Net increase (decrease) during the year
-77
(652)
2,588
401
4,828
7,088
-1,988
Unappropriated Fund balance, beginning of year
269
19,950
22,591
30
2,091
44,931
46,919
Unappropriated Fund balance, end of year
192
19,298
25,179
431
6,919
52,019
44,931
TABLE 2
SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING FUND
FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31
1986 TO 1990
1990
1989
1988
1987
1986
%
%
%
%
%
Source:
Province of B.C. - Grants
77.5
78.7
79.4
80.0
79.7
Student Fees - Credit
14.9
15.2
14.9
15.4
15.3
Student Fees - Non-credit
5.2
4.2
3.7
3.0
3.2
Other
Distribution by Function
2.4
1.9
2.0
1.6
1.8
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Academic and Associated Services
73.3
72.6
72.5
72.1
73.2
Library
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.5
7.3
Student Awards and Services
2.9
2.6
2.7
2.6
2.6
Administration
6.0
5.8
5.6
5.3
4.3
General
1.7
1.1
1.0
1.2
0.7
Plant
9.5
11.2
11.4
11.8
12.3
Overhead recovered
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.4)
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
TABLE 5
SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH FUND
FOR THE YEAR6 ENDED MARCH 31,1986 TO 1990
1990   1989
Source
Goverment of Canada
Province of British Columbia
Other goverments and agencies
Total governments
Individuals, business, foundations
Other
Distribution
Salaries and Benefits
Travel and field trips
Operational supplies and expenses
Furniture and equipment
Other
%
%
1988
1987    1986
%        %
62.1
64.1
67.7
68.9
62.6
12.0
11.0
8.5
7.9
9.2
2.1
2.5
1.7
2.5
2.8
76.2
77.6
77.9
79.3
74.6
23.7
22.2
21.8
20.5
24.9
0.1
0.2
0.3
0.2
0.5
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
54.2
56.0
55.6
58.2
56.7
6.9
6.7
6.5
6.3
6.1
22.0
21.6
21.6
20.4
18.1
10.7
9.4
11.3
10.1
13.1
6.2
6.3
5.0
5.0
6.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0 TABLE3
SUMMARY COMPARISONS OF TOTAL GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING EXPENSES
1985-86 T01989-90
 I
Furniture
I
I
Student
Sub
Travel &
Library
Supplies &
Equipment &
Academic
%
Services
%
Staff
%
Total
%
Benefits
%
Total
%
Field Trip
Acquisitions
Expenses
Utilities
Alterations
Total
%
%
%
%
%
%
1989 - 90
41.3
2.5
28.6
72.4
9.2
81.6
1.8
2.2
8.9
2.6
2.9
100.0
1988 - 89
42.3
2.4
28.4
73.1
9.3
82.4
1.7
2.3
8.0
3.3
2.3
100.0
1987 - 88
42.2
2.4
29.2
73.8
9.2
83.0
1.6
2.3
7.9
3.5
1.7
100.0
1986 - 87
42.8
2.5
28.5
73.8
9.0
82.8
1.4
2.4
7.9
3.7
1.8
100.0
1985 - 86
43.7
2.5
28.4
74.6
9.1
83.7
1.1
2.3
5.2
4.3
3.4
100.0
TABLE 4
TOTAL SPONSORED RESEARCH
FUNDING
(thousands of dollars)
1989-90
Amount
86,432
1988-89
80,147
1987-88
71,511
1986-87
65,280
1985-86
59,619
Total Academic Salaries* as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1979/80 to 1989/90
1979/80       1980/81        1981/82       1982/83       1983/84       1984/85       1985/86       1986/87       1987/88
UBC Alta Sask Man UWO UTO McGill
Source: Canadian Association ot University Business Officers
* Comprises academic ranks and other instructional staff and student service appointments.
Excludes early termination agreements
Object of expense calculations are taken as a percentage ol net expenditures, which includes cost recoveries,
therefore the sum of the object of expense percentages will exceed 100.
Non-Academic Salaries as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1979/80 to 1989/90
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers
Excludes earty termination agreements
Object of expense calculations are taken as a percentage of net expendkures, which includes cost recoveries,
therefore the sum of the object of expense percentages wHt exceed 100.
Total Salaries & Benefits as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1979/8010 1989/90
•
■^s^--^rr7^fr:^' ^"^^^_
~^*r±-                 ^.^"'^    S'x\                                   "~ "^ ^^. TORONTO
^""^--x^                                                         MoGU.
—t \ 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1—
90
1979/80     1980/81     1981/82     1982/83     1983/84     1984/85     1985/86     1986/87     1987/88    1988/89    1989/90
UBC Alta Seek Man UWO UTO
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers
Excludes earty termination agreements
Object of expense calculations are taken as a percentage of net expenditures, which Includes cost recoveries,
therefore the sum of the object of expense percentages wW exceed 100.
Non-Salary Expenditures as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1979/8010 1989/90
35
30
8
20
15
10       I I III II I I I 1       10
1979/80       1980/81       1981/82       1982/83       1983/84       1984/86       1965/86       1986/87       1987/88       1988/89       1989/90
UBC Alta Sask Han UWO UTO McGill
Source: Canadian Association ot University Business Officers
Object of expense calcuiationa are taken as a percentage of net exrjeryjfr*asjridudes cost recoveries.
therefore the sum of the object of expanse percentages wl exceed 100.
Percentage Distribution of General Purpose Operating Expenditures
Faculties and Administrative Units
1985/86-1989/90
3.5     34     38 _<£
Faculties Plant Academic Services       Continuing Education Other
^   1985/86 ^   1986/87 g§   1987/88 Q   1988/89 H   1989/90
Faculties tnclucles ETA and retroactive salary increases.
Academic Service includes Compuiing Centre. Academe Services, Ubrary.
Continuing Education comprises CCE and rtort-credit program, rndudes'
Other includes student aid, student services, adrniriiswion, general and osSer.
Note: Expenditures are net of cairy toward.
qjjeaoltaopensecataiBionsareiBhenMap
therefore tw sum of Us object ol expense petrentBQBi wl enosad 100.
CcimiBartn tk* Mn**tMton * HeaHh Sciences etc.
hctudes cosi recoveries. UBCREPORTS Oct.4.1990
October 7-
October 20
CICSR Distinguished
Lecture Series
Cryptography In The Computer Age.
Window On Digital Communications.
James Massey, Professor fur Digitaltech-
nik, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, Zurich. First of seven lectures. Scarfe
100 from 1-2:30pm. Call 228-6894.
Physics Colloquium
Solar Neutrinos-1990. Ken Lande, U. of
Pennsylvania. Hennings 201 at 4pm. Call
228-3853.
Pharmacology Seminar
Isolation And Mode Of Action Of Antidiuretic Peptide
From Schistocerca Gre-
garia. Dr. Neil Audsley,
Zoology, UBC. Friedman
Lecture Hall B from 11:30-
12:30pm. Call 228-2575.
Health Sciences Student
Research Forum
Oral And Poster Presentations Of Scientific Work. Opening Remarks: Dr. David
F. Hardwick, Assoc. Dean, Research/Planning. Keynote Speakers: Michael Patten, Peter O'Loughlin. IRC Lecture Halls
and Seminar rooms from 5-8pm. Call
228-4305.
UBC Symphony Orchestra
Jesse Read, director. Free admission.
Old Auditorium at 12:30pm. Call 228-
3113.
Distinguished Artists Series
Michel Debost, flute and
Rita Constanzi, harp.
Admission: General, $12:
students/seniors, $7. Prelude lecture at 7:15pm.,
concert at 8pm. Music
Recital Hall. Call 228-3113.
Office for Women
Students Program
Video and Discussion: Fear Of Fat. Brock
204D from 12:30-2:20pm. Free admission. Call 228-2415.
Round Table Forum
Nationalism's Threat To
Justice. Dr. N. Wolterstorff.
Philosophical Theology,
Yale Divinity School.
Sponsored by the Graduate and Faculty Christian
Forum/Murrin Fund. Faculty Club Ballroom at 4pm. Call 228-2728.
NOTICES
FRIDAY, OCT. 19    j
Fisheries/Aquatic Science
Seminar Series
Spatial Pattern And Ecological Analysis.
Pierre Legendre, U. of Montreal. BioSciences 2361 at 3:30pm. Call 228-2731.
Chemical Engineering
Weekly Seminar
Recent Development Of Pigment Science
In Japan. Dr. M. Mori, Chairman, Fuji
Pigment Co. ChemEngineering 206 at
3:30pm. Call 228-3238.
Philosophy Fall
Colloquium Series
Can One Have A Right To
Benefits? Dr. N. Wolterstorff, Philosophical Theology, Yale Divinity School.
Buchanan Penthouse at
10:30am. Call 228-3292.
Public Lecture
Justice And The Integrity Of Creation.
Prof. N. Wolterstorff, Philosophical Theology, Yale Divinity School. Sponsored by
the Graduate and Faculty Christian Forum/Murrin Fund. IRC #2 at 4:30pm. Call
228-2728.
UBC Symphony Orchestra
"Jesse Read, director.    Free admission.
Old Auditorium at 8pm. Call 228-3113.
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Sat., Oct. 13
Carcinogens and Aging.
Prof. Bruce N. Ames,
Chairman, Biochemistry, U.
of California (Berkeley),
Cecil and Ida Green Visit-
IRC #2 at 8:15pm.   Call
ing Professor.
228-5675.
Sat., Oct. 20
German Unity-What Next?
Dr. G. Langguth, Head, Representation of
the European Communities To The Federal Republic of Germany, Bonn. IRC #2
at 8:15pm. Call 228-5675.
Carpool Matching
Now available. Send the
following information to
Karen Pope, Dean's Office,
Applied Science: your
home address (i.e. departure point); where you work
and what hours (e.g. M-F, 8:30am-
4:30pm); both your home phone number
and UBC local; if you have a car and
whether you smoke while driving. When
a match is found, you will be sent the
name(s) to contact for arranging a car
pool. Call 228-0870.
Awards And Financial Aid
Rhodes Scholarships (1991) application
forms for Oxford are now available in the
UBC Awards Office. Candidates must be
Canadian citizens or persons domiciled in
Canada; have been born between Oct. 2/
66 and Oct. 1/72; be single and have
completed at least 3 years university by
Oct. 1991. Awards Office, General Services/Administration 101 or call 228-5111.
Office For Women
Students Workshops
Essay Skills Workshop.
Nancy Horsman. For students wishing to improve
their essay preparation
skills. Free admission.
Consecutive Thursdays,
Oct. 18, 25 and Nov. 1. Buchanan B212
from 12:30-1:30pm. Call 228-2415.
Assertiveness-Social
Caren Durante. Basic communication
skills to utilize in social settings from classrooms to relationships. Free Admission.
Fridays, Oct. 12, 19 and 26. Brock 106
from 12:30-2:20pm. Call 228-2415.
UBC Speakers Bureau
Would your group like to know more about
Environmental Health or Canadian Theatre? More than 500 topics to choose
from; most speakers available free of
charge. Call 228-6167, Mon., Wed., Fri.,
8:30am-noon.
Our Chiefs And Elders
Portraits of BC Native leaders, chiefs, chief counsellors and elders by Kwaguitl
photographer David Neel.
Continues at the Museum
of Anthropology. Call 228-
5087.
Asian Centre Art Exhibits
Until Oct. 13: Chinese watercolours and
acrylics by Nathan Szeto.
Oct. 15-30: Exhibit of historical Buddhist icons
painted on seasoned wood
by Kojima Tadashi. Asian
Centre   Auditorium   from
11 am-5pm daily. Call 228-2746.
Executive Programmes
One/two day business seminars. Oct. 7-
20 series includes: Time Management,
$450; Construction Claims, $950; Training the Trainer, $675; Warehouse Operations, $875. Call 224-8400.
English Language
Institute Courses
Professional Development Series For
Practicing Language Teachers, Seven
workshops. Tues. and Thurs. evenings,
7-9pm, Oct. and Nov. Topics range from
Visuals: The Key to Communication to
Language Learning Games. Call 228-
5208.
Sports Medicine Study
Exercise and the Menstrual
Cycle. Volunteers needed
to participate. Female, age
18-35, fit, healthy, having
normal menstrual cycles
and not currently on oral
contraceptives. Physiological testing provided. Allan McGavin Sports Med.Centre,
John Owen Pavilion, UBC. Call Dr. Connie Lebrun 228-4045 or 980-6355.
Psychiatry Depression Study
Partipants needed for research study using new antidepressant medication. Depression sufferers, 18-65 years. Call Doug
Keller at 228-7318.
Psychiatry Personality
Questionnaire Study
Volunteers needed. Involves two, 45 min.
sessions. Participants will receive $15
stipend upon completion. Detwiller 2N2.
Call 228-7895/7057.
Memory and Memory
Strategies Study
Volunteers needed, aged 60-plus, to participate in a memory investigation exploring memory strategies and their ability to
boost memory performance. Call Karen
at 228-2140.
Dermatology Study
For Alopecia Areata—scalp area. Volunteers 18-65, good health, greater than 50%
hair loss for more than 1 year. Able to
attend weekly visits for 1 year. Call Dr.
Shapiro at 463-6111.
Daily Rhythms Study
Volunteers needed to keep a daily journal
(average 5 min. daily) for 4 months, noting
patterns in physical/social experiences.
Call Jessica McFarlane at 228-5121.
Sun Damaged Skin Study
Volunteers again needed, aged 35-70
years. Able to attend 6 visits over a 12-
month period. Honorarium paid participants. Call Dermatology at 874-8138.
Study For Acne Vulgaris
Volunteers aged 14-35 years needed.
Must be able to attend 4 visits over a 12
week period. Honorarium paid. Call Dermatology at 874-8138.
Sleep Disorders Study
Volunteers 18-45 years suffering from
Chronic Insomnia needed for a study on
sleep-promoting medication (hypnotics).
Must be available to sleep overnight at a
lab for five nights. Call Carmen Ramirez
at 228-7927.
Career Development Study
Research study on communication between parents and adolescents regarding
career and educational choices. Young
people aged 12-19 and one parent needed
to participate in an interview. Call Dr.
Richard Young at 228-6380.
Hypertension in
Pregnancy Study
Pregnant women, concerned about their
blood pressure, are invited to participate.
The study compares relaxation training
with standard medical treatment (own
physician). Call Dr. Wolfgang Linden at
228-4156.
Post Polio Study
Persons with polio needed
for functional assessment
and possible training programs. Elizabeth Dean,
Ph.D., School of Rehabilitation Medicine. Call 228-
7392.
Multiple Sclerosis Study
Persons with mild to moderately severe
MS needed for study on exercise responses. Elizabeth Dean, Ph.D., School
of Rehab. Medicine. Call 228-7392.
Back Pain Research
Volunteers needed for magnetic resonance imaging of healthy spines—nonpregnant women aged 30-40 and men
over 40, no pacemakers, no intracranial
clips and no metal fragments in the eye.
About one hour required. Call June, MRI
Unit, Mon.-Thurs. 8am-4pm, at 228-7720.
Statistical Consulting and
Research Laboratory
SCARL is operated by the Department of
Statistics to provide statistical advice to
faculty and graduate students working on
research problems. Forms for appointments available in Room 210, Ponderosa
AnnexC. Call 228-4037.
Surplus Equipment
Recycling Facility
{msmnnqi All surplus items. Every
Wednesday, 12-3pm.
Task Force Bldg., 2352
Health Sciences Mall. Call
228-2813.
iilflndMH
Volunteering
To find an interesting and challenging volunteer job, get in touch with Volunteer
Connections, Student Counselling and
Resources Centre, Brock 200. Call 228-
3811.
Sexual Harassment Office
Two advisors are available to discuss
questions and concerns on the subject.
They are prepared to help any member of
the UBC community who is being sexually
harassed to find a satisfactory resolution.
Call Margaretha Hoek or Jon Shapiro at
228-6353.
Narcotics Anonymous Meetings
Every Tuesday (including holidays) from
12:30-2pm, University Hospital, UBC Site,
Room 311 (through Lab Medicine from
Main Entrance). Call 873-1018 (24-hour
Help Line).
Badminton Club
Thursdays from 8:30-
10:30pm and Fridays from
6:30-8:30pm in Gym A of
the Robert Osborne
Centre. Cost is $15 plus
library card. Call Bernard
228-6809 or 731 -9966.
Fitness Appraisal
Physical Education and Recreation
through the John M. Buchanan Fitness
and Research Centre, administers a physical fitness assessment program. Students
$25, others $30. Call 228-4356.
Agricurl
Late afternoon curling starts Oct. 16. New
plus experienced curlers welcome. Thunderbird, Tuesday evenings, 5:15 or
7:15pm. Call Alex Finlayson at 738-7698
or Paul Willing at 228-5468.
Neville Scarfe Children's Garden
Located west of the Education Building. Free admission. Open all year.
Families interested in planting, weeding or watering
the garden, call Gary Pennington at 228-6386 or Jo-Anne Naslund
at 434-1081.
m&!t»..i*
Botanical Garden
Open every day from 10am-5pm until Oct.
8; 10am-3pm Oct. 9-March 15. Free
admission after Oct. 8. Call 228-3928.
Nitobe Garden
Open Monday to Friday from 10am-5pm
until Oct. 8; 10am-3pm Oct. 9-Mar.15.
Free admission after Oct. 9. Call 228-
3928.
Advertise in UBC Reports
Edition
Oct. 18
Nov. 1
Nov. 15
Nov. 29
Deadline (noon)
Oct. 9
Oct. 22
Nov. 5
Nov. 19
For information phone 228-3131
To place an ad phone 228-4775 UBCREPORTS Oct4.1990
People
O'Brian named Braide winner
O'Brian
John   O'Brian,   a
professor of Fine Arts,
has won the first Janet
Braide Memorial Award
for his outstanding contribution io scholarship
in the field of Canadian
art history.
O'Brian won the
award, which honors the
memory of Canadian art
historian Janet Braide.
for an essay and his editorial control of the exhibition catalogue. The Flat Side of the Landscape: The Emma Lake Artists' Workshop.
O'Brian. who as guest curator of The Flat
Side of the Landscape was responsible for the
selection of artwork, also edited the 150-page
exhibition catalogue and contributed an essay,
"Where the Hell is Saskatchewan, and Who is
Emma Lake?"
Dr. Thomas Perry
Sr., professor emeritus
of Pharmacology and
Therapeutics at UBC.
has been awarded the
first Vancouver Citizens
Peace Award in recognition of his contributions to world peace at a
community level.
A U.S. Army Captain
during World War II, Dr.
Perry has vigorously opposed nuclear weapons
testing since the end ofthe war in 1945.
Dr. Perry emigrated to Canada in 1962
where he continued to be a strong and vocal adversary of nuclear arms.
Dr. Perry
He also became an opponent of the Vietnam
War and embarked on efforts to reduce hostilities
between Canada and the Soviet Union.
He has been active in several peace groups
throughout the years, including Canadian Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War and Veterans Against Nuclear Arms. In addition, he has
been an appointed member of Vancouver's Special Council Committee on Peace since it was
formed in 1985 by city council.
Dr. Perry was responsible for organizing the
Vancouver Centennial Peace and Disarmament
Symposium in 1986.
The Vancouver Citizens Peace Award was
presented to Dr. Perry by Vancouver Mayor Gordon Campbell in a civic commemoration of the
UN's International Day of Peace, Sept. 18.
The International Union
of Radio Science (URSI)
has elected Edward Jull,
a professor in Electrical
Engineering, as its president for a three-year term.
URSI was created in
1919 to stimulate and coordinate international studies in the fields of radio,
telecommunications and
electronic sciences.
With a secretariat located in Brussels, Belgium, URSI has 39 member countries. Jull has
been vice-president of URSI since 1987 and is its
first Canadian president. He was elected at the
recent 23rd general assembly in Prague, Czechoslovakia.
JuU
Ronald Hagler, a professor in the School of
Library, Archival and Information Studies, has
been awarded the American Library Association's
Margaret Mann Citation, the highest award given
to specialists in the field of cataloguing and classification.
He was chosen for the 1990 award in recognition of his outstanding contributions to the development and implementation ofthe Anglo-American Cataloguing Rules and his work as a teacher,
writer and participant in the formulation of those
rules.
Hagler, a founding member of the school,
teaches cataloguing, the history of the book and
the description and indexing of archival materials.
Commerce    Professor
Martin   Puterman   has
been elected first president
of a new section of the Statistical Society of Canada,
a group which serves as a
focus for about 800 statisticians in universities, government and industry.
The newly formed bi-
ostatistics section will represent   the   interests   of
members who are involved in the application of
statistics to the biological sciences.
Puterman established the Biostatistical Consulting Service at Children's Hospital Variety Club
Research Centre and recently stepped down as its
director. A professor in management science,
one of his research areas is the medical application of statistics.
Puterman
Ronald Jobe, a professor in Language
Education, has been elected president of the
International Board on Books for Young
People (IBBY) at its 22nd World Congress
held recently in Williamsburg, Va.
It is the first time IBBY's president has
come from outside Europe.
Founded in 1953 and based in Basel, Switzerland, IBBY has 52 national sections and
members in 64 countries.
Every two years, IBBY presents the Hans
Christian Andersen Award, the highest international recognition given to illustrators
and authors of children's books.
The School of Architecture has named
Sanford Hirshen as its new director, effective Jan. 1.
Hirshen has taught in the Department of
Architecture at the University of California,
Berkeley, since 1966.
A full professor since 1974, he has also
served as chairman of the department and as
director of the Centre for Planning and Development Research and Associate Dean for
Research at the College of Environmental
Design.
His professional work includes design of
public housing and facilities for the elderly,
the disabled, students and families, as well
as schools, parks, health care facilities and
private residences.
Recent work includes planning for the
University of California, Los Angeles, including the design of the university's campus laboratory school in coordination with
architect I.M. Pei's office.
In 1985, Hirshen won a Guggenheim fellowship to study European public housing.
Ecologist honored
Victoria establishes Krajina chair
By JO MOSS
The provincial government has established a new research chair in silvics
and silviculture at UBC honoring one
of the university's best-known ecolo-
gists.
The V.J. Krajina/B.C. Forest Service Chair in Silvics and Silviculture
recognizes Vladimir Krajina, a professor emeritus in Botany, who dedicated
his career to advancing our knowledge
of the ecology of forest trees and developing an ecological classification
system for the province.
Krajina's classification system is
based on the complex relationships
between climate, soil and vegetation
and forms the groundwork for the application of ecologically sound forest
management practices. It is the system on which all B.C.'s forestry programs are based.
"If we know what we have and
where we have it, then we are better
able to say what we can do with it,"
said UBC Forestry Professor Karel
Klinka, who will occupy the chair.
The B.C. Ministry of Forests is
providing an annual grant of $65,000
for five years to enable Klinka to carry
out research in two areas which are
becoming increasingly important to the
forest industry: silvics, the study of
the life history and ecological characteristics of forest trees; and silviculture, the practice of cultivating the forest.
Klinka worked with Krajina as a
graduate student at UBC and did his
PhD thesis on the classification, map
ping and interpretation of ecosystem
units in the Malcolm Knapp/UBC
Research Forest. He has since worked
with ecologists in B.C.'s Ministry of
Forests to build on Krajina's work and
complete a comprehensive inventory
of the province's ecosystems.
"To manipulate forest ecosystems
and their productivity, we need this
basic information. We can use that
data to make predictions, then we can
establish a better basis on which to cut
the forest and regenerate it," Klinka
explained. "That's the key."
In his new position, he begins the
next step which is to obtain quantitative information on shade tolerance of
forest trees and develop a site-specific
decision-making system that will enable foresters to make more informed
decisions about regenerating the forest.
"The basic underlying principle is
that trees grow and behave in ways
that depend on the sites in which they
grow. Trees that form different ecosystems should be managed differently," Klinka explained.
A former forester with Canadian
Cellulose Co., Klinka has been a research scientist with the B.C. Ministry
of Forests since 1975 and associated
with UBC in various adjunct positions
since 1978.
3 associate deans
named for Arts
Dean of Arts Patricia Marchak has
named three associate deans to assist
her in the administration ofthe Faculty
of Arts.
Geography Professor Graeme
Wynn will handle the new student affairs portfolio. His responsibilities
include virtually all student- and curriculum-related affairs in the faculty.
Wynn has overall charge of student
advising through the senior advisor's
office and will handle student appeals,
awards, and liaison with high schools
and colleges, as well as with the Faculty of Science.
As part of his duties, History Professor Robert Kubicek will oversee the
processing of promotions and tenure.
He will also head up a new portfolio
concerned with research and serve as
liaison with the office of the Vice-
President, Research. Kubicek will also
handle prize applications, and conference support requests, as well as relations with the Faculty of Graduate
Studies.
Economics Professor Donald Paterson will be responsible for soft money
budget allocations, sessional lecturers
and teaching assistants, the equipment
budget, and supplies and expenses.
A fourth associate dean will be
named later this year to deal with interdisciplinary and inter-faculty matters.
EMRG
TESTING AND RESEARCH SERVICES
• Test Scanning and Scoring
• Student Course Evaluations
• Research Consultation and Support
• Questionnaire and Survey Forms Design
• Data Collection and Data Entry
• Data Analysis
EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENT RESEARCH GROUP
Room 1312, Neville Scarfe Building
2125 Main Mall, Vancouver V6T 1Z5
Telephone: (604) 228-4145 Fax: (604) 228-6501
Attention Professors
How to Build a Custom
Course       ^^^^     Packet
Readings
Out-of-print   w I  On reserve
Periodicals   W  I News articles W j    Journals
Case studies W [Lab exercises 9 I   Overheads   W I Study guides I
Drawings      P   |    Illustrations   P   |        Maps        W Charts       ■ I       Diagrams
Kinko's Academic Services was created with the professor and student in mind. With
our Copyright Clearance Service you have the ability to develop the perfect course packet,
legally and efficiently, with no cost to you or your department. If your course requirements
are not covered by available textbooks, give us a call, and create your own course material.
academic services
For further information : contact Mark Elliott
5706 University Blvd., Vancouver, B.C. ph 222-1688 UBC REPORTS Oct. 4.1990
Lieutenant-Governor David Lam (right) plants a rhododendron
named in his honor during the opening ofthe New Education and
Visitors' Centre in the Botanical Garden's David C. Lam Asian Garden. Accompanying him is David Tarrant, gsarden education coordinator.
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
•research design
> sampling
• data analysis
• forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D.
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508       Home: (604) 263-5394
Classified
Classified advertising can be purchased from Media Services. Phone
228-4775. Ads placed by faculty and staff cost $6 per insertion for 35
words. Others are charged $7. Tuesday, Oct. 8 at 9 a.m. is the deadline
for the next issue of UBC Reports which appears on Thursday, Oct. 18.
Deadline for the following edition on Nov. 1 is 4 p.m. Monday, Oct. 22. All
ads must be paid in advance in cash, by cheque or internal requisition.
Services
GUARANTEED ACCURACY plus
professional looking results with WP5
and HP Deskjet Plus printer. Editing
and proofreading. Competitive rates.
Pickup and delivery available at extra
cost. West End location. Call Suzanne
683-1194.
VICTORIA REAL ESTATE: Experi-
enced, knowledgeable realtor with
faculty references will answer all queries and send information on retirement or investment opportunities. No
cost or obligation. Call (604) 595-
3200. Lois Dutton, REMAX Ports
West, Victoria, B.C.
NOTARY PUBLIC: for all your Notarial Services including Wills, Conveyancing and Mortgages, contact
Pauline Matt, 4467 Dunbar St., (at
28th & Dunbar), Vancouver, B.C.
Telephone (604) 222-9994.
Miscellaneous
FINDERS FEES: Significant sums to
be earned for acting as a business
intermediary. Absolutely no experience needed. Earn thousands for simply being the catalyst. Ideal for raising
funds for yourself or the needs of
charities. Write us for full information.
Box 46136 Station G, Vancouver,
B.C., V6R 4G5
Accommodation
HOUSE SITTING: Postdoctoral fellow, wife and baby seek housesitting
arrangement to begin in Fall, 1990, or
Spring, 1991. We are responsible,
non-smokers, good with pets and
house plants and especially enjoy gardening. Call Geoff or Denyse (403)
432-7874 evenings.
For Rent
OFFICES FOR RENT: Two offices
for rent. Lutheran Campus Centre at
UBC. One full-time, one shared. $500
and $300 incl. utilities. Phone 224-
1614 or 224-3328.
DRIVING: Tired of driving to UBC from
Coquitlam? So am I. If you are interested in car pooling, call Judy at 228-
2404
For Sale
BLACK & WHITE ENLARGEMENTS: from your negatives, individually hand exposed, cropped,
dodged and shaded to your exact
specifications. High quality papers in
matte or high gloss finish. We can
get the best from your sub-standard
negative. Great prices, an 8x10 custom enlargement just $5.70! Call
Media Services Photography at 228-
4775. (3rd floor LPC, 2206 East Mall).
Computer game teaches
children about forestry
By JO MOSS
Harry the Harvester is a character
in a new computer game for children
designed to bring forest management
into B.C.'s classrooms through colorful
graphics and animated scenarios.
Called FORTOON, it has been
developed by UBC Forestry Professor
Hamish Kimmins, and computer programmer Kim Scoullar, from a computer simulation forest management
program, called FORCYTE, devised
by Kimmins for Forestry Canada.
FORTOON is a simplified, user-
friendly version of the more technical
FORCYTE and operates in simple
language on an inexpensive desktop
computer.
It allows teachers to introduce forestry and forest management practices
to students as young as Grade 3.
"There's tremendous flexibility
with the program," Kimmins said.
"FORTOON can be used to teach older
students critical thinking and the consequence of choice.
"In forest management decisions,
there's always a price to pay in the
future in terms of forest yield, profitability, employment in the industry, and
impact on the environment."
FORTOON demonstrates visually
how choices made for forests today
impact on succeeding generations of
trees, surrounding vegetation, soil fer
tility and site productivity.
The program tracks more than 300
variables — factors in the ecosystem
cycle such as light intensity, soil conditions and vegetation growth — and
can predict the ecology of the hypothetical forest more than 200 years into
the future, when the forest is managed
in any one of many different ways.
The demonstration program was
funded by the Council of Forest Industries and B.C. Forest Industries. Now,
K immins wants to develop FORTOON
further so that it can be used in B.C.
schools.
"We want to get people to understand the difference between good forestry and bad forestry and to discover
that in making long-term goals for forests there is always a trade-off," Kimmins said.
"If, for example, our goal is to set
aside wilderness areas for recreation,
then the trade-off is that the amount of
forest land to harvest is smaller.
"Getting the greatest supply of logs
and other products now may reduce
future log supplies, but ensuring sus-
tainability may increase costs and reduce short-term log supply," he said
The FORTOON program begins by
depicting a forest scene complete with
trees, shrubs, and blacktail deer.
Students select characters, such as
Harry, to play a part in the scenario,
and choose a series of actions for him
to carry out.
They can opt to fertilize newly
planted trees, thin a young forest, or
harvest a mature stand, for example.
The effects of unexpected fire or insect
infestation can also be investigated.
Whatever the choices, the results
unfold instantly before the students"
eyes as FORTOON runs through a 60-
year rotation cycle in a matter of minutes.
A simple bar graph on one side of
the screen tracks changes in soil composition, and indicates increasing and
decreasing levels ofthe vital tree nutrients, nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium.
The effects of the selected forest
management plan on such things as
jobs, profits, wildlife, soil conditions,
contributions to the greenhouse effect,
and fossil fuel energy used, are tabulated for the viewer.
Once FORTOON is fully developed. Harry will be joined by Henrietta the Harvester, Penelope the tree
planter, and others representative of
occupations in the forest industry.
Other wildlife — birds and mammals
— will join blacktail deer in the computer forest.
Kimmins has canvassed professional foresters and school teachers for
suggestions on enhancing the program
and hopes to begin testing FORTOON
in selected schools this fall.
You are cordially invited to attend the
'90 UBC/AMS Computer Show
"Computing for the 1990's"
Wednesday, October 10th and
Thursday, October 11th
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Ballroom
2nd Floor
6138 Student Union Building
UBC
EXHIBITORS
Networking & Communications
UBC Bookstore
UBC University Computing
Services
Silicon Graphics Computer
Systems
Oracle Corporation, Canada
Koa-Didak Ltd.
IBM Canada Ltd.
ABS Technology Ltd. DBA
TIC-IDM Distribution Inc.
Abaton Technology Inc.
Toshiba of Canada,
Information Systems Group
Precision Visuals, Inc.
Data General (Canada) Inc.
NeXT Canada Ltd.
Zenith Data Systems
NEC Canada Inc.
Sun Micro Systems of Canada Inc.
Griffco Marketing
Epson Canada Limited
Hewlett-Packard (Canada) Ltd.
ESRI Canada Ltd.
Sharp Electronics of Canada Ltd.
Interworld Electronics
& Computer Industries Ltd.
B.C Tel
Door prizes donated by: Abaton Technology Inc.; Koa-Didak Ltd.;
Sun Micro Systems of Canada Inc.; UBC/AMS.
WE LOOK FORWARD TO SEEING YOU
AT THE SHOW. UBCREPORTS Oct.4.1990
Health Sciences Week
Focus on total health care
By CONNIE FILLETTI
The concept of total patient health care is
one of the major focuses of UBC's third
annual Health Sciences Week Oct. 14 to Oct.
20.
A highlight of the week's events and activities is the Health Care Team Clinical
Competition, designed to enhance students'
knowledge about other health professions
and their roles in the clinical arena.
"The Health Care Team Clinical Competition is absolutely unique in Canada," explained UBC Faculty of Dentistry professor
and chair of the competition committee, Dr.
Ravindra Shah. "We have received inquiries
from other post-secondary institutions across
North America that would like to organize
one for their health sciences students."
The Health Sciences at UBC include medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmaceutical sciences, occupational therapy, physiotherapy,
social work, audiology and speech sciences,
clinical psychology, counselling psychology
and nutrition.
"In the community, health professionals
seldom have the opportunity to work together," said Dr. Shah. "Our students rarely
get an opportunity to interact during their
health education at the university. As a result, they can only treat a patient from a
limited viewpoint when, in reality, they want
to be able to provide total service to their
patients."
Dr. Shah feels the clinical competition is
an ideal approach for UBC to take in addressing the need for students pursuing careers in the different health sciences to interact.
"Every discipline will be approaching the
patient's problem in harmony," he said. "We
Photo by Media Services
Members ofthe Health Care Team Clinical Competition committee represent each discipline ofthe Health Sciences at UBC.
are setting the example that knowledge about
other health professions is critical to maintaining a patient's health and health care."
Designing a course for such an education
would only overload an already full curriculum, he added. But the clinical competition
encourages group participation in a relaxed
setting while still providing a challenge to
the students.
Three teams of students will be selected
from the senior year of each of the health
sciences disciplines to compete in the clinical competition. The teams will be presented
with a hypothetical patient and asked questions about the case. Their responses will be
assessed by a panel of judges.
"This is an original program with real
academic value," said Dr. Shah. "Students
will learn enormously about the critical art
of judgment based on sound scientific principles during the two-hour session. The
emphasis is on thinking."
The Health Care Team Clinical Competition will be held before a live audience Oct.
18 between 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. in IRC
lecture theatre six. The audience will be invited to give brief comments when
appropriate.
Book helps cross cultural health barriers
By JO MOSS
Providing health care for Canada's immigrant population can be confusing and frustrating—both for those providing the care
and for those receiving it.
Each may complain the other doesn't
understand them.
Now, two UBC professors and a provincial government social worker have produced
a unique book to assist health care providers
in identifying issues and concerns that people
in different cultures have.
Called Cross-Cultural Caring: A Handbook for Health Professionals in Western
Canada, it's a series of essays written by
people from nine ethnic communities, describing their values and beliefs as they relate to health.
"It's not a recipe for administering health
care to ethnic groups," said UBC Nursing
Professor Joan Anderson who co-edited the
book with Nancy Waxier-Morrison, associate professor of Social Work and Sociology
and Elizabeth Richardson, a social worker
with the Ministry of Social Services and
Housing.
"But it does give background knowledge
so that health care providers can be aware of
what issues their patients face. It can help
them better understand and assess individuals from other cultures."
Even when a patient from a different ethnic group is dressed in Western clothes and
speaks fluent English, he or she may not
understand the Canadian way of doing things,
Anderson said. Conversely, a patient in traditional costume may be well-educated and
familiar with Western medicine.
Patient beliefs about health care can also
vary within an ethnic community depending
on the individual's education, class, and occupation.
"Each situation is different and each patient should be dealt with on an individual
basis," Anderson explained. But health care
providers should be aware of some basic
cultural issues, she said.
Touching the head or shoulder of another
person in casual contact, particularly if that
person is older, is seen by Cambodians and
Laotians, for example, as being disrespectful. Southeast Asians view illness as an
imbalance in body humors — bile, and
phlegm, for example —
and expect treatment to
restore the balance.
Among Central
Americans, a female
relative will often be expected to accompany a
woman to see a male
physician.
In addition to the cultural differences between immigrants and
Anderson
Health Sciences Week events
A complete schedule of events including lectures and poster displays, in addition to the Health Care Team Clinical
Competition, has been planned for
Health Sciences Week.
The week's program starts off with
the Dr. John F. McCreary Lecture Oct.
15. Dr. Andrew Pipe of the University
of Ottawa Heart Institute will deliver
an address entitled Politics, Pathology
and the Public's Health. He will discuss
how the health of future Canadians is
likely to be enhanced as much by political decisions as by the traditional activities ofthe health care professions.
The university community and the
public are invited to hear Dr. Pipe's
comments in IRC lecture theatre six beginning at 12:30 p.m.
On Oct. 17, UBC's First Nations
Health Care Professions Program is
sponsoring a lecture on Native Healing
Practices in IRC lecture theatre six at
12:30 p.m. Everyone is welcome to attend.
The Health Care Team Clinical Competition gets under way on Oct. 18 at
12:30 p.m. in IRC lecture theatre six.
The competition runs until 2:30 p.m.
and the public is encouraged to participate.
Beginning at 5 p.m. on Oct. 18 in the
IRC Mall and lecture theatres, the
Health Sciences Student Research Forum commences.
The forum features 90 poster and
oral presentations which address the
clinical and biological aspects of the
health sciences. Topics include nutrition, cancer, birth defects and the state
of the art in basic health sciences research.
The Marion Woodward Lecture also
takes place Oct. 18 at 8 p.m. in IRC lecture theatre two.
This year's speaker is Barbara Burke,
newly appointed vice-president of nursing at St. Paul's Hospital, a teaching
hospital of UBC's Faculty of Medicine.
Burke will focus on the growing isolation of the nursing profession from
other health care professionals.
For more information about Health
Sciences Week, call 228-3737.
health care providers, many immigrant families face stress and trauma unique to their
situation in Canada, Anderson said. They
are often used to having the emotional support of an extended family, which they may
have left behind in their native country. They
are frequently handicapped by inadequate
English and a lack of financial resources in
trying to adjust to a new life in Canada.
And they encounter problems in raising
their children in a different society—especially when the children accept and adopt
Western values quickly.
Anderson said health care providers need
to take into account the family's situation in
Canada when determining their health needs.
The book covers areas such as religion,
family structure, marriage, and child-rearing, as well as traditional health care beliefs
and practices and the relationship between
the patient and professional.
Aimed at anyone working in the health
care field, it also provides important information for health care administrators, teachers and others who regularly come in contact
with different cultures, Anderson said.
All three authors have worked with ethnic
communities for many years. Anderson has
carried out research in Canada with immigrant women. A National Health Research
Scholar in the School of Nursing, she was
born in Jamaica.
Waxier-Morrison has conducted research
in Sri Lanka and India on medical sociology.
Richardson was born and raised in India
where her Canadian parents lived for many
years and also taught English in Japan.
The three drew on their extensive network in the ethnic community for participation in this project. The book, which took
two years from inception to publication, was
issued this year by UBC Press.

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