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UBC Reports Apr 5, 2001

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 VOLUME     47     |      NUMBER    7     |     APRIL    5,     2001
INSIDE
3 Wireless women
A researcher ponders why
girls aren't in high-tech
20 Doctor detective
Dr. Andrew Eisen seeks to
ubc reoorts
unravel a puzzling disease THE   UNIVERSITY   OF   BRITISH    COLUMBIA
cliff hangers   A project to restore and preserve the ocean parkland
immediately below Cecil Green Park House has now been completed using
engineered fill in combination with reinforcing mesh orgeogrid on the cliff
face. The five-month project, which was managed by Land and Building
Services, stabilized the cliff face and protected it with a series of live wattle
fences that both re-vegetate the slope and provide areas for planting desirable
trees and shrubs. A berm constructed above the cliff is designed to contain
excess water in the event of a heavy rainfall to aid in preventing further
erosion. John Percy photo
ubc attracts leading
diabetes researcher
Donor's $2.5-million gift to
fund cutting-edge research
by Hilary Thomson staff
writer
AN   ALTERNATIVE  TO   PANCREAS
transplant — until now only available in Alberta — will be an option
for b.c. diabetes patients within
two years, thanks to a $2.5-million
gift to the university that will support the work of a leading diabetes
researcher and surgeon.
Dr. Garth Warnock, the first diabetes researcher in Canada to
successfully transplant healthy insulin-producing cells into a diabetic patient, is coming to ubc to expand his investigative and clinical
work with support from the newly
established Irving K. Barber Diabetes Research Fund.
"This remarkable gift allows us
to consolidate scientific leadership
in diabetes research here in b.c,"
says ubc President Martha Piper.
"By strengthening our capacity in
this area, we expect to attract additional outstanding investigators
to the university."
see Diabetes page 2
Creative educators earn
Somerset, Black awards
Scholars devote careers
to encouraging
appreciation ofthe arts
by Bruce Mason staffwriter
to graeme Chalmers and Errol
Durbach the awards they will receive April 10 have special personal significance — they pay tribute
to legendary ubc figures who were
mentors and friends.
Chalmers, a professor of Curriculum Studies in the Faculty of Education, has earned the Sam Black
Award for Education and Development in Arts.
Durbach, a professor of Theatre
and English in the Faculty of Arts,
will receive the Dorothy Somerset
Award for Performance and Development in Arts.
"Sam was on the search committee that hired me in 1975," says
Chalmers. "He was a valued colleague whose passion for teaching
and art had a global impact."
Interested in international art
education, Chalmers served as
chief examiner in Art/Design for
the International Baccalaureate
Organization, vice-president ofthe
International Society for Education through Art, and is editor of
Studies in Art Education.
His research focuses on the so-
cio-cultural foundations of art education and includes a study of
gender and class in 19th-century
art education and the implications
of cultural diversity for discipline-
based art education.
He has just completed a biography of 19th-century art educator,
Walter Smith, and is working on a
ssHRC-funded project to examine
art education in a 19th-century
boys' school, a convent, and a mechanics institute.
"Throughout my career I have
encouraged teachers, students and
parents to ask questions about the
why of art," he says.
"Art keeps culture alive and tells
us what is important, what is
see Creative page 2
Theatre Prof. Errol Durbach
Education Prof. Graeme Chalmers
Students counsel community groups
Students are astonished at
what they're capable of in
innovative course
by Hilary Thomson staffwriter
it's good medicine and it's easy to
swallow — that's what community
groups are saying about health-care
presentations by Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences undergraduates.
To earn 35 per cent of marks in a
course called Professional Practice
II, second-year students in groups
of four are instructed to undertake
a communications project as if
they were a branch of a pharmaceutical consulting company.
Students are connected with disease support societies, businesses,
pharmacies or other groups to provide pharmaceutical and healthcare information in the form of reference guides, booklets, videos or
workshops.
"This is the first time students
engage in hands-on pharmacy
counselling work," says Pharmaceutical Sciences lecturer Colleen
Brady who instructs the course.
"We've found they can handle a lot
more than we traditionally give
them — students are astonished
by what they can actually do."
The course aims to build students' skills in communication,
project management and teamwork
"The profession is changing to include more consultation with patients," says Brady. "Being in a dispensary counting out pills is only
part ofthe job — community groups
are hungry for accessible advice."
One group of students, working
with staff at the pharmacy at Safeway of Canada's Kingsway location,
recently gave a presentation to
about 25 seniors with diabetes.
The group, who dubbed themselves the Diabetx Consulting
Group, offered information and
demonstrations on complications
of the disease such as kidney and
eye problems. They engaged the
audience with a diabetes trivia
game and also created a video patterned after a news report about
new diabetes research.
"The audience thought it was
great and very entertaining," says
Shirley Yeats, a health-care counselor at the store's pharmacy who,
along with pharmacy manager
Munira Karim, served as project
Students (1-r) Hee-Sung Hongjessie
Lau, Kal Biling and Jenn Stotyn
partners.
"The hardest part was breaking
down the scientific language of
current research data into understandable information," says group
member Hee-Sung Hong.
Talking directly to people who
really wanted to learn about their
disease and feeling helpful were
some of the project's highlights,
according to group members Kal
Biling, Jessie Lau and Jenn Stotyn.
Brady evaluates students' reports to determine research skills
and reviews an in-class presentation. She and community partners
assess ability to meet deadlines,
professional conduct and overall
quality ofthe project.
Other project topics included
smoking cessation, eating disor-
see Counsel page 2 I      UBC     REPORTS      |     APRIL    5,     2001
LETTERS
Show environmental
leadership, says reader
Editor:
i see that the "protectors" ofthe
University Endowment Lands are
about to bulldoze the last remaining stand of trees at ubc in order
to build another huge ugly building, of which there are already too
many.
Would it not make sense, especially for a so-called "institute of
higher learning" to construct this
building on the adjoining parking
lot which has already been bulldozed and polluted with thousands of parked cars?
Very soon now the campus will
look very much like the downtown
area of Richmond, b.c.—wall-to-
wall blacktop.
And how is it that all university
students appear to be able to roar
around in the latest model car?
ubc looks like the auto mall.
Not only do these students destroy the campus with their cars,
they also destroy the communities that they drive through every
day.
I trust that it is not taxpayer's
dollars that are paying for these
luxury items.
With the very large number of
buses running into ubc until the
early hours of the morning I am
surprised at the very large number
of cars parked in and around the
campus.
One would think that our poor
students would be scrimping and
saving any way possible to pay for
their tuition fees.
I would suggest that the Board
of Governors of ubc have a duty to
preserve and protect the ubc endowment lands and not to destroy
them in the shortest possible time.
One only has to stand in Richmond overlooking the Fraser Valley and to see the dense black fog
that smothers the valley each and
every day to appreciate the price
that we have to pay for progress.
The University of British Columbia should be a leader and an
example to us and our children in
the way that we treat our earth.
I regret to say that it is neither.
Colin W.Sinclaire
Richmond, b.c
Diabetes
Continued from page 1
Warnock, a recognized world
leader in diabetes research, will
join the Faculty of Medicine in
June as head of the Dept. of Surgery at ubc and Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences Centre.
Annual income from the Barber
fund will support the development
of his laboratory which has potential to become a world class centre
of diabetes research.
Recruiting outstanding faculty
and providing for their research support is a key strategy in Trek 2000,
the university's vision document.
"My motivation in providing
this gift is to help create an environment at ubc where new knowledge on diabetes will be generated
and made available to the medical
community in b.c. I also hope that
this will be one small step to reversing the so-called brain drain
our province has been experiencing," says Barber, a ubc alumnus
and leading B.C. entrepreneur.
Warnock will bring a strong vision to diabetes research in B.C.—
his approaches offer less invasive
and less expensive alternatives for
individuals with this disease, adds
ubc's dean of Medicine Dr. John
Cairns.
Director ofthe Division of Surgical Research at University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton, Warnock
led the clinical islet transplant program at the University of Alberta.
In 1989 program researchers
performed Canada's first islet cell
transplant — isolating healthy
clusters of insulin-producing cells
or islets from the pancreas and
transplanting them into a diabetic
patient. The procedure can be
done by injection and would be an
alternative to pancreas transplant
for many patients.
Warnock was also the attending
surgeon for the first patient in the
world to live insulin-free more
than two years following islet cell
transplantation.
"I am excited to join diabetes researchers in B.C.," says Warnock,
currently a professor of Surgery
and chief of General Surgery at the
University of Alberta. "I am confident that by concentrating our efforts we can make a significant
contribution to diabetes care in
this province and in Canada."
Diabetes, which affects more
than two million Canadians, is
caused by insufficient secretion of
insulin by the pancreas. There
were eight pancreas transplants in
b.c last year.
Warnock, who as department
head will assume the cn. Woodward Chair in Surgery, also has
clinical interests in surgical issues
related to endocrine, pancreatic,
gastro-intestinal disease and surgical breast diseases. An accomplished instructor, he has earned
many honours for teaching excellence in clinical surgery.
Warnock succeeds Dr. Richard
Finley who was head of the Dept.
of Surgery for 12 years.
Counsel
Continued from page 1
ders, cholesterol and effectiveness
of Chinese herbs. Brady uses a lottery system to match student
groups to projects. Students reprise their presentations to classmates at the end ofthe course.
The majority of the 130-140 students who graduate from the faculty each year go on to community
pharmacy practice according to
Marguerite Yee, the faculty's associate dean, Undergraduate Programs.
Creative
Continued from page 1
changing and needs  to be  improved."
Durbach, a world authority on
Ibsen, joined ubc's English Dept.
in 1967. He quickly earned a joint
appointment in Theatre. He became active in the Frederic Wood
Theatre, which Somerset helped
create out of an army canteen hut
in 1951.
"I was inspired by Dorothy's
view of theatre as an important
force for good in the community,"
he says. "It is quite wonderful to be
associated with this great lady, the
first person I sought out for advice
when I became head of Theatre in
1988."
Durbach is author of Ibsen the
Romantic, A Doll's House: Ibsen's
Myth of Transformation and many
articles on modern, comparative,
and Commonwealth drama.
Last year he was invited with
ubc students to perform part of
his translation and adaptation of
Peer Gynt at an Ibsen festival in
Norway.
His version of Falstaff, a rearrangement of episodes from
Shakespeare's history plays and
comedies, will be staged in the Frederic Wood Theatre in November
next year.
Sam Black's 41-year association
with the university began in 1958
as a professor of Fine Arts and Art
Education.
Dorothy Somerset became director of the ubc Players' Club in
1934. She served as first artistic administrative head of the Fredric
Wood Theatre until her retirement
in 1965.
"Traditions are a big part of my
culture. Unfortunately, so is
diabetes."
Bernie, First Nations counsellor
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DIABETES CANADIENNE
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m
www.diabetes.ca
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DIRECTOR,   PUBLIC AFFAIRS
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(scott.macrae@u bc.ca)
editor/production
Janet Ansel!
(Janet. ansell@u bc.ca)
contributors
Bruce Mason
(bruce.mason@ubcca)
Andy Poon
(andy.poon@u bc.ca)
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(hilary. thomson@u bc.ca)
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(natal ie.boucher.lisik@ubc.ca)
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•New clients only UBC     REPORTS      |      APRIL     5,     2001      |     3
Fending off falls and fractures is a pressing matter for Sylvia Bell, a participant
in a multi-disciplinary research study currently underway at ubc and B.C.
Women's Hospital and Health Centre. The project will look at ways of
boosting bone health. Karim Khan photo
Study suggests girls
avoiding high-tech
Young women are steering
clear of courses despite
opportunities
by Bruce Mason staffwriter
"competence and confidence
with a range of technologies is essential for full participation in our
culture," says Education Assoc.
Prof. Mary Bryson.
Applied technology fields are
the fastest growing sectors in the
Canadian economy, production,
and educational curriculum development. But contrary to popular
belief there is no improvement in
the numbers of female students
enrolled in technology-intensive
courses in b.c.'s secondary schools
in the past 10 years.
That is the major finding and
first surprise in the Gender and
Technology in B.c. Schools Study,
the most comprehensive analysis
of its kind.
Study researchers are sounding
a warning that major curricular reforms are required.
"The evidence does not support
a pattern of slow and steady
change," says Bryson, one ofthe research team members.
In senior secondary courses, the
current percentage of girls enrolled in technology-intensive
courses remains extremely low
and essentially unaltered despite
an explicit Ministry of Education
gender equity policy.
Female students who are enrolled in technology-intensive
courses continue to earn more As
and B's than their male peers on
average, so it's not a question of
technophobia say the researchers,
who include sfu Education Prof.
Suzanne de Castell, ubc Curriculum Studies Assoc. Prof. Stephen
Petrina and Marcia Braundy, a
graduate student in ubc's Centre
for the Study of Curriculum and
Instruction.
In computer science and information technology courses, the
participation of female students
remains significantly below 50 per
cent of total students enrolled, and
declines precipitously as students
move towards Grade 12 where the
average is 20 per cent.
Boys continue to exert a pervasive predominance in technology-
intensive areas in the curriculum
with the exception of keyboarding,
information management and
clothing and textiles courses.
While total enrolments in the
most popular technology courses
have dropped by 13 per cent since
1987-88, the percentage of girls increased by just over two per cent.
In 1987-88 the percentage of girls
enrolled in Grade 11 and 12 technology courses was almost eight per
cent. Currently it is 10 per cent.
The study analysed all available
b.c. Ministry of Education sex-disaggregated data and contacted all
b.c. secondary schools. Of 375
schools, only 13 responded to a request for information on initiatives.
The fact that girls and boys are
mandated to take one applied
skills course is seen as a milestone
in gender relations in B.C. education history. However the result is
that a vast majority of boys elect
technology and girls elect business
education or home economics,
says Bryson.
Research team sets to
work on healthier bones
Program takes holistic approach with high risk group
by Hilary Thomson staffwriter
sticks and stones can break
your bones and so can stumbles
and falls if you are a senior with
poor bone strength.
Investigators at ubc and b.c
Women's Hospital and Health
Centre in disciplines that include
medicine, human kinetics, physiotherapy and bioengineering aim to
prevent fractures in elderly people
at high risk of falls.
"There's no way one person can
pull this off," says Asst. Prof. Karim
Khan of the Dept. of Family Practice and the School of Human Kinetics.
"We've combined the expertise
of researchers who have a substantial collective understanding of
bone health issues."
Called Fracture-Free b.c, the research program sees Assoc. Prof.
Heather McKay of the School of
Human Kinetics, Asst. Prof. Janice
Eng ofthe School of Rehabilitation
Sciences and Tom Oxland, associate professor of Orthopedics,
working with Khan in a four-year
program that looks at both preventing falls and building bone
strength.
Working in the lab and in the
community, investigators plan to
study 300 women aged 75 years
and older who are at high risk for
falls and fractures.
"Ours is the first prevention research program to work with such
a high-risk group and take a holistic view of this health problem,"
says Khan.
Risk factors for falls include
muscle weakness, joint stiffness,
blood pressure or vision problems,
medications that impair balance
such as sedatives and indoor and
outdoor environmental hazards.
Fracture risks include osteoporosis — a bone disease characterized by low bone density and
deterioration of bone tissue that
leads to increased bone fragility
and risk of breaking.
The team was recently funded
by the Canada Foundation for Innovation for equipment valued at
more than $400,000 that will help
them test balance and measure
bone strength.
Starting next year, women identified in co-operation with b.c
Women's Hospital and Health Centre will be referred for testing at the
ubc Bone Health Laboratory in the
School of Human Kinetics.
Physiotherapists   will   provide
participants with home instruction
on exercise. Occupational therapists will offer tips in making the
home fall-proof.
In addition, family practice physicians will be involved in minimizing the use of medications associated with falling.
Fractures in elderly patients are
associated with enormous direct
financial costs, says Khan, as well
as immeasurable physical and
emotional burdens.
In Canada, the annual cost of
treatment for hip fractures alone is
$280 million with nearly 25,000 osteoporosis-related hip fractures,
many of which are the result of
falls, according to a recent study in
the Canadian Medical Association
Journal.
As baby boomers age, caring for
fractures in elderly people represents an enormous economic burden, says Khan.
"There is no single magic bullet for bone health and we can't
undo fractures," he says. "We're
fighting a war against physical inactivity and a lifespan approach
to better bone health is a powerful weapon."
If the study shows prevention
activities to be valuable, researchers aim to expand the program to
include all seniors at risk.
Attention-deficit going undiagnosed,
untreated, says student researcher
Current criteria may be overlooking hyperactive girls
MORE INFORMATION
www.shecan.com
by Bruce Mason staffwriter
research at ubc is revealing that
many girls who suffer from atten-
tion-deficit/hyperactivity disorder
(adhd) are not being diagnosed
and treated.
"Between six and nine boys for
every one girl are currently being
referred to services for adhd but
studies indicate that the true ratio
is closer to two or three boys to
every girl," says Jeneva Ohan, a phD
student in Psychology.
She is conducting tests to identify adhd behaviours in girls to
improve assessment and treatment.
Ohan is also actively spreading
the word in the community.
She will conduct a free public
workshop on the current status of
research, treatments and where to
go for help on Tuesday, April 17, at
7 p.m. at the Richmond Cultural
Centre.
The workshop is organized by
the Richmond branch ofthe Canadian Mental Health Association.
adhd, one ofthe most common
psychiatric childhood disorders, is
characterized by developmentally
inappropriate levels of inattention
including  distraction   and  day
dreams and/or hyperactive and
impulsive behaviour such as having trouble staying seated or
awaiting a turn.
Approximately five per cent of
children meet the criteria for diagnosis. They often have a higher risk
for failing and dropping out of
school, adolescent parenthood,
driving accidents and arrest.
"adhd criteria may not identify
how girls show these problems because criteria for diagnosis were
developed based on research with
mostly boys," says Ohan.
In a study designed with her supervisor Psychology Prof. Charlotte Johnston, mothers identified
current criteria used to diagnose
adhd as more appropriate for
boys and other inattentive and hyperactive behaviours not used in
diagnosis as descriptive of girls.
For example, fidgeting or
squirming is included as part of
the criteria for adhd, but whispering to classmates and doodling instead of doing work are not.
Girls with adhd may also be receiving treatments that are more
appropriate for boys.
"It is often difficult for adhd
boys to develop solid social relationships and given this informa-
PhD studentjeneva Ohan
tion, effective treatment plans
have been developed," Ohan says.
"We know social relationships
are more important to girls but research has looked at interactions
that are more typical of boys, such
as physical aggression," she adds.
"Little is known about social interactions more typical of girls,
such as forming tightly knit friendships."
Because social relationships
differ, it makes sense that adhd
girls have different social strengths
and weaknesses, says Ohan.
"We need to know what these
are. It is crucial to identify children early so that we can help
them develop to the best of their
abilities." 4     I      UBC     REPORTS      |      APRIL     5,     2001
MONDAY, APRIL 9
Applied Ethics Colloquium
Ethical Consumption In A Starving
World: Negotiating Partial And Impartial Obligations. Lisa Fuller. Klinck
462 from 2-4pm. E-mail ethicsC®
interchange.ubc.ca. Call 822-8625.
Boehringer-lngelheim Lecture
F.pigenetic Regulation Of Mammalian
Development. Shirley iVl. Tilghman,
Howard Hughes Institute, Princeton
u. irc#6 at 3:45pm. Refreshments at
3:30pm. Call 822-3178.
Thematic Lecture Series
The Child As Agent In Family Life.
Leon Kuczynski, u of Guelph. Green
College at 5pm. Call 822-1878.
TUESDAY, APRIL IO
Museum Of
Anthropology Exhibition
Echoes 2001. Emily Carr Institute
students, moa lobby from nam-spm.
Continues to May 13. Tues. to 9pm
(5-gpm free admission). Call
822-5087.
Women And Film Film Showings
Marlene. moa Theatre Gallery from
2:30-4:30pm. E-mail wmstl@
interchange.ubc.ca. Call 822-9171.
Concert
Super Classic Great Performers At
The Chan. Dawn Upshaw, soprano;
Richard Goode, piano. Chan Centre at
8pm. $i5-$78. Call 822-2697.
THURSDAY, APRIL 12
Masterclass
Dawn Upshaw Vocal Masterclass.
Chan Centre from i2noon-2pm. $15
adult; $10 student/senior. Call
822-5574.
Earth And
Ocean Sciences Colloquium
Shallow Seismic Imaging Of An Andean Paleolake/Salt Flativan. Susan
McGeary, u of Delaware. GeoSciences
330-A from i2:30-i:30pm. Call
822-8610.
Earth And Ocean Sciences
Colloquium
Detection Of Inner Core Scattering
And Rotation With An Antique Seismic Array.John Vidale, ucla. GeoSciences 330-A from i2:30-i:3opm.
Call 822-8610.
Law And Society Midday Lecture
Spectacular Politics: Protests Against
The World Trade Organization In
Seattle 1999. Kate Sullivan, u of
California. Green College at 12:30pm.
(No outside food or beverage please.)
Call 822-1878.
NOTICES
Lactose Intolerant?
Researchers at ubc are interested in
learning more about lactose intolerance. Participation will take about
20-30 minutes of your time. Ifyou are
19 years of age or older, experience
lactose intolerance, live in the gvrd,
and would like more information or
to participate in this questionnaire-
based study, call 822-2502.
calendar
APRIL     8    THROUGH     APRIL    21
Botany Seminar
Dinoflagellate Nuclear ssu Phylogeny
Suggests Multiple Chloroplast Losses
And Replacements. Juan Saldarriega.
BioSciences 2000 at 12:30pm. Call
822-2133.
Equality/Security/
Community Colloquium
The Community Employment
Innovation Project: Social Capital,
Employment Initiatives And
Community Development In Cape
Breton, Nova Scotia. Reuben Ford,
Social Research and Demonstration
Corp. Green College at 4pm. Call 822-
1878.
St.John's College
Global Change Lecture
The Battle Over Globalization: What's
The Fuss About? Marc Lee, research
economist, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. St.John's College 1080
from 5-6:i5pm. E-mail sjc.eventst"
ubc.ca. Call 822-8781.
Health Promotion
In Motion Seminar
Physical Activity And Health: What
Do We Know, What Should We Do?
Alan Martin, Human Kinetics. Green
College at 7:30pm. Call 822-1878.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL II
Orthopedics Grand Rounds
tba. Asst. Prof. David Wilson,
Mechanical Engineering, Queens u.
vgh, Eye Care Centre Aud. at 7am.
Call 875-4192.
Open House
International Building Safety Week -
Ever Wondered Why Development Or
Building Permits Are Necessary?
Campus Planning Gardenia Room
from nam-2pm. Call 822-0463.
Obstetrics And Gynecology Seminar
The Discovery Of A New Form Of
Gonadotropin Releasing Hormone.
Shahram Kosravi. B.c.'s Women's
Hosp. 2N35 at 2pm. Call 875-3108.
Art History And Visual Art Lecture
Writing Travels: Power, Knowledge
And Ritual On The English East India
Company's Early Voyages. Miles Og-
born, Cultural Geography, u of London. Lasserre 102 at 12:30pm. Call
822-2757.
TUESDAY, APRIL 17
Museum of Anthropology Exhibit
Continuing Traditions, moa Gallery 5
from nam-spm, Tuesday to 9pm
(5~9pm free admission). Continues to
April 30. Call 822-5087.
Botany Seminar
Biochemical And Molecular Analysis
Of Entry Point Enzymes Into Poplar
Phenylpropanoid Metabolism. Dae-
Kyun Ro. BioSciences 2000 at
12:30pm. Call 822-2133.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL l8
Orthopedics Grand Rounds
An Update On Injury Prevention In
Canada. Dr. Peter Wing, vgh. Eye
Care Centre Aud. at 7am. Call
875-4192.
School Of Nursing Rounds
The Implementation Of Midwifery In
bc: Challenges For Midwives, Nurses
And Physicians. Prof. Elaine Carty,
Jude Kornelsen. ubc Hosp., Koerner
Pavilion T-206 from 3-4pm. Call
822-7453.
Senate Meeting
Regular Meeting OfThe Senate, ubc's
Academic Parliament. Curtis 102 at
8pm. Call 822-2951.
THURSDAY, APRIL 19
India And South Asia
Research Seminar
Mother India: Class And Gender At
The Birth Of A Nation. Tithi Bhatta-
charya, ck Choi 120 from i2:30-2pm.
Call 822-4688.
Eyeglasses Needed
Recycled eyeglasses/sunglasses are
desperately needed in Third World
countries. Donors may drop off any
eyeglasses at sub or ubc Hosp. Call
692-5616.
UBC Gardens
The Nitobe Memorial Garden, ubc
Botanical Garden and the Shop in the
Garden will be open until Oct. 8 from
ioam-6pm daily including weekends.
For information about the garden call
822-9666 or the Shop 822-4529.
Volunteer Paid Participants Needed
CroMedica Prime is a Phase One research company located in Vancouver
General Hospital. Our research studies require that volunteers take one or
more doses of an investigational medication. We are currently looking for
healthy volunteers, male/female, nonsmoking aged 18 and older and not
taking any medications. Volunteers
are financially compensated upon
completion of a study Ifyou are interested please call our Research Recruitment Co-ordinator, Monday to
Friday between gam-spm at 875-5122
or e-mail volunteers@cromedica.com.
Research Study
Researchers at the Dept. of Psychology are conducting a study examining
sexual functioning in women. The
aim of this study is to help women
who experience sexual difficulties.
Your confidentiality will be assured.
All participants will receive a detailed
sexual psychophysiological profile for
their participation. Ifyou are a
healthy, heterosexual, premenopausal
woman who is currently in a relationship, please call 822-2952.
Habitat For Humanity UBC
Is looking for volunteers. Come help
out on the construction site and build
homes for low-income families. No
skills required. For more information
and to register for an orientation,
e-mail habitat@vancouver.net or call
681-5618.
Family Career Development Project
Parents and adolescents are invited to
participate together in research that
addresses how parents and adolescents talk about the youth's future. If
your family faces challenges such as
unemployment or illness, call
822-4919 to participate.
Parents With Toddlers
Did you know your child is a word-
learning expert? We are looking for
children (one to five years old) and
their parent(s) to participate in
language studies in the Psychology
Dept. at ubc You and your child, and
a trained researcher will play a word
game using puppets and toys or
pictures. As you might imagine,
children find these word games a lot
of fun. During your visit, you will
remain with your child at all times. If
you (or someone you know) might be
interested in bringing your child for a
30-minute visit to our research
playroom, please contact Dr. Hall's
Language Development Centre at
822-9294.
Born Between 1930 And 1976?
The Adult Development And Psycho-
metrics Lab at ubc is looking for men
and women born between 1930 and
1976 to participate in a series of focus
groups looking at what it means to be
your age today. Call 822-5250.
Participants Wanted
Are you a postmenopausal woman
with Type Two diabetes interested in
beginning an exercise program? St.
Paul's Hospital Healthy Heart Program and Diabetes Centre are recruiting participants who do not smoke or
use insulin for a research project on
the effect of exercise on diabetes for
women. Call 806-8601.
Morris And Helen Belkin Art Gallery
Stephen Andrews: Likeness. Featuring drawings, bookworks and recent
portrait works, by Toronto artist
Stephen Andrews. Included is the
well-known, "Facsimile" (1991-93),
comprised of 147 portraits etched in
graphite on wax, of people lost to
Hiv-related illnesses. Continues to
May 13. Tuesday to Friday from 10am-
5pm, Saturday i2noon-spm, Sunday
i2noon-5pm. (Closed Mondays and
statutory holidays). Call 822-2759.
UBC Birdwalks
Anyone who is interested can meet at
the flagpole above the Rose Garden
on Thursdays at 12:45pm. Look for a
small group of people who are
carrying binoculars and bird books,
(and bring your own, ifyou have
them). Call 822-9149.
Sage Bistro
To the faculty, students, administration and admirers ofthe University of
British Columbia we present Sage
Bistro at the University Centre. Sage
is open Monday through Friday from
nam-2pm. Our luncheon menu
changes weekly and features a wide
selection of wines by the glass. For
reservations please call 822-1500.
Premenstrual Asthma Study
ubc/SL Paul's Hospital researchers
are seeking females with asthma and
regular menstrual cycles for a study of
estrogen's effects on asthma symptoms and lung function. Must be 18-
50 years of age and not taking birth
control pills. Honorarium and free
peak flow meter provided. If interested, please call 875-2886.
Parkinson's Research
A research team from ubc is asking
for the assistance of people with Parkinson's to participate in research.
This research is aimed at understanding how Parkinson's may affect complex activities such as managing
multiple tasks. Participation involves
performing fairly simple tasks, some
of which involves responding verbally
to computer screen displays. Ifyou
are a healthy person ofthe age 50
years or older, we are also in need of
several people to participate as part
of a non-Parkinson's comparison
group. Call 822-3227.
Sexual Assault Research
The Anxiety and Fear Laboratory in
the Dept. of Psychology requires female volunteers who have experienced
unwanted sexual activity, to participate in a research project. Ifyou have
ever had sex with someone when you
didn't want to, because the other person continued the event when you said
no, forced or threatened to force you,
or because you were given alcohol or
drugs, and you would be interested in
helping us with our research, please
call 822-9028. Confidentiality and privacy protected.
Museum Of Anthropology
Exhibition
Echoes 2001. April 10 to May 13. Continuing Traditions. April 17 to 30. Attributed To Edenshaw: Identifying
The Hand OfThe Artist; Two Case
Studies: Northwest Coast Art. Continues to Aug. 31. Conversations: The
Tecson Philippine Collection. Continues to Sept. 3. Anthropology 432 Student Projects: What is Missing?
Continues to Dec. 31. Winter hours
Wed.-Sun. nam-spm, Tues. to 9pm (5-
9pm free admisssion). Call 822-5087.
Traumatic Stress Clinic
Psychologists conducting research at
the Traumatic Stress Clinic at ubc
Psychiatry are offering free treatment
to people suffering from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (ptsd). ptsd is
caused by events such as physical or
sexual assault, and motor vehicle accidents. Call the Traumatic Stress
Clinic at 822-8040.
AMS Rentsline
Helping students find housing since
J993. the ams Rentsline is ubc's off-
campus housing registry. This service
gives students access to hundreds of
rental listings, and landlords access to
thousands of students looking for
housing. You can call the Rentsline
from any touchtone phone 24 hours a
day, 365 days a year. Call 714-4848.
Faculty Women's Club
The Faculty Women's Club brings
together women connected to the
university either through their work
or that of their spouses, for social
activities and lectures. The main purpose ofthe Faculty Women's Club is
to raise funds for student scholar-
CALENDAR    POLICY   AND    DEADLINES
The ubc Reports Calendar lists university-related or university-sponsored events
on campus and offcampus within the Lower Mainland. Calendar items must
be submitted on forms available from the ubc Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251
Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver BC, v6t izi. Phone: UBC-info (822-4636).
Fax: 822-2684. An electronic form is available at www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca.
Please limit to 35 words. Submissions for the Calendar's Notices section may
be limited due to space. Deadline for the April 19 issue of UBC Reports—which
covers the period April 22 to May 12 —is noon, April 9. UBC     REPORTS      |      APRIL     5,     2001      |     5
UBC
THE    UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
Equity Office Annual Report 2000
Letter from the President
Dear Colleague:
in compliance with the requirements of ubc's Policy on Discrimination
and Harassment and to meet our obligations under the Federal Contractors Program, ubc's Equity Office has produced annual reports since 1995.
These reports document our efforts to establish a campus where every
student, faculty, and staff member can study and work in an environment
free from discrimination and harassment.
I am pleased to provide you with the Equity Office Annual Report 2000.
This report describes the University's progress toward educational and
employment equity, as well as the University's processing of complaints of
discrimination and harassment. In addition, the report describes the Equity Office's educational activities, which promote equity and prevent
discrimination on campus.
After reading this report, please discuss it with your colleagues. The
Equity Office welcomes your questions and comments.
Sincerely,
Figure 1: Education and Training by Type
January-December 2000
(J
MARTHA C. PIPER
Message from the Associate Vice President, Equity
the equity office Annual Report 2000 summarizes campus activities
that promote equity and provides statistics that track both progress toward equitable hiring practices and the resolution of discrimination and
harassment complaints brought to the Equity Office.
The Equity Office could not achieve its goals without a well-trained,
hard-working staff. Unfortunately, the Office said goodbye to two valued
colleagues during 2000: Wale Adeyinka left his position as Equity Advisor
to pursue a private consulting practice; Joan McBain retired early from
her position as Administrative Secretary. We wish both Wale and Joan all
the best in their new endeavours.
As a consequence of resignation, retirement, and medical leave, the Equity
Office was short staffed for several months of 2000. Nonetheless, equity services were always available to the campus community. Skillfully juggling her
roles as a Training Administrator in Human Resources and as an Equity Advisor, Maura Da Cruz demonstrated her commitment to developing creative
partnerships between the Equity Office and other campus units. Maura's
work integrates Equity Office programs into innovative, cross-campus initiatives such as Imagine ubc, the Leadership Program, and Train the Trainer.
Meanwhile, Margaret Sarkissian, known across campus for her excellent
judgement in case management as well as for the humor and understanding
she brings to educational sessions, continued to supervise casework in her
role as Senior Equity Advisor. As always, Poh Peng Wong, Equity Office Administrator, worked effectively and efficiently behind the scenes, and thereby
kept the Office running smoothly throughout the year.
In the latter half of 2000, the Office welcomed two new advisors. Anne-
Marie Long arrived at ubc with experience at Queen's and Dalhousie
universities in the provision of disability accommodation and redress of
sexual harassment. Natasha Aruliah, a ubc graduate with degrees in Psychology and Counselling Psychology, came to us with previous work
experience in student service positions at ubc and in the uk. In 2000, the
Equity Office also welcomed a new Administrative Secretary, Chris
McKay. In addition to providing secretarial support to the Equity Advisors, Chris also performs reception duties. We are delighted that Chris,
who worked previously in many campus departments through Limited
Time Only, chose the Equity Office for a permanent assignment at ubc
The Equity Office collaborates and cooperates with many individuals and
other University units. One example of this combined effort is the Equity
Office Train the Trainer course. We want to thank Sue Eldridge (Enrolment
Services), Pauline Fox (Housing & Conferences), Peter Godman (Human Resources), and Begum Verjee (Women Students' Office) for helping Equity
Office Advisors present workshops on discrimination and harassment.
We also thank Penny Dixon (Financial Services) and Kathy Hansen
(Human Resources), whose efforts ensure the integration of employment
equity data with the Integrated Human Resource Information System.
And once again, we applaud Planning & Institutional Research (pair),
which supports the work ofthe Equity Office through the development
and maintenance of reporting systems and analyses of equity data. Our
thanks to Ashley Lambert-Maberly, Louise Mol, Elmer Morishita, Sham
Pendleton, Karima Samnani, Ron Siy, and especially, pair's Director,
Walter Sudmant, for assistance in making ubc's data-driven equity program comprehensible and meaningful.
Presentations
Figure 2: Education and Training by Audience
January-December 2000
1999
Administrators
4%        Mixed Audience
Staff                           9%
Faculty
7%
Students
^^     437.
^^•^                Students
49%         _,
(,.   = 70)
Mixed Audience
Managers/Administrators               ...
10%                         Facul,y
^                        6%
Staff
31V.
Education & Training Report
^ucu^^—-
SHARON E. KAHN
the goal of ubc's equity Office is to heighten campus awareness and
understanding of two university policies: one of these policies concerns
discrimination and harassment; the other, employment equity.
The Office achieves its goal through education. In 2000, we delivered 24
presentations and 44 workshops (see Figure 1). Audiences for these activities included the entire campus community: administrators, faculty, staff,
students, union representatives, employee associations, and departmental equity committees (see Figure 2).
To serve the educational needs ofthe ubc community, the Office offers
both standardized and specially designed programs. Workshops and presentations cover a wide variety of human rights and equity-related topics,
such as diversity, anti-racism, accommodation under human rights law,
and employment equity.
Highlights of Equity Office Education
and Training Initiatives
Standard Training Workshops
• "Anti-racism" and "Discrimination and Harassment Awarene      ivi   k-
shops for staff, offered through the most Training Program
"Diversity and Inclusion in the Classroom" workshop for ii    motors
and teaching assistants, offered through the Centre forTc.i.   irK: &
Academic Growth
Custom Workshops
The following workshops were created at the request of campus units to
meet the needs of specific audiences:
• "Discrimination and Harassment Awareness" workshops for managers
and supervisors in the Bookstore, in Food Services, and in Land &
Building Services
• "Discrimination and Harassment Awareness" workshops for Forestry
graduate students, Vancouver School of Theology residence advisors,
and Bookstore support staff
• "Inclusion in the Classroom" workshop for Forestry faculty UBC     REPORTS      |      APRIL    5,     2001
THE     UNIVERSITY     OF     BRITISH     COLUMBIA
EQUITY     OFFICE     ANNUAL     REPORT     2000
In partnership with Student Services staff, "Student Success" workshop for Agricultural Sciences students
"Leadership & Diversity" workshop for Housing & Conferences residence advisors
• "Anti-racism" workshop for Education students
"Human Rights: Rights & Responsibilities" workshop for international
students
Standard Presentations
Several presentations were made at orientation programs for students,
staff, and faculty. These audiences included
• Social Work and Dentistry students
Housing & Conferences residence advisors
University Orientation staff participants and Centre for Teaching &
Academic Growth faculty participants
• Managers enrolled in the most course "Selection Interviewing: Ensuring Equity"
Campus Security support staff
Custom Presentations
• "What is ubc's Equity Office?" for Computer Science and Graduate
Studies students
• "Sexual Harassment: Prevention and Remedies" for Family Studies students
Partnerships
In order to integrate equity into the day-to-day activities of academic and
administrative campus units, ubc's Equity Office works closely with other
units.
Committee for an Inclusive Campus Community
The Equity Office coordinates the Committee for an Inclusive Campus
Community (cicc). cicc members include students, staff, and faculty
who represent a cross-section of campus units. Participating units include the Alma Mater Society, Anthropology and Sociology, Campus
Security, Centre for Teaching & Academic Growth, Disability Resource
Centre, English Department, Faculty of Law, First Nations House of
Learning, and the Women Students' Office. Established in 1996, this
group seeks to foster an inclusive campus community that not only
respects but also values difference. To achieve its goals, cicc works in
collaboration with both student groups and student service providers
to develop and implement initiatives for an inclusive study and work
environment.
The committee hosted the following cicc events in 2000:
• "First Nations Stories and the Politics of Identity," a seminar for students, faculty, and staff
• "Pride & Prejudice: the Road to Multiculturalism and Human Rights
in bc," a video discussion to commemorate March 21: Elimination of
Racial Discrimination
• "Multi-racial Relationships," a panel discussion for students
Dean of Science Ambassador Program
The goal ofthe Dean of Science Ambassador Program is to give students a larger role in the Faculty of Science and the community.
Student volunteers are involved in numerous activities such as education fairs, department open houses, Science Week events, workshops,
mentoring programs, and Imagine ubc. As well, they publicize science
events, write articles, and develop websites. Credits are assigned to
each activity. To receive credit as an Ambassador, a student must complete a mandatory requirement, which includes three workshops on
leadership and one on diversity.
The Equity Office and the Faculty of Science co-delivered six Diversity Training workshops to over 100 Dean of Science ambassadors.
Imagine UBC
The Equity Office, Women Students' Office, and Imagine staff delivered a module titled "Collaboration and Leadership: A Kernel of
Knowledge" to over 400 My Undergraduate Group (mug) leaders.
Leadership Program
The Leadership Program, a 1999 initiative ofthe Women Students'
Office, is co-sponsored by Counselling Services, Equity Office, Faculty
of Science, First Nations House of Learning, International Student
Services, Learning Exchange, and Student Health Services.
• "Celebrating Individualism and Collaboration" and "Appreciating
Diversity" workshops were offered to students across a number of
units, including the Engineering Co-op Program and the Dean of
Science Ambassador Program.
• The Equity Office and the Women Students' Office developed a one-
day leadership and diversity program, "Diversity, Collaboration and
Citizenship Skills." Two sessions were presented to student leaders
in programs such as Colour Connected, International House, Safer
Campus, and the Wellness Information Network.
First Nations House of Learning: Longhouse Student Leadership Program
The Equity Office and the Women Students' Office worked with First
Nations House of Learning staff to present an introductory session to
the Longhouse Student Leadership Program "Longhouse Teachings."
Women of Colour Network
The Women of Colour Network, a community building program, received funding and support from the Equity Office and the Women
Students' Office to offer the following sessions:
• "Race and Cultural Identity" workshop
• "Women in the Shadows" video presentation
• "Women of Colour in the Arts" seminar
Train the Trainer
Representatives from the Faculty Association, Housing & Conferences,
Human Resources, and Land & Building Services participated in a
two-day Train the Trainer program on discrimination and harassment
awareness. Faculty and staff who complete Train the Trainer co-lead
"Discrimination and Harassment Awareness" workshops with Equity
Office staff and serve as a training resource for their respective units or
campus associations.
Other Initiatives
ubc's Equity Office
• organized display booths for students at Imagine ubc and First Nations orientation programs
• sponsored an end-of-term celebration for the Women of Colour Network
Responded to 130 inquiries regarding the University's Employment
Equity and Discrimination and Harassment Policies, as well as other
human rights issues and practices, ubc administrators, faculty, staff,
and students composed 85 per cent of these contacts; the other 15 per
cent came from media reporters and representatives from government
agencies and other educational institutions.
Educational & Employment Equity Report
ubc's policy on employment equity (1990; revised, 1995) is based on
principles of individual merit and achievement, which means that employment decisions at the University are based on job performance
criteria—the skills, knowledge, and abilities relevant to specific positions.
In keeping with these principles, the University's Employment Equity
Plan (1991; revised, 1997) is designed to make the University a fair and equitable workplace in terms of hiring, training, and advancement. The Plan
also seeks to attract and retain members ofthe four groups that the Federal Contractors Program designates as traditionally under-represented:
women, First Nations people, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities.
Progress Toward Equity in 2000
achievements in educational and employment equity over the past
year are listed under the four objectives of ubc's Employment Equity Plan.
Objective A
Review of ubc's employment policies and practices for their potential discriminatory effect on members of designated groups; design of policies and
practices to support employment equity opportunities for designated-group
members.
1. The Board of Governors approved the Policy on Responsible Use of
Information Technology Facilities and Services, which addresses harassment by email.
2. The Board of Governors approved revisions to the Policy on Advertising of Position Vacancies. These revisions permit the Provost to make
non-competitive appointments in special circumstances, such as partner positions and Natural Science and Engineering Research Council
University Faculty Awards for Women.
3. To enhance ubc's efforts to recruit and retain faculty, the University
arranged for the Women's Resources Centre to provide relocation and
transition services for incoming faculty recruits and their partners.
4. The University Administration and the Faculty Association agreed to a
one-time Professional Development Reimbursement for faculty members, including sessionals (previously, sessionals were not eligible for
professional development funds). In addition, the University redressed
a long-standing inequity by placing $1 million in a supplemental pension for long-term faculty and librarians who previously were
ineligible to join the pension plan.
5. The University Administration revised the guidelines for the Professional Development Reimbursement Fund, thereby providing faculty
on the Return to Work Program the same privileges accorded their
full-time colleagues.
6. Faculty Relations created an online listing of available faculty positions, including positions for research associates and postdoctoral
fellows. UBC     REPORTS
APRIL     5,     2001      |      7
7. Following a 1998 agreement, the University Administration and the
Faculty Association conducted a review of long-term sessional faculty.
As a result, 15 faculty appointments were converted from sessional to
12-month lecturer positions.
8. Deans approved standardized wording for recruiting senior faculty
from designated equity groups: "In order to increase the representation of members of designated equity groups among senior faculty, we
may consider making an appointment at a higher rank for a woman,
visible minority, disabled, or aboriginal applicant with exceptional
qualifications."
9. The Senior Appointments Committee and Deans adopted a new
document, "Guide to Promotion and Tenure Procedures at ubc," to
supplement the Agreement on Conditions of Appointment for Faculty.
10. The University Administration negotiated an agreement with the Association of Administrative & Professional Staff, bc Government
Employees Union Child Care Services employees, and cupe 2950 for
sick leave to attend ailing children, parents, and spouses, including
same-sex partners, and as well, for adoption-leave provisions similar
to those previously negotiated for maternity leave. The agreement between the Administration and cupe 2950 also includes a one day,
personal emergency leave.
11. The University Administration negotiated an agreement with cupe 116
and cupe 2278 to increase bereavement leave for immediate family
members, including same-sex partners. The agreement between the
Administration and cupe 2278 also includes sick leave to attend children, parents, and spouses, including same-sex partners.
12. To ensure that employees in traditionally female jobs are paid wages
based on the fair value of their work, the University Administration
and cupe 2950 entered the second phase ofthe Pay Equity Plan. This
phase, which took effect August 2000, consists of a new pay structure
with new pay bands. In addition, a new committee—the Job Evaluation Maintenance Committee—was formed to address cupe 2950
reclassification requests and appeals. The committee consists of management and union representatives. The Association of
Administrative & Professional Staff, bc Government Employees Union
Child Care Services employees, and cupe 116 also secured commitments from the provincial government for funds to achieve pay equity.
13. To enhance campus access for those who live or work downtown, ubc
opened a Robson Square branch.
14. The Senate approved a new, broad-based admissions policy, which
permits use of criteria additional to grade averages when evaluating
applications from secondary school graduates who studied full-time
outside Canada for at least one year immediately prior to applying to
ubc for admission.
15. The Senate approved a policy on prior-learning assessment that enables students to achieve course credit through the formal assessment
of competencies that have been acquired through either formal or informal learning. In another initiative to improve university access for
adults and other non-traditional students, the Director of Advanced
Studies in Continuing Studies was seconded to Student Services to
review recruitment and admission programs and services.
16. Deans agreed that Faculties would adopt "Effective Teaching Principles and Practices" from the Senate Report on Teaching Quality,
Effectiveness, and Evaluation. These principles and practices include
respect for the diverse talents and learning styles of students and sensitivity to intellectual and cultural issues.
17. The Faculty of Graduate Studies approved recognition of certain
courses taken by unclassified and non-degree students. In another
policy revision, Graduate Studies eliminated restrictions on the
number of ubc distance courses that students may take for credit towards a graduate degree (individual departments and graduate
programs still may set some restrictions). These policy changes help
students with childcare responsibilities or with disabilities to complete their course work in a timely way.
18. The trek 2000 Operational Timetable set a goal to increase the
number of First Nations students by ten percent. Currently, 550 First
Nations students are enrolled at ubc
19. The Student Recruitment Strategy Report calls for increased efforts to
recruit First Nations students and enhanced accessibility for students
with disabilities. The Recruitment Strategy also affirms ubc's commitment to developing a student body that reflects the multicultural
nature of Vancouver's and British Columbia's populations as well as to
providing appropriate accommodation and support for students
whose first language is not English.
20. Senate approved a Faculty of Arts First Nations Studies Program.
21. In Fall 2000, the first students were admitted to the new ma program
in Women's Studies and Gender Relations. The Centre for Research in
Women's Studies and Gender Relations continued to work with Simon
Fraser University on developing a cooperative PhD in Women's Studies
and Gender Relations.
22. In collaboration with Okanagan University College and University College ofthe Cariboo, the School of Social Work and Family Studies
embarked on a three-year, part-time Master of Social Work program
through distance education. Distance education programs are particularly important to non-traditional students.
23. The Equity Office offered 44 workshops and 24 presentations to faculty, staff, and students on equity-related issues such as employment
equity, anti-racism, diversity, and accommodation under human rights
law (see Education & Training Report).
Objective B
Development of special measures and reasonable accommodation to
achieve and maintain a ubc workforce representative of qualified applicant
pools.
1. For several years, the proportions of designated equity-group members
have remained relatively stable: women 52 per cent, aboriginal people
1.5 per cent, visible minorities 23 per cent, and persons with disabilities
four per cent (see ubc Workforce Data).
2. Since the academic year 1986/87, ubc has appointed women to 33 per
cent of vacant tenure-track positions, a figure consistent with the proportion of women receiving Canadian university doctoral degrees. For
the academic year 2000/01, ubc appointed women to 32 per cent of
vacant tenure-track positions.
3. Academic departments continued to apply for University funds to increase the representation of members of equity groups (women, First
Nations persons, members of visible minorities, and persons with disabilities) and to secure the employment of eminent academics by
hiring spouses or partners with outstanding qualifications.
4. The Faculty of Science received three Natural Science and Engineering
Research Council University Faculty Awards. These awards are intended to increase the number of women on faculty.
5. The Equipment Accommodation Fund and the Disability Resource
Centres Access Fund were used to facilitate the purchase of ergonomic
furniture, hearing aid technologies, and computer enhancements for
faculty and staff requiring special accommodation.
6. The Equity Enhancement Fund underwrote a Faculty of Arts initiative
to mentor aboriginal students and a First Nations Longhouse initiative
to establish a Student Leadership Program.
7. The Health Promotion Program hired a second Return to Work Coordinator, ubc employee groups and the University Administration jointly
developed the Return to Work Program to enable ill or injured employees to continue working or to return to work.
8. The University Administration sponsored ten faculty women at a bc
Senior Women in Academic Administration in Canada conference at
the University of Victoria.
9. For the eleventh year, ubc co-sponsored the Vancouver ywca's Women
of Distinction awards. Ten ubc women were nominated, including two
students in the Young Woman of Distinction category. Two faculty
members received awards in the categories of Health and Wellness, and
Science, Research and Technology.
10. The Faculty Association Status of Women Committee sponsored a retirement planning workshop for women.
11. Canada Foundation for Innovation approved the Centre for Research in
Women's Studies and Gender Relations' infrastructure proposal for
Studies in Autobiography, Gender, and Age.
12. The Centre for Research in Women's Studies and Gender Relations and
the Institute of Asian Research, in collaboration with the Simon Fraser
University's Women's Studies Department, held a symposium and participatory forum, "Women's Studies: Asian Connections." Attendees
from 21 countries helped Canadian Asian women and Women Studies
students develop a network of professional connections.
13. Coordinated through the Alma Mater Society Safe Walk program, a
White Ribbon campaign included a pancake breakfast to raise funds
for and awareness of efforts to prevent violence against women. The
ubc Administration matched the $1,300 raised at this event.
14. As co-sponsors, ubc and Simon Fraser University each granted $50,000
to freda Centre for Research on Violence against Women and Children, ubc students complete internships or conduct research at this
centre.
15. Along with swift (Supporting Women in Information Technology),
Simon Fraser University, the nserc-ibm Chair for Women in Science
and Engineering for bc and the Yukon, and the New Media Innovation
Center, ubc sponsored a one-day event to explore opportunities and
provide support for girls and women in science and technology.
16. In partnership with the university detachment ofthe rcmp, Campus
Security offered women's self-defense training as a complement to
other university safety initiatives such as the Alma Mater Society
Safe Walk program, the Security Bus, Blue Light Emergency Phones,
and Campus Security bike patrols.
17. The Faculty of Arts held its first Arts Orientation for First Nations Students.
18. In conjunction with the First Nations House of Learning and Committee for an Inclusive Campus Community (cicc), the Equity Office
sponsored a seminar, "First Nations Stories and the Politics of Identity."
19. Ninety First Nations women and women of colour participated in a
five-part Leadership Workshop. With support from the Equity Office
and the Women Students' Office, this project employed several First
Nations women and women of colour and established a women's social
and professional network. 8     |      UBC     REPORTS      |     APRIL     5,     2001
THE     UNIVERSITY     OF     BRITISH     COLUMBIA     |      EQUITY     OFFICE     ANNUAL     REPORT     2000
20. A First Nations House of Learning career fair promoted summer and
career employment opportunities for First Nations students. The
House of Learning and the Museum of Anthropology co-sponsored a
work-study program for native youth.
21. The Faculty Association surveyed its members regarding their disabilities. A committee will analyze the data and thereby provide
guidance to the Association and the Administration on the need for
additional policies regarding faculty disability.
22. Pride ubc, an Alma Mater Society resource group for the lesbian, gay,
bisexual, and transgendered campus community, held a series of
events that included speakers, a panel discussion, and a dance to celebrate Out Week.
Objective C
Establishment of a ubc work environment that supports the successful integration of designated-group members.
i.   ubc awarded an honorary degree to one of Canada's first deaf persons
hired to teach the deaf. This occasion marked the first time in Canada
that a deaf person received an honorary degree and the first time a
convocation address was delivered in American Sign Language.
2. The University Orientation Program for new employees was presented
five times to a total of 170 staff and faculty; in addition, the University
President held a reception to welcome new faculty and staff.
3. The Equity Office continued to participate in orientation programs for
new employees through Human Resources and the Centre for Teaching & Academic Growth. In addition, the Equity Office participated
both in Imagine ubc, an orientation program that welcomed 4,200
new undergraduate students, and in Faculty of Graduate Studies orientation activities for new students.
4. To complement Imagine ubc, the University initiated an orientation
program for parents of new students. International Student Services
also welcomed over 800 new international students.
5. The Office ofthe Vice President, Research, developed a Mentoring
Network to support and develop special initiatives for new/junior faculty members. A primary objective ofthe new initiative is to help new/
junior faculty better understand academic research procedures.
6. The Faculty of Education distributed equity reference binders to each
of its departments.
Figure 3: Employment Equity Occupational Groups (eeog)
EEOG Examples of UBC Positions
Senior Managers
Associate Vice President, Dean, President, Registrar, University Librarian,
Vice President.
Middle and Other Managers
Associate Dean, Chair, Computer Systems Manager, Director, Financial
Managers, Food Service Manager, Head.
U n iversity Teachers
Assistant Professor, Associate Professor, Clinical Instructor, Instructor I and
II, Lecturer, Member Extra Sessional Studies, Professor, Senior Instructor,
Sessional Lecturer.
3.2 Professionals (excluding
University Teachers)
Accountant, Coordinator Student Services, Counsellor, Editor, Employee
Relations Officer, General Librarian, Genetic Assistant, Physician,
Programmer/Analyst, Scientific Engineer, Social Science Researcher.
Semi-Professionals and
Technicians
Biosafety Officer, Building Inspector, Coach, EngineeringTechnician,
Graphics Supervisor, Horticulturist, Library Assistant, Medical Artist,
Research Assistant/Technician, Research Scientist.
Supervisors
Accommodation Manager, Accounting Supervisor, Campus Mail
Supervisor, Cleaning Supervisor, Head Service Worker, Section Head,
Senior Resident Attendant, Supervisor (Administration), Word Processing
Coordinator.
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
Farm Manager, Grounds Supervisor, Head Carpenter, Head Plumber, Herd
Manager, Mechanical Trades Supervisor, Sub-Head Electrician, Sub-Head
Gardener.
Administrative & Senior
Clerical Personnel
Administrative Assistant, Administrator, Budget Analyst, Conference
Coordinator, Executive Assistant, Lab Supervisor, Office Manager,
Personnel Assistant, Secretary 1 to 5, Senior Admissions Officer.
Skilled Sales & Service Personnel
Assistant Cook, Commissary Cook, Commissary Baker, First Cook, Head
Cook, Relief Cook, Second Cook.
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
Bricklayer, Carpenter, Electrician, Locksmith, Maintenance Engineer I and
II, Painter, Plumber, Sheet Metal Worker, Shift Engineer.
Clerical Personnel
Administrative Clerk, Buyer 1 to 3, Clerk 1 to 3, Clinical Office Assistant 1 to
3, Computer Operator, Data Entry Clerk, General Clerk, Mail Clerk,
Program Assistant, Store Person.
Intermediate Sales & Service
Bookstore Assistant, Computer Salesperson, Dental Assistant,
Housekeeper, Patrol Person, Sales Attendant, Sales Clerk, Utility Worker,
Waiter/Waitress.
Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
Clerk Driver, Farm Worker 1 to 5, Milker, Nursery & Greenhouse Gardener,
Printing Operator 2 and 3, Spray Painter, Truck Driver.
Other Sales & Service Personnel
Food Services Assistant, Gate Keeper, General Worker, Grocery Clerk,
Janitor, Caretaker, Building Supplies Service Worker, Kiosk Attendant,
Residence Attendant, Service Worker: Ice Maker.
7. The Equity Office revised "Promoting Equity in Employment at UBC:
An Administrator's Guide to Hiring Staff and Faculty" and distributed
copies to all academic and administrative units.
8. The Equity Office participated with the Committee for an Inclusive
Campus Community (cicc) and other campus groups in sponsoring
the third annual one-day conference to commemorate the International Day for the Elimination of Racial Discrimination.
9. The Equity Office, Counselling Services, International House, and the
Committee for an Inclusive Campus Community (cicc) sponsored
"Multi-racial Relationships," a panel discussion on communication
and values among family members with diverse backgrounds.
10. Equity Office staff served on the advisory committee for the Faculty of
Education's David Lam Multicultural Chair.
11. Equity Office staff and the Faculty of Science co-delivered six diversity
training workshops to over 100 students in the Dean of Science Ambassador program.
12. The Equity Office and Planning & Institutional Research (pair) made
a presentation on women in ubc's workforce to the Faculty Association Status of Women Committee.
13. Equity Office staff contributed to drafting university-wide surveys on
student safety and on the graduate student experience.
14. Equity Office staff presented a session, "Rights & Responsibilities," for
international students.
15. In cooperation with the Equity Office, Human Resources offered a
workshop, "Selection Interviewing: Ensuring Equity" five times to a
total of 68 staff, including administrators and union employees. As of
2000, over 500 ubc staff have received this training.
16. Seeking to enhance their workplace skills, 400 employees logged 640
registrations in Human Resources' most Program. Course offerings
included workshops on disability issues, anti-racism, and diversity.
17. The best Program offered two 12-week workplace language skills programs to 42 employees, best is available at no cost to employees
wishing to improve their command of English. The program helps employees improve their reading, writing, listening, and speaking skills.
In 2000, eligibility for best was extended to employees in
postdoctoral and research associate positions.
18. The cupe 2950 Job Skills Training Program offered staff training to
improve job performance skills and to enhance opportunities for
transfer and promotion. Since August 2000,134 employees have
logged 200 registrations in Job Skills courses.
19. With funding from the Alma Mater Society Innovative Project Fund,
the Equity Office and the Women Students' Office delivered a students' leadership training program in citizenship skills. The program
explored ways diversity can enhance both collaboration and individualism.
20.The University again received provincial government "Safer Campus"
funding for installation of security lights, especially on the north end
of campus, where there is higher nighttime pedestrian traffic, particularly along West Mall and in associated parking areas.
21. The Alma Mater Society expanded its Safe Walk program following a
student referendum that approved additional funding of $7,752.00.
This money will fund an additional team of walkers during peak times.
22. The Women Students' Office Safer Campus Peer Educators continued
to offer interactive workshops for students on acquaintance sexual
assault and other personal safety issues.
23. With funding from the Alma Mater Society Innovative Projects Fund,
the Personal Security Coordinator's Office conducted a personal security mapping survey to determine areas on campus where people feel
safe and where they do not. Over 700 respondents provided information that will be used to determine future safety measures.
24.The Health, Safety & Environment Department initiated an office ergonomics improvement program with the objective of preventing
repetitive strain injuries associated with improper workstation setup
and inappropriate work practices.
25. The Vancouver Institute public lecture series included Virginia Valian,
Cecil and Ida Green Visiting Scholar, speaking on "The Advancement
of Women: Why So Slow?"
26. Housing & Conferences, in conjunction with the Alma Mater Society
and Student Services, hosted three performances of theatrical presentations on cultural diversity.
Objective D
Adoption of monitoring and accountability mechanisms to evaluate and
adjust ubc's employment equity program.
1. The Equity Office administered the employment equity census to
newly hired faculty and staff. The overall response rate to this census
was 71 per cent (8,292 employees—see ubc Workforce Data).
2. The Equity Office produced its fifth annual report reviewing the University's progress toward equity and providing an overview of case
processing and resolution of complaints of discrimination and harassment, as well as the Office's educational and training activities, ubc's
Equity Office Annual Report 1999 was published in ubc Reports (April
20, 2000) and appears on the Equity Office's website, http://
www.equity.ubc.ca.
Other Manual Workers
Labourer2, Labourer2 (Const & Hvy), Labourer (Special). UBC     REPORTS     |     APRIL    5,    2001     |     9
3. The Equity Office worked with two university-wide advisory committees—the President s Advisory Committee on Discrimination &
Harassment, and the President's Advisory Committee on Equity.
4. Equity Office staff wrote articles, letters to the editor, or were interviewed for articles on ubc's equity program. These materials
appeared in the Ubyssey and the Vancouver Sun. In addition, the Equity Office revised its website, http://www.equity.ubc.ca, adding
several reports that provide data on the representation of designated
equity groups among Canadian students and doctorate recipients in
Canada and the us.
5. Deans agreed to include in their annual hiring plans data on the representation of equity groups among students and tenure-track
faculty, as well as on qualified applicant pools for graduate students
and tenure-track faculty. In addition, Deans agreed to procedures to
be applied in cases where the representation of equity groups in a faculty falls below the level in relevant, qualified applicant pools.
6. Equity Office staff met with the new bc Commissioner for Freedom of
Information and Protection of Privacy to review confidential-record
management procedures.
7. In conjunction with ubc's Office of Planning & Institutional Research, the Equity Office completed several studies using
employment-equity census data (See ubc Workforce Data, Faculty
Attrition and Progress Through the Ranks, and Comparison ofthe
ubc Workforce and ubc Graduates).
UBC Workforce Data
ubc classifies its employment positions using the fifteen Employment Equity Occupational Groups (eeogs) established by the Federal
Contractors Program to facilitate monitoring the Canadian labour force.
The fifteen eeogs and examples of ubc positions in each category are
listed in Figure 3.
Figures 4 through 7 provide an overview ofthe number of ubc's designated-group employees in each ofthe fifteen eeogs. These figures provide
snapshots ofthe University's workforce on 31 May 1998,1999, and 2000.
Figure 4 indicates the representation of male and female employees in
all ofthe eeogs. Figure 5 shows the representation of aboriginal people,
and Figure 6 shows the representation of visible minorities. Figure 7 provides the representation of persons with disabilities—both those who
self-identify in ubc's employment equity census, and those on ubc's Income Replacement Plan.
The data for men and women in Figure 4 are drawn from ubc's Integrated Information Human Resource Information System (ihris) and
thus accurately reflect the gender distribution of ubc's workforce. Data
on the other three designated groups—visible minorities, aboriginal people, and persons with disabilities—are drawn from ubc's employment
equity census, which relies on voluntary self-identification. Over twenty-
five percent of ubc employees have not participated in the census; thus,
the data on these three groups may misrepresent their actual numbers in
the ubc workforce.
Figure 8 provides the response rate to ubc's employment equity census for the years 1998,1999, and 2000. Over these three years, the overall
response rate has gone down slowly. Although the response rate within
eeogs has been consistent over three years, there has been considerable
variation among eeogs: high response rates are found in eeogs Senior
Managers, Middle and Other Managers, and Administrative & Senior
Clerical Personnel; low response rates are found in eeogs Skilled Sales 8c
Service Personnel, Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel, and Other
Manual Workers.
Comparison ofthe ubc Workforce with the Canadian Labour Force
figure 9 shows the proportion ofthe four designated employment equity groups in ubc's workforce between 1994 and 2000, as well as the
proportion of these groups in the 1996 Canadian labour force (the 1996
Canadian census provides the most recent available data). A comparison
of these two sets of figures indicates ubc's progress in developing a
workforce that represents the diversity in pools of potential candidates
with appropriate qualifications.
Figure 9 also compares ubc's workforce figures with those of other employers who report to the federal government under the Employment Equity Act (Workforce Under the Act, 1996). These employers represent
federally regulated, private-sector organizations and Crown corporations.
Note that the data provided by Human Resources Development
Canada relate to the number of people in the four designated groups
who actually were employed, rather than those only qualified for employment. Thus, one can compare the percentages of people employed at ubc
with those employed in the Canadian labour force and in other organizations. Human Resources Development Canada data do not allow direct
comparison ofthe ubc workforce with qualified applicant pools, which
include unemployed people.
In all ofthe four designated groups, ubc compares favourably with
other employers under the Employment Equity Act. In addition, ubc
compares favourably with the overall Canadian labour force in the proportion of visible minorities and women. However, ubc's proportion of
aboriginal people and persons with disabilities does not compare favourably with the proportion found in the overall labour force.
Equity-Group Distribution ofTenure-Track Faculty
Figure 10 shows the annual gender distribution of new tenure-track faculty appointments from the 1986/87 academic year through January 2001.
ubc met its goal to hire women to fill at least 35 per cent of vacant tenure-
track faculty positions several times over these 15 years. As of January
2001, the University has hired women to fill 32 per cent of available positions for the academic year 2000/01. The 35 per cent goal is based on the
proportion of women receiving doctoral degrees from Canadian universities.
Figure 11 also shows the number of men and women among new tenure-
track faculty appointments for the past fifteen years. Trend lines drawn
through both the total number of faculty appointments as well as the
number of men hired since the 1986/87 academic year reveal declines. A
trend line drawn through the number of women hired over these 15 years
reveals a more stable trend.
Figure 12 shows the gender distribution of full-time faculty by rank.
Since 1985/86, the proportion of women has risen from 16.4 per cent to
24.3 per cent among all tenure-track faculty—an increase of 114 women in
tenure-track positions. In the same period, the number of men has declined by 229. The greatest gains for women faculty have been made at the
ranks of Professor and Associate Professor.
Figure 4: ubc Workforce: Gender by eeog
Female
Hale
Employment Equity Occupational Group
May 1998
May 1999
May 2000
May 1998
May 1999
May 2000
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
N
%
Senior Managers
10
32.26%
9
30.00%
10
31.25%
21
67.74%
21
70.00%
22
68.75%
Middle and Other Managers
139
39.15%
137
37.43%
149
38.30%
216
60.85%
229
62.57%
240
61.70%
University Teachers*
553
26.15%
561
27.18%
569
27.86%
1,562
73.85%
1,503
72.82%
1,473
72.14%
Professionals (excludinq University Teachers)
527
50.14%
573
50.35%
631
52.98%
524
49.86%
565
49.65%
560
47.027o
Semi-Professionals & Technicians
743
56.25%
804
58.09%
800
58.14%
578
43.75%
580
41.91%
576
41,86%
Supervisors
57
62.64%
54
59.34%
60
62.50%
34
37.36%
37
40.66%
36
37.50%
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
3
9.09%
3
7.50%
5
8.47%
30
90.91%
37
92.50%
54
91.53%
Administrative 81 Senior Clerical Personnel
819
96.35%
799
95.92%
802
95.70%
31
3.65%
34
4.08%
36
4.30%
Skilled Sales & Service Personnel
10
27.78%
11
26.19%
10
21.74%
26
72.22%
31
73.81%
36
78.26%
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
4
1.83%
5
2.05%
3
1.26%
214
98.17%
239
97.95%
235
98.74%
Clerical Personnel
615
80.50%
647
82.53%
642
82.31%
149
19.50%
137
17.47%
138
17.69%
Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel
249
64.01%
239
63.56%
251
59.90%
140
35.99%
137
36.44%
168
40.10%
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
5
5.95%
8
8.60%
7
8.43%
79
94.05%
85
91.40%
76
91.57%
Other Sales & Service Personnel
373
57.83%
361
57.12%
343
55.68%
272
42.17%
271
42.88%
273
44.32%
Other Manual Workers
9
15.52%
9
11.84%
7
8.05%
49
84.48%
67
88.16%
80
91.95%
Mm:^::V-f^(WWfi^^::
':'.'4**#'
'iiitiwb
4,220
M&tm
4,2**
51.72%
3.925
4S.»1*
3,*n
48.49%
4,003
4».a»*
•University Teachers includes sessional and extra-sessional appointments.   Faculty with administrative appointments arc included
among Middle and other Managers, Senior Managers.
Note:   Data from the University's Integrated Human Resources Information System (IHRIS) on the extract date of 3! May
Figure 5: ubc Workforce: Aboriginal People by eeog as a Percent of All Respondents
Aboriginal
People
Employment Equity Occupational Group
May 1998
May 1999
May 2000
N
%
N
%
N
%
Senior Managers
0.00%
-
0.00%
0.00%
Middle and Other Manaqers
2
0.62%
4
1.20%
4
1.15%
University Teachers*
21
1.26%
21
1.27%
21
1.29%
Professionals (excludinq University Teachers)
9
1.07%
7
0.78%
7
0.79%
Semi-Professionals & Technicians
9
0.95%
10
1.03%
11
1.18%
Supervisors
4
5.26%
3
4.11%
3
3.90%
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
0.00%
0.00%
0.00%
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel
13
1.78%
14
2.02%
14
2.05%
Skilled Sales & Service Personnel
1
5.00%
1
4.35%
1
4.55%
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
1
0.88%
2
1.74%
3
2.40%
Clerical Personnel
7
1.22%
7
1.20%
8
1.39%
Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel
4
2.42%
4
2.58%
4
2.80%
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
1
2.00%
1
1.85%
0.00%
Other Sales & Service Personnel
9
2.55%
10
2.75%
10
2.87%
Other Manual Workers
2
9.09%
2
6.25%
4
11.11%
TOWW»
S3
l."«W>
86
1.«4<M>
90
1.531b
University Teachers includes sessional and extra-sessional appointments. Faculty with administrative appointments are included among Middle and other Managers, or Senior Managers.
Note: Data from employees who self-identified on ubc's employment equity census as members of designated groups
who were active on the extract date of 31 May.
Figure 6: ubc Workforce: Visible Minorities b
y eeog as a Perce
ntofAll Respondents
Visible Minority
s
■-   —
May 2000
-     —
Employment Equity Occupational Group
May 1998
May 1999
N
%
N
%
N
%
Senior Managers
2
6.90%
2
7.41%
3
10.71%
Middle and Other Managers
29
202
8.95%
12.08%
29
197
8.76%
11.95%
28
202
8.09%
12.46%
University Teachers*
Professionals (excluding University Teachers)
200
23.84%
229
25.67%
231
26.22%
Semi-Professionals & Technicians
297
31.26%
317
32.68%
310
33.37%
Supervisors
19
25.33%
0.00%
19
26.39%
0.00%
21
2
27.63%
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
6.45%
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel
180
24.73%
174
25.22%
170
24.96%
Skilled Sates & Service Personnel
8
40.00%
10
43.48%
10
45.45%
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
12
10.53%
12
10.34%
11
8.80%
Clerical Personnel
171
29.74%
177
30.31%
186
.  32.29%
Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel
66
5
39.76%
10.20%
59
5
37.58%
9.43%
65
4
44.83%
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
8.89%
Other Sales & Service Personnel
121
34.28%
131
36.19%
128
36.99%
Other Manual Workers
5
21.74%
5
15.15%
6
16.22%
TOTAL
%mf
ai.is*
':■*#*&■■'■..
22.«4W>
1,377
23.3S*
University Teachers includes sessional and extra-sessional appointments. Faculty with administrative appointments are included among Middle and other Managers, or Senior Managers.
Note: Data from employees who self-identified on ubc's employment equity census as members of designated groups
who were active on the extract date of 31 May. IO    I     UBC    REPORTS     |     APRIL    5,    2001
THE    UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA     |     EQUITY    OFFICE    ANNUAL    REPORT    2000
Figure 7: ubc Workforce: Persons with Disabilities by eeog as a Percent of All
Respondents
^^^^U'^AX^^UMkk
ia   ;UMmi
Sftii
Employment Equity Occupational Group
Maw
WW
imW
Senior Managers
1                         1 4<  „
1              i "II".,
1                       1 5-".,
Middle and Other Managers
12
3.69%
1 1                    3.33%
10
2.89%
University Teachers*
50
2.99%
53
3.20%
45
2.77%
Professionals (excluding University Teachers)
17
2.01%
21
2.35%
19
2.15%
Semi-Professionals & Technicians
31
3.26%
28
2.89%
28
3.02%
Supervisors
5
6.58%
5
6.85%
4
5.19%
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
0
0
0
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel
26
3.57%
24
3.47%
25
3.65%
Skilled Sales & Service Personnel
0
0
0
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
2
1.75%
2
1.72%
3
2.40%
Clerical Personnel
14
2.44%
14
2.41%
16
2.80%
Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel
4
2.40%
4
2.56%
4
2.78%
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
3
6.00%
3
5 56%
3
6 52%
Other Sales & Service Personnel
10
2.80%
II
3 01%
9
2 58%
Other Manual Workers
1                  4 35%
1                   3 03%
2
5 41%
■Hut**-,-  .•fei.:.Ki»»j*.'.*■ mwmw:
PFTHT -  W.
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Employment Equity Occupational Group
WwW&mm      < WmWmW
is   . ^HBI
NS8-       H.l	
H '' ,,/l' UK
In    HIM
Senior Managers
1              3.45%
1                    3 84%
1                   3 57%
Middle and Other Managers
15
4.57%
15
4.70%
14
3.99%
University Teachers*
57
3.39%
64
4.00%
54
3.29%
Professionals (excluding University Teachers}
20
2.36%
26
2.97%
26
2.92%
Semi-Professionals & Technicians
48
4.96%
44
4.68%
43
4.56%
Supervisors
10
12.35%
10
14.68%
8
9.64%
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
0
0
0
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel
46
6.14%
38
5.70%
36
5.16%
Skilled Sales & Service Personnel
1                    4.76%
1                   4.34%
1                   4.35%
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
6
5.08%
5
4.38%
5
3.94%
Clerical Personnel
25
4.27%
30
5.28%
31
5.30%
Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel
4
2.40%
5
3.29%
5
3.45%
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
5
9.62%
5
9.79%
4
8.33%
Other Sales & Service Personnel
38
9.87%
32
9 04%
31
8 33%
Other Manual Workers
1                  4 35%
2
6 24%
4
10 81%
«■£<"?'       \.t.-i :*:■ .;    ;■   -w •; .%■   '
• .*.3.m '   '!•
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„ 4W*
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..„:       ^      m^m
As shown in Figure 13, patterns of gender distribution differ dramatically in different faculties and schools. For example, women make up 33.3
per cent of faculty in the School of Architecture, 96.7 per cent of faculty
in the School of Nursing, and 8.8 per cent of faculty in Engineering. Thus,
women make up 27.6 per cent of faculty in the Faculty of Applied Science.
Commerce and Science have respectively 8.6 per cent and 13 per cent
women in faculty positions; Education has 48.5 per cent women.
Figure 14 shows the distribution of tenure-track faculty by rank and
designated equity group for 1998,1999, and 2000. The number of tenure-
track faculty who self-identify as visible minorities increased from 1998 to
2000. The number of tenure-track faculty who self-identify as aboriginal
people or as having a disability decreased from 1998 to 2000, though the
percentages of these faculty members remained at one per cent and three
per cent respectively.
Figures 12,13, and 14 contain different sets of data. The data in Figure
12—full-time faculty—is drawn from ihris and excludes Senior Managers, many of whom retain tenured faculty positions in addition to their
administrative roles. The data in Figure 13 also is taken from ihris, but
includes Senior Managers. The data in Figure 14 is taken from respondents to ubc's employment equity census and, like Figure 13, includes the
president, vice-presidents, associate vice-presidents, and deans. The data
set in Figures 13 and 14 also differs from Figure 12 because the employment equity census includes some part-time, tenured faculty. Moreover,
snapshot data from ihris and the employment equity census data are
drawn at different points in time: the data in Figure 12 is taken from the
University's annual submission to Statistics Canada for 31 October,
whereas the data in Figures 13 and 14 is taken from the University's employment equity census snapshot for 31 May.
University Teachers includes sessional and extra-sessional appointments. Faculty with administrative appointments are included among Middle and other Managers, or Senior Managers.
' irp : Income Replacement Plan
Note: Data from employees with disabilities who self-identified on ubc's employment equity census and employees
who were on the University's Income Replacement Plan on the extract date of 31 May.
Figure 8: Response Rate to ubc's Employment Equity Census
Response Rate
1998
1999
2000
Senior Managers
93.5%
90.0%
87.5%
Middle and Other Managers
91.3%
90.4%
88.9%
University Teachers*
79.1%
79.9%
79.4%
Professionals (excluding University Teachers
79.8%
78.4%
74.0%
Semi-Professionals & Technician
71.9%
70.1%
67.5%
Supervisors
82.4%
79.1%
79.2%
Supervisors: Crafts and Trades
54.5%
52.5%
52.5%
Administrative & Senior Clerical Personnel
85.6%
82.8%
81.3%
Skilled Sales & Service Personnc
55.6%
54.8%
47.8%
Skilled Crafts & Trades Workers
52.3%
47.5%
52.5%
Clerical Personnel
75.3%
74.5%
73.8%
Intermediate Sales & Service Personnel
42.7%
41.8%
34.6%
Semi-skilled Manual Workers
58.3%
57.0%
54.2%
Other Sales & Service Personnel
54.7%
57.3%
56.2%
Other Manual Workers
39.7%
43.4%
42.5%
TOTAL
73.9%
n.o%
71.0%
*  University Teachers includes sessional and extra-sessional appointments.
Faculty with administrative appointments are
included among Middle and othe
Managers,
or Senior Managers.
Figure 9: Representation of Members of Designated Groups in the Canadian Labour
Force
Under the Act
Canadian
Designated Group                                            UBC
UBC
UBC
UBC
UBC
UBC
UBC
Workforce
Labour Force
I994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
(19%)
(19%)
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
Women                                                                  51.00
51.34
51.69
51.26
51.19
51.51
51.72
44.83
46.40
Aboriginal People                                                    1.35
1.42
1.36
1.32
1.40
1.44
1.53
1.22
2.10
Visible Minorities                                                 20.63
20.32
21.0I
22.04
22.19
22.84
23.38
9.23
10.30
Persons with Disabilities (inc. IRP)**                  4.94
4.83
4.83
4.63
4.58
4.78
4.38
2.67*
6.50*
Persons with Disabilities (excl. IRP)                      n.a.
n.a.
n.a.
2.96
2.96
2.97
2.87
Note: Under the Act Workforce covers both crown corporations and
federally-regulated, private
sector employers.
* From 199I Health and Activity Limitations Survey
" IRP:   Income Replacement Plan
Figure io: ubc Workforce: New Tenure Track Faculty
Appointments (Jan. 31, 2001)
Total
Male
Female
hired
#
%
#
%
Year
1986, 87
S7
12
7|
15
20
198" 88
89
05
_3
2 i
27
1988 89
9-1
<H
08
30
52
1989 9(1
111
8"
"8
24
22
1990 91
hi
39
Ol
22
30
1991, 92
92
57
02
35
38
1992 93
81
52
01
29
30
1W3 9i
|-
25
5.-1
22
)-
199-1  95
"0
■13
01
2"
39
1995 96
5-t
39
_2
15
28
1990 9"
02
il
00
21
5i
1997 98
52
29
50
23
it
1998 99
28
18
0 1
1(1
30
I9'W 00
- 1
51
09
21.
31
2(XX> 01
"5
51
OS
2l
32
Total
10-17
"03
<r
3-l-t
',,'•
Faculty Attrition and Progress Through the Ranks
a number of questions related to equity can be answered by following
a specific cohort of newly hired faculty for a period of time. Figure 15 reveals the status ten years later of 183 faculty hired as assistant professors
in 1988 and 1989—135 men and 48 women. (Three female faculty members were hired in Nursing and Rehabilitation Sciences in these two years,
but were excluded from this analysis because faculty in these Schools
may be hired without doctorates. Faculty without doctorates generally do
not achieve full professor rank)
At the end often years, 24 (13 per cent) ofthe group had reached the
level of full professor; 76 (42 per cent) were associate professors; 12 (seven
per cent) remained as assistant professors; and 71 (39 per cent) had left
UBC
If the rates of attrition were exactly the same for men and women, we
would expect 52 men (39 per cent) and 19 women (39 per cent) to have
left ubc after 10 years. In actuality, one more man and one fewer woman
left than would be expected. Similarly, if the rates of promotion were exactly the same for men and women, we would see 18 men (13 per cent)
and 6 women (13 per cent) at the rank of full professor after 10 years. In
actuality, 23 men and one woman achieved this rank after 10 years. If the
promotion rates for men and women were exactly the same, we would
expect 5 fewer men (18) and 5 more women (6) at the full professor rank
than actually achieved this rank.
The statistical significance ofthe difference between the actual and
expected numbers was tested using a chi-squared statistic. The result
shows a statistically significant difference.
Comparison ofthe ubc Workforce and UBC Graduates
figure 16 compares ubc's workforce with ubc graduates from the
classes of 1991,1993,1996, and 1997. The proportion of women and visible
minorities among ubc faculty and staff is smaller than the proportion of
women and visible-minority students who recently graduated from ubc
The proportion of ubc faculty and staff who self-identify as aboriginal
people has remained stable for several years, while the proportion of
graduates who self-identify as aboriginal people has risen to match their
proportion in ubc s workforce. The number of persons with disabilities in
ubc's workforce is slightly larger than the number of recent graduates
who self-identify as having a disability.
Discrimination & Harassment Report
ubc's policy on discrimination and harassment (1995; revised,
1996) provides procedures for managing and remedying complaints of
discrimination and harassment.
In the context of ubc's Policy, the terms "discrimination" and "harassment" refer to intentional or unintentional behaviour for which there is
no reasonable justification. On the basis of characteristics defined by the
1997 bc Human Rights Code, discrimination and harassment adversely
affect both individuals and groups.
Under this code, ubc must not discriminate against students, faculty,
or staff on thirteen prohibited grounds, such as religion, place of origin,
and sexual orientation. Recent court decisions also have established
ubc's clear obligation to maintain a discrimination-free work and study
environment. This obligation falls upon all individuals who supervise the
work or conduct of others. "Supervisors" may include faculty members,
administrators, or managers. UBC     REPORTS      |      APRIL     5,     2 O 0 I      |      II
Equity Office procedures for handling discrimination and harassment
complaints offer a clear, equitable approach to problem resolution and
supplement other University and extra-University mechanisms, such as
those of employee associations and unions, the courts, the bc Human
Rights Commission, and the Office ofthe bc Ombudsman.
The Equity Office divides discrimination and harassment complaints
into five categories:
POISONED ENVIRONMENT
Any conduct or comment about personal characteristics that are protected under the Policy on Discrimination and Harassment—for
example, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, disability, or age—that has
the effect of creating a hostile, intimidating, or offensive environment
quid pro quo
Coercive sexual conduct involving rewards or threats
ASSAULT
Unwelcome physical contact, including fondling, touching, and the
use of force
OTHER FORMS OF DISCRIMINATION
Conduct that compromises the access, opportunity, or evaluation of
an individual on the basis of personal characteristics unrelated to performance and protected under the Policy
ALLEGATIONS NOT COVERED BY THE POLICY
Behaviour that offends human rights, but that involves a respondent
or takes place at a location not under ubc's jurisdiction, or that falls out-
Figure n: New Tenure Track Faculty Appointments Over Time
FIGURE 11:  New Tenure Track Faculty Appointments Over Time
■# men
■# women
Total Hires
■Trend (#men)
•Trend (# women)
Trend (total)
Figure 12: UBC Workforce: Gender Distribution of Full-Time Faculty by Rank (31 October)
Instructors
Tenure
Track
All Ranks
Professor
Associate
Assistant
1,11
8<Sr.
Subtotal
Percentage
Lecturer
Total
Percer
tage
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
Male
Female
85/86
678
35
497
85
293
130
38
45
1506
295
83.6%
16.4%
13
34
1519
329
82.2%
17.8%
86/87
687
34
47'
90
291
119
41
43
1490
286
83.9%
16.1%
15
35
1505
321
82.4%
17.6%
87/88
689
35
468
94
290
116
34
39
1481
284
83.9%
16.1%
13
25
1494
309
82.9%
17.1%
88/89
689
40
45!
100
304
112
34
41
1478
293
83.5%
16.5%
15
25
'493
318
82.4%
17.6%
89/90
684
4i
442
102
346
126
32
41
1504
310
82.9%
17.1%
'5
30
1519
340
81.7%
18.3%
90/91
688
48
425
99
356
'34
32
46
1501
327
82.1%
17.9%
12
3°
1513
357
80.9%
19.1%
91/92
682
52
416
103
348
153
34
42
1480
350
80.9%
19.1%
11
32
1491
382
79.6%
20.4%
92/93
673
63
410
97
332
162
34
44
1449
366
79.8%
20.2%
12
24
1461
390
78.9%
21.1%
93/94
683
68
416
99
317
162
33
44
1449
373
79.5%
20.5%
10
26
'459
399
78.5%
21.5%
94/95
692
78
417
IOI
295
159
30
43
1434
381
79.0%
21.0%
8
24
1442
405
78.1%
21.9%
95/96
684
85
435
109
268
146
25
46
1412
386
78.5%
21.5%
12
22
1424
408
77-7%
22.3%
96/97
697
86
43i
no
255
149
25
43
1408
388
78.4%
21.6%
16
27
1424
4'5
77.4%
22.6%
97/98
692
98
418
128
241
142
27
4'
1378
409
77.1%
22.9%
16
22
'394
43'
76.4%
23.6%
98/99
686
IOI
386
136
216
128
25
37
1313
402
76.6%
23.4%
'3
25
1326
427
75.6%
24.4%
99/00
670
106
381
141
209
122
24
39
1284
408
75.9%
24.1%
18
29
1302
437
74.9%
25.1%
OO/OI
676
109
359
135
215
124
27
4'
1277
409
75-7%
24.3%
20
34
1297
443
745%
25.5%
Note: Exc!
udes President, Vice Presidents, Associate Vice Presidents, ar
d Deans.
Figure 13: UBC Workforce: Gender Distribution of Full-Time Faculty by Faculty and School (May 31, 2000)
Professor
Female
Male
Total
Agricultural Sciences
4
19
23
Applied Science - All
to
57
67
Engineering
3
55
58
Architecture
-
2
2
Nursing
7
-
7
Arts-All
32
154
186
Arts
26
138
164
School- Journalism
1
-
1
School- Lbrary & Archival Studies
1
1
2
School- Music
2
12
14
School- Social Work&Famil/ Studies
2
3
5
Commerce
1
39
40
Dentistry
2
10
12
Education - All
14
32
46
Education
14
27
41
School- Human Kinetics
-
5
5
Forestry
1
18
19
Graduate Studies - All
4
28
32
Graduate Studies
2
24
26
School- Comm& Reg Planning
-
4
4
School- Occup Hyg Program
2
-
2
Health Sciences
-
4
4
Lam
4
17
21
Medicine - All
24
152
176
Medicine
21
151
172
School- Audiology & Speech Sciences
1
1
2
School- Rehab Sciences
2
-
2
Pharmaceutical Sciences
3
11
14
Science
7
149
156
Grand Total
106
690
796
Associate
Professor
Female
Male
Total
3
12
15
16
30
46
2
27
29
3
3
6
11
-
11
48
91
139
41
80
121
-
1
1
3
1
4
1
4
5
3
5
8
2
21
23
3
8
11
25
23
48
22
19
41
3
4
7
1
10
11
1
7
8
-
2
2
1
3
4
-
2
2
5
7
12
29
95
124
25
95
120
1
-
1
3
-
3
1
6
7
5
65
70
139
375
514
AssEtant Professor
Ferrole
Male
Total
6
2
8
14
24
38
4
21
25
1
2
3
9
1
10
35
45
80
27
38
65
1
-
1
1
1
2
1
4
5
5
2
7
4
12
16
2
14
16
22
13
35
19
12
31
3
1
4
3
9
12
1
3
4
1
2
3
.
1
1
1
1
2
3
1
4
30
73
103
25
72
97
2
1
3
3
-
3
2
3
5
14
32
46
137
232
369
Instructo
Female
r I, II, Senior
Male
Total
-
-
-
3
2
5
1
1
2
-
1
1
2
-
2
12
4
16
10
4
14
2
-
2
-
2
2
4
1
5
3
-
3
1
1
2
1
2
3
.
1
1
10
4
14
1
4
5
3
-
3
6
-
6
3
1
4
12
9
21
45
26
71
Total
Total
Total!
Female
Men
•
13
33
46
43
113
156
10
104
114  ,
4
8
12 1
29
1
30 |
127
294
421
104
260
364
2
1
3
7
3
10
4
20
24
10
10
20
I
74
81
7
32
39
65
69
134
58
58
116
7
11
18
6
39
45
6
38
44
3
28
31
1
1
8
2
3
5
1
5
6
12
26
38
93
324
417
72
32 2
394
7
2
9
14
-
14
9
21
30
38
255
293
427
1,323
1,750
%of
Women
283%
27.6%
8.8%
33.3%
96.7%
30.2%
28.6%
66.7%
70.0%
16.7%
50.0%
8.6%
17.9%
48.5%
50.0%
38.9%
133%
13.6%
9.7%
12.5%
40.0%
16.7%
31.6%
223%
18.3%
77.8%
100.0%
30.0%
13.0%
24.4%
Note:   Includes President, Vice Presidents, Associate Vice Presidents, and Deans 12     |     UBC     REPORTS     |     APRIL    $ ,    2001
THE     UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH     COLUMBIA     |     EQUITY    OFFICE     ANNUAL    REPORT    2000
Figure 14: UBC Workforce: Equity Group Distribution of Tenure-Track Faculty by Rank
as a Percent of All Respondents (31 May)
By Visible Minority
Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Instructor I, II Senior
paWinim imi|ynSni|irnti|i|i;r.at n
1998
50
636
46
70
Jitf-jlpfrji
J£»
»vw
.ifisas
iSdffiSt
34B    MAtv,
,?,ff*fr
11.M*
1999
643
62
JS2L
7.939h
«L57%
».78%
J«S*
il
2000
Total!
53
426
If 11:13
9 68
■ Iff A |^f I
By Aboriginal
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Instructor I, II, Senior
ifap'rfiin
|tmi|l|iMiliyii.
1998
Abong
Total
638
427
»*Wt
S
1999
Aborig
Total
350
66
''191! •   S    > *    *
X^bJmmmSStm
413
,*t, ;„§dff
Afisfc
«&
iiitllfirTi
Aborig
Total
305
■i?::!3
»f 33
liittimjii
-l^ft'l^*'
By Self-Identified Disability
Professor
Associate Professor
Assistant Professor
Instructor I, II, Senior
'EST •    ' '' :—
1998
Dis
Total
20
429
66
m- -mm
%w»
3.14*
ZJ0»
-MiS
9.0Mb
3.17*
1999
Total
415
62
46
niiMfft.
<*«»
1998
%«*
1999
WCrta
2000
' *|fcDI*
By Self-Identified Disability (+IRP»
Dis
Total
Dis
Totai
Dis
Total
Professor
20
637
„JV*f*f
19
645
3fc«S*
17
641
' 4ttH
Associate Professor
15
432
M?*
17
420
4.05%
16
429
1r73%k
Assistant Professor
11
351
13
323
4.02"*
12
308
ftp*
Instructor I, II, Senior
6
66
;-m*»
6
62
>«"*
6
—
*«»fe
'^■-: - -  ■■-.; --.< ■■■■'■■■1"  *
•i;«r
1,486
iMtm
55
)**§»
S.7Mfc
,JW
1,446
*■»*
Note:  Includes President, Vice Presidents, Associate Vice Presidents, and Deans
* IRP: Income Replacement Plan
Figure 15: Status of Newly Hired Faculty After 10 Years
(excludes Nursing and Rehabilitation Sciences)
Actual
men
women
total
left UBC
53
18
71
Assistant
4
8
12
Associate
55
21
76
Full Prof
23
1
24
Total
135
48
183
Expected
left UBC
52
19
71
Assistant
9
3
12
Associate
56
20
76
Full Prof
18
6
24
135
48
183
Actual - Expected
left UBC
1
-1
Assistant
-5
5
Associate
-1
1
Full Prof
5
-5
chi-squarec
0.000992
The difference between the distribution of final ranks for men and
women is statistically significant. The probability of such differences occurring by chance are less than 1 in 1000.
Figure 16
UBC Bachelor
s Degree Graduates
by Equity Group
1991
1993
1996
1997
Women
Aboriginals
Visible Minorities
Disabled
54.3
1.0
25.9
2.8
55.5
1.2
25.2
2.6
56.4
1.4
29.5
2.1
57.9
1.5
32.0
2.2
UBC Faculty & Staff
by Equity Group
1994
1996
1999
2000
Women
Aboriginals
Visible Minorities
Disabled
Disabled (IRP)
51.0
1.4
20.6
n.a.
4.9
51.7
1.4
21.0
2.5
4.8
51.5
1.4
22.8
3.0
4.6
51.7
1.5
23.4
2.9
4.4
IRP: Income Replacement Plan
side the one-year limit for reporting complaints, or that may be effectively
dealt with under other University procedures
This category also covers interpersonal conflicts not covered by human
rights legislation or the Policy. Such behaviour includes bullying and "personal harassment" that take place in either an academic or employment
context. Interpersonal conflicts in this category nevertheless remain the
responsibility of ubc managers and supervisors.
Complaints Received in 2000
the equity office provided consultation and case management assistance to students, faculty, and staff, including administrative heads of
unit, executive members of employee associations, and members of department equity committees.
Complaints accepted by the Equity Office were resolved by complainants themselves, through the intervention of Equity Advisors or
administrative heads with complainants and respondents, or by a collaborative process involving Equity Advisors, administrative heads,
complainants, and respondents.
Many complainants who visited the Equity Office did so for only one or
two sessions and did not request Equity Office interventions. Some complainants sought information and advice on how they might address
problems themselves. Others reported being too fearful of retaliation to
confront respondents or to inform administrative heads.
The Equity Office categorizes complaints as either "consultations" or
"cases." "Consultations" involve providing information and advice to complainants and administrators who then proceed to manage complaints on
their own. "Cases" involve the Equity Office in direct intervention with
the parties to a complaint. This report combines "cases" and "consultations" under the term "complaints."
As in the past three years, no case went to a formal investigation in
2000. One complaint, in which a student alleged that a disability had not
been appropriately accommodated, was resolved through the services of
an external mediator.
In 2000, the Office participated in efforts to resolve 69 fewer complaints than in 1999, a drop that can be accounted for partly by revised
methods of record keeping: this past year, Equity Advisors did not record
inquiries that required little time, such as single telephone calls or email
letters consisting of a few questions. During 2000, Equity Advisors responded to approximately 50 inquiries about complaints that, if added to
the recorded complaints, would bring the number of complaints in 2000
close to the number of complaints handled in 1999.
Other reasons for the drop in number of complaints may be due to the
Equity Office offering educational sessions and networking with other
campus service organizations; another contributing factor may be the
introduction of ubc's Policy on Academic Accommodation for Students
with Disabilities. Additionally, due to staff turnover and staff illness,
which required extensive sick leave, the Office was understaffed for several months. Although the Office did not turn anyone with a complaint
away during this time, difficulty in reaching an advisor may have led some
people to seek help in other avenues.
Complainants brought 136 new complaints to the Equity Office. Of
these, 85 (63 per cent) were consultations in which the Office was not
asked to intervene, and 51 (37 per cent) were cases which involved the
Office in attempts to address and resolve concerns. Ofthe 136 complaints,
61 (45 per cent) were covered by ubc's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment. Ofthe 136 complaints, 75 (55 per cent) fell outside ofthe Policy's
mandate for reasons previously discussed in "Allegations Not Covered by
the Policy." Figure 17 tracks the number of complaints of discrimination
and harassment presented to the Equity Office in 1999 and 2000, during
which time the proportion of complaints covered by the Policy increased
from 86 out of 205 (42 per cent) to 61 out of 136 (45 per cent).
The leading causes of human rights problems at ubc in both 1999 and
2000 were discrimination and harassment on the basis of sex/gender, ethnicity, and disability. Ofthe 61 complaints in 2000 that fell under the
mandate ofthe University's Discrimination and Harassment Policy, 36 (59
per cent) involved allegations of sexual or gender discrimination or harassment, an increase from 54 per cent of complaints in 1999. As in 1999,
next came ethnicity, which in 2000 comprised 20 per cent of complaints.
The third most frequent type of complaint involving human rights issues
covered by ubc's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment was complaints of discrimination on the ground of disability. In 2000, seven
complaints (11 per cent) related to disability.
One category of complaints of discrimination and harassment that reflected a change from the 1999 figures was that of complaints on the
ground of sexual orientation—5 of 61 complaints (eight per cent). In 1999,
one complaint on the ground of sexual orientation comprised one per
cent of all complaints covered by ubc's Policy.
In addition to the 61 complaints that involved human rights issues covered by the Policy on Discrimination and Harassment, 75 complaints
brought to the Equity Office in 2000 involved allegations not covered under ubc's Policy. Figure 17 also tracks the number of complaints that did
not fall under the Policy. From 1999 to 2000, the proportion of complaints
not covered by the Policy decreased slightly from 119 out of 205 (58 per
cent) to 75 out of 136 (55 per cent). UBC     REPORTS      |      APRIL     5,     2001      |      13
Figure 17: Discrimination and Harassment Complaints
Covered by UBC's Policy
Figure 18: Context of Discrimination and Harassment Cases January to December 1999
and 2000
1999
2000
Out of 205 total
Out of 136 total
complaints
86
complaints.
§1
covered by Policy
covered by
Policy
Age
1
1%
0
0
Disability
11
13%
7
11%
Ethnicity (ancestry/colour/race)
24
28%
12
20%
Family Status
1
1%
1
2%
Marital Status
0
0
0
0
Political  Belief
0
0
0
0
Religious Belief
2
2%
0
0
Sex/Gender
46
54%
36
59%
Sexual Orientation
1
1%
5
8%
Unrelated Criminal Offense
0
0
0
0
Not Covered by UBC's Policy
1999
2000
Out of 2D5 tota
Out of 13Ji total
complaints
US
nol
complaints, 75 not
covered by
Pol
cy
covered by
Policy
Behaviour covered under other UBC
policy
or procedure
63
53%
38
51%
Event outside one-year limit
1
1%
2
3%
Respondent and/or context nol under UBC
jurisdiction
13
11%
13
17%
Personal Harassment
42
35%
22
29%
In 2000, 53 out of 136 (39 per cent) complaints concerned human
rights issues not covered by ubc's Policy: the behaviours or events were
outside the one-year limit, were covered by other University policies or
procedures, or involved a complainant or respondent not under ubc's
jurisdiction. The remaining 22 complaints that were not covered by the
Policy concerned personal harassment involving interpersonal conflicts
between peers, between supervisors and their employees, or between faculty and students.
Of complaints not covered by ubc's Policy, the largest group, 38 of 75
(51 per cent), fell into the category of "behaviour covered under other
ubc policy or procedure." Personal harassment followed at 22 of 75 (29
per cent). These figures are similar to those of 1999 when 53 per cent of
the complaints not covered by ubc's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment involved behaviour covered under other ubc policies or
procedures and 35 per cent of complaints not covered by ubc's Policy
involved personal harassment.
Figure 18 describes the contexts ofthe events that gave rise to complaints of discrimination and harassment in 1999 and 2000. The
proportion of complaints that occurred in academic contexts stayed
consistent at 54 per cent in 1999, and 55 per cent in 2000. At the same
time, the proportion of complaints that occurred in employment contexts fell from 39 per cent in 1999 to 35 per cent in 2000.
Figure 19 provides a gender breakdown of parties involved in the discrimination and harassment complaints. As in previous years, women
were much more likely to be complainants (70 per cent) and men were
much more likely to be respondents (49 per cent). Women brought the
largest group of complaints against men (38 per cent), followed by complaints by women against a department or the University (15 per cent),
and complaints by women against other women (13 per cent). Men
brought complaints against other men (11 per cent), against women (7
per cent), and against a department or the University (6 per cent). Complaints by women against men rose from 33 per cent in 1999 to 38 per
cent in 2000; complaints by men against women decreased from 12 per
cent in 1999 to 7 per cent in 2000. Complaints by women against a department or the University rose from 10 per cent in 1999 to 15 per cent in
2000; complaints by men against a department or the University fell
from 11 per cent to 6 per cent over the same period.
The gender of some complainants and respondents was unknown,
and some complainants and respondents were in groups containing
both men and women. Examples of complaints where the respondent is
unknown are allegations of harassment by anonymous email, notes, or
phone calls, or stalking by a stranger. As well, administrators or other
third parties who seek assistance from the Equity Office may not reveal
the gender of a complainant or respondent, and when the respondent is
a group, department, or an association, gender cannot be designated. In
both 1999 and 2000, three per cent ofthe complaints involved complainants either in a group comprised of both genders or an individual whose
gender was unknown.
Figure 20 shows that students continue to bring the largest number of
complaints to the Equity Office. In 2000, undergraduate students
brought 38 per cent of all complaints; graduate students, 18 per cent. The
combined figure for undergraduate and graduate students as complainants increased from 54 per cent of all complaints in 1999 to 56 per cent in
2000. The next two largest groups bringing complaints were support
staff and faculty. In 1999, support staff brought 16 per cent of all complaints; in 2000, support staff brought 18 per cent. In 1999, faculty
brought 15 per cent of all complaints; in 2000, faculty brought 13 per cent.
Figure 21 indicates the position of complainants at the University relative to respondents. In 1999, the largest group of complaints—57 out of
205 (28 per cent)—were brought against undergraduate and graduate
students, with 21 per cent ofthe complaints brought against undergraduates as respondents. In 2000, faculty made up the largest group of
respondents—25 out of 136 (26 per cent), with students a close second
(25 per cent).
2000
Non UBC
2%
Athletic
1%     n
1999
Employment
39%
Figure 19: Gender of Complainants and Respondents
1999
2000
n=205
n=136
Female  complainant
26
13%
18
13%
Female respondent
Female complainant
68
33%
52
38%
Male respondent
Female  complainant
8
4%
2
1%
Both respondent
Female complainant
20
10%
21
15%
Department/University respondent
Female  complainant
1
<1%
2
1%
Unknown respondent
Male complainant
20
10%
15
11%
Male respondent
Male complainant
25
12%
10
7%
Female respondent
Male  complainant
2
1%
0
0
Both respondent
Male  complainant
23
11%
8
6%
Department/University respondent
Male  complainant
6
3%
4
3%
Unknown respondent
Both  complainant
1
<1%
0
0
Male respondent
Both complainant
2
1%
1
<1%
Department/University respondent
Unknown complainant
2
1%
2
1%
Department/University respondent
Unknown complainant
1
<1%
1
<1%
Unknown respondent
Figure 20: Complaints by Campus Groups January to December 1999 and 2000
1%(2)
1999
Faculty
13% (17)
Off Campus
5% (7)
Other UBC
1%<3)
Off Campus
3% (7)
Faculty     ^^tffl
15%(30|^^^M
Management &     ^^H^^^^l
Professional      1     ^^^^d
8% (16)          ^^^•**7
^^^^^^^  Undergraduate
Administrative     V                    /
Head of Unit      \                /
2% (5)               *V             /
T
Support Staff
16% (33)
Graduate
20% (42)
Administrative
Head of Unit
1%(2)
Support Staff
18% (25)
Graduate
18% (25) 14     I     UBC     REPORTS      |     APRIL    5,     20OI
THE     UNIVERSITY     OF     BRITISH     COLUMBIA     |      EQUITY     OFFICE     ANNUAL     REPORT    2000
Figure 21: Position of Complainants and Respondents
Figure 22: Behavioural Description of Complaints
COMPLAINANT POSITION
1999
2000
Respondent Position
UNDERGRADUATE STUDENT
n=69
n=52
Undergraduate Student
24
35%
20
38%
Graduate Student
3
4%
2
4%
Support Staff
4
6%
2
4%
Administrative Head of Unit
3
4%
0
0
Management & Professional
5
7%
1
2%
Faculty
12
17%
15
29%
Other UBC Campus
2
3%
2
4%
Off Campus
6
9%
4
8%
Department/University
8
12%
5
10%
Unknown
2
3%
1
2%
GRADUATE STUDENT
n=42
n=25
Undergraduate Student
9
21%
1
4%
Graduate Student
3
7%
4
16%
Support Staff
2
5%
1
4%
Administrative Head of Unit
2
5%
0
0
Faculty
14
33%
10
40%
Other UBC Campus
0
0
1
4%
Off Campus
1
2%
1
4%
DepartmentyUniversity
10
24%
7
28%
Unknown
1
2%
0
0
FACULTY
n=30
n = 17
Undergraduate Student
6
20%
4
24%
Graduate Student
5
17%
2
12%
Administrative Head of Unit
5
17%
0
0
Faculty
7
23%
5
28%
Off Campus
1
3%
0
0
Department/University
4
13%
4
24%
Unknown
2
7%
2
12%
SUPPORT STAFF
n=33
n=25
Undergraduate Student
0
0
1
4%
Support Staff
9
27%
5
20%
Management & Professional
8
24%
10
40%
Faculty
2
6%
0
0
Other UBC Campus
0
0
1
4%
Department/University
12
36%
7
28%
Unknown
2
6%
1
4%
MANAGEMENT & PROFESSIONAL
n=16
n=6
Undergraduate Student
2
13%
0
0
Graduate Student
1
6%
0
0
Support Staff
3
19%
2
33%
Administrative Head of Unit
1
6%
0
0
Management & Professional
2
13%
2
33%
Faculty
6
38%
2
33%
Department/University
1
6%
0
0
ADMINISTRATIVE HEAD OF UNIT
n=5
n=2
Graduate Student
1
20%
0
0
Support Staff
1
20%
0
0
Faculty
2
40%
1
50%
Department/University
1
20%
1
50%
OTHER UBC CAMPUS
n=3
n=2
Undergraduate Student
1
33%
0
0
Other UBC Campus
0
0
2
100%
Off Campus
1
33%
0
0
Unknown
1
33%
0
0
OFF CAMPUS
n=7
n=7
Undergraduate Student
1
14%
0
0
Graduate Student
1
14%
0
0
Management & Professional
1
14%
0
0
Faculty
0
0%
2
29%
Off Campus
0
0%
3
43%
Department/University
3
43%
1
14%
Unknown
1
14%
1
14%
In 1999 and 2000, student complaints about other students remained
stable (19 per cent in 1999 and 20 per cent in 2000). Student complaints
about support staff also remained stable (three per cent in 1999 and two
per cent in 2000). However, student complaints about management and
professional staff dropped from seven per cent in 1999 to two per cent in
2000, while student complaints about faculty rose from 13 per cent to 18
per cent during the same period. Complaints about a department or the
University comprised nine per cent of student complaints in both 1999
and 2000.
In 2000, 40 per cent of complaints brought by support staff named
management and professional staff as respondents, followed by complaints against a department or the University (28 per cent). Support staff
brought complaints against other members of support staff 20 per cent of
the time. Support staff had named these same three groups in the majority of their complaints in 1999 as well.
After students and support staff, faculty members comprised the third
largest group of complainants. Faculty complaints against students remained stable at 37 per cent in 1999 and 36 per cent in 2000. Faculty
complaints against other faculty members rose from 23 per cent in 1999
to 28 per cent in 2000. The third largest category of respondents to faculty complaints in 2000 was the department/university category in which
complaints rose from 13 per cent in 1999 to 24 per cent in 2000.
1999
2000
n=205
n=136
Poisoned Environment
Insults/slurs/unacceptable jokes
35
17%
15
11%
Following/staring/stalking
7
3%
7
5%
Unwelcome verbal/written advances
14
7%
7
5%
Verbal/written threats
8
4%
5
4%
Offensive visual material
5
2%
2
1%
Quid Pro Quo
Coercive romance
0
0
2
1%
Coercive sex
2
1%
1
<1%
Retaliation
5
2%
2
1%
Assault
Unwelcome touching/fondling
8
4%
5
4%
Physical threat or force
9
4%
0
0
Sexual threat or force
4
2%
5
4%
Other Forms of Discrimination
Biased academic decisions
34
17%
8
6%
Biased employment decisions
0
0
6
4%
Exclusion or denial of access
21
10%
9
7%
Systemic
13
6%
8
6%
Allegations Not Covered by Policy
Interpersonal Conflict - Academic
22
11%
21
15%
Interpersonal Conflict - Employment
18
9%
10
7%
Bullying
0
0
13
10%
Work/Studyplace harassment
0
0
10
7%
Figure 22 categorizes the types of behaviours people complain about
when they come to the Equity Office. In 1999, one-third of all complaints
involved Poisoned Environment, but in 2000 this figure dropped to 26 per
cent. Similarly, reports of Other Forms of Discrimination dropped from 33
per cent in 1999 to 23 per cent in 2000. Reports of Quid Pro Quo (coercive
sexual behaviour and retaliation) remained stable (three per cent in 1999
and three per cent 2000), and reports of Assault decreased slightly from
10 per cent in 1999 to eight per cent in 2000. Reports of Interpersonal
Conflict rose dramatically from 20 per cent in 1999 to 40 per cent in 2000.
Examples of Complaints
the following examples describe typical complaints received by the
Equity Office. To protect the individuals involved, all distinguishing details of persons and circumstances have been modified.
Complaints of Sexual Harassment
A female graduate student complained that male students in her lab
asked her to do their photocopying, make coffee, and clean up afterwards.
The supervising faculty member who had witnessed this behaviour had
not admonished the other students. The Equity Advisor agreed to talk
with the supervisor and work with him to remedy the concern.
A female student who worked part-time on campus reported that she
was sexually harassed by a co-worker who made unwanted sexual comments and jokes. The Advisor discussed ways the student might be able
to address this behaviour with her supervisor and/or the respondent, and
the Advisor met with the respondent to discuss why the behaviour, if true,
was inappropriate and must stop.
A Complaint on the Ground of Sexual Orientation
A staff member who complained of homophobic behaviour in the
workplace was unable to object because he feared that by doing so he
would reveal his sexual orientation. Shielding the identity ofthe complainant, the Equity Advisor brought the concern to the Administrative
Head of Unit, who agreed to an Equity Office education session for unit
staff members and management.
A Complaint of Racial Harassment
An Administrative Head of Unit called to discuss a faculty member's complaint that a male exchange student racially harassed him. The Equity
Advisor offered to meet with the complainant and discussed strategies
for the Administrative Head to handle the complaint.
A Complaint on the Ground of Disability
A female undergraduate sought advice on ways to talk to her professor
about her disability. Initially, the professor was unwilling to accommodate
the student by allowing her to record lectures because doing so would
give the student "unfair advantage." The Equity Advisor suggested the
student register with the Disability Resource Centre where an advisor
would help her and the professor to reach agreement over appropriate
accommodations.
Complaints outside the Equity Office's Mandate
An employee reported that she was having problems with her supervisor.
She complained she was not fairly remunerated for her work or recognized for her contributions to group projects. After she complained to her
supervisor, he began to find fault in her work, denied her professional development activities, and said that she was neither motivated nor a team UBC     REPORTS      |      APRIL     5 ,     2001      |      15
player. The Equity Advisor explored with the employee whether her conflict with her supervisor was related to one ofthe grounds protected
from discrimination by human rights legislation. As the conflict appeared to be "personal harassment," the Equity Advisor suggested the
employee bring her concern to the attention of her supervisor's Administrative Head or her employee association.
A female student complained that her ex-partner, who had no association with ubc, insisted they resume their relationship and stalked her
when she refused. The Equity Advisor referred the student to the Police,
who issued a restraining order. As well, the Advisor talked about strategies to protect her safety and arranged for counselling and support
services.
A Complaint by One Student about Another
A male student reported harassment by a female student in one of his
classes. The Equity Advisor met with both parties and, after the first attempt to stop the behaviour did not fully succeed, worked with the
Administrative Head to remove the female student from the classroom.
The harassment stopped.
A Complaint by a Support Staff Member about a Manager
A male staff member, an immigrant with English as a second language,
complained of bias in shift allocation and professional development opportunities. He also complained of other staff members' culturally
insensitive remarks. Afraid of retaliation, the complainant did not want
to press a complaint against his supervisor. The Equity Advisor agreed to
talk in confidence with the Administrative Head and to arrange an educational session in the unit.
A Complaint by a Faculty Member about Another Faculty Member
A faculty member complained he was receiving communications of a
personal nature from a colleague. The Equity Advisor discussed ways in
which he could communicate to his colleague that the messages were
unwelcome and inappropriate.
Case Outcomes
the primary goal of complaint resolution—and of human rights legislation—is to remedy situations individuals find difficult to resolve on
their own. Often the Equity Office complaint-resolution process involves
helping complainants develop skills to take action without direct intervention by the Equity Office; for example, to approach respondents or to
ask administrative heads to do so. In situations such as these, complainants may not return to the Equity Office to report on the outcome of
their actions, or the Equity Office may not receive reports from the Administrative Head of Unit on actions taken.
During 2000, the Equity Office intervened directly in 33 human rights
cases under ubc's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment. As of December 31,2000, the Equity Office had referred four cases which did not
fall under ubc's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment to other University departments or outside agencies; judged 22 of these cases to be
resolved, and was continuing to monitor two ongoing cases.
The Equity Office or the complainant notified the Administrative
Head of Unit in 25 ofthe 33 cases; as a result, the Administrative Head
worked with the Equity Office in the resolution ofthe majority of these
complaints. To achieve resolution, Equity Advisors and Administrative
Heads engaged in one or more ofthe following informal procedures:
referral of complainant to Victim Services, Women Against Violence
Against Women, the rcmp, or Vancouver Police
provision of accommodation for a student with a disability
advice and recommendations to enhance safety for a complainant
who was being stalked
letter from a complainant to a respondent advising the respondent to
cease all contact with the complainant
intervention from the Equity Advisor advising a respondent ofthe
potential consequences of continued harassment
mediation between a complainant and a respondent
arranging for a respondent to apologize to a complainant
termination of a supervisory relationship where a student was harassing a professor
education and training in bias-free interviewing techniques for all
members of a selection committee
education and training in anti-racism for managers and staff in a unit
where there were allegations of racism
In 29 of these 33 cases, the Equity Office or the Administrative Head
informed respondents ofthe allegations against them. In the remaining
four cases, the respondent was not contacted. In one case, the complainant decided to pursue a grievance through the union; in another case,
the complainant decided to take the allegations through the criminal
justice system; in two cases, complainants decided to withdraw their
complaints.
Members ofthe President's Advisory Committees on
Discrimination & Harassment, and Equity
Martin Adamson
Faculty Association
Joost Blom
Law
Lisa Castle
Human Resources
Jim Gaskell
Curriculum Studies
David Green
Economics
Jim Horn
Human Resources
Sharon Kahn
Equity Office
Madeleine Maclvor
First Nations House of Learning
Paul Marantz
Faculty Association
Janet Mee
Disability Resource Centre
Robert Nugent
International Union of Operating Engineers
Dennis Pavlich
President's Office
Elizabeth Pinnington
Graduate Student Society
Moura Quayle
Agricultural Sciences
Margaret Sarkissian
Equity Office
Richard Spencer
Student Services
Begum Verjee
Association of Administrative and Professional
Staff
Equity Office Staff Profiles
Associate Vice President, Equity
sharon e. kahn, phD, has been a professor of Counselling Psychology in
ubc's Faculty of Education since 1975. Through her teaching, research, and
publications, Dr. Kahn addresses the interests of scholars and practitioners in counselling theory and practice, gender-fair issues, women's career
development, and employment-related concerns. In 1989, as ubc's first
Director of Employment Equity, Dr. Kahn inaugurated an on-going program based on policy and data analysis. In 1994, she was appointed
Associate Vice President, Equity, and charged with directing ubc initiatives in employment and educational equity, and prevention of
discrimination and harassment.
Senior Equity Advisor
Margaret sarkissian, ma, is a ubc graduate with a degree in Counselling Psychology. She was a counsellor and administrator on campus for
many years before joining the Equity Office as a full-time Equity Advisor.
As Senior Equity Advisor, she develops and implements strategies and
educational programs that support the University's Employment Equity
Policy. In addition, she assists in the implementation ofthe University's
Policy on Discrimination and Harassment by facilitating educational
workshops and supervising case management of discrimination and harassment complaints.
Equity Advisors
Natasha aruliah, MEd, is a ubc graduate with degrees in Psychology
and Counselling Psychology. She worked as a Counsellor and Advisor at
ubc before leaving Canada for the uk, where she worked in universities
and as an independent consultant and trainer in Equal Opportunities.
When she returned to ubc in 1999, she assisted the David Lam Chair in
Multicultural Education and worked with the Intercultural Studies certificate through Continuing Education. In September 2000, Ms. Aruliah
joined the Equity Office, where she manages complaints, delivers training,
and coordinates the activities ofthe Committee for an Inclusive Campus
Community.
maura da cruz, ma, is a part-time Equity Advisor who works with students, faculty, and staff to promote and coordinate Equity Office training
and educational programs. Ms. Da Cruz conducts awareness and skill-
building workshops on ubc's Policy on Discrimination and Harassment,
and manages complaints under the Policy's informal resolution process.
Ms. Da Cruz also works as Training Administrator in the Department of
Human Resources. In this capacity, she works with the University community, program committees, and consultants to plan, develop, implement,
and evaluate training programs for staff.
anne-marie long, ma, joined the Equity Office at ubc as an Equity
Advisor in July 2000. With degrees in Psychology and Women's Studies,
Ms. Long was involved in equity and social justice issues at Queen's,
Dalhousie, and Mount Saint Vincent universities. Most recently, she
worked for the Sexual Harassment Office at Dalhousie University, where
she was responsible for implementing its sexual harassment policy and
procedures. At ubc, she works with students, staff, and faculty to help resolve complaints of discrimination and harassment, facilitates I 6     |     UBC     REPORTS     |     APRIL    5,     2001
educational sessions, and helps create educational materials and equity
initiatives.
Administrator
poh peng wong has a background in commerce from the London Chamber of Commerce and Industry. Widely experienced in office and organizational systems, Ms. Wong has been at ubc since May 1989. Presently, she
oversees the employment equity census, as well as office administration
and budget, and assists the Associate Vice President, Equity.
Administrative Secretary
At ubc since 1998, chris mckay has worked in various departments as a
Limited Time Only temporary employee and most recently as Administrative Secretary in the Board of Governors Office. In her current position,
she performs reception duties for the Office and provides secretarial and
clerical support to the Equity Advisors.
To make an appointment with an Equity Advisor, please contact the Equity Office, in Room 2306, Brock Hall, or call
(604) 822-6353. The Equity Office Web site address is www.equity.ubc.ca. USC     REPORTS      |      APRIL    5,     2001      |
ships. There are 19 different interest
groups within the club, ranging from
art appreciation and bridge to hiking.
Do come and join us. Call Elizabeth
Towers, president 224-5877 or Gwyn-
eth Westwick, membership 263-6612.
Twin Research
Are you, or do you know a female
adult twin? We are studying the relationship types of fraternal and identical female twins. Ifyou can help by
completing some questionnaires and
being interviewed about relationships, e-mail tmacbeth@cortex.
psych.ubc.ca or call 822-4826.
Parents With Babies
Have you ever wondered how babies
learn to talk? Help us find out. We are
looking for parents with babies between four to 21 months of age, including babies raised in a bilingual
home, to participate in language de-
Field hockey team co-captain Jen Dowdeswell (right) was named a ubc Athlete ofthe
Year at last week s annual Big Block awards. Dowdeswell led ubc this year in a battle
for the Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union (ciau) conference title. Olympic
swimmer Mark Versfeld was also named Athlete ofthe Year. The women's and men's
swim teams, the only teams to win four consecutive dual titles in ciau history, took the
teams of the year award, ubc Athletics photo
velopment studies. Ifyou are interested in bringing your baby for a one-
hour visit, please call Prof. Janet
Werker's Infant Studies Centre, Psychology, 822-6408 (ask for Kate).
Statistical Consulting And
Research Lab (SCARL)
scari. offers statistical advice and
long or short-term assistance to
researchers. Resources include
expertise in many areas of statistical
methodology and a variety of
statistical software. Web site
www.stat.ubc.ca/scarl, e-mail
scarl(«\stat.ubc.ca or call 822-4037.
Chronic Fatigue
Syndrome (CFS) Research
Infectious Diseases researchers from
vgh seek volunteers diagnosed medically with cfs to participate in a
study about managing symptoms.
Call Kenna Sleigh 875-5555 ext. 62366.
Sustainability Co-ordinators
The World Is what You Make It! The
ubc Sustainability Office is seeking
outgoing volunteers to act as departmental Sustainability Co-ordinators.
In this role, the volunteer will get
training and support in their efforts
to raise awareness of sustainability
within their unit. With only a limited
time commitment, our co-ordinators
are affecting changes by sharing work
BaA!m!m^i ^^wSAwabmi   85T'
Don Protean
B.Comm>ePP,RFP
dproteau@hlp.fpc.ca
638-0344
Frank Danielson
B.Ed., CFP
frank#mellor.bc.ca
688-1919 ext. 15
**" Complimentary consultations available for UBC Faculty and Staff "<
>■ Retirement and Estate planning -<
^" UBC pension expertise •<■
*"* References available •<■
"I am completely satisfied with the service I am receiving from Don."
M. Dale Kinkade, Professor Emeritus of Linguistics, UBC
"Frank and Don made me feel very comfortable with their advice and long range
planning. Their knowledge of the faculty pension plan is also a plus for UBC
professors."
Dr. /. H. McNeill, Professor, Pharmaceutical Sciences, UBC
Call or e-mail to be put on our campus seminar invitation list!
FPC Investments Inc.
Securities Dealer
GREEN  COLLEGE
THEMATIC  LECTURES
Green College is pleased to announce two new
Thematic Lecture Series for 2001-2002:
"The Shifting Culture of Conflict: Perspectives
on Conflict Prevention, Management and
Resolution"
Co-convenors: John Hogarth, Director, and Sharon
Sutherland, Co-Director, Dispute Resolution Program,
Faculty of Law
"The Nature of Creativity: Biology, History and
Socio-Cultural Dimensions"
Co-convenors: Anna M Kindler and J. Scott Goble,
Department of Curriculum Studies, Faculty of Education
and Christopher A. Shaw, Department of Ophthalmology
These series will begin in September 2001 and run
throughout the academic year. Speakers and
schedules will be announced in late summer.
For further information:
cmtander@mterchange.ubc.ca or 822-1 878
UBC   Supply   Management's
AnnualTradeShow
UBC
Acquisition   Solutions
2 o O I
We have a New
Mission... -
Come Trek with us !
Showcasing
Scientific
and Major
University
Suppliers
• Door Prizes
• Free Admission
• Refreshments
W:- \%i:
You're invited...Think About It.
Thursday, April 26
10 a.m. - 5 p.m. War Memorial Gym
To register visit www.supplymanagement.ubc.ca/tradeshow
This Blessed Wilderness
Archibald McDonald's Letters from the Columbia,
1822-44
Archibald McDonald was one
of the most important fur
traders on the west coast.  He
is particularly remembered as
a factor at Forts Langley,
Kamloops, and Colvile, and
as one of the traders who
enabled the Hudson's Bay
Company to gain control of
the vast region west of the
Rockies.
In this informative and
entertaining collection of
letters, his life as a factor,
family man, amateur
naturalist, and observer
provides an invaluable
glimpse of both the man and
the west coast between 1822
and 1844.
Tills Bl.lSSI I) NlLDLKU:'
Jean Murray Cole, ed.
Available through the UBC bookstore,
or Raincoast Books:
Tel:   1-800-561-8583  /  Fax: 1-800-565-3770
www. ubcpress.ca
UBCPress
environment specific information on
energy conservation, waste reduction,
and transportation alternatives. For
more information visit www.
sustain, ubc.ca/aourintiatives/
sust_coord.html or call 822-3270.
UBC Fencing Club
ubc Fencing Club meets every
Monday and Thursday from 7-'_)pm in
the Osborne Gym. Learn decisionmaking, poise and control.
Newcomers welcome. Drop-in lee.
I .eave message at 878-7060.
Chan Centre Tours
Free tours ofthe Chan Centre for the
Performing Arts are held every
Thursday. Participants are asked to
meet in the Chan Centre main lobby
at 1pm. Special group tours can be
booked through www.chancentre.
com or at 822-1815.
Fire Hydrant Permits Now Required
Campus Planning and Development
(cp&d) and ubc Utilities have jointly
implemented a permit program for
fire hydrants which is effective November 2000. Permits have become
necessary to comply with provisions
ofthe bc Plumbing Code and the bc
Fire Code. Permit applications must
be submitted a minimum of 24 hours
in advance. Application forms will
soon be available at www.lbs.ubc.ca.
Users wanting to connect to a fire
hydrant should pick up application
forms at cp&d Regulatory Services
located at 2206 West Mall. Call cp&d
at 822-2633 or for further information, ubc Utilities at 822-4179.
Call For Evening Volunteers
Crane Production Unit (a division of
the ubc Disability Resource Centre)
needs volunteers to narrate textbooks
onto tape. We are looking primarily
for those who can read between 4:30-
8:30pm for a two-hour session once a
week. An audition will be required.
For more information, call 822-6114
Monday-Thursday from 4:40-8:3opm.
Religion And Spirituality Drop-Ins
Every Wednesday you can join the
chaplains in a relaxed environment to
explore a variety of topics related to
religion and spirituality. Drop in or
call International House at 822-5021
or e-mail ihouse.frontcounter
(ffiubc.ca.
Lunch Hour Drop-Ins
F.very Thursday you can join fellow
international students in a relaxed,
social environment to explore a variety of topics designed to help you succeed at ubc. Topics include health,
safety, arts and literature, and music
throughout the world. Drop in or call
International 1 louse at 822-5021 or e-
mail ihouse.frontcountert" ubc.ca.
UBC Zen Society
Zazen (silling meditation) each Tuesday from i:3o-2:3opm while classes
are in session. Asian Cent re lea Gallery. All are welcome. Call 822-2573.
BC SMILE
The British Columbia Service For
Medication Information Learning
And Education (bc smile) is a medication information program for the
public in bc It is located at the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences at ubc.
and is staffed by licensed pharmacists
to educate the public of all ages about
the safe and effective use of medications. The free telephone consultations include complicated inquiries
on medication issues such as interactions, contra-indications. allergies,
medication reviews, herbs, and alternative therapies, smii.f. pharmacists
also provide public presentations on a
variety of medication-related topics.
All presentations contain valuable
practical, unbiased, and up-to-date
research information. Call
(800) 668-6233 or 822-1330. I 8     |     UBC     REPORTS      |     APRIL    5 ,     2001
DIGEST
Pools on wheels
A free carpool ride-matching system is available via the ubc trek
Program Centre Web site at
www.trek.ubc.ca. Students, staff,
and faculty can find rides and passengers easily and instantly to
share and reduce their commuting
costs and stress.
The university's goal is to reduce
single occupancy vehicles coming
to campus by 20 per cent.
The envelope please
A new professorship in the Faculty
of Applied Science will help prepare
future architects and engineers for
the challenges in design and construction of building envelopes.
The Polygon Adjunct Professorship in Building Science will build
on existing strengths at ubc and is
aimed at forging closer ties with the
activities and research of professionals in the provincial building
industry.
It is funded by a partnership between ubc, Polygon Homes Ltd.,
and Forintek Canada Corp. Both industry partners have been active in
helping to seek solutions to the envelope failure issue that affects so
many b.c. homeowners.
The initiative will be led by the
Civil Engineering Dept. and the
School of Architecture in the Fac
ulty of Applied Science. The Dept.
of Wood Science in the Faculty of
Forestry will also be involved.
Polygon donated $135,000 and
Forintek provided $60,000 to establish the position.
So accommodating
The name of the ubc Conference
Centre has changed to Conferences and Accommodation at the
University of British Columbia.
The name change accompanies
a refreshed visual identity for the
accommodation properties which
include Walter Gage Commons
and Towers, Totem Park and Place
Vanier Residences. They will now
be promoted as the West Coast
Suites, The Gage Towers at ubc,
The Residences at ubc and Pacific
Spirit Hostel respectively.
The West Coast Suites are available year-round. The other facilities
are open to the public from May to
August, when students have moved
out ofthe residences.
"We provide extensive on campus accommodation, meeting
space and exhibit facilities for visitors and groups," says Trish Brown,
director of sales and marketing.
Accommodations range from
dormitory or hostel-style rooms to
full suites. Group rates are available
as are ubc discounts for individual
visitors on some room types.
For more information call
(604) 822-1000, or visit
www.ubcconferences.com.
"he
'   /MPflitfl   Graphic Design & Illustration
Vi roup'i'■„•.„;':-.;■:: on Campus!!
1 el us suPP°rt vo- — ^ W*"^J* ^s^enc
.\Ne otter W\e° le s. reports a ceplto
Phone 822-5769 for more information.
classified
Accommodation
POINT GREY GUEST HOUSE
A perfect spot to reserve accommodation for guest lecturers or other
university members who visit
throughout the year. Close to use
and other Vancouver attractions, a
tasteful representation of our city
and of UBC. 4103 W. 10th Ave., Vancouver, bc, V6R 2H2. Call or fax
222-4104.
TINA'S GUEST HOUSE
Elegant accommodation in Point
Grey area. Minutes to ubc. On
main bus routes. Close to shops
and restaurants. Includes TV, tea
and coffee making, private phone/
fridge. Weekly rates available. Call
222-3461. Fax 222-9279.
GREEN COLLEGE GUEST
HOUSE Five suites available for
academic visitors to ubc only.
Guests dine with residents and enjoy
college life. Daily rate $58 plus $14/
day for meals Sun-Thurs. Call 822-
8660 for more information and
availability.
WEST COAST SUITES An
affordable fully-equipped suite
right on campus. Spacious one br
suites with kitchen, balcony, tv and
telephone.  Ideal for visiting lecturers, colleagues and families. 2001
rates from $M9/night.  ubc discounts available. Visit www.
westcoastsuites.com. Call 822-1000.
ST.JOHN'S COLLEGE GUEST
ROOMS Private rooms on campus forvisitors to ubc on academic
business. Private bath, double bed,
telephone, tv, fridge, in-room
coffee. Dinner five days per week.
Breakfast seven days per week.
Competitive rates. Call for information and availability 822-8788.
PETER WALL INSTITUTE
University Centre. Residence
offering superior hotel or kitchenette style rooms and suites. All
rooms have private bath, queen
bed, voice mail, cable tv and
Internet-linked PC. Beautiful view of
sea and mountains. For rates and
reservations www.pwias.ubc.ca.
Call 822-4782.
Accommodation
VANCOUVER SCHOOL OF
THEOLOGY Affordable accommodation or meeting space near the
Chan Centre and moa. 17 modestly
furnished rooms with hall bath are
avail. Daily rates starting at $36.
Meals or meal plans are available in
the school cafeteria. For more information call 822-9031 or 822-9490.
CAMILLA HOUSE in Kitsilano
area, furnished suites or rooms avail.
Kitchen and laundry facilities. Close
to main bus routes, shopping and
dining. Weekly and monthly rates
avail. Call 737-2687.
FRANCE Ultimate vacation central
Paris one br apt. Close to Paris one
br apt. Close to Avignon Provence
two br house. Accommodates six
people. All fully furnished. Call
738-1876.
LUXURIOUSLY ONE br and den
apartment. Large patio facing Van
Dusen gardens, master and guest
bath, full security, 1105 sq. ft., 2 parking stalls, easy commute to ubc Immediate occupancy. $i,20o/mo.
E-mail feyonawa@interchange.
ubc.ca. Call Marina Au 261-0661.
OCEAN VIEW TOWNHOUSE
in Kits. Stellar location. Three br and
den. Gourmet kitchen with gas stove.
Available May 24 to Aug. 24. $2,000/
mo. incl. util. not phone. Dog welcome. E-mail gkonantz@
everesttrekking.com. Call 731-7650.
FAIRVIEW SLOPES First floor
townhouse. Great view of water/city,
close to seawall, restaurant, stores,
sleeps four, sunny roof deck. Available for rent in July four to six weeks.
$42o/wk. incl. util. Call 732-7444.
Bed And Breakfast
B & B BY LOCARNO BEACH
Walk to ubc along the ocean. Quiet
exclusive neighbourhood. Near buses
and restaurants. Comfortable rooms
with tv and private bath. Full breakfast. Reasonable rates, n/s only
please. Web site www.bbcanada.
com/locarnobeach. Call 341-4975.
ALAN DONALD, PH.D.
BLOSTATLSTLCAL CONSULTANT
Medicine, dentistry, biosciences, aquaculture
IOI-58O5 BALSAM STREET, VANCOUVER, V6M 4B9
264 -9918 DONALD@PORTAL.CA
PLACING   CLASSIFIED   ADS
Deadline: for the April 19 issue: 12 noon, April 9.
Enquiries: ubc-info (822-4636) • Rate: $16.50 for35 words or less.
Additional words: 50 cents each. Rate includes cst.
Submission guidelines: Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to: ubc Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park
Road, Vancouver BC, v6t izi. Ads must be accompanied by payment
in cash, cheque (made out to ubc Reports) or journal voucher.
Accommodation
Wanted
PROFESSIONAL COUPLE with
13-year-old seeks new home as ofjune
1. Prefer three br house or apt. in
Vancouver proper with easy drive to
ubc n/s, n/p, exc. ref. E-mail
Joyce.hinton@ubc.ca. Call 822-8195.
YOUNG PROFESSIONAL
COUPLE looking to share lovely
character home in the heart of
Kerrisdale. Large kitchen, bath., l/r,
d/r, attic, studio. Bright home with
high (12 ft.) ceilings, new oak floors,
windows in closets, fenced yard with
fruit trees, dog, deck, d/w, m/w, w/
d, f/p. Two blocks to ubc and downtown buses, walk to all amenities.
Avail. April 1. $600 plus one-third
util. E-mailvocalize@home.com. Call
454-0414 or 842-0414.
Services
TRAVEL-TEACH ENGLISH
5 day/40 hr. tesol teacher certification course (or by correspondence).
1,000s of jobs avail, now. free information package, toll free
(888) 270-2941 or (780) 438-5704.
RETIRING in the next three years?
As a specialist who has assisted
many ubc faculty and stafFmembers
through the retirement process I can
help sort out the options and provide you with free retirement projections. Call for a complimentary
meeting at my place or yours! Don
Proteau, bcomm, cfp, rfp. E-mail:
dproteau@hlp.fpc.ca or call
687-7526.
UBC FACULTY AND STAFF
Retirement income and financial
planning. Edwin Jackson, Certified
Financial Planner. Ascot Financial
Services Limited. Investments, life
insurance, annuities, know-how. Call
224-3540.
DONNA'S TRANSCRIBING
Will pick up, copy, and transcribe
data according to your needs. Reasonable rates, efficient, confidential,
accurate, and flexible. Excellent ref.
Greater Vancouver area. E-mail
donna_bucsis@telus.net. Call
826-5477 or 302-3128.
MEDICAL DENTAL CLINIC
Located in the University Village,
#207 - 5728 University Blvd. Dr. Chris
Hodgson (physician), for appointment call 222-2273 (222-CARE). Dr.
Charles Borton (dentist), please call
838-6684 (83-TOOTH).
Recreation
OPEN HOUSE Sunday, April 29
from 2-4pm. West Point Grey Lawn
Bowling Club, Sixth Avenue and
Trimble. Come out and try! Qualified coaches. It's a fun, challenging,
inexpensive sport for all ages. Ifyou
can't make the Open House, come
any Sunday at 1:30pm. Call 224-6556.
Next calendar deadline:
noon, April 9 . C     REPORTS      |      APRIL     5,     2001      |
Winning Law teams lead
way in making their case
Up and coming lawyers
from ubc face off in
international competition
IT IS NO MOOT POINT —UBC Law
students excel in national and in
international competition.
Three of six national moot competitions have been won this year
by teams from ubc and members
of the teams have won numerous
individual honours. Two of the
teams are now competing at the
international level.
ubc teams earned first place in
the Corporate/Securities competition and the Wilson and Jessup national moot competitions in February. The client counselling team also
won the regional competition and
as the top Canadian team will compete internationally in New Zealand
next week. The Jessup team is taking
part in the international round in
Washington, d.c this week.
"This unprecedented success is a
source of tremendous pride among
the entire faculty and university,"
says Law Dean Joost Blom. "It is a
result of hard work and talent, but
also the fact that we enjoy enthusiastic support from the bench and
the bar."
Local judges and lawyers devote
time to practise with and talk to
ubc teams, says Elizabeth Edinger,
the associate dean of Law. Practitioners who are former competitive
mooters have a tradition of passing
on their experience, she adds.
"For the students themselves
and their coaches from the faculty
and legal profession, preparing for
moot competitions is very intense," she says. "They often miss
classes and work through the
night in the Law library."
For the members of the Wilson
team, it is well worth the effort.
Named for Justice Bertha Wilson, the competition revolves
around charter issues of equality.
In the final, the team argued
against the University of Toronto
before Supreme Court Justice Louis Lebel on criminal code provision
for the protection of private
records.
Team members, affectionately
know as the 'Wilson mooters,' say
it's as close as it gets to the real
thing and winning both the oral
and written competition was a real
bonus. They stayed up for three
and four days at a time and gave up
December break.
The Corporate/Securities team
comprises Gera Grinberg, Jay
Kesten, Brooke Jamison, Monica
Rakhinshteyn    and    Amandeep
Sandhu. The faculty adviser is Assoc. Prof. Barry Slutsky. It is sponsored by Borden Ladner Gervais.
The Wilson team includes Ali
Kanji, Jason Kuzminski, Jen
Brough, Micheal Vonn and Robert
Diab. The faculty advisers are
Prof. Robin Elliot and Lindsay
Lyster. It is sponsored by Heenan
Blaikie.
The Jessup team is made up of
Don Montrichard, Monique Pon-
gracic-Speier, Brian Sims and Danielle Topliss. The faculty adviser is
Assoc. Prof. Ian Townsend-Gault.
It is sponsored by Fasken, Martine-
au, DuMoulin.
The Client Counselling team
members are Christopher Young,
Parmjit Singh Pawa, Toireasa Jes-
persen-Nelson. The adviser is
Doug Cochran. The team is currently unsponsored.
Dream comes true with
community book drive
Lecturer Graham Mallet
set some wheels in motion
when he heard of a
graduate student's dream
an empty space in children's lives
and a library room in Oaxaca, Mexico will be filled by 10,000 children's books from Delta, B.C.
The 3,800 kilograms of books
were donated by children and adults
and collected by Delta schools
through the Tsawwassen Rotary
Club which stored, packaged and arranged for the books' transport.
We're all PALS
and we're just
People With ALS (Lou Gehrig Disease]
The idea for the project began
when Mario Lopez, a teacher from
Oaxaca, was presenting his master's thesis in children's literature
in the Faculty of Education last
May. In attendance was Graham
Mallet, who teaches in the faculty's
Language and Literacy Education
Dept.
Mallett became intrigued by a
major goal mentioned by Lopez—
to set up a children's library in Oaxaca, a city of one million people,
where illiteracy among children is
a major problem.
The dream moved closer to reality when Mallett, a member of the
Tsawwassen Rotary Club, arranged for Lopez to speak to the
club. Lopez explained that the library had given him space, but he
didn't have any books.
Club members rolled up their
sleeves and began spreading the
word. Storage space was offered by
Tsawwassen dentist Frank Donis.
Mexicana Freight Lines kindly
agreed to transport the books to
Oaxaca free of charge. In addition,
the Rotary Club donated $1,000 for
the purchase of Spanish language
books.
Honour Roll
United in
the Fight
against ALS
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ALS Society of BC
or visit our website at
www3.telus.net/aisbc
*S09-626W(?^tP!.'Md(.'f St.
VancouverBC V06 1V9
CANCER
PREVENTION
You Can Have A
Hand In It
The Canadian Cancer
Society says that a well-
balanced, varied and
moderate diet may
protect you
against the
risk of cancer. \
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Zoology Prof. Carl Walters has
been selected as one of 10 "guardians of the oceans" for his work in
developing multi-species fisheries
harvesting models for improved
global fisheries management.
Walters, who works with the
Fisheries Centre, has been chosen
as a 2001 Pew Marine Conservation fellow. He has been awarded
$150,000 from the Pew Fellows
Program in Marine Conservation,
an initiative of the Pew Charitable Trusts operated in partnership with the New England
Aquarium.
Each year, 10 outstanding
ocean champions are supported
by the program to undertake pioneering projects that tackle urgent conservation challenges in
four areas: sustainability of marine ecosystems; fisheries management; marine contamination;
and coastal conservation.
Since the program was
launched in 1990, fellows have
been chosen from more than 20
countries.
Two ubc scholars have been appointed scholars-in-residence in
Women's Studies for 2002.
Gwen Chapman, associate
professor in Agricultural Sciences, and Shauna Butterwick. assistant professor in Education
Studies, have been appointed.
The visiting scholar program is
an integral part of the Centre for
Research in Women's Studies and
Gender Relations. Scholars who
are accepted spend leave time of
one to six months in affiliation
with the centre.
The goal of the centre is to
stimulate feminist research and
to facilitate interchange of ideas
and collaboration among scholars at ubc and elsewhere.
The visiting scholar program is
open to faculty, both untenured
and tenured, as well as to independent scholars who are en-
Zoology Prof. Carl Walters
gaged in critical work on women
and gender.
ubc scholars-in-residence for
2000-01 are: Ruth Buchanan, assistant professor, Faculty of Law;
Nancy Frelick, chair, Comparative Literature and associate professor, Dept. of French, Hispanic
and Italian Studies; and Gloria
Onyeoziri, associate professor,
Dept. of French, Hispanic and
Italian Studies.
Lloyd Axworthy, director and
chief executive officer of the Liu
Centre for the Study of Global Issues, has received the Madison
Medal for 2001 from his alma
mater, Princeton University.
The medal is given annually to
a graduate school alumnus who
has had a distinguished career,
advanced the cause of graduate
education or has achieved a
record of outstanding public
service.
Axworthy, who obtained his
PhD in political science from
Princeton in 1972 and spent almost 27 years in government,
was Canada's minister of Foreign
Affairs until last fall.
Architect ofthe Ottawa Treaty
that outlawed land mines, he has
also campaigned vigorously for
the creation of a permanent international criminal court that
would try people accused of genocide, war crimes or crimes
against humanity.
Victoria Bell
Your University
Area Specialist
Top producer Dunbar Office
Member mls Medallion Club
Pager: 667-0747; Cell: 209-1382
My real estate goal is to build integrity based
relationships backed with an extremely high
commitment to professionalism and accountability.
I offer 21 years of success and experience.
Please call me for any university real estate market
information, current evaluation of your property or
any real estate assistance that you may require.
DEXTER PROPERTIES INC. - 228-9339 20  |  UBC REPORTS  |  APRIL 5, 2001
PRO FILE
Dr. Andrew Eisen is hot on the trail of
a disease that paralyses its victims
On the track of a killer
by Hilary Thomson staffwriter
THE DISEASE IS MYSTERIOUS.
It appears in clusters in unlikely
places that range from a California
football team to a South Pacific island.
Long believed to be a disease of
the spine, it may actually be a disease ofthe brain.
It has no cure yet patients are
known to have a remarkably positive outlook.
The disease is amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (als). It has been the
fascination of Dr. Andrew Eisen for
more than 30 years.
"Working with this disease is
like unravelling a detective story,"
says Eisen, the director of Vancouver's als Clinic and head of ubc's
Dept. of Neurology. "It's baffling
and simple at the same time."
Eisen originally studied neurosurgery before going on to neurology. He obtained his medical degree at the University of Leeds in
England and completed his residency in Neurology at the Montreal Neurological Institute. He
was appointed to staff there in
1968, and later taught at Montreal's McGill University.
By that time, he was captivated
with understanding human motor
loss of power in hands and arms.
Complete paralysis can occur at
any time within two to five years of
diagnosis. About 20 per cent of
those diagnosed live for more than
five years and up to 10 per cent survive more than 10 years.
The disease attacks the motor
neurons that transmit electrical
impulses from the brain to voluntary muscles throughout the body.
Over time, muscles lose strength
and cease to function. Brain activity remains healthy but support is
required to move, breathe, eat and
communicate.
Most people with als are between 50 and 75 years old. Between
ages 40-50 twice as many men as
women get the disease. After 50
years of age the incidence is equal
but increases for women over 75
years.
As the baby boomer population
ages, pressure to understand this
disease and its cause is increasing.
"There are many theories and
just as many questions," says Eisen.
"We're now exploring the idea that
the disease starts in the brain and
then kills cells in the spinal cord."
Mysterious aspects of the disease include the fact that although
Ultimately fatal, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (als) is
both a baffling and simple disease, says world-renowned
expert Dr. Andrew Eisen. Hilary Thomson photo
function and with als, also known
as Lou Gehrig's Disease after the
u.s. baseball player who died ofthe
illness in 1936.
Eisen joined ubc in 1980 to direct the Neuromuscular Disease
Unit and the als Clinic — both located at Vancouver Hospital. An
internationally recognized expert,
his patients come from all over
North America.
"If you are lucky and your neurologist is on the ball you'll be referred to Dr. Eisen," says Sue Lewis-
O'Halloran, president of b.c.'s als
Society. "He's reputed to be the top
als diagnostician in the world—
and this disease is hard to diagnose."
Monitoring almost one-third of
the 3,000 Canadians with the disease, the als clinic is the only one
in b.c. and the largest in Canada.
Its database tracks an illness that
is rapidly progressive and fatal.
Early symptoms often include
difficulty swallowing or slurred
speech, tripping and falling and
old cells appear to be more vulnerable to the disease, accounting for
its late onset, it does not seem to be
a degenerative disease. Many patients are fit rather than frail.
Also, only the motor cells in the
brain and spinal cord are affected.
It is a human disease only, not
known in other primates. And two
groups of muscles, those operating
eyes and the bladder, are untouched by the disease.
"This is an important clue about
the origin of als," says Eisen.
"These two areas are not directly
connected to the brain. Since they
are unaffected it supports the theory that als is a brain disease."
Eisen has used cortical magnetic
stimulation to better understand
how and where als might affect
the brain. The painless technique
uses a magnetic stimulator to assess the function of the motor
pathways.
Eisen's research has earned him
the prestigious 1999 Forbes Norris
award, an international recogni
tion sponsored by the Motor Neuron Disease/als Association of
England and Wales. In 1998, he was
also named a distinguished researcher by the American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine and was the recipient of the
Distinguished Medical Research
Lecture at ubc.
"The level of funding for als in
Canada is not good with about six
to seven new grants awarded annually," says Eisen. "We hope the
situation may improve through the
new Canadian Institutes of Health
Research."
But tracing the disease to its
source is only part ofthe detective
work. Another is finding the cause
ofthe malfunction.
researchers have explored
environmental factors such as the
presence in water of lead, mercury,
aluminum or calcium. These elements are found in areas where
there is high incidence of the disease, such as the South Pacific island of Guam, in western New
Guinea and on the Kii peninsula in
Japan.
Other clusters for the disease include patients serving in the merchant navy in Halifax in the 1950s.
Three members ofthe San Francisco '4gers football team were also
diagnosed. The cause or mechanics of the clustering is not known
and it is very difficult to prove that
they are statistically significant,
says Eisen.
Family history of als is very rare
— less than five per cent of patients
have family members with the disease. Mutations in at least two
genes have been discovered in relation to als and one of those occurs
in about 20 per cent of familial als.
"A single genetic factor is
unlikely," says Eisen. "It may be a
multi-gene problem connected
with aging genes, but I suspect the
answer may come from a whole
different source — one we haven't
even explored."
Diagnosing patients who have a
fatal disease with no known cause
isn't easy.
"Breaking the news is the hardest part," says Eisen who recommends compassion and understanding as an antidote to burnout. "The diagnosis may take 10
minutes but I usually spend hours
with the family — it's very draining
emotionally."
Although there are few therapeutic options and limited time for
treatment because of the disease's
rapid progression, Eisen finds that
als patients are a joy to work with
and surprise him with their positive outlook.
"This man is so determined
to find answers for these patients,"
says Lewis-O'Halloran. "Now there's
hope because of people like him."
Patients at the als clinic were
part ofthe initial trial for the only
drug yet developed for the disease,
Rilutek. It had some modest
effects. Interventions such as providing stomach tubes and non-invasive ventilation allow patients to
stay at home comfortably.
Future therapy will likely explore the effectiveness of infusing
human stem cells — the precursor
cells that produce the wide variety
of mature cells — into the motor
cortex and spinal cord of als patients. The goal is to replace damaged and dying motor neurons.
Eisen also shares his knowledge
with undergraduates and over his
30-plus-year career he has worked
with almost 100 fellows and residents. He has some concerns
about teaching, however.
"There are pressures on students having to cover too much
ground today. It's not possible to
match the necessary time with the
advances that have taken place."
a soft-spoken man, Eisen offsets
the demands of his work with many
activities, including photography.
In the hallway leading to his office
hang pictures that document travels to exotic locales. Iguanas, rhinos
and domed sepulchres all have
been captured by his lens.
He is also a runner, skier, golfer
and opera buff, but does not hesitate to cite his long and sustaining
marriage as a primary source of
balance and renewal.
For students contemplating a
career in neurology he has some
advice.
"Neurology is a spectacular specialty. It is a continuous detective
story involving the workings of the
brain and mind and muscles, als
and all neurodegenerative diseases
are not going away — if I were to
start my career now I would look at
molecular biology and genetics of
als."
Next year Eisen will preside at
the World Congress of Neuromuscular Diseases being held in Vancouver. It will be a concentration of
global experts all seeking to solve
the mysteries of als. It is doubtful
that Canada could find a better
representative.

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