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UBC Reports Sep 28, 1972

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 REPORTS
VOLUME   EIGHTEEN,   NUMBER   TWELVE
SEPTEMBER 28, 1972, VANCOUVER 8, B.C.
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is no stranger to the governing councils of the
University of B.C. As a former member of the
Board of Governors he was responsible for
recommending construction of $50 million
worth of campus buildings. He is also a former
lawyer who specialized in labor law after
developing a passion for social justice while a
student at UBC during the dark days of the
Great Depression.
By Jim Banham
■   ~M   ^ you happened to be em educated Canadian in
I    M"^    your twenties in the 1930 you were, accord-
_■_ _JM_      ing     to     Montreal-born     author     Hugh
MacLennan, like an aircraft "tuned up with the motors
turning over ready to fly."
The problem, he adds, was that you stayed on the
ground, or just above it for ten years, "no matter how
well tuned up you were."
If, in 1934, you lived in Vancouver and happened to
be Nathaniel Theodore Nemetz, who was installed on
Aug. 31 as UBC's ninth Chancellor, the outlook was
every    bit    as   dismal    as    that    described    by    Hugh
MacLennan even  though you had just graduated from
UBC at the age of 21 as a Bachelor of Arts with first
class honors in history.
When he graduated "Sonny" Nemetz had hoped that
he would be offered a scholarship to do graduate work
in history at an eastern United States university. (The
nickname Sonny was given to UBC's new Chancellor by
his mother and his close friends call him that to this
day.)
The hoped-for scholarship went to someone else,
however, and even if it had been offered to him, he
could not have accepted. The recipient had to pay his
own transportation to the East "and I didn't have the
money," he said recently.
So Sonny Nemetz went to work in a law office as a
Vancouver School of Law student and began the
three-year work-study regime — at a salary of $10 a
month — which led to his being called to the bar in
1937. Eventually he became a principal in one of B.C.'s
top law firms, was elevated to the bench in 1963 as a
Justice of the Supreme Court of B.C. and became a
Justice of the B.C. Court of Appeal in 1968.
Despite a professional career that would have kept
two men busy. Chancellor Nemetz is no stranger to the
Board and Senate Room of UBC's old Administration
Building. Here UBC's two top governing bodies, the
11-member Board of Governors and the 98-member
Senate, each meet ten times a year to debate, discuss,
approve or reject reports, recommendations and motions
that touch the lives of everyone who works and studies
at and visits the University of British Columbia.
As Chancellor, Nathan Nemetz will again be a
member of both bodies and he will, no doubt, find that
his Board and Senate colleagues are still grappling with
some of the problems that concerned him when he was a
Board member for 11 years from 1957 to 1968 (the last
three years as chairman) and a Senator for seven years
from 1957 to 1963.
Despite an absence from UBC's governing councils,
Chancellor Nemetz is still very much alive to the issues
and ideas that are discussed on the campus and in the
world of education generally.
One issue that concerns him is the composition of
UBC's Board of Governors and he describes as "well-
grounded" the suggestion that members of the Board
should represent specific areas of community interest.
He points out that in the past, by custom and not
Please turn to Page Two
See OPEN UNIVERSITY Open University Idea Appeals to New
Continued from Page One
law, an attempt was made to have representatives of
labor, industry and the judiciary sitting on the Board.
"I've read the criticism," he says, "that the Board
appears to be business-dominated. On the whole, I
believe it's advisable to have a Board representative of
the community at large. This brings to the Board specific
points of view, but, mo're important, enables these
representatives to take back to their constituencies the
point of view of the Board and the University."
In short, he says, "the only way the University can
prosper is to have the support of the community, and
the more individuals you have participating from therfufl
spectrum of society, the better the University is
founded."
A recent educational development that appeals to
Chancellor Nemetz is Britain's Open University,
. which offers degrees after a period of supervised home study and which makes extensive use of
television for lectures.
"I'm hopeful that as UBC has more money it will
explore the possibility of developing credit extension
programs for young people and those who missed the
opportunity of going to university. An Open University
type of operation would also be useful in providing
continuing education in the professions."
Behind his desire to foster new approaches to
education lies the Chancellor's conviction that "it's
important for the University to make it known that
there are no barriers to returning to the educational
process to enable people to pursue a field of interest that
will make them more useful contributors to society."
Fostering new approaches to University problems is
one of the characteristics that marked Nathan Nemetz's
previous tenure on the Board of Governors. He was
responsible, while chairman of the Board's property
committee from 1961 to 1965, for persuading the
federal government to take a new approach to financing
student residences.
Early in the 1960s UBC drew up plans for construction of Acadia Park, a housing development on the
southeast edge of the campus for married students and
those with families. This in itself was a radical departure
from the practice of most universities, which at that
time were concentrating on providing residences for
single men and women.
The idea which Nathan Nemetz had accepted in
Ottawa was to place a value on the land on which
University housing developments were to be built. In the
case of Acadia Park this meant that an additional
$550,000 was available for construction.
"A lot of people said Central Mortgage and Housing
Corporation, which lends money to universities for
residences, wouldn't buy the idea," Chancellor Nemetz
says. "Someone bet me $10 it couldn't be done. I said it
could and I collected that bet."
As chairman of the Board's property committee in
the early 1960s, Nathan Nemetz had his hands full. The
period was one of frantic expansion, utilizing funds from
two major public campaigns to construct facilities for
University enrolments that were increasing annually by
up to ten per cent.
He was responsible for recommending construction of
buildings worth some $50 million and in the process he
learned to read building plans. The experience has stood
him in good stead; he is now chairman of the committee
that is planning the new law courts in downtown
Vancouver.
Students of that era will also tell you that Nathan
Nemetz was one of the key figures in the negotiations
with the University administration that led to construction of the new Student Union Building. For this and
other contributions to UBC activities the Alma Mater
Society presented the much-coveted Great Trekker
Award to him in 1969.
So far this portrait of UBC's new Chancellor reveals a
fairly  conventional  public  figure  who, after a young
2/UBC Reports/Sept. 28, 1972
This picture of Nathan Nemetz appeared in
the student annual. The Totem, in 1934,
the year UBC's future Chancellor
graduated. Among his classmates were Prof.
Bob Osborne, now head of UBC's School
of Physical Education and Recreation;
Dean George Volkoff, now head of the
Faculty of Science at UBC, and Prof. V. C
"Bert" Brink, now professor of agronomy
in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences.
manhood of hard work, became a member of an
establishment organization — the judiciary — and has
found time to devote to public service.
The other, less familiar, Nathan Nemetz is a man who
developed a passion for social justice in the intellectual
ferment of the 1930s. It was a ferment which, according
to Hugh MacLennan, "for passionate sincerity . . . had
no equal in the English-speaking world since the age of
Milton," and it largely revolved around a desire to do
something about the Great Depression.
It's difficult for anyone born after 1940 to realize
what the depression meant in North America. Statistics
can only outline the problem: in the U.S. 16,000,000
people, or one-third of the work force, were unemployed and the 1929 gross national product of more
than $100 billion was nearly cut in half by 1933. The
same year, in Canada, 26.6 per cent of the non-
agricultural work force — 647,000 people — had no jobs.
On the Prairies the weather turned sour in keeping with
the times and there were food drives in Vancouver and
on the UBC campus for the destitute on the drought-
stricken Prairies.
"There was a terrible sense of unease among the
students of that day," Sonny Nemetz recalls. "We were
overcome with a sense of apprehension about economic
and political matters and the group of students I
belonged to felt that socialism was the answer to the
world's ills. We were greatly influenced by such men as
American author Lincoln Steffens, who returned from
Russia in the 1930s and said, 'I have seen the future and
it works.'
Like students of every generation, those of the 1930s
indulged in endless bull sessions on every conceivable
subject. And talk, if the testimony of his wife and the
student annual of that day, The Totem, is accurate, was
one thing that Sonny Nemetz excelled at.
In fact, says Mrs. Nemetz (nee Bel Newman and a
UBC graduate herself), the first time she saw her future
husband he was trying to talk his way out of a jam at
Prince of Wales high school, which in those days was
housed in a building at 25th Avenue and Marguerite
Street (today it is an elementary school).
Sonny Nemetz still chuckles when he recalls th*
incident: "It was around Hallowe'en, and a friend of
mine and I had conceived the idea of setting off some
firecrackers in the teacher's desk. We concocted a
complicated device for exploding them when she opened
the desk drawer.
"She didn't know I'd done it but she picked me ou^
immediately as the culprit. In fact, I have a theory that
people with dark hair are unfairly picked on generally.
At least it seemed to me in those days that the blonde
fellows could get away with murder."
When Sonny Nemetz came to UBC in 1930 he put his
verbal skills to work as a debater. The formal debate, a
contest between two sides to see which one has more
skill in speaking and reasoning, is not a form of
entertainment that appeals to today's undergraduates. In
the 1930s it was a highly regarded intellectual game and
Nathan Nemetz excelled at it.
He was a member of UBC's McGoun Cup debating
team four years in a row and is described in the 1934
Totem as one of UBC's "golden-tongued orators." In the*
spring of that year he debated, with classmate Edward
Fox, the affirmative of the resolution "That the
economic salvation of Canada lies in the socialization of
her finance and major industry," with a team from the
University of Manitoba.
McGoun Cup debates were, in those days, one of tha^
highlights of the University year. The debaters and
judges appeared in tuxedos and the confrontations were
held in the Oak Room of the old Hotel Vancouver, at
the corner of Georgia and Granville Streets. On this
occasion the persuasiveness and logic of the UBC team
prevailed and one of the judges who cast his vote for thf*
Vancouverites was H.R. MacMillan.
If Sonny Nemetz's University career ended well, the
same cannot be said for the start of it. He very nearly
failed his first year by wasting his time playing chess and
the card game called blackjack in a room in the old
Women's Gymnasium, where the new Buchanan office
tower now stands. *"
He had obviously shown promise, however, because
at the end of his first year the late Prof. Walter Sage, one
of UBC's legendary early teachers, called Sonny Nemetz
into his office and told him to straighten up.
Prof. Sage said he was prepared to recommend UBC's
future Chancellor for the honors history program if he
would only stop doing whatever it was that caused him"
to miss so many lectures. The chess and blackjack
stopped.
Even the sternness of Walter Sage could not prevent
Sonny Nemetz from taking an active part in the political
life of the UBC campus of that day, which largely
stemmed from the depression. *
A £i the 1920s closed, UBC was on the point of
f^\ ^^k embarking on a further expansion of its
J. M\. k^x facilities. When the depression hit, plans
for new buildings went down the drain and the operating
budget was cut from $650,000 to $250,000. Ttes
precipitated an internal struggle which eventually resulted in the passage of a motion of non-confidence in
Dr. Leonard Klinck, the then president, by UBC's
Senate.
At the same time UBC students and faculty members
were fighting to prevent implementation of a report by IT
B.C. Royal Commission chaired by Mr. George Kidd, a Chancellor
Vancouver businessman, which suggested that it might
be necessary to close the University and subsidize B.C.
students in order that they might attend universities
elsewhere.
Sonny Nemetz was one of the chief organizers of a
Hoor-to-door campaign which saw students collect
thousands of signatures on a petition demanding that the
University be kept open and the recommendations of
the Kidd Report rejected. He remembers vividly the day
that George Kidd and Prof. Henry Angus, later dean of
Graduate Studies at UBC, debated Kidd's report in the
old Auditorium. It was the first time that loudspeakers
were erected outside the Auditorium so that the crowds
could hear the discussion inside.
Somehow Sonny Nemetz also managed to act as
exchange editor on The Ubyssey, a job that involved
sending UBC news to other Canadian student papers and
editing return despatches. When he was not involved in
yniversity affairs he helped to put himself through
University by playing the violin and banjo in a four-piece
dance band for $5 an engagement and working in the
summer as an office boy in a law office or as an assistant
to a journeyman electrician in the small contracting
business operated by his father.
■ ■ ~l Estill takes pride in the fact that he
I—I MA learned to install a "knob and tube job"
M m M A in some of Vancouver's homes. Metal
conduits, through which wiring is passed, were unknown
in the 1930s. Instead, an insulated wire was run through
the house beams and to prevent overheating at the point
where the wire passed through the beam, a porcelain
tube was fitted into the beam. There was a knob at one
end of the tube to prevent it from sliding through the
hole in the beam. The system can still be found in many
early Vancouver homes that have not been rewired.
"That experience has stood me in good stead,' the
-Chancellor said recently with a grin. "I've been chairman
of arbitrations for the electrical industry and when I tell
the union representatives that I know how to put in a
knob and tube job it gains me a measure of respect."
In the spring and summer of 1934 Sonny Nemetz saw
a lot of Bel Newman, who years before had watched him
•trying to talk his way out of trouble at Prince of Wales
high school. She too had come on to UBC a year after
her future husband and had followed his fortunes by
attending innumerable campus debates. She graduated in
1935 with a first-class degree in economics, political
science and philosophy.
But instead of herself becoming a law student as she
had planned, she decided to marry Sonny Nemetz and
put him through law school. As a law student he was
making $10 a month and "it just wasn't possible for us
to live on $20 a month," says Mrs. Nemetz.
She went to work in her family's business in a
position she thought would be temporary but which
proved to be permanent. She eventually became
managing director of the business and ran it until she
resigned in 1963. The Nemetzes have one son, Peter, a
UBC graduate, who is now a teaching fellow in
economics at Harvard University.
When Nathan Nemetz set up his own law practice
after being called to the bar in 1937 it was only natural
that he should specialize in labor law: "It was an
extension of the social consciousness I'd developed as a
student."
It was not a happy era for labor. Industry often
attempted to break unions and there was often violence
and resort to goon squads. Nathan Nemetz acted for
many unions in this period and as legal representative for
the old Vancouver Newspaper Guild helped to smooth
the way for its inclusion in the American Newspaper
Guild. He also acted for the Vancouver Secondary
Teachers Association.
^_    In   this  period   a   group   of  friends  and   colleagues
gathered in the Nemetz's living room to form the first
On Aug. 31, B.C.'s Lieutenant-Governor and
Visitor to the University, the Hon. John
Nicholson, left, installed Mr. Justice Nathan
Nemetz as Chancellor of the University for a
three-year term of office. Mr. Justice Nemetz
B.C. Civil Liberties Union. Among the charter members
were two legendary UBC English professors. Garnet
Sedgewick and Billy MacDonald.
As time went by, Nathan Nemetz's reputation as a
lawyer led to his being asked by both management and
labor to act as an arbitrator and conciliator in an
increasing number of labor-management disputes. He
was instrumental in settling disputes in the forest
industry in 1964, 1966 and 1970 and the provincial
government asked him to prepare a report on Swedish
labor law and practices in 1968. In 1971 he was the
arbitrator in a dispute between B.C. Hydro and the
Electrical Workers Union.
~|^ fW ■ — Justice Nemetz will not agree with the
™J I I m statement that he is often chosen as an
-L T JL -I- m. # arbitrator in difficult disputes largely
because labor has confidence in his ability to arrive at a
settlement which will be fair to it. He merely says that
he has been told that that is so.
"In a difficult labor-management situation," he says,
"it's essential to have the confidence of both parties. If
the confidence is there, both sides will allow you to
make a mistake if they believe it's an honest one. But if
both sides lack confidence in the mediator, even the
most minor error will arouse resentment.
"Someone has said that the best solution to labor-
management disputes is to have both sides demurring at
the proposed settlement. Then you know it's probably
fair."
There has never been a year, according to the
Nemetzes, that they have not maintained a close
connection with and a deep-seated interest in UBC
affairs. They have attended for decades the weekly
winter meetings of the Vancouver Institute, a town-
gown organization that sponsors a series of 19 or so
lectures annually and meets in Room 106 of the
Buchanan Building (he is a former president of the
Institute and this year his wife is a member of the
Institute's governing Council).
Mr. Justice Nemetz's deeper involvement in UBC's
affairs began in the mid-1950s. He was president of the
UBC Alumni Association in 1956-57 and represented the
Alumni Association Board of Management on Senate
from 1957 to 1963. This led to his election by Senate to
the Board of Governors and in 1965 he became the first
Senate-elected Board member to be elected chairman of
the Board of Governors.
"I was fortunate, as a Board member, in having an
interest in all facets of University life because it's my
own   University,"   he  says.   "It's helped  to create  my
succeeds as Chancellor Dr. Allan M. McGavin,
who remains on the Board as an appointee of
the Lieutenant-Governor in Council and who has
been elected Chairman of the Board for a
two-year period.
mode of life and helped me to achieve my objectives. I
feel I owe the University a debt, not as a quid pro quo,
but in the sense that other young people should be given
the same opportunity that I had to get an education.
Nothing distresses me more than to hear people say that
they know of a young man or woman who would
benefit from a higher education but is unable to go
because of a lack of money. I feel that if a student has
the ability, the University should provide a place for him
or her."
Those who know Sonny Nemetz well, and have
followed his career closely, also speak about his capacity
for political manoeuvring, not the kind associated with
partisan politics, but simply the ability to persuade in
order to bring about a result which is mutually satisfactory to all concerned.
This capacity is an innate ability and something that
showed up early, according to a friend of almost 50
years, Stuart Keate, who claims that Sonny Nemetz got
him started on a career in journalism when they were
both students at Prince of Wales high school.
Sonny was editor of the school's newspaper, "Three
Feathers," which appeared four times a year. One day he
suggested to Stuart Keate that he might like to be editor
of the paper.
"It's easy," he told Stuart Keate. "All you have to do
is get contributions from the class representatives. The
printers will help you make it up. You'll like it."
Only after Stuart Keate had agreed to take on the job
did Sonny Nemetz reveal that he'd given up the
editorship to be free to run for president of Students'
Council. "Naturally," he added, "I'd, uh, like a little
editorial support for the campaign."
"Naturally," Stuart Keate replied.
"Regard and tremble at the majesty of that juvenile
manoeuvre," Stuart Keate says in retrospect. "In one
stroke Sonny had unloaded a job he didn't much like
(nobody else would take it); had endeared himself to the
teachers by finding a successor; had guaranteed the
success of his political campaign by appointing a friendly
editor; had done his friend a favor by launching him on a
career that would last a lifetime."
■  ~M    I   ^ adds: "No man of my acquaintance loves
I—I    MA    UBC more. ...   I believe he will prove a
_■_ J ■—^most distinguished Chancellor."
Stuart Keate is undoubtedly right.
But the mind boggles.
If he could accomplish all that as a 14-year-old
schoolboy, what may we expect of the mature Justice of
the Court of Appeal as Chancellor of the University?
UBC. Reports/Sept. 28, 1972/3, Unique skylight of new Sedgewick Undergraduate Library will afford a view Into the Library during
day and serve as a light beacon at night
Instructors using the 500-seat lecture hall in the Instructional Resources Centre can make use of a
wide range of audio-visual equipment
Modernistic exterior of the new Geological Sciences
NEW HEIGHTS
UBC students and faculty members will be able to go4 .
from the heights to the depths before 1972 is over.
The heights are the three towers of the new Walter H.
Gage Residence and the Buchanan Annex office tower,
where occupants and visitors to the upper storeys can enjoy
a superlative view of Greater Vancouver — on a clear day.
The   depths  will   be   the   new   two-storey   Sedgewick
Undergraduate    Library,    now   in   the   final    stages   of
construction under the Main Mall, which will provide 2,000
study spaces and a book collection of 180,000 volumes.
PLEASANT VIEW
The view from the new Library won't be extensive but it
will be just as pleasant. Small-scale landscaped courtyards
will be visible through floor-to-ceiling windows on the east
and west sides of the unique building.
The new residence, named for UBC's President, consists
of three 16-storey towers and a group of low-rise apartment
units, the latter now in the final stages of construction. The
complex cost more than $8.8 million and was built with^
funds borrowed from the Central Mortgage and Housing
Corporation.
In keeping with Board of Governors policy, the CMHC
loan will be repaid out of the rents and other services
charged to students and to visitors who make use of the
complex for conferences in the spring and summer.
The development is also a new departure in residence*
living. Students live in groups of six men or women, each
group occupying one of four suites on each of the 16 floors
of the high-rise towers. Two suites on each floor are
occupied by senior s.tudents who have previously lived in
other UBC residences.
Each student has a separate bedroom and study are£
and each group of six shares a common sitting room,
kitchen and bathroom facilities. A total of 1,368 students
will be housed in the residence when it is complete.
Completion  of  the  12-storey  Buchanan Annex office
tower   this  summer  has  meant  that  life  is  a  little  less
crowded for some faculty  members and students in the^
Faculty of Arts.
The Departments of German, English, French,
Economics and History have moved into the $2.8 million
building, which also includes nine seminar rooms for
small-group teaching as well as a number of reading rooms
and small libraries for the use of students and faculty
members.
OAK TREES KEPT
The design of the $3.9 million Sedgewick Undergraduate
Library is an ingenious solution to a seemingly insoluble
problem: how to create a new library facility in an area^
where a careful survey showed it ought to be —
immediately west of the existing Main Library — without
destroying the traditional character of the oak-lined Main
Mall and adjacent landscaping.
The architectural solution was to remove some 100,000
cubic yards of earth to provide for an underground librarv
and to encase the roots of the oak trees in brick-faced
caissons which have been made an integral part of the
interior and exterior design of the building.
When the building is completed in November, the roof
of the Library will again become the Main Mall linking the
north   and   south  sections  of  the  central   campus.   Nev<»
features of  the   Mall   will  be staircases leading down to
4/UBC Reports/Sept. 28, 1972 ■ "';  ±}^^-.\}^['''''''[
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ijhic: iBBspoM-rn.tsssprt:. :sji, 'i mm- Prof. Michael Ovenden, right, of UBC's Department of Geophysics and
Astronomy, is the discoverer of a "footprint" of the lost planet Aztex,
which is shown in the diagram at far right in relation to the other
planets up to the time of its disappearance, calculated at approximately
16,000,000 years ago. Positions of the planets are shown on a
logarithmic scale graduated in astronomical units (1 A.U. - distance
from the Earth to the Sun). Fig. I shows relative positions of the
planets soon after the solar system was formed. Fig. 2 shows the
position shortly after Aztex vanished. Fig. 3 shows the present position,
with asteroids (perhaps chunks of the fragmented planet) filling the
former orbit of Aztex. Fig. 4 predicts relative positions in the distant
future, when the solar system will again have reached a state of
equilibrium. {Pluto, outermost of the planets, is not shown).
Creativity and
The Value of a
T    Little
Iffnoranre
O        " ""
By  Peter  Thompson
4,500 million years ago, at
the birth of the soljfr system-
Figure 1
Aztex Jupiter Saturn
Mercury
.313
Uranus Neptune
Venus   W Earth Mars •[
■/     \ / .
.954     .983 2.44     2.78      5.19 9.75 17.80
J Zi L
16 million years ago, before
Aztex disappeared
1 A.U.
I    I   I   I  I
10 A.U.
J I I    1   I l   I
31.97
100 A.U.
I i 1 1 ■    ■    ■   I
Figure 2
tefcury Venus    Earth Mars Aztex Jupiter       Saturn
>wt.u> i>
.405
I  l»n..V        M«
o
.713     1.004       1.44        2.80 5.20        9.51 19.46 29.71
1 A.U.
J I I     . 1   -.1     I    I    I   I
the present
10A.U.
J I I I    I   1 I  I	
100 A.U.
J L
Figure 3
Mercury Venus   Earth
Mars Asteroids Jupiter     Saturn Uranus       Neptune
.387
.723   1.0
1.524
1 A.U.
J L  ) I—I   1   1 I	
500 million years from now
J L
5.203        9.539
10A.U.
 I	
19.18     30.06
_i I L
100 A.U.
■    ■    ■   I
Figure 4
Mercury   Venus   Earth    Mars Asteroids Jupiter Saturn Uranus
.461      .696    1.016     1.24
=                         1 A.U.
J I U  I    I .J.J	
10.5     12.7
Neptune
37.3
10 A.U.
J i I        I       I    I   I  I   I
100 A.U.
J J    ■      I   - I I I   1    I   I	
Prof. Michael Ovenden's discovery of a "footprint" of
a tenth planet which disappeared 16 million years ago in
a gargantuan explosion is disconcerting. It arouses in
some of us a mild case of cosmic anxiety.
In mid-August at the NATO Advanced Institute on
Dynamical Astronomy at Cortina d'Ampezzo, Italy,
Prof. Ovenden announced that a planet 90 times the
mass of the Earth once orbited the Sun between Mars
and Jupiter and disappeared in the greatest explosion
our solar system is known to have experienced. Mysteriously, almost all trace of Aztex, the name he has given
to the lost planet, has vanished. Only fragments of it -
totalling a mere 1/900th of its original mass - still exist.
After all, we are approaching the last quarter of the
20th century and many of us are in a post-moon landing
frame of mind. Many of us are already jaded with space
travel. And astronomy has penetrated beyond our solar
system into the galaxy of which our solar system is a
mediocrity and beyond to other galaxies and even
beyond that.
Modern astronomy paints a vision of drama in our
universe. Instead of the universe continuing on unperturbed to eternity, we know that it is often witness
to instability and catastrophe. Stars collapse, their fuels
exhausted. Or they can explode, spreading their matter
into interstellar space. Galaxies are shuddered By unimaginably huge convulsions.
But these events always happen "out there." We tend
not to associate them with ourselves nor with our corner
of the universe. In spite of our secular knowledge about
the universe that modern astronomy has given us, we
sub-consciously assume our solar system to be static and
whole, i mis assumption-may-i i3vs a psyciiO»ogic3i i^asis,
a throw-back to the Medieval view of the universe that
placed the Earth in the centre.
HUGE PLANET
Now along comes Prof. Ovenden and tells us that he
has evidence that one of our sister planets disintegrated.
On the one hand he gives us a planet we never knew
existed, a huge planet that dwarfed our own, and on the
other he destroys it in a cosmic catastrophe that is both
recent and close to home. Other astronomers had
thought it likely that a planet once existed between Mars
_a_nd_ Jupjter. but. none had imagined it 90 times the mass
of the Earth. Nordid many think it could have exploded
so recently.
Sixteen million years ago is comparatively recent in
the history of our solar system. The solar system is
about 4,500 million years old. If its age were represented
by one year, .then Aztex would have blown up
yesterday, 32 hours ago to be more exact.
6/UBC Reports/Sept. 28,1972
Sixteen million years ago the Earth was much like it
is today. The continents had formed. The oldest
mountain ranges on the Earth had come and been
eroded away. In that recent evening sky, the brightest
object apart from the moon was Aztex, occupying the
same position it had for thousands of millions of years.
Then suddenly Aztex exploded in a tremendous flash of
light and flaming meteorites, remnants of the destroyed
planet, showered the Earth.
Could the same thing happen to the Earth? Prof.
Ovenden says the evidence is that only large planets may
blow up. Disintegration isn't associated with the puny
likes of the Earth.
Others might find Prof. Ovenden's discovery of a
footprint of A2tex disconcerting for another reason. The
process he used to determine that Aztex once existed
and a new theory on the behavior of planets is the
reverse of what is conventionally taken to be the pattern
of scientific discovery.
It all began about two decades ago.
"I have had a dream - you would perhaps call it an
obsession — but I have had a dream for 20 years that the
distances of the planets from the Sun are not
accidental," Prof. Ovenden said.
"The planets are close together near the Sun but as
you go out from the Sun they get farther and farther
apart. Except for one interesting exception. Between
Mars and Jupiter there is a gap.
"This regular spacing of the planets around the Sun
and the gap between Mars and Jupiter has been known
to astronomers for centuries. In fact, exactly 200 years
ago a German astronomer, Johann Titius, put forward
the first mathematical representation which showed that
the distances of the planets from the Sun aren't random.
But  neither Titius nor anyone else has been able to
cXpi3in Wity.
The problem perplexed Prof. Ovenden — "I've been
worrying away at it like a dog at a bone for the past 20
y^aia        —    uul    i n;    ^uu.un   L   uu    Mhut.il    auuu L    il    uiii.ii    ulpi.
years ago when he was given a year's study leave from
UBC. He was free from teaching and administration and
could concentrate completely on research.
He first went to the Institute of Theoretical
Astronomy at Cambridge University, which has a reputation for being something of an international think tank
for astronomers since most of the staff are visiting
scientists from centres all over the world. Turning over
in his mind was an explanation for the distribution of
the planets around the Sun. His idea was that the planets
tend to adjust the distances between their orbits simply
through the mutual gravitational influence of one upon
the other.
The dominant gravitational force in our solar system
is, of course, the Sun. Because it has 99.9 per cent of the
total mass of the solar system the flight of a planet is
constantly being bent in a curved line around the Sun.
Prof. Ovenden maintains that the planets slowly adjust
their distances so that their mutual gravitational forces
are minimized. If the planets were close together they
would interact violently and change their orbits quickly:
If they were far apart, they wouldn't interact as
intensely and their orbits would change slowly. He calls
his theory the principle of "minimum interaction
distribution."
It's as if the planets were anti-social and want to keep
as far away from each other as the laws of physics allow.
At one point, he was thinking of calling it the principlt-
of planetary claustrophobia. The major role in establishing interplanetary distances would be Jupiter because
of its huge mass. Jupiter's mass is more than the
combined mass of all the other planets. Compared to
Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune, the Earth is trivial.
But what is the minimum interaction distribution of
the planets, the positions where they would interfere'
with each other least? Prof. Ovenden was faced with a
mathematical barrier. No direct way of calculating the
minimum interaction distribution exists.
LABORIOUS JOB
"To calculate how the solar system evolved we have
to do very lengthy calculations, called integrations," he
said. "We have to assume that all the planets except one,
say the Earth, are fixed, and calculate how much the
Earth's orbit would move during a day or so. Then we
keep the Earth and the rest of the planets fixed and
move, say, Venus.
"It's a very laborious job and every time we make a
little step we introduce a little error because, of course,
the planets are ali in constant motion. Do it a tnousanu
times and the errors have added up. Do it a million times
"You could  not carry enough  figures in the. most.
powerful computer to have any appreciable accuracy in
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planets of our solar system has been integrated, after
months of computer work, is one million years. That
may seem a long time but it is useless for my needs since
the age of the solar system is 4,500 million years."
If he was to be able to prove lhat his idea of
minimum interaction distribution was right, he would
have to find some way of getting around integration
mathematics. So he left Cambridge and went to the
Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering
Mechanics at the University of Texas at Austin, where %>
group of integration experts had formed as a result of
the United States space program.
His most intense thinking about the problem probably began at this point. After spending days using the
Austin computer trying to find a short cut around the
staggering  problem  of  integrations,  he'd  fly  to  the-„
Instituto  de   Astronomia de  la  Universidad  Nacional
Autonoma de Mexico, where he pondered the results. In
the end he was able to develop a technique that allowed
him to run the complete evolution of the solar system
tiwough a computer in^bout 10 seconds. The technique
was approximate but sufficient for what he wanted.
If the principle of minimum interaction distribution
explains the position of the planets orbiting the Sun, it
could also be applied to the moons or satellites revolving
around individual planets within the solar system.
So he calculated the minimum interaction distribution for the five satellites or moons of Uranus and the
major five of the 12 satellites of Jupiter. When he
compared the theoretical minimum interaction distribution of the satellites around their parent planets with
their known distances, he found he was amazingly
accurate. Then he calculated the minimum interaction
distribution for the planets of Barnard's star, the only
other star apart from the Sun known to have an
extensive planetary system. Again the match was nearly
perfect.
"To a precision 1 did not expect, the principle
worked. The distribution of the satellites of Uranus and
Jupiter was very accurate, to within about one per cent
of what I had calculated them to be. The distribution of
the planets around Barnard's Star was also in agreement,
though not so accurately because more error is involved
in estimating distances in another solar system. But the
distribution was within - in fact, far better than ! had
expected — the pattern I had predicted."
-Then he applied his theory to the planets in our solar
system. First he took the huge outer planets of Jupiter,
Saturn, Uranus and Neptune because they would be
little affected by the gravitational influence of the other,
smaller planets. The theoretical and actual positions of
the planets didn't match.
So Prof. Ovenden calculated what could account for
trie present positions of the large planets and be
consistent with his theory. He found that the actual
positions of the outer pianets ma1<e sense only if it is
assumed that a mass 90 times that of Earth orbiting the
Sun heiween- Mars and Jupiter disappeared 16 million
years ago.
- Then he calculated the theoretical positions of the
smaller,  inner planets — Mercury,  Venus,   Earth and
Mars.   Again   the   figures   didn't   match   their   actual
distances. And again the actual distances made sense if it
was assumed that Aztex existed until 16 million years
ago,
.He says he would have been quite content if he had
found that the actual and theoretical positions of the
planets in our solar system matched. "Now the simple
hypothesis I started with has changed. My idea that the
planets seek minimum  interaction distribution  is true
but the evidence, I think, is unambiguous that there was
a planet 90 times the mass of the Earth in the asteroid
belt and it went 16 million years ago."
Two centuries ago, suspecting a planet in the famous
gap between Mars and Jupiter, astronomers began a
systematic search of that part of the sky. Astronomers
have subsequently found tens of thousands of pieces of
rock, the largest about 500 miles in diameter. It has long
been thought that these asteroids might be part of a
disintegrated planet, since their surfaces are broken and
jagged rather than smooth like a planet's. Many
meteorites striking the Earth are believed to have come
from the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter.
Geophysical analysis of many of the meteorites indicates
that they were suddenly broken down into small pieces
about the same time as Prof. Ovenden has calculated
that Aztex disappeared.
But what happened to Aztex? The total mass
of the asteroids is only 1/900th of the mass of
the lost planet. What happened to the other
664,540,800,000,000,000,000,000 tons of matter? Did
it fall into the Sun? Was it blown out of the solar
system? No one knows.
One month before Prof. Ovenden, at the scientific
meeting in Italy, launched and destroyed Aztex in the
same breath, a NASA space probe began to enter the
175-million-mile wide asteroid belt. The unmanned
Pioneer 10, travelling faster and further than any other
man-made object, is scheduled to emerge from the belt
early in 1973 and pass behind Jupiter before turning
back toward the Earth.
So far the space craft has collided with much more
dust in the asteroid belt than was anticipated. A speck of
Aztex dust just 2/1,000th of a gram could penetrate the
space ship's aluminum body and cause serious damage.
Pioneer 10, ^travelling faster and farther than any other
are estimated at nine to one in favor.
Instead of trying to find out where most of Aztex
went when it blew up. Prof. Ovenden is following
another mystery. What made Aztex blow up? This will
be his main research interest now that he is back
teaching at UBC.
INTUITION  CITED
The method he used to arrive at his principle of
minimum interaction distribution is the" opposite to
what many consider to be the pattern of scientific
discovery. The conventional view is that a scientist first
gathers data on whatever he's studying and works out an
idea based on what he sees. Much valuable scientific
activity follows this method.
But what Prof. Ovenden has done is the reverse. The
idea of minimum interaction distribution came first. His
biggest task was to find out if the idea matched reality.
"Intuition is the driving force of science," he says.
"Discoveries that unite bits and pieces of our experience
into a coherent pattern are the product of ideas. A new
pattern, a new perception of regularity and order,  is
discovered in what appeared before as chaotic and
arbitrary."
The history of science is strewn with examples of
this. One of the most famous is Newton's discovery of
the Law of Gravity. Newton first had the idea that the
moon was held in orbit by the gravitational force of the
Earth and that this attraction was exactly counterbalanced by the tendency of the moon to fly off into
space, by its centrifugal force. After he got the idea he
had to calculate the gravitational force of the Earth and
the centrifugal force of the moon. Then he had to show
that the resulting theoretical orbit of the moon
coincided with its actual orbit.
Prof. Ovenden says the creative imagination is as
active in the sciences as in the arts. Each re-arranges the
world into a new point of view. Each succeeds or fails on
the basis of whether the new vision makes sense or not.
Roughly, Prof. Ovenden says, the same criterion applied
to a new scientific theory also applies to a poem or
painting, if it offers a consistent, coherent view of the
world, then it is "right." Just as two poets can write
different noerns about the same experience, so scientists
can produce different views of the same phonomenon
and so long as they work equally well, they are both
valid.
The search for unity in the universe is a fundamental
activity of man. The history of all the sciences is marked
by a search for harmony. But the theme of harmony is
intense in the legacy of astronomy', perhaps because it is
the oldest of the sciences.
Pythagoras, the Greek who is often called the father
of science, believed that the heavRnly .bodies, movfiil
through space in such exquisite mathematical harmony
that they produced music which no one could hear.
Kepler, who was an astrologer as well as astronomer,
worked furiously at trying to find some explanation for
the  distances  between   the  orbits  of  the planets.  He
t f-j r» 11 n hi f f-ja.j-jarl fViMnr! tHi^ *ipf^fpt nf prP-STir'vn whipn rip ri.^H
the idea that the orbits could be represented by five
geometrical shapes placed one inside the other. Such
harmony, Kepler believed, could only be the result of a
supreme divinity. Though his astronomical assumptions
were wrong, they eventually led to Kepler's Three Laws,
which later formed a major part of the foundation of
Newtonian mechanics.
FORCE OF GRAVITY
For many astronomers, celestial or cosmic harmony
was God-given. God was a mathematician addicted to
geometry. "Geometry is unique and eternal, the reflection of the mind of God," said Kepler. Newton thought
that without the constant intervention of the mind of
God, the universe would collapse under the crushing
force of gravity.
What Prof. Ovenden did could have been done by any
astronomer in the past 200 years. Any astronomer could
have thought of minimum interaction distribution and
perhaps some did. Anyone could have worked out the
approximate method of doing integrations on the
planetary orbits. They might not have had computers at
their disposal to run through the evolution of the solar
system in ten seconds. But the calculations could have
been done manually. They wouldn't have taken as long
as some done by astronomers in the past.
"Many of the original ideas I have had had their germ
in a question asked by a student, often an undergraduate
student," he said. "One greatly underestimates the
importance and significance of comments made by
intelligent people who are new to a subject.
"One must always be sceptical about generalizations
about education, but the thing that most perturbs me is
the notion that to do something original you have to
iearn what everyone" else has "done" on" "the " subject.
Basically, things are created, new ideas arise, not by
continuing on from where others have left off but by
breaking off somewhere down the iine and thinking
again.
"The tree of knowledge is a good symbol. A branch
doesn't start from the tip of the tree; it starts somewhere
down the trunk. All creative things involve thinking
again, seeing the world in a new way.
"But one mustn't go too far. I'm deliberately
overstating the case because I see around me so much of
the opposite view. Of course, you have to know enough
about a subject to know what the problems are. One
could nuote Newton s comment that-if he'd been able to
see farther than anyone else it was because he stood on
the shoulders of giants. But, nevertheless, if you spend
all your time learning what other people have done, not
only will you not have time to develop your own ideas,
but you won't have any ideas of your own to develop.
"For creative work I think a little ignorance is a
valuable thing."
UBC Reports/Sept. 28, 1972/7 DR. LEON KOERNER PIES AT SO
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hit 39ir,6il ,^f,3Hn; llHibaa;, laiban t^ laffldisnrr-si iknr. SPECIAL PROGRAMS
CONTEMPORARY THOUGHT IN SCIENCE: THE
MIND/BRAIN OF MAN - 9 Thursdays, Oct. 5-Nov. 30,
8 p.m., Vancouver Public Library, 750 Burrard St. A
series of lecture-discussions with leading brain research
scientists and related investigator:;. Topics will include:
brain waves origin and meaning; stages of sleep ancl dream
recall; physiological correlates of memory; sex
differences, sexuality and the brain.
BODY-BRAIN AND EXTRA-SENSORY PERCEPTION:
IMPLICATIONS FOR THE NATURE OF MAN - Friday,
Nov. 24, 8:30 p.m., Hebb Lecture Theatre, UBC. Dr.
Charles T. Tart, University of California, Davis and rioted
for research and scientific study of states of consciousness.
THE 20TH CENTURY MUSIC SERIES - 4 Thursdays,
Oct. 5—19, Nov. 30, Dec. 15, 8 p.m., Maritime Museum.
Lectures in conjunction with the Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra 20th Century Series.
IDEAS AND BOOKS - Informal seminars on issues of
our times. Topics:
Alternatives to the Technological Society — 4 Tuesdays,
Oct. 3-24, 8 p.m., UBC.
The Limits to Growth — 4 Tuesdays, Oct. 3—24, 8 p.m.,
UBC.
The Politics of Ecology — 4 Tuesdays, Oct. 31 —Nov. 21,
8 p.m., Hycroft.
The Radicalizing of Quebec — 4 Tuesdays, Oct. 31— Nov.
21, 8 p.m., UBC.
LAW REFORM AND FAMILY LAW: A WORKSHOP -
4 Wednesdays, Oct. 11—Nov. 1, noon, Vancouver Public
Library, 750 Burrard St.
LOCAL HISTORY: ARCHIVAL METHODS FOR THE
AMATEUR HISTORIAN - 5 Thursdays, Oct. 19-Nov.
16, 8 p.m., Vancouver City Archives.
UTILIZING THE BUSINESS LIBRARY
EFFECTIVELY: RESEARCH AND RESOURCES -
Wednesday, Oct. 18, 9 a.m.—4:30 p.m., Vancouver Public
Library.
ANIMALS WITHOUT BACKBONES - 6 Mondays, Oct.
23—Nov. 27, 8 p.m., Vancouver Public Aquarium.
ANTHROPOLOGY  FILM SERIES - 5 Tuesdays, Oct.
3-Nov.  28, 7:30 p.m..  National Film Board Theatre,
1155 West Georgia St.
NEW APPROACHES TO WORKING WITH
VOLUNTEERS: AN INSTITUTE - Wednesday and
Thursday, Nov. 29 and 30, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Jewish
Community Centre, 950 West 41st Ave. Special program
with Dr. Eva Schindler-Rainman, internationally-known
consultant to voluntary organizations, business, government and educational institutions.
FRASER VALLEY LAND USE - WHOSE CONCERN?
— Wednesday, Oct. 18, 9 a.m.—5 a.m.. Town & Country
Motor Inn, Delta.
THE DAYTIME PROGRAM
DESIGN AND INTERIORS - 8 Mondays, Sept. 25, 1:30
p.m., Vancouver Public Library.
CONVERSATIONS ABOUT MUSIC - 6 Tuesdays, Sept.
26, 1:30 p.m.. University Hill United Church, 5375
University Blvd.
THE FEMININE EXPERIENCE: NOVELISTS AND
SENSIBILITIES - 7 Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 10 a.m.,
Vancouver Public Library.
LEARNING THROUGH PLAY IN EARLY
CHILDHOOD - 7 Tuesdays, Oct. 17, 1:30 p.m.,
Kitsilano Public Library.
CONTEMPORARY ANTHROPOLOGY AND THE
NATURE OF HUMAN NATURE - 10 Tuesdays, Sept.
19, 1:30 p.m., International House, UBC.
THE PSYCHOLOGY OF CREATIVE THINKING - 10
Tuesdays, Sept. 26, 10 a.m., International House, UBC.
DEVELOPING PERSONAL POTENTIAL, Part I - 4
Wednesdays, Oct. 11, 9:30 a.m.. Centre for Continuing
Education, UBC.
DEVELOPING PERSONAL POTENTIAL, Part II -
Monday, Wednesday & Thursday, Nov. 6, 8 and 9, 9:30
a.m.. Centre for Continuing Education, UBC.
MYTHS OF MAN: LEGENDS AND FICTIONS - 8
Wednesdays, Sept. 27, 10 a.m., Hycroft, 1489 McRae.
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF ENGLISH
LITERATURE - 10 Wednesdays, Sept. 27, 1:30 p.m.,
International House, UBC.
ON BECOMING HUMAN: THE PRACTICAL WISDOM
OF TIBETAN BUDDHISM - 5 Wednesdays, Oct 11, 10
a.m., Vancouver Public Library.
THE INTERNATIONAL SCENE - 8 Wednesdays, Oct. 4,
1:30 p.m., Vancouver Public Library.
GARDENING THROUGH THE SEASONS, Series 11-6
Wednesdays, Oct. 4, 10 a.m.. Horticultural Greenhouses,
UBC.
THE PERCEPTIVE FILMGOER - 6 Wednesdays, Oct. 4,
1:30 p.m., National Film Board, 1 155 West Georgia.
KEEPING A JOURNAL - 8 Wednesdays, Oct. 4, 1:30
p.m..  University   Hill  United  Church,   5375  University
Blvd.
HELEN: THE FACE THAT LAUNCHED A THOUSAND
SHIPS - 12 Thursdays, Sept. 21, 1:30 p.m., University
Hill United Church.
ANGER AND AGGRESSION - 5 Thursdays, Oct. 19, 10
a.m., Vancouver Public Library.
CHINA IN PERSPECTIVE: CONTINUITY AND
CHANGE - 5 Thursdays, Oct. 5 1:30 p.m., Vancouver
Public Library.
HERITAGE 300 YEARS OF DEVELOPMENT IN
CANADIAN ART - 8 Thursdays;, Sept. 21, 1:30 p.m.,
International House, UBC.
SACRED BEAUTY: MAN'S RELIGIOUS EXPLORATIONS IN ART AND ARCHITECTURE - 9
Thursdays, Sept. 28, 2 p.m., Vancouver Public Library.
EDUCATING TODAY'S CHILD: ALTERNATIVES AND
INNOVATIONS - 6 Thursdays, Oct. 5, 10 a.m.,
Vancouver Public Library.
CONTEMPORARY YOUTH CULTURE: ALIENATION
AND ADJUSTMENT - 6 Thursdays, Oct. 5, 1:30 p.m.,
Vancouver Public Library.
INTRODUCTION   TO   ECONOMICS  -   10  Thursdays,
Sept. 21,10 a.m., International House, UBC.
EFFECTIVE STUDY - 4 Saturdays, Nov.  18, 10 a.m.,
Vancouver Public Library.
PARENTING SKILLS FOR THE NEW FAMILY - Public
Lecture Thursday, Nov. 9, 8 p.m., Unitarian Church, 949
West 49th. Workshop Saturday, Nov. 11, 9:30 a.m..
Centre for Continuing Education, UBC.
OPTIONS FOR WOMEN - 6 Tuesdays, Sept. 19, 9:30
a.m., Centre for Continuing Education, UBC.
WOMEN'S RESOURCES CENTRE - a new entity to
provide a comprehensive and co ordinated approach to
programs for adult women who find themselves tfirust
into changing societal roles and who are seeking
opportunities for personal growth. For information call
228-2181, local 273.
PEOPLES AND CULTURES
GREAT    CIVILIZATIONS    OF    THE    ANDES    -    8
Thursdays,   Oct.   5,   7:30   p.m.,   Vancouver   Centennial
Museum.
PEOPLES, CULTURES AND PLACES - 10 Wednesdays,
Oct. 4,8 p.m., UBC.
LIFE    IN    THE    SOUTH    PACIFIC:    THE    LAU   OF
MALAITA - 5 Mondays, Oct. 16, 7:30 p.m., Kitsilano
Library.
ARCHAEOLOGY OF B.C. - 8 Wednesdays, 8 p.m., Oct.
11, Archaeology Lab., UBC.
EXPLORATIONS IN VISUAL COMMUNICATIONS:
STILL PHOTOGRAPHY AND PERCEPTION OF
SOCIAL LIFE - 6 Thursdays, Oct. 19, 8 p.m., UBC.
SOCIAL PARAMETERS OF THE CHINESE
REVOLUTION - 8 Tuesdays, Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m.
Kitsilano Library.
INTRODUCTION TO EAST ASIA - 27 Tuesdays, Sept.
12, 7 p.m., UBC.
THE CHANGING CHURCH IN LATIN AMERICA - 6
Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 8 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre, UBC.
Centre Offers
163 Courses
UBC's Centre for Continuing Education is
offering 163 non-credit courses in the humanities,
creative arts, social sciences and public affairs in its
Autumn 1972 Program beginning in September
and October.
A brochure with complete descriptions of
courses listed on this page and registration forms is
available from the Centre at 228-2181.
Among highlights this autumn are: an
innovative Women's Resources Centre aimed at
providing a comprehensive and co-ordinated
approach to programs of special interest to
women; several distinguished visiting lecturers,
including Dr. Charles T. Tart, psychologist.
University of California at Davis, noted for his
scientific study of states of consciousness; Dr. Eva
Schindler-Rainman, behavioral scientist, known
internationally for her work as consultant to
voluntary organizations, business, government and
educational institutions; Dr. Thomas Szasz,
professor of psychiatry. State University Hospital,
Syracuse, N.Y., author of The Myth of Mental
Illness and The Manufacture of Madness; a new
program on life in the ocean, Animals without
Backbones; a music lecture series in conjunction
with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra's 20th
Century Series; expanded studio courses in the
creative arts; two new courses in the Centre's
continuing China Program — Social Parameters of
the Chinese Revolution and China in Perspective:
Continuity and Change, and a course on City
Politics using Vancouver as a laboratory and the
'72 municipal elections as an educational
experience.
The Centre for Continuing Education is also
offering continuing professional education courses
this autumn in engineering, law, education, social
work, forestry, criminology, human relations,
aging, food science, architecture, community and
regional planning, and agriculture. For professional
and technical course calendars and announcements, telephone the Centre.
SOCIAL IDEAS AND ISSUES
THE PROSPECTS FOR ANARCHISM - 8 Wednesdays,
Oct. 4, 8 p.m., Lutheran Campus Centre, UBC.
THE   CONSEQUENCES   OF   CORPORATIONS   -   6
Wednesdays, Oct. 11,8 p.m., UBC.
COMPUTERS AND SOCIETY - 8 Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 8
p.m., UBC.
ON   INTUITION   AND   INTROSPECTION - 6 Thurs.,
Oct. 5,8 p.m., UBC.
HUMAN BEHAVIOUR
INTRODUCTION   TO   PSYCHOLOGY   -   16  sessions,
Monday Oct. 16, 8 p.m., UBC.
THE PSYCHOLOGY  OF  WOMEN - 3 Tuesdays, Nov.
14, 8 p.m., Vancouver Public Library, 1 Saturday, Dec. 2,
10 a.m.. Centre for Continuing Education, UBC.
ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY  -   16 sessions, Thursday,
Oct. 12,8 p.m., UBC.
REWARD AND PUNISHMENT: BEHAVIOUR MODIFICATION IN HOME AND SCHOOL - 8 Thursdays, Oct.
12,7 p.m., UBC.
HUMANITIES
LOVE AND SEX VICTORIAN STYLE -8 Thursdays,
Oct. 5, 8 p.m., UBC.
VOICES FROM ISRAEL: AN INTRODUCTION TO
CONTEMPORARY HEBREW LITERATURE - 8
Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 8 p.m., Jewish Community Centre, 950
West 41st.
RUSSIAN LITERATURE AND CULTURE: THE
CONTEMPORARY SCENE AND ITS BACKGROUND -
10 Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 8 p.m., UBC.
THE    FEMININE    EXPERIENCE:    NOVELISTS   AND
SENSIBILITIES - 7 Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 8 p.m., UBC.
THE    VOICE    OF    THE    SHAMAN    IN    CANADIAN
POETRY:    VISION   AND   VIGOR   IN   THE   LAST   50
YEARS - 10 Thurs., Oct. 5, 8 p.m., UBC.
SCIENCE AND MATHEMATICS
ON   THE   SHOULDERS   OF   GIANTS:    THE   GREAT
ASTRONOMERS  -  6 Mondays, Oct. 16, 8 p.m., H.R.
MacMillan Planetarium.
BIRDS IN MIGRATION - 7 Saturdays, Sept. 23, 10
a.m., UBC.
ADVANCED STATISTICS - 12 Mondays, Sept. 25, 8
p.m., UBC.
THE CITY
CITY POLITICS - ELECTION '72 - 5 Mondays, Nov.
20, 7:30 p.m..  Room 211,  Buchanan  Bldg., UBC, and
various campaign headquarters.
CITIES  IN THE WILDERNESS - 6 Mondays, October
16, 8 p.m., Vancouver Public Library.
ARCHITECTURE IN THE CITY - 5 Thursdays, Oct. 5,
7:30 p.m., Gastown.
THE CREATIVE ARTS
CLASSICAL    GUITAR     FOR     BEGINNERS    -     10
Tuesdays,   Oct.   3,   Section   1,  8—9  p.m..  Section   11,
9:15-10:15 p.m., UBC.
VOICE CLASS - 10 Tuesdays, Sept. 26, 8 p.m., UBC.
RENAISSANCE VOCAL MUSIC - 10 Tuesdays, Sept.
26, 8 p.m., UBC.
YIN-YANG      APPROACH      TO     DRAWING    AND
PAINTING - 8 Wednesdays, Oct. 11,7 p.m., UBC.
PAINTING:   ADVANCED  -  8  Thursdays,  Oct.  19, 8
p.m., UBC.
DRAWING: A NEW WAY OF SEEING - 10 Tuesdays,
Oct. 3, 8 p.m., UBC.
FIGURE   DRAWING:   ADVANCED  -  10 Wednesdays,
Oct. 4, 8 p.m., UBC.
HISTORY OF WESTERN ART - 27 Mondays, Sept. 11,
7 p.m., UBC.
THE    PHOTOGRAPHER'S    EYE:     INTRODUCTORY
CREATIVE    PHOTOGRAPHY    WORKSHOP    -     10
Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 8 p.m., UBC.
THE     PHOTOGRAPHER'S     EYE:     ADVANCED
CREATIVE    PHOTOGRAPHY    WORKSHOP    -     10
Thursdays, Oct. 5, 8 p.m., UBC.
FILM MAKING 1-10 Mondays, Sept. 25, 8 p.m., UBC.
FILM MAKING   11  - 10 Thursdays, Sept. 28, 8 p.m.,
UBC.
24    FRAMES    PER    SECOND:     PERSONAL     FILM
MAKING - 10 Thursdays, Sept. 28, 7:30 p.m., UBC.
TAPESTRY    AND    CREATIVE    WALL    HANGINGS
WORKSHOP - 10 Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 7 p.m., UBC.
ADULT ACTING:  INTRODUCTORY - 8 Wednesdays,
Oct. 4,7:30 p.m., UBC.
WEEKEND     IN     CREATIVE     REDISCOVERY:     A
PERCEPTION WORKSHOP - Friday, Sept. 22, 8 p.m.,
Saturday, Sept. 23, 10 a.m.—7 p.m., Sunday, Sept. 24, 11
a.m.-3p.m., UBC.
IMPROVISATION  AND  DRAMA GAMES - Saturday,
Sunday, Oct. 7 & 8, 9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., UBC.
AUTHENTIC MOVEMENT:  WHAT DO OUR BODIES
SAY THAT WORDS DO NOT? - Monday - Friday,
Sept. 11-15, 3:30-5:30 p.m., UBC.
EXPLORATIONS    IN    AUTHENTIC    MOVEMENT   -
Mondays & Thursdays, Oct. 2, 1-3 p.m., UBC.
NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS
CHINA    IN    PERSPECTIVE:     CONTINUITY    AND
CHANGE   -   5   Mondays,   Oct.   2,  8   p.m.,   Delbrook
Secondary School, North Vancouver.
THE  INTERNATIONAL SCENE: UBC - 8 Thursdays,
Oct. 5, 8 p.m., UBC.
THE INTERNATIONAL SCENE: NORTH SHORE - 8
Wednesdays, October 4, 8 p.m., Delbrook Secondary
School, North Vancouver.
THE   INTERNATIONAL   SCENE:    RICHMOND   -   8
Mondays, Oct. 2, 8 p.m., Richmond Secondary School.
COMMUNICATIONS AND LANGUAGE PROGRAMS
GENERAL  SEMANTICS AND  THE   LANGUAGE  OF
POLITICS AND ADVERTISING - 8 Thursdays, Oct. 5,
8 p.m., Vancouver Public Library.
POPULAR   ART   AND   CULTURE:   PROBLEMS   OF
COMMUNICATION - 8 Mondays, Oct. 16, 8 p.m., UBC.
POLITICS OF MEDIA - 6 Mondays, Oct. 23, 8 p.m.,
UBC.
CHINESE:   BEGINNING   MANDARIN   -   40 sessions,
Mondays & Thursdays, Oct. 2, 7 p.m., UBC.
COURSES IN WRITING
INTRODUCTORY CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOPS
- Section I — 10 Tuesdays, Oct. 3, 8 p.m., UBC. Section
11-10 Wednesdays, Oct. 4, 8 p.m., UBC.
WORKSHOP     IN     POETRY     WRITING     FOR
PUBLICATION - 10 Mondays, Oct. 2, 8 p.m., UBC.
WRITING IMPROVEMENT COURSES - Several sections
begin the week of Oct. 9, 10 sessions each.
READING AND STUDY SKILLS CENTRE
READING     IMPROVEMENT    COURSES    -    Several
sections begin the week of Oct. 9, 10 sessions each.
EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL PROGRAMS
ARCHAEOLOGY   TOUR   OF   SOUTH   &   CENTRAL
AMERICA - Dec. 15, 1972-January 7, 1973.
INDIA  -  December  15,  1972-January 6,  1973; THE
SILK    ROUTE    TO    SAMARKAND    -    May,    1973;
SCANDINAVIAN STUDY TOUR - May, 1973; JAPAN
- May, 1973; CHINA - Spring or Summer, 1973;
SOUTHEAST ASIA - Summer, 1973; SOUTH PACIFIC
- July and August 1973; UNITED KINGDOM - July and
August, 1973; CLASSICAL GREECE II - May-June,
1973; EAST AFRICA - July, 1973.
PROFESSIONAL AND TECHNICAL
PROGRAMS OPEN TO OTHER
INTERESTED PERSONS
AN INTRODUCTION TO THE PSYCHOLOGY OF THE
AGING   —   5  Tuesdays,   Nov.   7,  4  p.m.,  Shaughnessy
Hospital.
BEGINNING WORK WITH GROUPS - 6 Tuesdays, Oct.
10, 11:30 a.m., Family Service Centres Board Room.
THE     COMMUNITY     SELF-HELP     MOVEMENT     -
Thursday,  Oct.   12, 8-10 p.m., and Friday, Oct.  13, 9
a.m.—5 p.m., UBC.
A COGNITIVE EXPLORATION OF THE HUMANISTIC
GROUP  MOVEMENT  -  5 Tuesdays,  Oct.   17, 8 p.m.,
UBC.
INSTITUTE: GROUP  LEADERSHIP - THEORY AND
TECHNIQUES   -    Wednesday,   Sept.    27,    7:30   p.m
Thursday, Sept. 28, 9 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 29, 9
a.m.-4:30 p.m., UBC.
REFLECTIONS ON BUILDINGS AND THE CITY: THE
REALISM OF THE PARTIAL VISION - Friday Oct.
27,3 p.m., UBC.
FORESTS, FISH AND WATER  (Phase II) - Thursday,
Friday and Saturday, Dec. 7-9, UBC.
THE     ECOLOGY    OF     FORESTRY    (Part    II)    -    7
Thursdays, Oct. 12, 4 p.m., Vancouver Public Library.
CHILDREN   WITH  SPECIAL   NEEDS - 8 Wednesdays,
Oct. 11, 4:30 p.m., UBC.
EARLY RECOGNITION OF LEARNING POTENTIAL:
THE GIFTED CHILD - 8 Thursdays, Oct. 12, 7 p.m.
UBC.
SEMINAR ON GROUP INTERACTION - 10 Thursdays,
Oct. 5, 4:30 p.m., UBC.
LEARNING THROUGH PLAY IN EARLY CHILDHOOD - 7 Wednesdays, Oct. 18, 8 p.m., Handsworth
Secondary School, North Vancouver.
THE     CRIMINAL    JUSTICE    SYSTEM     (Part    II)    -
Wednesdays, Sept. 20-December 6, 7:30 p.m., UBC.
DEVIANCE AND CRIMINAL BEHAVIOUR - Tuesdays,
Sept. 19-December 5, 7:30 p.m., UBC.
CATTLE  BREEDING  FOR MILK AND WEIGHT GAIN
—    6   Tuesdays,    Oct.   10,   8   p.m.,   Lord   Tweedsmuir
Secondary School, Cloverdale.
UBC Reports/Sept. 28, 1972/9 UBC's PRESIDENT, Dr. Walter H. Gage,left, and Mr.
H.B. "Bert" Smith, both members of the graduating
class of 1925, view three paintings purchased recently
by the class for UBC's art collection. President Gage
holds a Cowichan river scene painted by Mr. Jack
Shadbolt, while Mr. Smith holds a graphic by UBC
artist Prof. Gordon Smith. In the background is a
third painting, entitled "Stable Door," by Prof. Sam
Black, of the Faculty of Education. Funds raised by
the class also purchased a new piece of equipment for
UBC's Crane Memorial Library for blind students.
Picture by UBC Photo Department.
Class of '25 Does it Again
UBC's graduating class of 1925 has done it again.
Made another class gift to the University, that is.
The class, which includes UBC's President, Dr.
Walter H. Gage, decided to make another gift to the
University when it held its 45th reunion in 1970.
Mr. H.B. "Bert" Smith, former assistant superintendent of schools in Vancouver and chairman of the
class of 1925 reunion committee, also heeided up a
14-member fund-raising committee.
The funds have been used to purchase a high-speed
tape and cassette duplicator for the Crane Memorial
Library for blind students in Brock Hall and three
paintings by noted B.C. artists for the UBC art
collection.
The high speed duplicator will allow books now
recorded on 1,200-foot tape reels to be duplicated
quickly onto cassettes for use in small, modern
playback machines. The mailing, storing and carrying
of the cassettes is more convenient than tape reels.
The three paintings purchased are by Prof. Sam
Black and Prof. Gordon Smith, both of UBC's
Faculty of Education, and Mr. Jack Shadbolt.
Members of the fund-raising committee, in addition to Mr. Smith, were: Mr. Stan Arkley, Mr. Heilly
ON THE MOVE?
LET US KNOW
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behind!
To guarantee that UBC Reports goes where
you go, please send us the following information: your name, new address and degree
and year.
And please attach an address label from UBC
Reports giving your old address.
If you are now receiving more than one copy
of UBC Reports, please send us all address
labels and we'll correct the situation.
Send the information to: UBC Reports
Mailing Lists, 6251 N.W. Marine Drive,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
■■■fcJfc Vol. 18, No. 12 - Sept. 28,
|l|l|l 1972. Published by the
llllll   University of British Columbia
*** *** ***   and    distributed    free.    UBC
REPORTS
n t r v n    »j    Rep0rts appears on Thursdays
during   the   University's   winter   session.   J.A.
Banham,   Editor.   Louise Hoskin and Maureen
Flanagan,   Production   Supervisors.   Letters  to
the    Editor   should   be   sent   to   Information
Services,    Main    Mall    North     Administration
Building, UBC, Vancouver 8, B.C.
Arkley, Dr. Neal Carter, Mr. Lyle Atkinson, Mrs.
Murray Brink, Mrs. R.L. McLeod, Mr. Harold
Henderson, Mrs. Elsie Pain, Mrs. William Auld, Mrs.
Howard T. Mitchell, Mrs. Walter Bennett, Mr.
Kenneth Caple and Mrs. Phyllis Ross, former
Chancellor of the University.
UBC Erosion
Explained
The UBC Alumni Association has joined with the
Vancouver Parks Board in a campaign to persuade the
provincial government to finance a project to stop
Point Grey cliff erosion.
The Association has thrown its support behind a
Parks Board proposal for construction of a S250.000
sand-gravel protective fill along the most seriously
threatened section of cliffs — about 3,700 feet. The
proposal does not include a road along the beach.
As part of the campaign, the Association is
currently preparing an illustrated brochure documenting the nature and extent of the erosion problem
and explaining the proposed solution. It will be
distributed to representatives of the provincial
government and to other interested parties to develop
support.
In recent years the cliffs have been eroding at a
rate of 0.3 to 1.6 feet a year. Cecil Green Park, the
Alumni Association headquarters, is seriously
threatened with eventual collapse into the sea if the
erosion is not stopped. Also threatened are the
School of Social Work in the old Graham residence,
the UBC President's Residence, and the former
women's residences in the old Fort Camp area.
"We feel it would be irresponsible for government
authorities to continue to neglect solving this ever-
worsening erosion problem when public land and
buildings are threatened," said Harry Franklin,
Alumni executive director. "What we would like to
see is the construction of a protective strip of sand
and gravel that would both stop the cliff erosion and
preserve the beach for recreation."
The Alumni Association supports the protective
fill proposal as the most economical way of solving
the problem. The fill would enable the cliffs to slump
to their natural angle of repose, protect the base of
the cliffs from further wave erosion and preserve the
beach for recreational use.
The Association intends to seek, along with the
Parks Board, a meeting with provincial Minister of
lands Mr. Robert Williams to press for action on this
problem.
Anyone interested in receiving a copy of the
Alumni Point Grey cliff erosion brochure should
contact the UBC Alumni Association, 6251 N.W.
Marine Drive, Vancouver 8, B.C. (228-3313).
REVENUES
EXCEED
$100 MILLION
UBC received and spent more than $106,000,000
during the fiscal year that ended March 31, 1972, an
increase of $15,354,280 or 16.9 per cent over the
previous year.
It was the first year in UBC's history that its revenue
and expenditure exceeded $100,000,000.
The higher income in the 1971-72 fiscal year was
largely the result of a 15.6 per cent increase in the
operating grant UBC received from the provincial
government.
UBC received $53,492,293 for operating purposes in
1971-72, an increase of $7,212,423 over the previous
year. The provincial government, however, recovers a
major share of annual operating grants from Canada's
federal government.
CAPITAL GRANT
UBC also received a $6,000,000 capital grant from
the provincial government in 1971-72, the same sum it
received the previous year. Other campus facilities are
constructed with funds received from foundations,
commerce and industry, students, alumni, faculty,
private individuals and by borrowing.
UBC's total income and expenditure for the 1971-72
fiscal year is set out in the Consolidated Statement of
Fund Transactions on the page opposite.
The difference between UBC's expenditures and
revenues — $94,764 — is accounted for in the difference
between fund balances at April 1, 1971, the beginning of
the fiscal year, and March 31, 1972, the end of the fiscal
year.
Expenditures in 1971 72 for academic purposes,
including faculty salaries and payments to student
assistants for teaching duties and laboratory supervision,
totalled $49,844,898, a 12.8 per cent increase over the
previous year.
Expenditures for research assisted or sponsored by
government or industry were also up by 14.4 per cent
from $10,835,998 in 1970-71 to $12,400,236 in
1971-72.
Student fees continued to decline as a percentage of
total University operating funds. In 1970-71 fees made
up 13.9 per cent of UBC operating revenues, while in
1971-72 they made up only 11.9 per cent.
The table at the bottom of the page opposite shows
income and expenditure for six Ancillary Enterprise
operations.
DEFICITS RECORDED
Two of UBC's ancillary services — the Bookstore and
the Health Service Hospital — had deficits in the last
fiscal year.
Two other ancillary services showed a surplus during
the fiscal year. The surplus from Housing Services —
$25,973 — is reserved for future debt repayment, while
the $5,586 surplus from the University Research Farm
at Oyster River on Vancouver Island is used to support
research in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences.
The debt repayment figures shown under three of the
ancillary services are sums largely paid to Central
Mortgage and Housing Corporation, which lent funds to
UBC for the construction of food facilities and
residences.
10/UBC Reports/Sept. ,28, 1972 UBC's CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF FUND TRANSACTIONS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1972
INCOME
EXPENDITURE
Operating and Capital Grants — Canada
Health Sciences Centre
TRIUMF Project
—  British Columbia
Health Sciences Centre
Student Fees     	
Sale of Services and Rentals	
Endowment Income     	
Sponsored or Assisted Research	
Gifts, Grants and Bequests      	
Miscellaneous	
Total Income
Academic       	
Library       	
Sponsored or Assisted Research      ....
Administration      	
Student Services       	
Plant Maintenance, including Renovations
and Alterations $1,647,399      	
Fellowships, Scholarships and Bursaries
General Expenses	
Land, Buildings and Equipment     ....
Total Expenditure
Ancillary Enterprises (Net)
Excess of Income over Expenditure
for the year ended March 31, 1972
Net Additions to Fund Balances
Reclassification of Funds
Fund Balances at April 1, 1971
Fund Balances at March 31, 1972
as per Statement of Financial Position
Endowment
OPERATING FUNDS
and
Student Loan
Capital
Total
General
Specific
of all
Purposes
Purposes
Total
Funds
Funds
Funds
$
$
$
$
$          1.713
$            1,713
-
-
-
-
1,532,424
1,532,424
-
-
-
-
10,222,486
10,222,486
53,492,293
-
53,492,293
-
6,000,000
59,492,293
-
-
-
-
41,329
41,329
10,038,248
-
10,038,248
-
-
10,038,248
2,058,032
1,191,954
3,249,986
-
-
3,249,986
-
1,239,990
1,239,990
-
-
1,239,990
-
12,847,743
12,847,743
-
-
12,847,743
-
2,531,417
2,531,417
529,634
3,341,832
6,402,883
488,886
130,212
619,098
—
533,169
1,152,267
$66,077,459
$17,941,316
$84,018,775
$     529,634
$21,672,953
$106,221,362
$47,716,337
$ 2,128,561
$49,844,898
.   $
$
$49,844,898
5,010,141
58,250
5,068,391
-
-
5,068,391
(      139,082)
12,539,318
12,400,236
-
-
12,400,236
2,340,444
(             5,100 )
2,335,344
-
30,983
2,366,327
997,627
427,145
1,424,772
—
—
1,424,772
8,690,418
108,741
8,799,159
_
—
8,799,159
931,242
1,713,190
2,644,432
-
-
2,644,432
136,113
148
136,261
1,680
53,311
191,252
-
-
-
—
23,387,925
$23,472,219
23,387,925
$65,683,240
$16,970,253
$82,653,493
$          1,680
$106,127,392
188,734
—
188,734
—
—
188,734
$65,871,974
$16,970,253
$82,842,227
$          1,680
$23,472,219
$106,316,126
$     205,485
$
$
$
-
971,063
527,954
(     1,799,266)
-
(           87,862 )
87,862
-
135,957
7,922,030
18,758,028
11,066,166
$     341,442
$ 8,805,231
.$19,373,844
$ 9,266,900
INCOME
EXPENDITURE
STATEMENT OIF UBC's ANCILLARY ENTERPRISE OPERATIONS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1972
University Total
Campus            Residences          Housing         Health Service Farm all
EJookstore        Food Services    Food Services       Services              Hospital Oyster River Sources
Sales        $1,896,016             $1,087,664             $   252,949             $     58,080         $            - $167,514 $3,462,223
Rentals and Meal Passes                   -                              -                      1,076,342               2,165,298                       - 2,460 3,244,100
Hospital Revenue                -                               -                               -                               -                           166,692 - 166,692
$1,896,016             $1,087,664             $1,329,291              $2,223,378                $166,692 $169,974 $6,873,015"
Cost of Merchandise for Sale        $1,499,934             $   381,086             $   677,633         $                              $            - $ $2,558,653
Salaries and Wages      311,917                  454,436                  459,383                   620,190                   129,433 71,857 2,047,216
Fringe Benefits (including Board Allowance)     .    18,100                      28,458                      27,869                      14,378                        5,717 5,650 100,172
Dietary Service             -                              -                              -                              -                           20,579 - 20,579
Utilities       10,046                       -                           21,388                  203,966                       4,808 6,333 246,541
Other Operating 108,319                     74,488                     57,523                  447,079                     13,874 79,218 780,501
Development of Facilities       -                              -                              -                           25,197                       - 1,330 26,527
Debt Repayment, including Interest      ....      -                         149,196                     85,495                  886,595                _    -      - _1,121,286
$1,948,316             $1,087,664             $1,329,291              $2,197,405                $174,411 $164,388 __S6^01,475
Net Operating Margin for Year                       ($      52,300)       _$ -        $ ^            $      25,973               ($    7,719) $    5,586 ($       28,460)
Obsolete Stock Written Off (see note below) $    134,301          $-                $-                $-                $- $- $   134,301
Reserved for Future Debt Repayment            _        - -                     N,       -                           25,973                =  -                    25,973_
Excess of Income over Expenditure                        	
for the Year Ended March 31, 1972             ($   l86/6m)       $ -_        $            -                $ ^_                 ($    7,719) $    5,586 ($188,834)
NOTE - Bookstore inventory includes textbooks at a cost of approximately $320,000 which are not currently saleable and are not returnable.
The ultimate loss is not known since a portion of these books may be used as required texts in future years.
UBC Reports/Sept. 28, 1972/11 a&^ UBC ALUMNI    ■ ■
Contact
V.-.jjjj.'j *t% "Kg1*,-i;.i'ij«.|  ''' *:*'*£
jt^^pr*^1'^'
.W^;
w***«   **£i^
;< - 4*«ir® **$»>!*?'
■: SIP******
sin***.-/     -s    ■
l^^c£
Students march to Point Grey in the 1922 Great Trek to pressure the government to build the University. On Oct. 19, alumni, students and Great
Trekkers will re-live the Trek with a vintage car parade to UBC.
REUNION DAYS HIGHLIGHT
Great Trek to UBC Re-enacted
A mini re-enactment of the Great Trek of 1922 is
to be staged on Oct. 19 as the highlight of the 50th
anniversary celebrations of that historic student
campaign which was instrumental in having the
University built at Point Grey.
The Great Trek anniversary will be one of the key
features in Reunion Days '72.
A contingent of Great Trekkers, Alumni
Association and Students' Council representatives will
take part in the re-enactment, which will feature a
parade of vintage cars and the engineering students'
award-winning Wally Wagon from outside the gates to
the University.
Some of the original organizers of the Great Trek
will ride in the parade. They include Dr. and Mrs. Ab
Richards, Mr. and Mrs. Aubrey Roberts, Mr. and Mrs.
J.V. Clyne, and Mr. R.L. McLeod. The other special
guests will include Alumni Association President Mrs.
Frederick   Field,   Alumni  executive director  Harry
Franklin and Alma Mater Society President Doug
Aldridge.
After assembling at 12:30 p.m. at 10th and
Sasamat, the parade will proceed up 10th to Blanca
St., follow University Boulevard to the East Mall,
north on the East Mall to Crescent Road, following it
to the West Mall, left at University Boulevard and left
again at the Main Mall to the Cairn.
There, at about 1 p.m., UBC President Walter Gage
and Chancellor Nathan Nemetz will give the party an
informal welcome and Dr. Ab Richards, who was
AMS president in 1922, will seal a time capsule to be
opened on the 100th anniversary of the Trek.
Following a parade around campus, the party will
gather at Cecil Green Park for an informal tea hosted
by the Board of Management of the Alumni
Association.
On the following day, Friday, Oct. 20, there will
be a dinner in the UBC Faculty Club at 7 p.m. for
Great Trekkers, and members of the classes of 1923,
Sports Program For Young Alumni
The Young Alumni Club is offering an expanded
program for the 1972-73 year.
The club is organizing a sports program involving
squash, badminton, curling, hockey and skiing. For
the latter sport, the club offers a pre-ski exercise
program and ski trips.
All this is in addition to the regular Thursday and
Friday evening informal pub sessions at Cecil Green
Park. On Thursdays, sessions run from 8 p.m. to
midnight and on Fridays from 4:30 p.m. to 12:30
a.m.
Young Alumni Club memberships are available to
alumni and students in their graduating year for a $4
fee.
Further information on the club and its programs
12/UBC Reports/Sept. 28, 1972
may be obtained by contacting Mr. Perry Goldsmith,
Alumni program director, at 228—3313.
Alumni Branches
Continue Growth
The UBC Alumni branches program continues to
expand with three meetings planned for the fall.
UBC President Emeritus Dr. Norman MacKenzie
will speak to alumni gatherings in Halifax on Oct. 26
and in Winnipeg on Nov. 1.
On Nov. 4, UBC Chancellor Nathan Nemetz will
be the special guest of a California alumni function in
Los Angeles. And on Nov. 6, UBC Graduate Studies
Dean, Dr. Ian McTaggart Cowan, will speak to
Kootenay area alumni in Selkirk College, Castlegar.
'24, '25, and '26. The 50th anniversary dinner will be
highlighted by the presentation of the Greak Trek
Award for 1972.
A series of other social functions will be held for
other classes as part of Reunion Days '72. A men's
golf tournament will be held at McCleery Golf Club
on Oct. 6 and a week later, on Oct. 13, a women's
golf tournament will be held at the same club.
Saturday, Oct. 21, will be the day when graduates
will renew their ties with UBC. Reunions have been
set on that day for the classes of 1927, '32, '37, '42,
'47 and '52. Separate functions will be held for '47,
'57, and '62 Applied Science, '52 Physical Education,
'57 Architecture, '57 and '62 Pharmacy, '57 Law, '57
Nursing and '62 Forestry.
In the evening, a Reunion Days dinner will be held
in the Faculty Club and a ball will follow in the
Graduate Students Centre.
For further information call the Alumni office:
228-3313.
I.C. "Scotty" Malcolm (left). Alumni Fund Director,
is presented with an award for distinguished achievement   in   developing  alumni   support  by   American
Alumni  Council  President Winston  Forrest (centre)        *"
and AAC Board Chairman Robert Linson.

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