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UBC Publications

UBC Reports Aug 11, 1994

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 %-
THE  UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBCREPORTS
Lounge
Act
Sunbathers
soak up the
rays at UBC's
Empire pool.
The pool was
the site of
aquatic events
at the British
Empire Games,
forerunner of
the
Commonwealth
Games, held in
Vancouver 40
years ago this
summer.
Gavin Wilson photo    t
^i^mHK^^^^™*- •   -■■■   «
Report reveals UBC's
impact on economy
by Abe Hefter
Staff writer
UBC's annual economic impact on British Columbia is estimated at $2.3 billion,
according to a report produced by the
Office of Budget and Planning.
The $2.3 billion represents more than
three per cent of the province's gross
domestic product and is significantly
higher than the $1.4 billion pumped into
the B.C. economy by the forest and logging sector, excluding manufacturing.
The report is the first attempt to quantify the total economic impact of the university on the provincial economy. It includes returns to investment in university education resulting from higher Incomes and levels of employment and
productivity of university graduates, as
well as a detailed analysis of both the
regional economic impact and spillover
effects on innovation, productivity and
job creation.
'The economic impact of UBC is much
greater than the sum of all its spending
and employment." said UBC President
David Strangway.
"UBC is a leader in innovation, productivity and job creation. The resulting
links between UBC researchers and industry have enabled students to receive
up-to-date undergraduate and graduate
training from highly skilled and dedicated faculty and internationally respected visiting scholars."
The most significant economic impacts,
according to the report's author, Walter
Sudmant, manager of Institutional Research and Planning in the Office of
Budget and Planning, are from higher
incomes, higher productivity, higher employment levels, innovation, and knowledge creation brought about by the research and teaching activities ofthe university.
The report indicates that UBC research,
accounts for 6,391 jobs and $826 million,
in annual revenue, with 60 per cent of all
research in B.C. being undertaken by the
university itself. In addition, UBC's presence draws $300 million in out-of-province revenue, creating 4,800 jobs.
The average UBC graduate earns a
minimum of $ 11,500 annually in excess
of probable earnings without their degree," said Sudmant.
"Studies show that the increase in
income of a university graduate is greater
than the total cost of their education. For
every dollar that society invests in university education, $1.72 is returned."
Copies of the report, The Economic
Impact of the University of British Columbia, are available from UBC's Office of
Budget and Planning at 822-6317.
Board approves
standstill budget
by Connie Filletti
Stctff writer
A continuing freeze on salaries of senior administrators and no provision for
faculty and staff wage increases are among
the steps taken to balance UBC's operating budget for 1994/95.
The $341,554,000 budget, approved
by the Board of Governors at its July
meeting, reflects a cut of approximately
one per cent, or $2.2 million, in the
university's base operating grant from
the provincial government.
"Government has explicitly conveyed
to us that they have not provided any
funds for salary and wage increases for
any employee group," said UBC President David Strangway.
"Our employees are stretched to the
limit as a result of prior reductions and
reallocations and reducing the workforce
is not a viable option."
Currently, salaries and benefits account for 84 per cent of UBC's general
operating expenditures. If a salary increase is awarded to any employee group,
a corresponding reallocation would be
necessary, Strangway said.
Salaries for the president, vice-presidents and associate vice-presidents will
be frozen for the fourth consecutive year.
Increases for non-salary items such as
supplies, equipment and professional
development activities for faculty and
staff also remain frozen at 1991/92 levels.
Good news includes the provision of
approximately $4.5 million by the province to support enrolment growth, ofwhich
the university will apply $2.2 million to
offset the cut in the base operating grant.
Forty-live per cent of the remaining
$2.3 million will be allocated to academic
units, 30 per cent to graduate student
assistance and 25 per cent to infrastructure costs.
The province is also providing a number
of grants for designated purposes including $1.2 million for teacher education
and $4.6 million to purchase academic
equipment.
UBC will also receive, on a one-time
basis, funds from the province's Skills
Now initiative. The funds, equal to one
per cent ofthe university's operating grant,
or $2.6 million, are to be used for productivity improvements.
Proposals under consideration are
modular graduate courses in business,
science and technology, help to non-tra
ditional students, including disabled and
First Nations students, environmental
management, a new media centre focusing on technology in the classroom, and
programs designed to improve employees' ability to operate effectively and efficiently.
The 1994/95 budget also provides for
the continued protection against inflation of the library acquisitions budget
which is up by $452,000 or 5.7 per cent.
Tuition income was used to support
rising fixed costs including hikes in utility rates of almost $900,000 and $3.2
million in benefits. Many of the benefit
increases such as those for Workers' Compensation, Canada Pension Plan and Unemployment Insurance are mandated.
Year's revenue
up $40 million
UBC's financial statements for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1994 show
that the total revenue for the university
increased by $40 million over the previous year to a total of $710 million.
More than 50 per cent of the revenue
came from provincial government sources
compared to 11 per cent collected from
student fees.
Additional revenue sources included
other governments, sales and services,
endowment donations, investment income and non-government grants.
Ofthe total revenue, $352 million was
allocated to the general purpose operating fund (GPOF) which supports the general operations of the university including academic and staff salaries, student
services and continuing education.
The major funding sources for the
GPOF were provincial government grants
of $269 million and credit tuition fee
income of approximately $60 million.
Submission Deadline
a reminder that written submissions
on the report by Bay Spaxman on
Principles and Process: Planning for
the University of British Columbia
should be sent to the UBC Community Relations Oft ice, Rm, 207-6328
Memorial Rd., Vancouver, B.C., WT
1Z2, by August 31,1994.
Inside
Hear, Hear
A unique research facility will focus on hearing accessibility issues
Language Allowance 3_
The government will offer exams for Grade 12 Mandarin and Japanese
Fighting Pain 4_
New drugs may counter the onset of diabetes-related nerve damage
Taxing Problems 20
Forum: Prof. Jon Kesselman reviews a GST alternative 2 UBC Reports ■ August 11, 1994
New institute will focus on
hearing accessibility field
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
UBC has approved the creation of an Institute for Hearing
Accessibility Research (IHEAR),
which will be the first of its kind
in North America.
The institute will be a centre
for research and training in the
field of hearing accessibility —
the ability to understand the
spoken word in all situations of
everyday life — which is the
major issue affecting people
who are hard of hearing.
IHEAR was recently approved by the university's Senate and Board of Governors as
an interdisciplinary research
institute in the Faculty of
Graduate Studies.
Little is known about the
hard of hearing and late deafened people, who communicate by speech, although they
make up about seven per cent
of North Americans, said Prof.
Charles Laszlo, acting director
of IHEAR.
Most research to date has
focused on the deaf, people who
have a hearing disability and
use sign language to communicate. They comprise about
one per cent ofthe population.
The consequences of hearing impairment are extremely
complex and poorly understood," said Laszlo, who is also
a professor in the Dept. of Electrical Engineering and a member of the group that spearheaded the institute. "UBC is
in a unique position to establish pre-eminence in this field."
Laszlo said UBC can play a
leadership role because of the
research already under way
here, the support of professionals and industry who want to
participate in research and development, the support from
the hard-of-hearing community, and Vancouver's world
leadership in disability issues.
Aunique feature ofthe institute is the involvement of the
hard-of-hearing community,
which was represented on the
planning committee. It will continue to have a significant role
to play in the operation of the
institute, Laszlo said.
The institute will capitalize
on   the  broad     	
spectrum of re- ^^^^^^^^m
search related
to hearing that
already exists
on campus in
several departments and faculties. It will
make it easier
for researchers
to set up
multidisciplinary
projects, share
equipment, coordinate graduate students
and apply for
grants. 	
Some of the
topics the institute will address
include acoustical conditions, rehabilitation of the hard of hearing elderly, psycho-social issues,
hearing aids and assistive listening devices and hearing ac-
"The consequences
of hearing
impairment are
extremely complex
and poorly
understood. UBC is
in a unique position
to establish preeminence in this
field."
Charles Laszlo
cessibility  in  the  workplace,
schools and health care.
  Immediate
plans call for
seminars
where researchers can
present their
work. The institute will also
build links with
professionals
from the health
care system,
industry, education, and
other fields related to hearing issues.
Long range
  plans for the institute include
funding new interdisciplinary
projects, organization of research
conferences and workshops,
sponsorship of scholarships for
graduate students and support
of stipends for visiting scholars.
Welcome Gift
John Chong photo
Vancouver Quadra MP Ted McWhinney, centre, visited
the Museum of Anthropology July 28 on behalf of Heritage
Canada to present funds for several major projects and
training initiatives. The projects include $13,500 to
support an international conference on wet-site
archeology scheduled for 1995; $16,600 to extend the
itinerary of the travelling exhibition, A Rare Flower: A
Century of Cantonese Opera in Canada; $34,050 to
support a one-year internship in preventive conservation;
and $18,000 towards the museum's student internship
program. McWhinney is joined by program co-ordinator
Jennifer Webb, left, and museum conservator Miriam
Clavir.
by Abe Hefter
Staff writer
UBC is embarking on a long-
term project to provide a Card
Access and Alarm Monitoring
System (CAAMS) for campus
buildings.
The project will see the perimeters of buildings fitted with
CAAMS devices such as card
access controls, door locking/
unlocking systems and monitors.
"CAAMS is a very sophisticated security system which allows for all kinds of control combinations, including pre-programmed door locking and unlocking," said John Smithman,
director of Parking and Security
Services.
"In addition, life will become a
lot easier for those who have to
fumble through a large number
of keys to gain access to different
buildings on campus,"
Smithman said. "One card could
be programmed to allow access
to a number of buildings. Lost
cards can also be deprogrammed, rendering them useless. The same can't be said for
lost keys."
The initial phase of this
project, which includes the installation of CAAMS facilities in
the Museum of Anthropology and
the University Services Building, will be completed by the end
of October. The University Services Building's existing key card
system will be integrated into
the new CAAMS system.
"The final university-wide system may have more than 500
cardreaders, 30,000 cardholders
and 50 to 250 operator work
stations. The work stations
would allow individual departments to set up and change access privileges for card holders
in their areas," said Smithman.
"An operator work station in a
security control centre is currently being installed at the Parking and Security Services building."
Parking and Security has also
added a fourth bicycle to the
campus bike patrol.
Highly visible bike patrollers
cover more ground, more quickly,
than walking patrollers, said
Smithman. In addition, their
speed and ability to go where
cars cannot, shortens their response time to answer alarms
and requests for assistance, he
added.
DISCOVER the
COMPETITION!
Attention
Foreign
Students!
Are You Considering
Canadian Permanent
Residence?
Do You Need Help With
Student/Work
Extensions?
Van Reekum Veress
Immigration Consulting
Ltd.
1-800-565-5236
For All Immigration
Concerns
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
• research design • data analysis
• sampling • forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508
Home: (604) 263-5394
FACULTY EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
(Part-Time Secondment)
PROGRAM CONSULTANT, FACULTY DEVELOPMENT
The Centre for Faculty Development and Instructional Services is
searching for an experienced faculty member with acknowledged
superior teaching skills to join our team and to assist in developing new
programs and overseeing current offerings. The part-time secondment
is for the 1994/5 academic year, and the ideal individual will possess the
abilities to work with peers in enhancing their teaching skills through
individual and departmental consultation, through the development of
educational seminars and workshops, through the writing of brief
articles on teaching, and in other ways which fit that person's special
expertise.
This ideal candidate will possess strong interpersonal skills, and the
ability to form relationships with individual faculty members, with
graduate students, and with committees. S/he will possess superior
oral and written communication skills, and have taken courses or read
extensively in the field of teaching in higher education. For the
successful candidate, a departmental secondment will be arranged,
with no costs accruing to that department.
The position is for 1 1/2 days to 2 1/2 days per week (depending upon
availability) and runs from September 1, 1994 until March 31,1995.
Please send a letter of application and a curriculum vitae to: Gail
Riddell, Director, UBC Centrefor Faculty Development and Instructional
Services, Basement of David Lam Management Research Centre,
6326 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T1Z2 by August 31,1994.
Card access, alarm system
will improve campus security
UBC REPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December, June, July and August) for the entire
university community by the UBC Community
Relations Office, 207-6328 Memorial Rd., Vancouver
B.CV6T1Z2.
Managing Editor: Steve Crombie
Editor: Paula Martin
Production: Stephen Forgacs
Contributors: Connie Filletti, Abe Hefter, Charles Ker,
Gavin Wilson
Editorial and advertising enquiries: (604) 822-3131
(phone), (604) 822-2684 (fax).
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in
UBC Reports do not necessarily reflect official
university policy.
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. UBC Reports ■ August 11, 1994 3
Summertime Blues
Gavin Wilson photD
Jon Anderson of the band Paisley Suitcase sings for lunchtime crowds at
SUB Plaza. The performance was part of a concert series sponsored by the
Alma Mater Society.
Renovations under way to
improve teaching space
by Abe Hefter
Staff writer
More than $1.36 million has been set
aside for a major renovation of Hebb
Theatre, one of the university's major
lecture halls, as part of UBC's ongoing
program to improve and upgrade classroom space.
Renovations to the 450-seat lecture
theatre will include improved acoustics, lighting, and wheelchair accessibility, a new public address system,
new carpeting and podium, and a complete paint job.
The renovations, currendy underway
as part of improvement plans for 1994/
95, will be completed in September.
Since 1992, improvements totalling
almost $3 million have been made to
audiovisual and media equipment and
classroom furnishings, including lighting, heating and air circulation systems,
floor and wall coverings.
For 1994/95, a further $400,000 has
been allocated from the academic equip
ment fund to classroom maintenance
needs, to go along with the Hebb Theatre
renovations and the cyclical major main
tenance annually undertaken by Plant
Operations.
Full text of the Teaching Space
Report is on Page 9
Under the direction of the President's Advisory Committee on Teaching Space, a classroom master plan will
be developed as a means of ensuring
that the university maintains and enhances classroom space in a systematic fashion.
Offbeat
by staff writers
Grace Wong's strawberry cheesecake is to die for.
That's the opinion of the noted epicureans in the Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration who recently got together for the 1994
Summer Bakemeister Contest.
The Edgar Kaiser Forum in the David Lam Management Research Centre
was wall-to-wall in custard and cream for the occasion, as faculty, staff and
graduate students whipped up 13 creations, including Colleen (The
Spicemeister) Colclough's Apple Spice Cake, Sandy (Peel Me Another One)
Tanaka's Banana Split Pie, Maureen (Book 'em Dano) Gilchrist's Hawaiian
Delight, and Izak (Turkish Delight) Benbasat's Turkish Chocolate Cake.
When all was said and done (and tasted), Assistant Dean Grace Wong
received top honours for her strawberry cheesecake. Second place went to
graduate student Moren Levesque for her Gateau Mousse Cafe Creme et
Chocolat, described as mouth watering. Third place went to marketing secretary Rosalea Dennie for her yummy Raspberry Berry Bountiful.
Faculty and staff also gathered to bid an adieu of sorts to Prof. Don Wehrung,
who is stepping down as associate dean following a five-year term to devote his
time to teaching and research. Wehrung was feted with the appropriately
embarrassing 'Don Wehrung, This is Your Life' slide show, which was narrated by noted housing expert and part-time comic Stan (Shecky) Hamilton.
Exams reflect Asian
cultural influence
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
UBC welcomes changes to the language curriculum of public schools recently announced by Premier Michael
Harcourt, said Daniel Birch, vice-president, Academic and Provost.
Among other changes, B.C. schools
will offer province-wide curriculum and
exams for Mandarin 12 and Japanese 12
by June 1995.
"Given the tremendous importance of
Asian cultures and languages to British
Columbia, it is a welcome development
that we allow more students in all school
districts the opportunity to study these
languages," Birch said.
Birch said he is also pleased that the
education ministry will work with teachers to develop a province-wide curriculum for the courses, which are now developed locally.
The changes announced by Harcourt
also mean that once exams are in place
UBC will be able to include Mandarin 12
and Japanese 12 in grade point average
calculations for admission.
Under a new UBC admissions policy
that goes into effect in the 1995-96 academic year, grade point averages for admission will be calculated solely on
courses that have provincial exams.
Until Harcourt's announcement, only
European languages had such exams.
Asian languages will continue to fulfil
UBC's language requirements and are
accepted as appropriate credit for high
school graduation and university entrance. Birch noted.
The Harcourt announcement followed
calls from UBC, language teachers, parents, business groups and others for
more choice in language instruction in
B.C.
"It is good to see the provincial government responding to these expressions of
concern," Birch said.
Harcourt also announced the development of a Punjabi curriculum and exam
for the 1996-97 school year, mandatory
second language Instruction in grades 5
to 8, and extension of provincial exams to
all languages for which there is a provincial curriculum — likely Cantonese and
Vietnamese — In the near future.
Six UBC faculty elected to
Royal Society of Canada
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
Six UBC faculty members are among
63 academics recently elected as fellows
of the Royal Society of Canada.
The society was founded in 1882 to
promote and develop learning and research. The newly elected fellows are
outstanding representatives of fields
such as film-making, business management, astronomy, literary criticism
and history.
UBC's new fellows were chosen for
their work in the fields of applied science
and engineering, earth, ocean and atmospheric sciences, life sciences and
mathematical and physical sciences.
Their election was announced June 8;
they will be formally inducted Oct. 14 at
a ceremony at Rideau Hall, the residence
of Gov. Gen. Ray Hnatyshyn.
The new fellows from UBC are:
Prof. Gordon Baskerville. head. Forest Research Management Dept., whose
research has added substantially to the
understanding of the dynamics of development in forests and stands of trees.
Prof. Martha Salcudean, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and associate vice-
president. Research, who is an outstanding authority on numerical simulation of
heat and mass transport in industrial
processes.
Prof. Ronald Clowes. Dept. of Geophysics and Astronomy and director of
the Lithoprobe program, who has pioneered the use of sophisticated seismic
methods to reveal the complex underground structure of the earth's crust.
Prof. Connie Eaves. Dept. of Medical
Genetics, a distinguished biological scientist who has contributed maj or insights
into how blood cells are formed and how
cell growth is regulated.
Prof. Robert Hancock, Dept. of Microbiology and Immunology and scientific
director of the Canadian Bacterial Diseases Network, who is internationally
known for his research on the outer membranes of a medically important pathogenic bacterium.
Prof. Nassif Ghoussoub. Dept. of Mathematics, who is recognized as a world
leader in the geometry of Banach spaces
and in non-linear analysis.
In The Works
John Chong photo
UBC President David Strangway, right, presented C.K. Choi with the
architectural drawings of the C.K. Choi Building for the Institute of Asian
Research. The presentation was made at a July 28 ground-breaking and
tree-planting ceremony on the building site on West Mall. The projected
completion date for the building is November, 1995. 4 UBC Reports ■ August 11, 1994
Calendar
August 14 through September 10
Monday, Aug. 15
Biochemistry/Molecular
Biology Seminar
Molecular Mechanisms Of a-Feto-
Protein Gene Regulation. Dr. Jen-
Fu Chiu. Copp Bldg. 2002/2004
at 3:45pm. Refreshments at
3:30pm. Call 822-3027.
Thesis Writing Seminar
Aug. 15-26. Two-week seminar
designed to assist engineering
graduate students with guidelines regarding the preparation
of Master's theses, doctoral dissertations, and papers intended
for publication, etc. Speaker:
Donna Shultz. Civil/Mechanical
1304, from 9am-1 lam. $100. Call
822-3347.
Tuesday, Aug. 23
Health, Safety,
Environment Course
Two-day Laboratory Chemical
Safety Course. Covers safe chemical handling, storage and disposal; lab inspections; emergency
response. Includes half-day practical. Cost is $200 for non-UBC
participants. Chemistry B250
from8:30am- 12:30pm. Call822-
5909.
Thursday, Sept. 8
Faculty/Staff Orientation
Campus Orientation For UBC
Employees. Speakers: President
David Strangway and others. Cecil
Green House, Yorkeen Rm. No
charge, refreshments provided.
8:45am-12pm. Call 822-9644.
Public Lecture
Fostering  Sustainability.   Dr.
Herman E. Daly, School of Public
Affairs, U. of Maryland. IRC #2 at
8pm. Call 822-9150.
Coffee House
Women's Coffee House. Representatives of UBC's support network for women in attendance.
Free child care, entertainment, free
coffee and muffins, pub open for
lunch. Students, faculty, staff welcome. Graduate Student Centre,
Koerner's Pub from  11 am-2pm.
Call 822-3203.
Asian Centre Lunch
Welcome Back Lunch. All persons
interested in South Asia welcome.
Report on Asian Centre's summer
activities and the new term's programs. Light lunch served. Asian
Centre 604 from 12:30-2pm. Call
822-2629.
Physics Colloquium
Random Fields And Spectroscopy,
A. Marshall Stoneham, AEATech-
nology, U.K. Hennings, 201.
4:00pm. Call 822-3853.
Thursday, Sept. 15
Plant Sale
Student Indoor Plant Sale. Three
days, Sept. 15-17, Botanical Garden, Reception Centre from 12-
5pm.. Call 822-9666.
Tuesday. Sept. 6
Lectures in Modern
Chemistry
New Reagents For Organic Synthesis: Preparation And Applications. Prof. Ed Piers, Dept. of
Chemistry, UBC. Chemistry
250{South Wing), 1:00pm. Call
822-3266.
P.Eng Exam Tutorials
Professional Engineering Examination Preparation Tutorials. An evening tutorial series
to assist applicants to prepare
for APEGBC Professional Engineering examination. Civil/
Mechanical 2205 from 6:30pm-
9:30pm. Sept. 6, 13, 20, 27,
Oct. 4. Call 822-3347.
Notices
Student Housing
A new service offered by the AMS
has been established to provide a
housing listing service for both
students and landlords. This new
service utilizes a computer voice
messaging system. Students call
822-9844, landlords call 822-
8725.
Campus Tours
School and College Liaison tours
provide prospective UBC students
with an overview of campus activities/faculties/services. Fridays at
9:30am. Reservations required
one week in advance. Call 822-
4319.
Disability Resource Centre
The centre provides consultation
and information for faculty members with students with disabilities. Guidebooks/services forstu-
dents and faculty available. Call
822- 5844.
Women Students' Office
Advocacy/personal counselling
services available. Call 822-2415.
Sexual Harassment Office
Advisors are available to discuss
questions or concerns and are
prepared to help any member of
the UBC community who is being sexually harassed find a satisfactory resolution. Call 822-
6353.
Basal Cell Carcinoma Study
Superficial Tumours. 18 yrs./
older. 6 visits over 16 weeks.
Honorarium upon completion. Call
875-5296.
Clinical Trial Dermatology
Actinic Keratoses Study. Raised
Legions with a flaky appearance
caused by sun damage. Must be
18 yrs./older. Possibility of 6 visits over 8-month period. Call 875-
5296.
Psychology Study
Music/Mood Study. Comprising
2 one-hour sessions, booked 2 days
apart. Participants will be paid
$20 upon completion of both sessions. Kenny Bldg. Rm. 1708.
Call 822- 2022.
Audiology/Speech Sciences
Study
Volunteers needed with normal
hearing, who are native-English
speakers; 18-35 years old, with
no previous instruction in linguistics to participate in a study
of speech perception in noise.
Honorarium paid. Call Anita at
822-5054.
Statistical Consulting/
Research Laboratory
SCARL is operated by the Dept. of
Statistics to provide statistical
advice to faculty/graduate students working on research problems.  Call 822-4037.
Surplus Equipment
Recycling Facility (SERF)
Disposal of all surplus items. Every
Wednesday, 12-5pm. Task Force
Bldg., 2352 Health Sciences Mall.
Call Vince at 822-2582/Rich at
822-2813.
Nitobe Garden
Open daily from 10am-6pm. Call
822-6038.
Botanical Garden
Open daily from 10am-6pm. Shop
In The Garden, call 822-4529;
garden information, 822-9666.
UBC TRAINING/DEVELOPMENT
MOST (Managerial/Other Skills Training Program) is
offering a series of courses to UBC employees in August.
For locations and fee information call 822-9644.
Aug. 16       Conflict Resolution I: An Introduction To
Win/Win
Aug. 17      Writing Reports And Proposals
Aug. 18       Stress Management
Aug. 30       Strategic Planning
Aug. 31       People With Disabilities In The Workplace
-*]UBC REPORTS
Calendar items must be submitted on forms available from the UBC Community Relations Office, 207-
6328 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C. V6T1Z2, Phone:
822-3131. Fax: 822-2684. Please limit to 35 words.
Submissions forthe Calendar's Notices section may: be
limited due to space. Deadline forthe September & Issue
of UBC Reports — which covers the period Sejrterflber
11 to September 24 — is noon, August 30.
Drugs fight diabetes-related nerve damage
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
UBC is one of several international sites involved in clinical
trials testing drugs that may help
treat one of the many complications associated with diabetes.
Alcar and FK 366 are
investigational drugs, not yet
generally available, which are
being investigated to determine
their effectiveness in treating the
deterioration of nerves caused
by diabetes or diabetic
neuropathy. About four per
cent of the population is afflicted with diabetes.
Often initially a painful condition affecting the legs and
sometimes the upper extremities, diabetic neuropathy occurs
mainly after the age of 30, and
later involves nerves controlling
body mechanisms such as sexual
function in men, stomach emptying and blood pressure maintenance, said Dr. Donald
Studney, an associate professor
of Medicine and co-ordinator of
the UBC trials.
Early symptoms of
neuropathy are sharp shoot
ing pains, tingling or burning
sensations in the feet, especially in the late evening, he
added.
Subtle signs of the disease,
which may include stomach
bloating, unusual sweating,
chronic diarrhea and constipation, impotence and dizziness,
begin appearing in 90 per cent of
diabetics approximately 10 years
after they first develop the illness, he added.
The investigational drugs act
by entering the nerve and intervening in the deterioration process taking place in the nerve,
Studney explained.
This is done by inhibiting the
excessive production of certain
metabolic byproducts which are
thought to be toxic to the nerves
ofdiabetics,"hesaid. "Both Alcar
and FK 366 have shown positive
results in preliminary studies
and our multi-centre studies
seek confirmation of the early
work."
Studney, who will examine
40 diabetic volunteers aged 18
to 70 during the two-year study,
believes that patients exhibiting
early signs of neuropathy have
the potential to benefit most from
the trials.
"It is a positive sign if patients
are experiencing pain from diabetic neuropathy because it is a
signal that the nerves are still
functioning," Studney said.
"Numbness means that the patient has reached an advanced
stage of neuropathy."
This is the fourth clinical trial
that Studney has participated in
since beginning his research in
neuropathy a decade ago.
Previous studies involving
Sorbinol, another investigational
drug, indicate that although it is
effective in treating diabetic
neuropathy, its side effects make
it intolerable.
Studney advises diabetics to
control their illness through exercise, diet and medications and
to seek comprehensive care for
and annual assessment of their
condition from their physician.
He cautioned, however, that
controlling diabetes will not necessarily control the pain which
accompanies neuropathy.
"Generally, the better the control the fewer the complications
and the poorer the control the
Dr. Donald Studney
more numerous and more severe the complications," Studney
said. "Neuropathy symptoms,
however, often occur in well-controlled diabetics and this capri-
ciousness is frustrating to patients
and their doctors."
Studney is encouraged by the
spirit of voluntarism he has encountered during
the past 10 years
from diabetics
who have participated in previous
neuropathy research programs.
"It has been
very satisfying to
know that volunteers from across
the province have
wanted to contribute to the knowledge base we have
and give us one
more little tool to
work with in our
search for the
cause of this debilitating condition."
Anyone wishing more information about participating in
the current trial may call 822-
7509.
Abe Hefter photo Supplement to UBC Reports
UBC Reports • August 11, 1994 5
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Executive Compensation - Draft Policy
RESPONSIBLE: President
PURPOSE:
• to articulate principles for establishing compensation packages for the
President and Vice Presidents of UBC;
• to provide for full disclosure of compensation for the executive officers of
UBC.
POLICY:
The guiding principles of the compensation program for executive officers of UBC
are:
Rationality: UBC establishes compensation levels which balance fair value for
work with UBC's financial situation.
Equity; Compensation relates internally
to the worth of ajob as measured by skill,
effort, responsibility, working conditions,
and externally to market comparisons of
similar jobs in similar institutions with
which we potentially compete for staff.
Ability to attract and retain qualified
applicants: UBC's compensation practices are competitive within the range
and type of organizations from which it
recruits.
Relation to performance: Where compensation is used as a means of acknowledging performance, performance measurement is based on clear, documented
individual and organizational targets.
Compliance with  legal obligations:
Compensation practices comply with
statutory obligations ofthe Employment
Standards Act, the Human Rights Act
and any other employment-related legislation.
Termination arrangements: In cases
of termination from the University for
cause, no notice or pay in lieu of notice is
paid. When an executive officer is required to step down for any reason other
than cause from that position, but exer
cises the option to return to a position as
a faculty member, librarian, or program
director, no notice or pay In lieu of notice
is paid. Terminations from the University
for reasons other than cause are compensated in accordance with current legal
values for executive termination.
Conflict of interest: Consistent with
the Policy on Conflict of Interest, decisions on compensation are made in a
manner to ensure that a conflict of interest will not occur.
Full disclosure: UBC makes regular
and full public disclosure ofthe compensation of each executive offiicer.
PROCEDURE SUMMARY:
The compensation package for vice presidents of the University, based on the
guidelines above, is recommended by the
President to the Board of Governor's
Management Resources and Compensation Committee for approval. The President's compensation package is dealt
with direcUy by the Management Resources and Compensation Standing
Committee.
Once approved, the compensation packages for each executive officer are published in the UBC reports for public information. The format for these reports is
Appendix A of this policy.
DETAILED PROCEDURES:
To determine the appropriate compensation level, the jobs of executive officers of
UBC are first evaluated by using a system
which measures factors such as skill,
effort, responsibility and working conditions, and then, based on the composite
job worth, compares with jobs in B. C.
organizations, and, where appropriate,
with similar positions at other North
American universities.
By using a standard format (see Appendix A), all elements of compensation are
costed into the total, unless noted as
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
August 11, 1994
Dear Colleagues:
We are developing policies on executive and management compensation.
These policies are to articulate the principles for establishing
compensation packages for senior administrators at UBC, and
provide for full disclosure in the cases of the President, Vice Presidents, Deans, Associate Vice Presidents, Registrar, Librarian and
Vice Provost.
Please review them and send in your comments to Vice Provost
Libby Nason.
Yours sincerely,
■<L.
C»-ji
David W. Strangway
President
r c
merely nominal In value.
The current legal value for notice upon
termination without cause for executive officers (non-inclusive of vacation
owed), applies to a maximum of twenty-
four months. Factors considered as
part of the guideline include age, employability and long service elsewhere.
In addition, up to one year of outplacement counselling service is paid
for by UBC. Arrangements for orderly
transition of benefit coverage may be
approved on an individual case basis
by the President. Where there is an
Board-approved contract, addressing
termination arrangements, with an
executive officer those contract conditions will apply.
Business expenses are governed by the
policies on Travel (#83) and Entertainment (#84). See also Policy #97, Conflict
of Interest.
DEFINITIONS:
Compensation means salary, other
forms of cash payments (including stipends and allowances), vacation, leaves
with pay, employer-paid benefits, loans,
use of car, car allowances, housing,
club memberships, tuition waivers, professional fees, and any other benefit
received by an executive officer from
UBC.
Executive Officer means President and
Vice President.
MANAGEMENT COMPENSATION
Dean, Associate Vice President, Librarian, Registrar and Vice Provost
Draft Policy
RESPONSIBLE; President
PURPOSE:
To articulate principles for establishing
compensation packages for management
officers of UBC.
POLICY:
The guiding principles of the compensation program for management officers of
UBC are:
Rationality:   UBC establishes compensation levels which balance fair
value for work with UBC's financial
situation.
Equity: Compensation relates internally to the worth of a job as measured
by skill, effort, responsibility, working
conditions, and externally to market
comparisons of similar jobs in similar
institutions with which we potentially
compete for staff.
Ability to attract and retain qualified applicants : UBC's compensation
practices are competitive within the
range and type of organizations from
which it recruits.
Relation to performance:   Where
compensation is used as a means of
acknowledging performance, performance measurement is based on clear.
documented individual and organizational targets.
Compliance with legal obligations:
Compensation practices comply with
statutory obligations of the Employment Standards Act, the Human Rights
Act and any other employment-related
legislation.
Termination arrangements: In cases
of termination from the University for
cause, no notice or pay in lieu of notice
is paid. When a management officer is
required to step down for any reason
from that position but has the option to
return to a position as a faculty member/librarian/program director, no
notice or pay in lieu of notice is paid.
Terminations from the University for
reasons other than cause are compensated in accordance with current legal
values for similar level management
terminations.
Conflict of interest:   Consistent with
the Policy on Conflict of Interest,
decisions on compensation are made in
a manner to ensure that a conflict of
interest will not occur.
Public Disclosure: UBC makes
regular and public disclosure of the
compensation of each management
officer.
PROCEDURE SUMMARY:
The compensation package for all management officers ofthe University, based
on the guidelines above, is recommended
by the President to the Board of Governors' Employee Relations Committee for
approval.
Once approved, the compensation packages for each management officer are
published in the UBC Reports for public
information. The format for these reports
is Appendix A of this policy.
DETAILED PROCEDURES:
To determine the appropriate compensation level, the jobs of senior managers of
UBC are first evaluated by using a system
which measures factors such as skill,
effort, responsibility and working conditions, and then, based on the composite
job worth, compares with jobs in similar
B. C. organizations, and, where appropriate, with similar positions at other North
American universities.
By using a standard format (see Appendix A), all elements of compensation are
costed into the total, unless noted as
merely nominal in value.
For management officers with administrative appointments, the guideline current legal value for notice upon termination without cause (non-inclusive of va
cation owed), is four weeks of notice for
each year of service to a maximum of
twenty-four months. The entitlements
are paid by means of salary continuance
with provision for a 50/50 split of unpaid
entitiement should the search for alternative employment be successful. In
order to assist management officers in
the search for alternative employment,
appropriate out-placement counselling
is provided. Arrangements for orderly
transition of benefit coverage may be
approved on an individual case basis by
the President.
Business expenses are governed by the
policies on Travel (#83) and Entertainment (#84). See also Policy #97, Conflict
of Interest.
DEFDVITIOIVS;
Compensation means salary, other
forms of cash payments (including
stipends and allowances), vacation,
leaves with pay, employer-paid benefits, loans, use of car, car allowances,
housing,  club memberships, tuition
waivers, professional fees, and any
other benefit received by an management officer from UBC.
Management Officer   in this policy
means Dean, Librarian, Health Science
Coordinator, Associate Vice President,
Registrar and Vice Provost. 6 UBC Reports • August 11, 1994
Supplement to UBC Reports
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
MANAGEMENT COMPENSATION - Service Unit Directors Excluded from AAPS
RESPONSIBLE: President
PURPOSE:
To articulate principles for establishing
compensation packages for management
officers of UBC.
POLICY:
The guiding principles of the compensation program for management officers of
UBC are:
Rationality:   UBC establishes compensation levels which balance fair
value for work with UBC's financial
situation.
Equity; Compensation relates internally to the worth of a job as measured
by skill, effort, responsibility, working
conditions, and externally to market
comparisons of similar jobs in similar
institutions with which we potentially
compete for staff.
Ability to attract and retain qualified applicants : UBC's compensation
practices are competitive within the
range and type of organizations from
which it recruits.
Relation to performance:   Where
compensation is used as a means of
acknowledging performance, performance measurement is based on clear,
documented individual and organizational targets.
Compliance with legal obligations:
Compensation practices comply with
statutory obligations of the Employment Standards Act, the Human Rights
Act and any other employment-related
legislation.
Termination arrangements: In cases
of termination from the University for
cause, no notice or pay in lieu of notice
is paid.  When a management officer is
required to step down for any reason
from that position but has the option to
return to a position as a faculty member/librarian/program director, no
notice or pay in lieu of notice is paid.
Terminations from the University for
any reason other than cause are
compensated in accordance with
current legal values for similar level
management terminations.
Conflict of interest:   Consistent with
the Policy on Conflict of Interest,
decisions on compensation are made in
a manner to ensure that a conflict of
Draft Policy
interest will not occur.
PROCEDURE SUMMARY:
The Vice Presidents have the authority to
conclude appointments for management
officers covered by this policy, including
compensation packages.
DETAILED PROCEDURES:
To determine the appropriate compensation level, the jobs of senior managers of
UBC are first evaluated by using a system
which measures factors such as skill,
effort, responsibility and working conditions, and then, based on the composite
job worth, compares with jobs in similar
B.C. organizations, and, where appropriate, with similar positions at other North
American universities.
By using a standard format (see Appendix A), all elements of compensation are
costed into the total, unless noted as
merely nominal in value.
The guideline current legal value for notice upon termination without cause for
management officers (non-inclusive of
vacation owed), is four weeks of notice for
each year of service to a maximum of
twenty-four months. The entitlements
are paid by means of salary continuance
with provision for a 50/50 split of unpaid
entitlement should the search for alternative employment be successful. In
order to assist management officers in
the search for alternative employment,
appropriate out-placement counselling
is provided. Arrangements for orderly
transition of benefit coverage may be
approved on an individual case basis by
the President.
Business expenses are governed by the
policies on Travel (#83) and Entertainment (#84). See also Policy #97, Conflict
of Interest.
DEFINITIONS:
Compensation means salary, other
forms of cash payments (including stipends and allowances), vacation, leaves
with pay, employer-paid benefits, loans,
use of car, car allowances, housing,
club memberships, tuition waivers, professional fees, and any other benefit
received by an executive officer from
UBC.
Management Officer in this policy means
Service Unit Directors excluded from the
AAPS bargaining unit because of their
management responsibility.
POLICY ON RELIGIOUS HOLIDAYS
RESPONSIBLE VICE PRESIDENT:
Vice President Student & Academic
Services
PURPOSE:
To enable students and members of faculty and staff to observe the holy days of
their religions.
POLTCY;
In constructing the academic calendar, UBC takes into account legal statutory holidays, days "in lieu" where appropriate, and days which it has agreed
through collective bargaining to grant
statutory holidays to members of faculty and staff, in determining days on
which the University is closed or classes
cancelled.
Recognizing the religious diversity of the
UBC community, UBC permits students
who are scheduled to attend classes or
write examinations on holy days of their
religions to notify their instructors in
advance of the holy day of their wish to
observe it by absenting themselves from
class or examination. Instructors provide opportunity for such students to
make up work or examinations missed
without penalty.
UBC permits members of faculty and
staff who are scheduled to work on holy
days of their religions to notify their administrative heads of unit in advance of
the holy days of their religion of their wish
to observe it by absenting themselves
from work. Administrative heads of unit
make efforts to accommodate such requests.
PROCEDURE SUMMARY:
Students are required to give two weeks'
notice of their intention to absent themselves under the terms of this policy.
They shall notify the instructor of each
course or, where this cannot be done, the
Head or Director of the unit concerned.
Administrative heads of unit, in trying to accommodate a request take into
consideration financial costs, disruption of any collective agreement, work
interruption, employee morale and,
where safety is an issue, the magnitude of the risk and the identity of
those who bear it.   For administrative
staff, normally such requests are met
by granting a day off without pay, or a
vacation day, or the opportunity to
make up the time.
Because the difficulties in re-scheduling work vary by unit, each unit will
establish a reasonable requirement for
advance notice by members of faculty
and staff.
DETAILED PROCEDURES:
The Registrar's Office will distribute a
multi-faith calendar to each administrative head of unit annually.
DEFINITIONS:
None
"~1
net  UiNxVliKDlI  I    \Jr    UKlilMl   vULUMDlA /
Policy and Procedure Handbook addition
This policy was approved at the July 21 meeting ofthe Board
ofGovernors and can he clipped and saved on page 77 ofthe
newsprint edition ofthe 1994 Policy Handbook.
Reappointment of Retired or Retiring Members of Faculty
Policy #27 - Revision
RESPONSIBLE VICE PRESIDENT:
Vice President Academic & Provost
Vice President Student & Academic
Services
PURPOSE:
To delineate circumstances under
which a faculty member/librarian may
be appointed after the age of 65, while
maintaining the policy of mandatory retirement at age 65.
POLICY:
It is recognized that many retired
faculty members/librarians make important voluntary contributions to their
disciplines, their departments and to
UBC. These activities are done without
a UBC appointment.
I	
Under certain circumstances, members of the academic staff beyond retirement may be appointed to one-year term
positions.
PROCEDURE SUMMARY:
Consideration of reappointments of
retired faculty members/librarians may
be given on the basis of the following
principles:
• that there be no requirement to
grant any appointment beyond age
65;
• that there be a specific benefit
derived by the unit concerned;
• that such appointments not be In
place of renewing the department
through the appointment of junior
faculty members;
that such appointments be made
primarily for teaching/collection
development duties, and occasionally for service on committees;
that remuneration be commensu
rate with the services performed
(eg. depending on the circumstances, teaching could be on a pro
bono basis, or involve a salary
ranging from very modest to the
scale amount for lecturers);
that no such appointment be for an
academic administrator position;
that the title used in these appointments reflect the current status of
the individual (eg. Professor Emeritus, Associate Professor - Retired);
that no payment be made for
occasional honorific or voluntary
duties (eg. chairing doctoral oral
examinations, supervising
graduate students).
DETAILED PROCEDURES:
All such appointments are recommended by the Head of Unit to the
Dean/Librarian, to the Vice President
for approval. Agreement in principle
should be sought by the Head before
any assurances are given to possible
appointees.
DEFINITIONS:
None
.J Supplement to UBC Reports
UBC Reports • August 11, 1994 7
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CASH HANDLING
Policy #119 - (revised) - Approved February 1989
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
August 11, 1994
Dear Colleagues:
This is to advise you of procedural changes to established university policies which are being recommended for my approval.
The new draft language appears in italics for your review.
In considering the proposed changes, I would like to consider
feedback from the campus community, and therefore invite you to
send any suggestions for improvement to Vice Provost Libby
Nason by September 10, 1994.
Yours sincerely.
Ot i/.
David W. Strangway
President
cri
PURPOSE
The purpose of this policy is to establish
responsibility and describe the minimum
requirements for cash handling.
RESPONSIBILITY
It is the responsibility ofthe Department
of Financial Services to ensure that the
policy requirements for cash handling
are clearly documented and current.
It is the responsibility of faculty and staff
who handle University funds to implement adequate procedures to ensure adherence to the policy requirements.
REQUIREMENTS
• University funds must be deposited
into a University account administered
by the Department of Financial Services.
• The full amount of cash received should
be deposited directly into the appropriate
bank account using a CashReceiptDirect
Bank Deposit form (see schedule A for
Specific instructions including donations
deposits and deposits for Contract and
Grant accounts). Cash receipts shall not
be used for personal loans, cashing of
cheques, making purchases, or for salaries, wages or honoraria.
• All cheques must be restrictively endorsed, i.e. "For Deposit Only to The
University of British Columbia", immediately upon receipt The 10 digit FRS
account number to be credited shall also
be entered on the reverse side of the
cheque. Cash and cheques must be
safeguarded at all times in a locked safe
or other secure location. Cash must not
be sent by mail.
'"Section A: Use of Cash Registers
***No change***
Section B:  Collection of Cash From
Coin-Operated Machines
***As is, until...***
REQUIREMENTS
• All departments that collect cash from
coin-operated machines must maintain
a control log of machine usage by recording the reading ofthe machine meter, e.g.
photocopy meter, at regular intervals (e.g.
weekly).
• The control logs of meter readings
must be reconciled to the cash deposit for
each machine. The reconciliation should
be performed by someone who does not
handle cash.
• A copy of the reconciliation should be
attached to the copy ofthe Cash Receipt
Direct Bank Deposit form sent to Financial Services - Cashiers. (See schedule A
for specific deposit instructions.)
Section C:  Sale of Course Material and
Tickets
***As is, until...***
• A copy of this reconciliation should be
attached to the copy ofthe Cash Receipt
Direct Bank Deposit form sent to Financial Services - Cashiers. (See schedule A
for specific deposit instructions.)
Section D:  Use of Petty Cash
***As is, until...***
• Purchases from the Petty Cash Fund
should not involve items which are needed
frequently. A Blanket Purchase Order
issued by the Purchasing Department is
more appropriate for repetitive purchases.
• Funds derived from any other source
shall not be added to the Petty Cash Fund.
Section E:  Use of Change Floats
***No change***
Section F:  Use of 3-Part Receipt Books
***As is, until...***
REQUIREMENTS
• 3-Part Receipt Books must be used by
those departments that do not use a cash
register to record cash receipts. If a
department has a need for a unique type
of receipt, then approval is required from
the Department of Internal Audit prior to
its use. Specific procedures for the use of
Receipt Books are printed on the cover.
• A receipt must be completed for any
cash amount received. If a customer
requests a receipt for payment by cheque
or money order, a receipt can be issued.
The receipt should note that it is in
respect of a cheque or money order and
not cash.
• All cash received must be deposited.
To ensure that all cash receipt is deposited, a supervisor in the department must
review the cash deposits and reconcile
the total cash to the total of copy 2 of the
3-part receipt forms.
• The numerical continuity of copy 2 of
the 3-part receipt forms must be controlled by the supervisor who reviews and
approves cash deposits for accuracy and
completeness.
• A suggested procedure for controlling
the numerical continuity of 3-part receipts is as follows:
• Record the FRS cash receipt form
number on both copy 2 and copy 3 ofthe
3-part receipt form.
• Use copy 3 ofthe 3-part receipt, which
remains in the receipt book, as the numerical continuity control log.
• All void receipts should be accounted
for and retained in the Receipt Book.
• Verify that each copy 2 is included in
a deposit and that the correct FRS cash
receipt form number is recorded on copy
3 of the 3-part receipt.
• Initial copy 3 for every copy 2 included
in the deposit.
See CASH HANDLING next page
Contracts & Grants
Cash Receipts
Other Cash Receipts
Schedule A: Procedures for Processing Cash Receipts Including Donations
CANADIAN FUNDS
Donations 'Receive a donation.
Cash Receipts 'Prepare a Donations Remittance Form (FG1 101).
•Endorse cheques "For Deposit to The University of British
Columbia". The ten digit account code number to be
credited shall also be entered on the reverse side of the
cheque.
•Complete Cash Receipt Direct Bank Deposit form and forward with the Donation Remittance to the Development
Office.
•If a deposit is made to a Contracts & Grants account,
prepare a CashReceipts Direct Bank Depositform. Send your
entire deposit (cash and cheques) and copies 1, 2&3 ofthe
Cash Receipt form to the Contracts & Grants Section in
Financial Services. Retain the remaining copies for your
records.
•If a deposit to a Contract & Grants account requires a
donations receipt, then the entire deposit should be forwarded to the Development Office instead of Financial
Services.
•Receive payment for goods or services.
•Prepare a receipt as required.
•Endorse cheques "For Deposit to The University of British
Columbia". The ten digit account code number to be
credited shall also be entered on the reverse side of the
cheque.
•Prepare a Cash Receipt Direct Bank Depositform (UBC
10122 AF). Distribution of copies of the form should be as
follows:
•Attach copies 1 and 2 with the cheques/cash and deliver it
to the commercial teller at the SUB branch of Bank of
Montreal. Off-campus departments can make arrangements
through Financial Services to take their deposits to a move
convenient branch of Bank of Montreal. If deposits cannot be
brought to any branch ofthe Bank of Montreal, they may be
brought to the Cashiers at Financial Services. If no cash is
included in the deposit, the deposit may be sent via Campus
Mail to the SUB branch ofthe Bank of Montreal. Mail is less
desirable due to the delay in getting the deposit to the Bank.
•Forward Copy 3 to Financial Services, addressed to the
cashiers. This copy should be forwarded on the same day the
deposit was delivered to the bank to ensure timely processing.
•Retain the remaining copy(s) ofthe Cash Receipt Direct Bank
Deposit form for follow-up tie. agree deposit to your FRS
ledgers).
•Sort the funds into the following groups:
Group A: U.S. Coins
Group B: U.S. Dollars and Cheques
Group C: Visa transactions
Group D: Mastercard transactions
•Complete the correct cash receipt form for each group as
follows:
Group A: CashReceipt- Direct Bank Depositform. (seeSched-
ule 1 for sample form)
Group B: Complete Cash Receipts- Direct Bank Depositform
for U.S. Funds,  (see Schedule 2 for sample form)
Group C: Complete Cash Receipt form for all Visa transactions, (see Schedule 3 for sample form)
Ensure that words "VISA- memo bank 18" is written or
stamped on the Cash Receipt form.
Group D: Complete Cash Receipt form for all Mastercard
transaction, (see Schedule 3 for sample form)
Ensure that the words "MASTERCARD- memo bank 17" is
written or stamped on the Cash Receipt form.
•Distribute the copies as follows:
Group A: Forward the coins and copies 1 and 2 ofthe Cash
Receipts- Direct Bank Depositform directly to the Bank of
Montreal - SUB branch. Forward copy 3 to Cashiers at Brock
Hall. Retain the remaining copies for your records.
Group B: Forward the Cash/ Cheques directly to the Bank of
Montreal - SUB branch together with copies 1 and 2 ofthe
Cash Receipts Direct Bank deposit for U. S. funds to the bank.
Forward copy 3 to Cashiers at Brock Hall. Retain the
remaining copy for your records.
Group C and D: Forward white copy of Cash Receipts form to
Cashiers at Brock Hall. Retain the remaining copies for your
records. Each unit accepting Visa/Mastercard will have
specific procedures for depositing these funds. The proce
dures are provided by Financial Services at the time Visa/
MastercardfacUities are implemented. Please referr to those
procedures or contact Financial Services for more information.
U.S. Currency & Visa
Mastercard
Transactions 8 UBC Reports • August 11, 1994
Supplement to UBC Reports
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The naming of Facilities or features at the
University after a person or persons falls
into four classes.
• Facilities that are part of the outside
environment of the University. For example, they include buildings, complexes of
buildings, roads, walkways, playing fields,
parks, gardens, agricultural or forestry
plots, etc.
• Facilities that are part of inside space.
For example, they include library/reading rooms, laboratories, seminar rooms,
galleries, recreational courts, lounges,
etc.
• Facilities that are made up of portable
items. For example, they include collections of art and/or artifacts- all identifiable because of specific focus or purpose.
• Posthumous tribute markers. These
include plaques, medallions or other
markers usually in association with such
features as trees, benches or small monuments.
POUCY
• New names for facilities in Class I are
to be approved by the Board ofGovernors
upon recommendation of the President
following consultation with the Dean if an
academic area and with the advice of the
President's Committee on the Naming of
Facilities.
• New names for facilities in Class II are
to be approved by the President upon
recommendation of the Vice President
who has responsibility for the use or
NAMING OF CAMPUS FACILITIES
Policy # 125 - Approved: February 1989
functional purpose of the facility following consultation with the Dean of an
academic area.
• New names for facilities in Class III are
to be approved by the Vice President,
Academic on the recommendations of a
Dean of Faculty for facilities that are
functionally related to his/her faculty, or
in the case of facilities outside the faculties, on the recommendation of the appropriate Vice President.
• New names for features in Class iV are
to be approved by the President in consultation with the Department of Campus Planning and Development.
• All new names shall be filed with the
Secretary to the Board ofGovernors and
the Director of Campus Planning and Development, who is responsible for informing the university community.
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
• In proposing a name for a University
facility, there must be clear evidence that
the person has made an exceptional and
significantly superior contribution to the
University purpose.
• Facilities that are, in whole or in
part, gifts to the University may be
named after a donor/donors provided
that the donation to be recognized is
the dominant factor in the receipt of
the gift, and represents a substantial
part of its value.
• It is not normal to name facilities after
individuals who are employed by the
University or hold positions related to its
administration.
• Before new names or re-naming of
existing facilities can be approved, due
consideration will be given to the familiarity and acceptability of existing
names.
• The question of suitability of new
names in relation to sites, locations and
directions for effective circulation and
access at the University will be assessed
before approval is given.
THE CAMPAIGN
The Committee on Naming of Facilities
recommends that in principle, for the
duration ofthe Campaign, the President
be authorized to approve the naming of
campus facilities after donors, provided:
• the value of the gift is measured in
millions of dollars;
• that none ofthe academic functions or
considerations are compromised, and
• the name is in keeping with University
values.
NAMING OF BUILDINGS
Policy #124 - Approved: April 1985
There shall be a President's Advisory
Committee on the Naming of Buildings.
The terms of reference ofthe committee
shall be to recommend to the President
that a building be named to reflect the
use of it (for example, the General Services Administration Building, the University Bookstore); or to honour someone associated with the University (for
example, the Henry Angus Building,
the Neville Scarfe Building, etc.); or to
recognize a donor (for example, the
Kinsmen Laboratory for Neurological
Research).
The committee shall respond to requests
from the President or his/her designate
in this matter.
The committee shall have nine members:
• Chancellor
• Vice President, Academic
• Vice President, Administration and
Finance
• Two deans of faculties (to be appointed
by the President)
• Dean of the faculty or director of the
non-faculty unit most closely associated with the building
• Director of Ceremonies (who will act
as chair)
• Chair of the Property Committee of
the Board
• Director of Campus Planning and
Development
THE APPOINTMENT OF GRADUATE STUDENTS TO TEACH A COURSE IN WHICH A BOARD OF
GOVERNORS APPOINTMENT IS REQUIRED   -    Policy # 75 - Approved: July 1992
Appointments in Academic Departments, Schools, Programs and Faculties (includingpositions sponsored by
Extra-Sessional Studies):
• A Master's student may not hold an
appointment to teach a course or courses
in which a Board of Governors appointment is required.
• Until admitted to candidacy, a doctoral student may not hold an appointment to teach a course or courses in
which a Board ofGovernors appointment
is required except that in special circumstances, with the approval ofthe head of
the department in which the student is
registered and the Dean ofthe Faculty of
Graduate Studies, the student may be
given an appointment to teach no more
than six credits of undergraduate course
work per term.
• A doctoral student who has been admitted to candidacy may be granted an
appointment as a part-time lecturer
(teaching duties normally to be limited to
no more than six credits of undergraduate
course work per term). Such appointment requires the written approval ofthe
Dean of Graduate Studies.
Appointments in Centre for
Continuing Education
To qualify as an Instructor or for other
teaching duties with the Centre for Continuing Studies, in a credit course, a student must:
• be in a doctoral program, have successful previous teaching experience, and
not teach more than six credits of course
work in any given term,
• have the written permission of the
Department (Faculty in non-departmentalized Faculties) in which the student's
program is offered.
• have obtained in writing the permission ofthe Dean ofthe Faculty of Graduate Studies.
In addition:
• a credit course will be given and students examined under the supervision of
afacuity member ofthe department or unit
in which the course is given. This faculty
member is in charge of all aspects of the
course.
Note: To maintain full-time status a student should not work more than 12 hows
per week, averaged over the year. A
student working more tham 12 hours a
week will forgo University Graduate Fellowships, etc. for the period ofthe appointment.
LICENCES OF DRIVERS OF VEHICLES ON UNIVERSITY BUSINESS
The Motor Vehicle Act (B.C.) and its regulations (collectively, the "Act") identifies
the classes of driver's licenses whichper-
mit the operation of motor vehicles in the
Province of British Columbia.
University employees and students (collectively, the "University Driver" or "University Drivers'') who operate motor vehicles on University business (including
employment and study activities) must
CASH HANDLING
Continued from previous page
• Follow up Immediately on any copy
2 receipts which are not submitted In
sequence.
Section G:  Receipt of Cheques By
Mail
***As is, until...***
REQUIREMENTS
• All cheques received in the mail must
be restrictively endorsed 'For deposit only
- The University of British Columbia', at
me time the mail is opened. The 10 digit
FRS account number to be credited shall
also be entered on the reverse side of the
cheque.
• The same person should not open
the mail and prepare the deposit.
Policy # 78
hold appropriate valid driver's licenses.
For most University Drivers a Class 5
driver's license will be sufficient. However, a class 5 driver's license only permits a University Driver the operation of a
2 axle motor vehicle with a maximum
seating capacity oftenpersons. including
the driver, whether or not the seats are
occupied, and provided the motor vehicle
is not a bus, school bus, taxi, ambulance,
motorcycle, special vehicle or special activity bus as defined by the Act.
A class 4 driver's license is required if: (1)
the maximum seating capacity of a motor
vehicle exceeds ten persons, including the
driver, and (2) the motor vehicle is a taxi
ambulance, special vehicle, or special activity bus or bus with a seating capacity of
not more than 25 persons including the
driver.
A bus is defined as a motor vehicle having
a seating capacity of more than ten persons, including the driver, that is operated
for hire or for public transportation.
A University Driver's failure to hold the
required class of driver's license could
invalidate the insurance coverage on the
motor vehicle operated by the University
Driver.
If a University Driver is in doubt about the
validity of his or her driver's license for the
operation of a motor vehicle, the University Driver must not operate the motor
vehicle until such validity is confirmed by
the B.C. Motor Vehicles Branch (Ministry
of Attorney General).
REMOVAL AND TRAVEL ALLOWANCES
Policy # 82 - Approved: February 1980
Those eligible for Removal and Travel
Allowances are:
• newly appointed full-time members of
the faculty whose appointments are for
two years or more;
• newly appointed Board appointees
(other than faculty) not on term appointments; and
• conditional appointees to the faculty.
This group consists of persons who are
close to obtaining their doctorate. They
are appointed as Instructors II for one
year on condition that they will automatically become Assistant Professors upon
presentation of formal evidence of successful completion of the doctorate.
Moving arrangements and payment ofthe
removal costs can be made by contacting
the transportation specialist in the Purchasing Department. The Purchasing
Department has a contractual agreement
with an internationally known moving
company that can offer substantial discounts and guaranteed services. The
transportation specialist should be contacted at least 2 months before the move
will occur.
Payment of all other removal and travel
allowances will be made upon arrival at
The University of British Columbia and
will be dependent upon submission to
the Department of Financial Services of
an itemized statement of actual expenses
incurred, supported by appropriate documents. The University will not settle
accounts directly with suppliers except
for those moving costs arranged through
the Purchasing Department as stated
above.
***the rest as is*** Supplement to UBC Reports
UBC Reports • August 11, 1994 9
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
TEACHING SPACE REPORT
INTRODUCTION
There has been considerable concern
expressed about the quality and upkeep
of teaching space on campus. The following describes in some detail the specific
actions taken in the last two fiscal years
and that proposed for the current fiscal
year.
OVERVIEW
Funding for classroom maintenance is
provided from three sources: i) the maintenance component of the operating
budget for Plant Operations, ii) minor
capital and cyclical maintenance designated grants from the provincial government, and ill) the provincially designated
academic equipment fund.
There are provincially mandated conditions which circumscribe the uses to
which the cyclical maintenance budget
can be applied. In particular, the funds
can only be used for major maintenance
Items that will not re-occur on a yearly
basis. Further, the funds cannot be used
for alterations and renovations, upgrading, or equipment. In short, they can be
applied only to major cyclical maintenance ofthe existing exterior and interior
of current facilities.
Organizational units with responsibility for the physical state of university
classrooms include: i.) the Department of
Plant Operations charged with the maintenance of the exterior and interior of
campus facilities, ii.) the Department of
Campus Planning and Development
charged with undertaking significant
alterations and renovations to existing
facilities as well overseeing the design,
planning and construction of new facilities, and iii.) Bio-Medical Communications responsible for advising on, ordering and installing of media equipment.
Advice on maintenance and enhancement to the classrooms including their
media capability is provided by the President's Advisory Committee on Teaching
Space which annually solicits advice from
the Deans of Faculties and the Coordinator, Health Sciences. The specific activities undertaken by each of the three
groups described above are detailed below:
Department of Plant Operations
The Department has initiated audits
of the University's classrooms( including
classrooms, seminar rooms and lecture
theatres). One audit assesses the current state of window coverings, furniture,
wall coverings, floor coverings, etc. In
addition to these visible components, a
second audit is done ofthe heating, ventilation, lighting and air conditioning
(where applicable) systems of each classroom. The audits serve as the basis for
establishing the priority and extent of
activity to be undertaken each year.
While the state of its classrooms represent a highly visible component, it is
important to recognize that there are
others aspects of the building envelope
which impact on the classrooms themselves. Because ofthe age of many of our
facilities, exterior weatherproofing is of
major concern and ensuring that it is in
satisfactory condition is mandatory before undertaking any maintenance on
the interior. Likewise, ventilation, heating, lighting and air conditioning systems
must be brought to satisfactory performance levels. Ofthe six million dollar cyclical maintenance budgets provided in each
of the last two years, approximately one-
third of each has been directed to the
weatherproofing of buildings including
roofs, walls, windows, and foundations.
Three buildings which benefited from
this activity were Hennings, Hebb and
Buchanan.
Table 1A displays the specific classroom related activities undertaken by
Plant Operations in years 1992/93 and
1993/94 while Table IB reflects that to
be undertaken in 1994/95. Several ofthe
major activities are worth noting. A complete painting of the interior of the
Buchanan Building was completed in
1992/93. This was followed in 1993/94
by work in a number of buildings including: Curtis, Henry Angus, Instructional
Resources Centre, and Macmillan. For
the current fiscal year, ten buildings will
be addressed with work scheduled to
start in late June and be completed before the start of fall classes!, excluding
heating, ventilation, and air conditioning
systems which will occur throughout the
year), the buildings include: Anthropol
ogy and Sociology, Biological Sciences,
Chemistry, Lasserre, Geography, Curtis,
Hennings, Math, Music, and
Wesbrook.The weatherproofing of the
Hennings Building undertaken last year
will be followed this year with a washing
and re-sealing ofthe exterior ofthe building and a comprehensive painting of the
interior of the building. In the Instructional Resources Centre, all theatres will
have carpeting repaired, stair nosing applied on aisles and steps, upholstered
furniture repaired and shampooed, carpets shampooed, and lighting relamped.
To avoid conflicting with scheduled
classes, interior painting in all buildings
scheduled for activity this summer will be
done in evening hours.
The activities proposed each year b}r
the Department of Plant Operations are
reviewed with the President's Advisory
Committee on Teaching Space to ensure
both coordination and effective use ofthe
limited resources available to address the
University's classroom requirements.
President's Advisory Committee on
Teaching Space
Among its responsibilities, The Teaching Space Committee is charged with
allocating a portion of the appropriation
for Academic Equipment and a portion of
the appropriation for Minor Capital.
Funds for the former are primarily di
rected to movable furnishings, e.g., media equipment, non-fixed seating, etc.
while the latter is applied to installed
seating as well as major and minor alterations and renovations. In 1993/94, the
dollars available for allocation by the
Committee included $250,000 of academic equipment funds and $450,000 of
the minor capital appropriation.
In each of the two years of its existence, the Committee has solicited from
each of the deans and the Coordinator,
Health Sciences, proposals for addressing the maintenance and upgrading requirements of those classrooms, seminar
rooms and lecture theatres which exist in
the buildings in whk-h their Faculties are
housed. The requests are assigned to one
or more of the categories described in
Appendix 1 and cost estimates are provided by staff of Plant Operations, Campus Planning and Development, and Bio-
Medical Communications following dis
cussion with representatives ofthe faculties which have made the requests.
In distributing the academic equipment funds, the Committee views its
highest priority to bring all existing
classrooms to minimal instructional
standards—overhead projectors and
screens, chalk or white boards, tables
and chairs, blackout curtains, etc.
Major alterations and renovations to
classrooms require removing the room
from room bookings for a sustained period of time. Because the most appropriate time is in the months of May through
August and given that the inception of
the Committee was early in calendar year
1993, it was not possible for any such
action to occur in the summer of 1993.
The list of requests submitted in 1993/
94 are displayed in Table 2. Consistent
with the priorities noted above, funding
was provided for those items encompassed in categories Academic Equipment 1 and 3 , and Minor Equipment 1.
For 1994/95, the Committee has been
provided withAcademic equipment funds
of $400,000 and $1,350,000 to undertake renovations to Hebb Theatre. Ofthe
academic equipment funds, $150,000 has
been allocated to Hebb Theatre leaving
$250,000 to be allocated to the 1994/95
proposals .The list of requests submitted
for 1994/95 are detailed in Table 3. No
allocations have yet been made as the
Committee is still in the process of developing detailed cost estimates.
However, two major commitments have
been made which will absorb much ofthe
1994/95 appropriations provided to the
Committee. They involve renovations to
Hebb Theatre and development of a classroom master plan.
In early fall 1993, the Committee engaged in discussion concerning major
alterations and renovations to the existing stock of classrooms and lecture theatres. Major enhancements to classrooms
should be based on knowledge of types of
classrooms desired, their size and location and the standards to which we want
to bring them. They should also be based
on a detailed assessment of which ones
within the existing stock warrant significant investments, which should be renovated for purposes other than classrooms
and consideration of where the most critical needs are within the university. The
same needs apply to the existing stock of
lecture theatres. These issues are intended to be addressed through development of the classroom master plan. Negotiations have been proceeding with
Ellensweig and Associates of Boston,
Massachusetts to assist the University
with its development. Details ofthe process to be followed are being developed
and will shortly be communicated to the
University community. The intent is to
begin the process early in the fall with a
final report anticipated in late spring of
1995.
While acknowledging the inadequacy
of its information base, the Committee
made several pragmatic decisions affecting its 1994/95 proposed course of action. First, to defer major alterations to
any existing classrooms until the classroom master plan is complete. Second, to
consider major renovation to one of the
lecture theatres. After considering several possibilities, the Committee designated Hebb Theatre as its primary candidate for major renovation work in the
summer 1994.
Why Hebb Theatre? First, it is a very
well constructed thirty year old building.
Because the building is structurally
sound, major investments in its renovation will be long lasting. Second, the
exterior ofthe building was already scheduled by Plant Operations for power wash,
painting and roof replacement this summer. Thus, both exterior and interior
requirements can be addressed at one
time and there is assurance therefore
that renovations to the interior will not be
adversely affected by unattended deficiencies in the building envelope. Third,
it is one of the largest lecture theatres(
seating 450) and is widely used for conferences. Fourth, while its primary use is
by one faculty, it does have a variety of
users from other faculties.
Renovations to Hebb Theatre were
begun in early May and will be completed
by the start of fall term classes.
Responding to the concerns of its instructional staff, the university has begun the long process of improving the
quality of its instructional facilities. To
summarize, the resource allocations of
the last two years have included: $550,000
per year of major cyclical maintenance
undertaken by Plant Operations;
$650,000 of academic equipment funds
directed toward classroom furnishings,
media equipment, and other general
equipment; $1,800,000 of minor capital
and cyclical and other maintenance funds
directed to the renovation of Hebb Theatre and a limited number of other classrooms as well as development of the
classroom master plan. Because the upgrading requirements of the University's
long neglected classrooms are so significant, it is important that we have a clear
understanding and consensus regarding
needs and priorities so that limited resources can be expended in the most
effective manner. It is anticipated that
with the active participation of all of the
Faculties, development ofthe classroom
master plan will provide the road map to
guide our future classroom upgrade activities.
TABLES
The tables below are printed on the following pages.
Table 1A
Work Completed, Fiscal Years
1992/93, 1993/94 Schedule
Table IB
1994/95 Schedule
Table 2
Classroom Enhancements
(1993/94)
Table 3
Classroom Enhancements
(proposed 1994/95) 10 UBC Reports • August 11, 1994
Supplement to UBC Reports
The University of British Columbia  /  Department of Plant Operations
CLASSROOM MAJOR MAINTENANCE PROJECT
Work Completed, F. Y.s 92/93 93/94
Schedule
Building Name
Room Type
Rm.
No.
Audit
Y/N
Interior Finishes
Furniture
Window Cover
Lighting
HVAC
TYPE
Wrk
C
TYPE
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
ADULT EDUCATION RES CTR
SEMINAR ROOM
1
N
BUCHANAN BUILDING A
CLASSROOM
A202
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING A
CLASSROOM
A203
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING A
CLASSROOM
A204
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING A
CLASSROOM
A205
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B212
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B214
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B216
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B218
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B219
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B220
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B221
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
SEMINAR ROOM
B222
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B223
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B224
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B225
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
SEMINAR ROOM
B226
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B228
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
SEMINAR ROOM
B230
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B232
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
SEMINAR ROOM
B234
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B312
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B313
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B314
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B315
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B316
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B317
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B318
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B319
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B320
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B321
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B322
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B323
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B324
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B325
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B327
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B330
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B332
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
CLASSROOM
B334
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING B
SEMINAR ROOM
B500
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING C
SEMINAR ROOM
C263
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D110
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D113
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D114
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D121
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D201
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D202
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D205
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D224
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D225
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D230
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D233
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D238
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D239
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D244
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D301
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D302
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D305
N
PAINT
Y
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D306
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D310
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D318
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D323
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D324
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D327
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D330
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D333
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D336
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D339
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D340
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
CLASSROOM
D344
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D348
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D351
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING D
SEMINAR ROOM
D352
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING E
SEMINAR ROOM
E266
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING E
SEMINAR ROOM
E274
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING E
CLASSROOM
E458
N
PAINT
Y
BUCHANAN BUILDING E
SEMINAR ROOM
E476
N
PAINT
Y
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
LECTURE THEATRE
177
Y
PAINT
Y
SEATS
Y
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
CLASSROOM
178
Y
PAINT
Y
Y
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
SEMINAR ROOM
179
Y
PAINT Supplement to UBC Reports
The University of British Columbia  /  Department of Plant Operations
CLASSROOM MAJOR MAINTENANCE PROJECT
UBC Reports-August 11, 1994  11
Work Completed, F.Y.s 92/93 93/94
Schedule
Building Name
Room Type
Rm.
No.
Audit
Y/N
Interior Finishes
Furniture
Window Cover
Lighting
HVAC
TYPE
Wrk
C
TYPE
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
104
Y
F'AINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
110
Y
F'AINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
210
Y
F'AINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
213
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
CLASSROOM
214
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
215
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
308
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
CLASSROOM
310
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
CLASSROOM
312
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
CLASSROOM
412
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
413
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
415
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG
CLASSROOM
417
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
31
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
33
Y
F'AINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
223
Y
F'AINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
225
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
226
Y
F'AINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
SEMINAR ROOM
228
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
321
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
323
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
325
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
326
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
SEMINAR ROOM
328
Y
F'AINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
421
Y
F'AINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
425
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
LECTURE THEATRE
426
Y
PAINT
Y
HENRY ANGUS BLDG ADD
SEMINAR ROOM
428
Y
F'AINT
Y
HORTI BLDG(& GREENHOUSES
CLASSROOM
102
Y
PAINT
Y
HORTI BLDG(& GREENHOUSES
CLASSROOM
112
Y
F'AINT
Y
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
SEMINAR ROOM
G41
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
Y
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
SEMINAR ROOM
G42
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
Y
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
SEMINAR ROOM
G44
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
Y
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
SEMINAR ROOM
G57
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
SEMINAR ROOM
G59
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
SEMINAR ROOM
G65
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
C
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
SEMINAR ROOM
G66
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
C
MACMILLAN BUILDING
CLASSROOM
158
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
Y
Y
MACMILLAN BUILDING
CLASSROOM
160
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
Y
Y
MACMILLAN BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
166
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
Y
Y
MACMILLAN BUILDING
CLASSROOM
256
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
Y
MACMILLAN BUILDING
CLASSROOM
260
Y
F'AINT
Y
SEATS
Y
Y
MATHEMATICS ANNEX
LECTURE THEATRE
1100
Y
PAINT
Y
MATHEMATICS ANNEX
SEMINAR ROOM
1102
Y
PAINT
Y
The University of British Columbia  /  Department of Plant Operations
CLASSROOM MAJOR MAINTENANCE PROJECT
1994
I 1 1995 Schedule
Building Name
Room Type
Rm.
No.
Audit
Y/N
Interior Finishes
Furniture
Window Cover
Lighting
HVAC
TYPE
Wrk
C
TYPE
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
ADULT EDUCATION RES CTR
SEMINAR ROOM
1
N
ANTHRO & SOCIO BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
141
Y
PAINT
Y
ANTHRO & SOCIO BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
202
Y
PAINT
Y
ANTHRO & SOCIO BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
203
Y
PAINT
Y
ANTHRO & SOCIO BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
205
Y
PAINT
Y
ANTHRO & SOCIO BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
207
Y
PAINT
Y
ANTHRO & SOCIO BLDG ADD
CLASSROOM
209
Y
PAINT
Y
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-CORE
LECTURE THEATRE
2000
Y
PAINT
SEATS
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-NORTH
TUTORIAL ROOM
1524
Y
PAINT
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-NORTH
TUTORIAL ROOM
2519
Y
PAINT
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-SOUTH
CLASSROOM
2321
Y
PAINT
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-SOUTH
CLASSROOM
2361
Y
PAINT
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-WEST
CLASSROOM
1465
Y
PAINT
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-WEST
CLASSROOM
2449
Y
PAINT
BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE-WEST
CLASSROOM
5460
Y
PAINT
SEATS
BUCHANAN TOWER (OFFICE)
SEMINAR ROOM
1127
N
FLOOR
Y
BUCHANAN TOWER (OFFICE)
SEMINAR ROOM
1206
N
FLOOR
Y
BUCHANAN TOWER (OFFICE)
SEMINAR ROOM
1207
N
FLOOR
Y
BUCHANAN TOWER (OFFICE)
SEMINAR ROOM
218
N
FLOOR
Y
BUCHANAN TOWER (OFFICE)
SEMINAR ROOM
498
N
FLOOR
Y
BUCHANAN TOWER (OFFICE)
SEMINAR ROOM
597
N
FLOOR
Y
BUCHANAN TOWER (OFFICE)
SEMINAR ROOM
826
N
FLOOR
Y
BUCHANAN TOWER (OFFICE)
SEMINAR ROOM
898
N
FLOOR
Y
CHEMISTRY BLDG EAST WING
LECTURE THEATRE
124
Y
PAINT
SEATS
CHEMISTRY BLDG EAST WING
LECTURE THEATRE
126
Y
PAINT
SEATS
CHEMISTRY BLDG-SOUTH WIN
LECTURE THEATRE
150
Y
PAINT
SEATS
CHEMISTRY BLDG-SOUTH WIN
LECTURE THEATRE
250
Y
PAINT
SEATS 12 UBC Reports • August 11, 1994
Supplement to UBC Reports
The University of British Columbia  /  Department of Plant Operations
CLASSROOM MAJOR MAINTENANCE PROJECT
1994
[ 1 1995 Schedule
Building Name
Room Type
Rm.
No.
Audit
Y/N
Interior Finishes
Furniture
Window Cover
Lighting
HVAC
TYPE
Wrk
C
TYPE
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
Wrk
C
CHEMISTRY BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
200
Y
FLR-PNT
SEATS
Y
CHEMISTRY BUILDING
CLASSROOM
225
Y
PAINT
SEATS
CHEMISTRY BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
300
Y
FLR-PNT
SEATS
CHEMISTRY BUILDING
SEMINAR ROOM
332
Y
PAINT
CIVIL/MECHANICAL ENG BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
1202
Y
FLR-PNT
CIVIL/MECHANICAL ENG BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
1204
Y
FLR-PNT
CIVIL/MECHANICAL ENG BLDG
SEMINAR ROOM
1206
Y
FLR-PNT
SEATS
CIVIL/MECHANICAL ENG BLDG
SEMINAR ROOM
1208
Y
FLOOR
TABLES
Y
CIVIL/MECHANICAL ENG BLDG
SEMINAR ROOM
1210
Y
FLR-PNT
CIVIL/MECHANICAL ENG BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
1212
Y
FLR-PNT
CIVIL/MECHANICAL ENG BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
1215
Y
FLOOR
CIVIL/MECHANICAL ENG BLDG
SEMINAR ROOM
1304
Y
PAINT
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
102
Y
PAINT
SEATS
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
LECTURE THEATRE
104
Y
PAINT
SEATS
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
CLASSROOM
105
Y
PAINT
SEATS
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
CLASSROOM
107
Y
PAINT
SEATS
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
CLASSROOM
202
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
SEMINAR ROOM
205
Y
PAINT
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
SEMINAR ROOM
211
Y
PAINT
Y
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
SEMINAR ROOM
301
Y
PAINT
FREDERIC LASSERRE BLDG
SEMINAR ROOM
309
Y
PAINT
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
100
Y
PAINT
SEATS
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
101
Y
PAINT
SEATS
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
CLASSROOM
147
Y
PAINT
SEATS
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
CLASSROOM
200
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
CLASSROOM
201
Y
PAINT
SEATS
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
CLASSROOM
212
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
CLASSROOM
214
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
SEMINAR ROOM
215D
Y
PAINT
TABLES
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
SEMINAR ROOM
223
Y
PAINT
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
CLASSROOM
229
Y
PAINT
SEATS
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
CLASSROOM
239
Y
PAINT
SEATS
GEOGRAPHY BUILDING
SEMINAR ROOM
242
Y
PAINT
Y
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES CTR
CLASSROOM
135
Y
FLOOR
GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES CTR
SEMINAR ROOM
330A
Y
FLOOR
Y
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
LECTURE THEATRE
101
Y
PAINT
DESKS
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
LECTURE THEATRE
102
Y
PAINT
DESKS
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
LECTURE THEATRE
201
Y
PAINT
DESKS
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
LECTURE THEATRE
157
Y
PAINT
BGEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
LECTURE THEATRE
169
Y
PAINT
Y
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
CLASSROOM
176
Y
PAINT
UPHOLST
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
SEMINAR ROOM
181
Y
PAINT
Y
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
SEMINAR ROOM
182
Y
PAINT
Y
GEORGE F.CURTIS BLDG(LAW)
SEMINAR ROOM
185
Y
PAINT
TABLES
Y
HENNINGS BLDG (PHYSICS)
LECTURE THEATRE
200
Y
PAINT
SEATS
HENNINGS BLDG (PHYSICS)
LECTURE THEATRE
201
Y
PAINT
SEATS
HENNINGS BLDG (PHYSICS)
LECTURE THEATRE
202
Y
PAINT
SEATS
HENNINGS BLDG (PHYSICS)
SEMINAR ROOM
301
Y
PAINT
Y
HENNINGS BLDG (PHYSICS)
CLASSROOM
302
Y
PAINT
Y
HENNINGS BLDG (PHYSICS)
CLASSROOM
304
Y
PAINT
Y
HENNINGS BLDG (PHYSICS)
CLASSROOM
318
Y
PAINT
Y
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
LECTURE THEATRE
G1
Y
FLOOR
SEATS
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
LECTURE THEATRE
G2
Y
FLOOR
SEATS
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
LECTURE THEATRE
G3
Y
FLOOR
SEATS
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
LECTURE THEATRE
G4
Y
FLOOR
SEATS
INSTRUCT RESOURCE CTR-IR
LECTURE THEATRE
G5
Y
FLOOR
SEATS
MACMILLAN BUILDING
CLASSROOM
342
Y
TILES
SEATS
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
100
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
CLASSROOM
102
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
CLASSROOM
103
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
CLASSROOM
104
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
CLASSROOM
105
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
CLASSROOM
203
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
CLASSROOM
204
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
CLASSROOM
225
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MATHEMATICS BUILDING
CLASSROOM
229
Y
PAINT
SEATS
Y
MUSIC BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
113
Y
PAINT
ABSORB
Y
MUSIC BUILDING
CLASSROOM
301
Y
PAINT
DESK
MUSIC BUILDING
CLASSROOM
302
Y
PAINT
DESK
Y
MUSIC BUILDING
CLASSROOM
304
Y
PAINT
DESK
Y
MUSIC BUILDING
CLASSROOM
338
Y
PAINT
DESK
MUSIC BUILDING
CLASSROOM
339
Y
PAINT
DESK
MUSIC BUILDING
SEMINAR ROOM
400B
Y
PAINT
DESK
Y
WESBROOK BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
100
Y
PAINT
SEATS
WESBROOK BUILDING
LECTURE THEATRE
201
Y
PAINT
SEATS Table 2
Supplement to UBC Reports
UBC Reports • August 11, 1994  13
Classroom Enhancements (1993/94)
Originator
Revised
Faculty                  Department
Request
Estimate
Estimate
AE1
AE2
AE3
Ag. Sciences MacMillan Building
blinds & curtains (5 rooms)
painting & cleaning (6 rooms)
seating reapairs (3 rooms)
3 screens
lighting repairs (6 rooms)
moulding repairs (6 rooms)
floor plug repairs (6 rooms)
seat repair (1 room)
screen replacement
fresnel screen replacement (overhead projector x2)
computer screen projector
permanent overhead projector
*
X
X
X
X
Family & Nutrl. Sci. Bldg.
seats repair (1 room)
install/repair drapes (9 rooms)
painting & cleaning (1 room)
classroom cabinet renovation (1 room)
light repair (1 room)
new furnishings
X
X
TOTAL
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
Applied Sci.   Architecture
curtains
2 slide projectors
1 TV monitor & VCR
$8,000
$750
$1,500
$750
$1,500
1 speaker
$600
$600
$600
Chemical Engineering
3 overhead projectors
$1,500
$1,500
Civil Engineering
secure tables
repair screen
Electirical Engineering
4 overhead projectors
Tables & 10 chairs
4 second screens
refurbish lecture rooms
20 blinds
$2,000
$4,500
$2,400
$6,000
$2,000
$2,400
$4,500
Metals & Materials Proc.
50 chairs
30 chairs
40 tables
$2,250
$1,350
$2,500
$2,250
$1,350
$2,500
Mining & Mineral Proc.
video overhead projector monitor
$6,000
$6,000
TOTAL
$39,350
$0
$7,250
$8,100
$10,600
categ ory of request--
AE4 MC1 MC2
MC3
MC4
NO
$0
$8,000
$0
$0
$0
$6,000
$0        $14,000
$0
$0
$0
$0
Arts **'
TOTAL
Commerce    Commerce
remodel two classrooms into one
remodel two classrooms into one
reorient seating
install screen
install beam projection system
replace curtains
repair temperature controls
replace tables & chairs & carpet
replace seating & carpet
$95,000
$90,000
$10,000
$28,000
X
X
X
$10,000
TOTAL
$223,000
$0                $0
$0
$10,000
$0
Education      Child Study Centre
4 child computer tables & 2 sand water tables
1 printer stand
$1,600
$100
$10,000
$100
Counselling Psychology
video equipment
video monitor system
40 chairs
1 filing cabinet
$5,500
$1,000
$2,000
$1,000
$5,500
$1,000
$2,000
Language Education
1 computer table & 2 chairs
40 chairs
2 desk- & 1 floor-podium & blackboard extension
VCR unit
$1,100
$7,000
$8,000
$600
$8,000
$600
$1,100
$7,000
Math & Science in Ed.
80 stools & 24 tables & 2 locking cabinets
1 screen & blackboard replacement & curtains
$7,500
$7,500
$7,500
X
Physical Education
video projector
18 tables & 48 chairs
$6,588
$10,964
$6,588
$10,964
Ed. Computing Services
35 chairs
$8,750
$8,750
Audio Visual Media Serv.
curtains
$2,000
$2,000
TOTAL
$71,202
$0        $17,500
$13,688
$29,814
$10,100
$0
$0
$0
$95,000
$90,000
X
X
$10,000
$10,000
$205,000
$0
$1,000
$0
$0
$0
$0      $1,000
Grad. Studies Comm. & Reg. Planning    replace blinds
replace ceiling
chairs, storage, shelving, & table
Inst, of Asian Research     repair sound system
Ctr. for Human Settlement: 6 tables & 40 chairs
TOTAL
$2,500
$2,250
$4,750 $0
$2,500
$2,500
$0
$2,250
$2,250
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0 14 UBC Reports • August 11, 1994
Faculty Department
Health Sci.    Woodward IRC
Law
TOTAL
Law
TOTAL
Library Sedgwick
Woodward
Main
TOTAL
Science        Science One
Biology 200
Geological Sciences
Supplement to UBC Reports
Originator   Revised    category of request-
Request
Estimate
remove burlap then paint
$5,035
paint
$5,100
1 video projector
$20,000
1 LCD video projector
$5,000
1 LCD video projector (overhead)
$6,500
$41,635
drywall repair
I
painting
■
100 chairs
■
10 tables
■
airconditioning unit
■
curtains
■
door repair
B
light replacement
$50,000
overhead projector
$9,000
6 monitors
$6,000
3 overhead projectors
$7,000
$72,000
repair 650 chairs*
$24,800
replace 85 chairs
$5,100
wheelchair accessible tables
$11,300
portable bibliographic instructional equipment"
$14,000
$55,200
Egan custom whiteboard & tracking system
$2,800
4 Draper Luma manual wall screens
$528
4 Egan porcelain whiteboards
$2,280
3M Model 95s overhead projector
$860
4 3M Model 920 overhead projectors
$2,300
Slide Ektagrphic projector and trays
$645
2 Bretford projection carts
$340
slide projector
$350
TV, VCR, & video camera
$1,500
Projecting Caramate
$650
2 video disk players
$2,000
2 Overhead projectors
$1,400
Re-orient seating, relocate controls, etc.
$2,000
2 projection screens
$4,300
Podium
$700
AE1
$0
$0
AE2
$20,000
$5,000
$6,500
$31,500
$0
$0
$0
$0
AE3
AE4
MC1
MC2
MC3
so
$o
$0
$0
$0
MC4
$5,035
$5,100
$10,135
X
X
NO
SO
$9,000
$6,000
$7,000
$22,000
$0
$24,800
$5,100
$0        $29,900
$0
$11,300
$14,000
$25,300
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
TOTAL
Buildings:      Buchanan
$22,653
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
$0
Computer Science
FNSC
Hebb Theatre
I.R.C.
Laserre
Law
MacLeod
Math
Wesbrook
Media Services
TOTAL
video projector
video projector
p.a. system
projection screens
overhead projectors & carts
4 overhead projectors & carts
speaker installation
speaker installation
lectern & p.a. improvements
overhead projector & cart
video projector installation
video eqwpfrfent
5 overhead projectors & carts
lectern & p.a. improvements
video projector
classroom upgrades
2 slide projector system ****
2 slide projector system ****
4 overhead projectors
drapes
video projector Installation **"
p.a. system improvements
VCR/Cable accessories
speaker system
lecter & p.a. improvements
video projector
installation & accessories
a.v. maintenance
supplies
labour
coordination
contingency
$15,000
$15,000
$8,500
$8,500
$3,000
$3,000
$2,500
$2,500
$12,000
$12,000
$2,200
$2,200
$3,500
$3,500
$3,500
$3,500
$5,000
$5,000
$500
$500
$25,000
$25,000
$1,000
$1,000
$3,250
$3,250
$20,000
$20,000
$15,000
$15,000
$12,000
$12,000
$9,500
$9,500
$9,500
$9,500
$3,000
$3,000
$8,000
$25,000
$25,000
$1,500
$1,500
$1,000
$1,000
$2,500
$2,500
$7,500
$7,500
$12,000
$12,000
$12,000
$12,000
$3,500
$4,800
$6,000
$5,000
$242,750
$0        $81,960
$133,500
$20,000
$8,000
Grand Total
$749,887
$3,500
$0 $3,500        $28,000
$0       $109,200       $208,788 $82,564 $38,900 $42,000
$0
$0
$0
$4,800
$6,000
$5,000
$0    $15,800
$0       $215,135    $16,800
Is this being covered off in funds for the new building?
What is the use of this?
Kathleen Beaumont will verbally present Ihe next phase of Ihe Buchanan
'* Issue of 1 or 2 - gel more information - high frequency of use - is this a standard requirement? Table 3
Supplement to UBC Reports
UBC Reports • August 11, 1994  15
Classroom Enhancements (proposed 1994/95)
Faculty
Department
Ag. Sciences MacMillan Building
Totem Field Building
Family SNutrl. Sci. Bldg.
TOTAL
Request
portable lectern (all rooms)
functional power outlets for projectors (6 rooms)
replace broken chairs (7 rooms)
bring rooms to stated capacity (6 rooms)
overhead projector screen (3 rooms)
replace tables (1 room)
three tables 61 x 31 (1 room)
row of fixed-arm chairs (1 room)
high-intensity overhead projector (1 room)
whiteboard (1 room)
remove dais (1 room)
30 drafting tables & stools
light proof blinds (2 rooms)
audio-visual cart
four audio-visual carts
videocasette recorder & monitor
3 slide projector remotes
Originator   Revised
Estimate    Estimate
Applied Sci.   Architecture
10 tables & 40 chairs
55,130
Bioresource Eng.
projection screen & slide projection
$1,200
Chemical Engineering
34 chairs
$1,020
curtains (two rooms)
$1,200
6 tables
$800
air conditioner
$2,000
Metals & Materials Proc.
and Mining & Mineral Proc.
projection screens
$800
overhead & slide projectors (5 rooms)
$8,400
12 tables & 24 chairs
$5,000
TOTAL
$25,550
Arts
Language Lab
40 computers, video presentation system,
sound, file server, etc.
$155,742
Amphiteheatres
fibreoptic wiring upgrades
$25,000
portable multimedia setup w/out wiring
$17,560
AE1
X
AE2
AE3
- categ ory of request-
AE4 MC1 MC2
MC3 MC4 NO
TOTAL
Commerce    Commerce
TOTAL
Education
TOTAL
Forestry
replace fixed seats with flexible seating
$14,000
X
replace fixed seats with flexible seating
$9,400
X
recarpet (2 rooms)
$3,000
$26,400
5 24x60 tables
$990
X
5 24x48 tables
$836
X
20 chairs
$6,000
X
4 sectional tables
$2,000
X
1 shelving system
$1,200
X
cabinets and shelving for classroom
$3,000
X
computer cart
$550
X
3 computer desks
$2,250
X
1 security cupboard
$500
X
1 microstation
$300
X
2 glass display cases
$600
X
6 glass doors
$600
6 faculty chairs
$2,882
2 lateral filing cabinets
$1,670
3 half-heigh filing cabinets
$1,407
2 ergonomic computer operator chairs
$561
1 faculty office desk
$791
1 secretary desk
$1,000
slide projection upgrade
$3,500
X
new chairs
$1,625
X
storage cabinets
$400
X?
X?
X?
X
X
X
TOTAL 16 UBC Reports • August 11, 1994
Faculty Department
Grad. Studies Comm. & Reg. Planning
Inst, of Asian Research
Fisheries Centre
TOTAL
Request
exhaust fan
painting
2 built-in audio-visual units
built-in screen
18 chairs
ugrade auditorium
new carpeting, paint, & furniture
5 whiteboards
Supplement to UBC Reports
Table 3
Originator  Revised   	
Estimate   Estimate       AE1
$9,615
AE2
AE3
-category of request--
AE4 MCI MC2
MC3 MC4 NO
X?
X?
Health Sci.
Law
vinyl flooring for lecture hall stairs
replace 37 chairs
clean windows
replace and repair signage
remove burlap & paint wall
remove thermostats & repair gyproc
TOTAL
Law
500chairs
$90,000
blackout curtains (4 rooms)
$4,000
classroom video monitors (6 rooms)
$9,000
TOTAL
taperecorder
$1,000
Woodward
repair 100 broken chairs
$6,000
wheelchair friendly computer table
$1,881
Law
reattach seats on 10 chairs
$400
Main
replace 30 chairs
$4,950
wheelchair friendly computer table
$1,881
Sedgewick
15 microcomputers
$51,000
replace 365 chairs
$14,600
X?
X?
X?
TOTAL
Pharmaceuitcal Science
blinds
blinds & ver
slide projector
overhead projector
led panel
blinds
paint
whiteboard
printer
blinds & desk
2 computer servers
2 computers
blinds/paint/bench/whiteboard (3 rooms)
TOTAL
$600
$1,400
$900
$900
$6,000
$1,400
$1,000
$600
$1,100
$5,000
$8,000
$6,000
$12,000
$44,900
MO?
NO?
Science
upgrade GEOL room 330
Hennings Overheads
Bumiture
Slide Projectors
Projection System
Room upgrades
Projection scopes
microbeam research centre
reading room
museum area
TOTAL
$23,300
$7,727
$6,600
$8,000
$29,900
$3,200
$12,200
$4,500
$4,500
$18,600
$118,527 UBC Reports-August 11, 1994  17
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
The Board ofGovernors took the following action at its meeting held on July 21,
1994.
FINANCE
The carryforward of general purpose
operating funds for the year ended March
31, 1994, in the amount of $5,660,042
was approved.
The Financial Statements for the fiscal
year ended March 31, 1994, were approved. Following approval by the Board,
the Auditor-General will issue the Auditor's Report which he has indicated will
include an unqualified opinion.
The Board approved the General Purpose Operating Funds Budget for 1994-
95, and the strategy reflected therein.
The Board approved two advances to
the Bookstore in the amounts of
$858,000 and $850,000 to fund Phases
UBC GAZETTE
I and II of its renovation.
Approval was given to terminate the
1952 agreement between the University
and the Alma Mater Society regarding
revenues from rental ofthe War Memorial
Gymnasium. This fund is to be wound up
March 31, 1994, and the balance added,
to funds available for construction of the
Student Recreation Centre.
Allocation ofthe $400,000 government
grant for UBC's partnerships with
Okanagan University College and University College of the Cariboo was approved in the following manner: Arts.
$ 151.500; Science, $ 151,500; Education.
$82,000; Central, $15,000:
SENATE
On the recommendation of Senate the
Board approved the following items:
1)        Ratification of membership of the
Department of Educational Studies and
the Department of Curriculum Studies;
2) Establishment of an Institute for
Hearing Accessibility Research (IHEAR);
3) Curriculum proposals from the
Faculties of Applied Science (excepting
Electrical Engineering 283 and 383), Arts
(except the School of Social Work proposals), Education, Graduate Studies (curriculum proposals and a Ph.D. program
in Counselling Psychology, Law (except
Law 340 and 366), Nursing, and Science
(except the deletion of Math 111)
4) Establishment of the Institute of
Advanced Studies (as approved by Senate at its meeting of February 16, 1994) to
be named "The Peter Wall Institute of
Advanced Studies" as specified in the
agreement establishing the Peter Wall
Endowment.
POLICIES
The Board of Governors approved
revisions to Policy #27, Reappointment
of Retired or Retiring Members of Faculty, and noted the President's proce
dures for implementation and administration.
OTHER BUSINESS
The Board approved the following Endowment Deeds:
(1) Saudi Arabia Research Endowment
Deed; (2) Rheumatology Research Endowment Deed; (3) Science One Endowment Deed.
The Board also approved renaming of
the "Ronald L. Cliff Junior Professorship
in Accounting Endowment Deed" to the
"Ronald L. Cliff Professorship for Junior
Faculty in Accountancy Endowment
Deed."
The Board approved the Job Evaluation Plan as jointly developed by
C.U.P.E. Union Local #'s 116 and the
University. The Plan consists of a
Manual, a Questionnaire, and weights
for a new point factor job evaluation
system.
APPOINTMENTS
The Board of Governors at its meeting of July
21, 1994 approved the following recommenda
tions and received notice about the following
items.
Ian S. Gartshore, Associate Dean, Faculty of
Applied Science, August 1, 1994 to June 30,
1996.
Antal Kozak, Associate Dean, Faculty of Forestry, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
John Alexander McLean. Associate Dean.
Faculty of Forestry, July 1, 1994 to June 30.
1995.
David I. McLean, Assistant Dean, Faculty of
Medicine. July 1, 1994 to June 30. 1997.
William A. Webber. Coordinator, Health Sciences, July 1, 1994 to June 30. 1995.
Olav Slaymaker. Associate Vice-President Research, Humanities & Social Sciences. July 1.
1994 to June 30, 1995.
Richard R. Barichello. Head, Dept. of Agricultural Economics. July 1, 1994 to August
31, 1994.
Margaret Arcus. Director. School of Family &
Nurtritional Sciences. July 1. 1994toJune30,
1997.
John Vanderstoep, Acting Head. Dept. of
Food Science, July 1. 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Brian Ellis. Head, Dept. of Plant Science. July
1, 1994 to June 30, 1997.
Brian Ellis. Acting Head. Dept. of Soil Science,
July 1, 1994 to June 30. 1995.
Bonita Long, Acting Head, Dept. of Counselling Psychology, July   1,   1994  to June 30.
1995.
David Robitaille, Head, Dept. of Curriculum
Studies, July 1, 1994 to June 30. 1997.
Graham Kelsey, Acting Head. Dept. of Educational Studies. July 1. 1994 to June 30, 1995.
John David Barrett, Head, Dept. of Wood
Science, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1998.
George A. Mackie, Head, Dept. of Biochemistry & Molecular Biology, July 1, 1994 to June
30, 1999.
Samuel Sheps, Head, Dept. of Health Care &
Epidemiology, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1999.
Angelo Belcastro, Director, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, July 1, 1994 to June 30,
1999.
Robert Ellis, Head, Dept. of Geophysics &
Astronomy, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1999.
G. Stephen Pond, Acting Head, Dept. of Oceanography. July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Harry Joe, Head, Dept. of Statistics, July 1,
1994 to June 30, 1999.
Richard Bulcroft. Assistant Professor, School
of Family & Nutritional Sciences, July 1, 1994
to June 30, 1997.
Greogory W. Bond. Assistant Professor, Dept.
of Electrical Engineering, July 1, 1994 to June
30, 1997.
K. Ezra Kwok, Assistant Professor, Dept. of
Chemical Engineering, Jan 1, 1995 to June
30, 1998.
Eddy H. Chui, Assistant Professor, Dept. of
Mechanical Engineering, August 1, 1994 to
June 30, 1997.
Steven N. Rogak, Assistant Professor. Dept.
of Mechanical Engineemg, July 1, 1994 to
June 30, 1997.
Steven L. Cockcroft, Assistant Professor,
Dept. of Metals & Materials Engineering, July
1, 1994 to June 30, 1997.
Warren J. Poole, Assistant Professor, Dept. of
Metals & Materials Engineering, August  1,
1994 to June 30, 1997.
Nam-Lin Hur, Assistant Professor, Dept. of
Asian Studies, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1997
Laurence W. Preston, Assistant Professor,
Dept. of Asian Studies. July 1. 1994 to June
30, 1997.
Paul Beaudry. Associate Professor. Dept. of
Economics. July 1. 1994 (tenured).
Elizabeth Lasserre.  Instructor It.  Dept. of
French, July 1. 1994 to June 30. 1997.
Ann E. Gorsuch. Assistant Professor. Dept. of
History, July 1. 1994 to June 30. 1997.
Paul L. Hewitt. Assistant Professor. Dept. of
Psychology. July 1, 1994 to June 30. 1997.
Dietmar Neufeld, Assistant Professor. Dept
of Religious Studies. July 1. 1994toJune30
1997.
Jan  Selman.  Associate Professor.  Dept.  of
Theatre & Film. July 1. 1994 (tenured).
Raphael Amit. Peter Wall Distinguished Pro
fessor of Entrepreneurship and Venture Capi
tai, July 1. 1994.
Amitava Chattopadhyay. Associate Profes
sor.   Faculty  of Commerce.  July   1.   1994
(tenured).
Sunil Dutta. Assistant Professor. Faculty of
Commerce. July 1. 1994 to June 30. 1997.
Amin Mawani Assistant Professor. Faculty of
Commerce, July 1. 1994 to June 30. 1997.
Michael (Lex) MacNeil. Assistant Professor.
Dept. of Clinical Dental Sciences. July 1. 1994
to June 30, 1997.
Lucie Thibault. Assistant Professor. School of
Human Kinetics. July 1. 1994 to June 30, 1997
Brent Davis, Assistant Professor.  Dept. of
Curriculum Studies, July 1. 1994 to June 30,
1997.
Susan M. Glenn, Assistant Professor. Dept. of
Forest Sciences, July  1,   1994 to June 30,
1997.
Scott George Hinch, Assistant Professor, Dept.
of Forest Sciences/Westwater Research / Fish
eries Centre, July 1. 1994 to June 30, 1997.
George A. Mackie. Professor. Dept. of Bio
chemistry & Molecular Biology, July 1, 1994
(tenured).
Elliot Goldner. Assistant Professor, Dept. of
Psychiatry, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1997.
Michael Smith, Peter Wall Distinguished Pro
fessor of Biotechnology, July 1, 1994.
Susan Bradley. Assistant Professor. Dept. of
Chemistry, July 1. 1994 to June 30. 1997.
David  Chen,  Assistant Professor,  Dept.  of
Chemistry, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1997.
RESIGNATIONS
Kenneth Pinder, Professor, Dept. of Chemical
Engineering, June 29, 1994.
Sylvia J. Holmes. Assistant Professor. School
of Nursing, June 30, 1994.
John Conway,  Professor, Dept. of History,
Dec 30, 1994.
Kloh-Ann  Amacher.  Associate  Professor,
School of Social Work. June 29, 1994.
Michael James Yellow Bird. Instructor II,
School of Social Work, June 30, 1994.
V. Srinivasan Rao, Assistant Professor, Fac
ulty of Commerce, July 31, 1994.
John Dennison. Professor, Dept. of Administrative, Adult. & Higher Education, June 29,
1994.
Barbara Schrodt. Associate Professor, School
of Human Kinetics, June 29, 1994.
Clifford J. Anastasiou, Professor, Dept. of
Math & Science Education, June 29, 1994.
Eileen Proctor, Associate Professor, Dept. of
Pathology, Apr 30, 1994.
Gordon Slobin, Senior Instructor, Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences, June 29, 1994.
DEATHS
The Board learned, with regret, the death of:
Philip E. Reid. Professor, Dept. of Pathology,
May 21, 1994.
LEAVES OF ABSENCE
STUDY LEAVES
Agricultural Sciences
Rajadurai Rajamahendran. Dept. of Animal
Science. July 1. 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Eleanore Vaines-Chamberlain, School of Family & Nutritional Sciences, Jan 1, 1995toJune
30. 1995.
Joanna K. Staniszkis, School of Family &
Nutritional Sciences, July 1, 1994 to June 30,
1995.
James M. White, School of Family & Nutritional Sciences, July 1, 1994 to Dec 31, 1994.
Applied Science
Richard G. Campanella, Dept. of Civil Engineering, Jan 1, 1995 to June 30. 1995.
Guy A. Dumont, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, Jan 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995.
Samir Kallel, Dept. of Electrical Engineering,
Sept 1, 1994 to Aug 31, 1995.
Virginia E. Hayes, School of Nursing, Sept 1.
1994 to Aug 31, 1995.
Arts
Martin G. Silverman, Dept. of Anthropology
& Sociology, July 1. 1994 to Dec 31, 1994.
Sue Ann Alderson, Dept. of Creative Writing,
July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Robert C. Allen, Dept. of Economics, Jan 1,
1995 to June 30, 1995.
Kenneth Hendricks, Dept. of Economics. Jan
1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
Marvin Cohodas, Dept. of Fine Arts, July 1,
1994 to June 30, 1995.
Robert Young, Dept. of Fine Arts, Jan 1. 1995
to June 30, 1995.
Brian Klinkenberg, Dept. of Geography, July
1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Alfred H. Siemens, Dept. of Geography, July
1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Richard Menkis, Dept. of Religious Studies,
Sept 1, 1994 to Aug 31. 1995.
David S. Freeman, School of Social Work,
July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Frank J. Tester, School of Social Work, July
1. 1994 to Dec 31, 1994.
Commerce & Business Administration
Roger M. Davis. July 1,  1994 to June 30,
1995.
Daniel Granot. July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Maurice Levi, July 1, 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Craig C. Pinder, July 1,  1994 to June 30,
1995.
Tae H. Oum, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Dan A. Simunic. July 1, 1994toDec31, 1994.
Barbara J. Spencer. July 1. 1994 to June 30.
1995.
Gordon Walter, Sept 1, 1994 to Aug 31. 1995.
Charles B. Weinberg. Jan 1, 1995 to June 30,
1995.
Continuing Studies
Francis Andrew. Apr 1. 1996toMar31. 1997.
Education
Norman E. Amundson. Dept. of Counselling
Psychology. Sept 1, 1994 to Aug 31, 1994.
Judith Daniluk.  Dept. of Counselling Psychology. July 1. 1994 to Dec 31. 1994.
John Friesen, Dept. of Counselling Psychology, July 1, 1994 to June 30. 1995.
Robert J. Tolsma. Dept. of Counselling Psy-.
chology, July 1, 1994 to June 30. 1995.
Mary Bryson. Dept. of Educational Psychology & Special Education. Sept 1, 1994 to Aug
31. 1995.
Alena Branda, School of Human Kinetics, Jan
1. 1995 to Jun 30, 1995.
Lee Gunderson. Dept. of Language Education. Jan 1, 1995 to June 30. 1995.
Kit Grauer. Dept. of Curriculum Studies. July
1. 1995 to June 30, 1996.
Forestry
Thomas P. Sullivan, Dept. of Forest Sciences,
July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Coordinator of Health Sciences/Medicine
Arminee Kazanjian, Centre of Health Services & Policy Research/ Dept. of Health Care &
Epidemiology, Sept 1, 1994 to Mar 31, 1995.
Law
Robin M. Elliot, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Medicine
Joanne Weinberg, Dept. of Anatomy, Jan 1,
1995 to June 30, 1995.
Noelle L. Lamb. School of Audiology & Speech
Sciences, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Susan Penfold. Dept. of Psychiatry. July 1,
1995 to June 30, 1996.
Catherine Backman. School of Rehabilitation
Sciences, Jan 1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
Isabel Dyck,  School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jan 1, 1995 to June 30, 1995.
Wendy Darlene Reid. School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Jan 1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
Bill Nelems, Dept. of Surgery, Sept 1, 1994 to
Aug 31, 1995.
Science
Gerald Neufeld, Dept. of Computer Science,
Sept 1, 1994 to Aug 31, 1994.
Alastair J. Sinclair, Dept. of Geological Sciences, Sept 1, 1994 to Aug 31, 1995.
Paul L. Smith, Dept. of Geological Sciences,
July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Rosemary Knight. Dept. of Geophysics and Astronomy, July 1, 1994 to December 31, 1994.
See GAZETTE Page 6 18 UBC Reports • August 11, 1994
UBC GAZETTE
Continued from Page 5
CHANGES TO STUDY LEAVES
Arts
Paul Yachnin, Dept. of English, from
Janl, 1995-Aug31, 1995toJanl,
1995 - Jun 30, 1995.
Commerce
W.T. Stanbury, from Jan. 1, 1994 -
Jun 30, 1994 to Jan. 1, 1994 - Dec.
31, 1994.
Science
G. Stephen Pond, Dept. of Oceanography, from July 1, 1994 - Jun 30,
1995 to July 1, 1995-Jun 30, 1996.
9THF.W I.F.AVRS
Applied Science
John Gaitanakis. School of Architecture, July 1, 1994 to Dec 31,
1994.
Roberta Hewat, School of Nursing,
Sept 1, 1994 to Dec 31, 1994.
Carole Robinson, School of Nursing, Sept 1, 1994 to Dec 31, 1994.
Louise Tenn,  School of Nursing,
Sept 1, 1994 to Dec 31, 1994.
Arts
Joshua S. Mostow. Dept. of Asian
Studies, July 1, 1994 to June 30,
1995.
Catherine Swatek, Dept. of Asian Studies, Sept 1, 1994 to Aug 31, 1995.
Kenneth R. Lum, Dept. of Fine Arts,
July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Jeff Wall, Dept. of Fine Arts, July 1,
1994 to June 30, 1995.
David W. Edgington, Dept. of Geog
raphy, Sept 1, 1994toAug31, 1995.
Patricia Shaw, Dept. of Linguistics,
Sept 1, 1994 to Dec 31. 1994.
Richard Johnston, Dept. of Political Science, Sept 1, 1994 to May 31,
1995.
David J. Albert, Dept. of Psychology, Jan 1, 1995 to Dec 31, 1995.
Charles E. Siegel. Dept. of Theatre
& Film, July 1,  1994 to June 30,
1995.
Commerce
Espen Eckbo, Jan 1, 1995 to June
30, 1995.
Murray Frank, July 1, 1994 to June
30, 1995.
Burton Hollifield. Sept 1. 1994 to
Aug 31, 1995.
Mihkel M. Tombak. Sept 1. 1994 to
August 31, 1995.
David Tse, July 1, 1994 to June 30,
1995.
Josef Zechner, Aug 1, 1994 to July
31, 1995.
Dentistry
Lance Martin Rucker, Dept. of Clinical Dental Sciences, Sept 1, 1994 to
Aug 31, 1995.
Education
Arthur J. More, Dept. of Educational Psychology & Special Education, Sept 1, 1994 to Aug 31, 1995.
Rita Watson. Dept. of Educational
Psychology & Special Education, July
1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Alison Dewar, School of Human Kinetics, Sept 1, 1994toAug31. 1995.
Robert Sparks, School of Human
Kinetics, Jan 1, 1995 to Dec 31,
1995.
Law
Robin Elliot, July 1,
30, 1997.
1995 to June
Science
Samuel T. Chanson, Dept. of Computer Science, Jan 1, 1994 to Dec
31, 1995.
CHANGES TO UNPAID LEAVES
Arts
Keizo Nagatani, Dept. of Economics, from Sept 1, 1994 - Aug 31,1995
to July 1, 1994 - June 30, 1995.
ADMINISTRATIVE LEAVES
Arts
Olav Slaymaker. Dept. of Geography, July 1, 1995 to August 31,
1996.
Errol Durbach, Dept. of Theatre &
Film, July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Commerce
Donald A. Wehrung. July 1, 1994 to
June 30, 1995.
Education
Murray Elliott. Dept. of Educational
Studies, July 1, 1994 to June 30,
1995.
Ron MacGregor, Dept. of Curriculum Studies, July 1, 1994 to June
30, 1995.
Medicine
Judith Johnston, School of Audiology & Speech Sciences, Jan. 1, 1995
to June 30, 1995.
Phil Bragg, Dept. of Biochemistry,
July 1, 1994 to June 30, 1995.
Faculties
- exceed
expectations
during fund-
raising drive
More than $60,000 has been
raised during alumni telephone
fund-raising campaigns recently held by UBC's faculties
of Forestry, Law and Medicine.
The faculties of Forestry and
Law, which expected to raise
$7,500 each, exceeded their
goal by about 30 per cent.
Forestry raised more than
$12,000 to support the Faculty Endowment Fund, the
~*~ Marc Gormley Memorial Bursary and the recently established Brenda Hansen Memorial Scholarship, which will
benefit graduate students specializing in integrated forest
research management and timber supply analysis.
The Faculty of Law raised
"*~       more   than  $10,000  for  the
Dean  of Law Fund  and  the
Friends  of the  Law  Library
Fund.
In addition to funding student conferences, faculty research projects, guest lecturers and equipment purchases,
^ the Dean of Law Fund will also
support activities planned to
celebrate the faculty's 50th anniversary throughout 1995.
Medical alumni pledged
more than $30,000 to help finance completion of the UBC
Medical Student and Alumni
Centre. Phase one of the 7,000-
square-foot centre was completed in 1990. Plans for phase
two of the centre include the
construction of meeting rooms,
^ an exercise room, showers,
lockers and storage space.
More telepledge campaigns
by other UBC faculties are being planned.
tt...the best organized
International Congress
mwMMwmm
<6...You provided meeting rooms for almost 4,000 people
and accommodation for over 2,000 for two weeks and did it
in a friendly and efficient manner.*
Dr. Gordon A. McBean - International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics
6*...You performed beyond the call of duty and were able
to foresee potential problems before they happened *
Dr. Daniel F. Gardiner- UBC Program for Executive Development
<* ...a mark of excellence to supply the needs of a
conference and receive no complaints!"
Mary Lou Bishoff- Anglican Renewal Ministries Conference
Let us help you plan
the best conference you've ever attended
•Accommodation in highrise towers with spectacular
ocean and mountain views
• Set on 1,000 wooded acres only 15 minutes from
Vancouver city centre
• Flexible meeting areas for groups from 10 to 3,000
• Complete audio-visual services and satellite
communications available
• Catering for events from barbecues to dinner dances
• Comprehensive conference organization and
systems support
Write, phone
or fax for
video and
information
UBC
Conference
Centre
University of British Columbia
5961 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 2C9
Telephone (604) 822-1060
Fax (604) 822-1069
Classified
The classified advertising rate is $ 15 for 35 words or
less. Each additional word is 50 cents. Rate includes
GST. Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to the UBC Community Relations
Office, 207-6328 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C.,
V6T 1Z2, accompanied by payment in cash, cheque
(made out to UBC Reports) or internal requisition.
Advertising enquiries: 822-3131.
The deadline for the September 8, 1994
issue of UBC Reports is noon, August 30.
Sendees
SINGLES NETWORK Single science
professionals and others
interested in science or natural
history are meeting through a
nationwide network. Contact us
for info: Science Connection,
P.O. Box 389, Port Dover, Ontario,
NOA 1N0; e-mail 71554.2160®
compuserve.com; 1-800-667-
5179.
EDITORIAL SERVICES Substantive
editing, copy editing, rewriting,
dissertations, reports, books. I
would be delighted to look at
your manuscript, show you how I
could improve it, and tell you
what I would charge. Please call
me for more information. Timothy
King, 263-6058.
FINANCIAL PLANNING,
Retirement Income, Life
Insurance. Local, independent,
personalized service with
comprehensive knowledge at
no cost or obligation. Integrating your financial needs to your
own personal, professional
association, group and
government benefit plans.
Please call Edwin Jackson BSc,
BArch, CIF, 224-3540.
ADULTEVENING ENGLISH Courses
by outstanding teachers at
Dorset Advanced Learning
Institute. We offer courses in all
language skill areas to Adult ESL
learners in intermediate and
advanced levels. Call 879-8686.
ACCENT REDUCTION, formal
speaking skills and all areas of
pronunciation for advanced
levels. TSE preparation and
practice starting Sept. 1994.
Private, professional, intensive
instruction. Downtown location,
689-5918.
EXPERIENCED TEACHER/TUTOR
Get ready for school, English as a
Second Language (ESL), English,
Social Studies, Math to Grade
10. Training in learning disabilties
and ESL. Call Lyn, 228-8669.
For Sale
MAC II CLASSIC computer for
sale. Brand new and never been
taken out of box. $900. Call Miro
at 631-6648.
Accommodation
POINT GREY GUEST HOUSE A
perfect spot to reserve
accommodation for guest
lecturers or other university
members who visit throughout
the year. Close to UBC and other
Vancouver attractions, a tasteful
representation of our city and of
UBC. 4103 W.lOth Ave.
Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2H2. Call
(604) 228-8635.
FALSE CREEK CONDO FOR RENT
furnished, 2 bdrms, 2 full
bathrooms, garage, balcony,
overlooking Fisherman's Marina,
steps to Granville Island Market.
Available Sept. for 10 months.
$1600/mo. Call 737-2803, 739-
0302.
FOR RENT Furn. 2 floors of house,
overlooking park in Dunbar.
Quiet, 6 rms, spacious deck,
garage. Incl: gardener, cleaning
lady twice/mo., cable, util. 1
block to bus & community centre,
2blocks to shops. Close to UBC.
Ideal for visiting professor/
professional couple. Avail. Oct.
1, '94. N/S, N/P, Refs.$l,750. Tel/
fax (604)987-3546.
SUBLET UBC Endowment Lands,
Aug. 23, '94-Sept. 1, '95. Furn. 2
bdrm, row housing with
basement. Shared backyard.
Kings Rd. behind UBC village. 5
min. walk to campus. $975/mo.
incl. hydro, cable, w/d. N/S,
references, damage deposit rqd.
Peter (604)228-1815.
Housing Wanted
NONSMOKING PROFESSIONAL
couple require furnished or
unfurnished house or condo near
UBC. Will housesit or reasonable
rent. Call Linda at (403) 433-8288
or 492-4638 (daytime).
EXECUTIVE COUPLE Mature
visiting executive couple seeks 2
or 3 bdrm furnished house (with
computer(s), if possible) for Oct.
30/94 to Apr. 30/95 (flexible). Nonsmoking, no pets, no children.
Tel. (613) 232-7632; Fax (613) 232-
8162; E-mail:ak916@freenet
•carlton»ca
HOUSING WANTED Non-smoking
professional couple seek a
furnished house or apartment to
rent from Jan. 1 to June 30,1995.
Strong preference for on or near
UBC campus. Call David at 224-
3751 or 822-8216 (daytime).
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Call822-3131 UBC Reports-August 11, 1994 19
Ross
People
by staff writers
Dr. Peggy Ross, a clinical associate professor of Anesthesia, has been
appointed associate dean. Equity, in the Faculty of Medicine for a three-
year term.
The newly created position is the only one of its scope
at any Canadian university.
Ross, a graduate of UBC's Faculty of Medicine,
completed a fellowship in Anesthesia at the University of
Toronto before becoming the first woman on staff in the
Dept. of Anesthesia at Toronto Western Hospital.
A past president of the Federation of Medical Women
of Canada (B.C. branch), she also served as director of
UBC's Obstetrical Anesthesia Resident Training Program from 1984 to 1992.
Ross is currently chair of education of B.C.'s Women's Hospital and Health Centre Medical Advisory
Committee and chair of the hospital's Outreach Education Committee.
As the associate dean, Equity, Ross is responsible for
issues related to gender, human rights, minorities and the disabled of concern
to students, residents and faculty in the Faculty of Medicine.
Steve Crombie, manager of Media Relations in the Community Relations
Office, has been named as a director of the Council for the Advancement
and Support of Education, District VIII.
The district represents professionals in public affairs, development, alumni
and government relations working at post-secondary institutions in B.C.,
Alberta, Washington, Oregon, Idaho and Montana.
Crombie's appointment is part of an effort to improve Canadian representation at the U.S.-based organization.
Peter Ufford, vice-president of External Affairs, has been appointed to the
Sport B.C. board of directors for a two-year term.
Ufford joins Kim Gordon, intercollegiate coordinator in the Dept. of
Athletics and Sport Services, who has been a board member since 1993.
Sport B.C. is a non-profit society founded in 1965 to maximize sport
participation and excellence in the province.  Members include more than 80
provincial sport organizations. Ufford has also been appointed to the Board of
Governors of Olympic Trust.
UBC's Development Director Ron Dumouchelle has
been named president of the Canadian Council for
the Advancement of Education (CCAE).
Dumouchelle, who was vice-president of the CCAE in
1993-94, will serve a one-year term.
He became director ofthe Development Office in 1988
and since that time has played an instrumental role in
the university's major capital campaign, A World of
Opportunity, the most successful fund-raising campaign
ever conducted by a Canadian university.
The CCAE is a national organization with members
drawn from more than 150 universities, colleges and
related organizations. Members are professionals in the
fields of alumni relations, fund raising and development,
public affairs and marketing, information services, and government relations.
Dumouchelle
Dr. Martin Hollenberg, dean of UBC's Faculty of Medicine, is the recipient ofthe 1994 J.C.B. Grant Award, the most prestigious award presented by the Canadian Association of Anatomists (CAA).
The award recognizes the outstanding contributions of a senior Canadian
anatomist in the field of anatomical sciences.
Hollenberg, who was appointed dean in 1990, was a professor in UBC's
Dept. of Anatomy from 1971 to 1975, and an honorary professor in the Dept.
of Ophthalmology.
Since his first appointment to UBC, he has served as professor and head of
Morphological Science at the University of Calgary, the dean of medicine at
the University of Western Ontario and the associate dean of research in the
Faculty of Medicine at the University of Toronto.
Hollenberg's areas of research are retinal regeneration and high-resolution
scanning electron microscopy.
He was presented with the award in Montreal on June 17 at the CAA's
annual banquet.
Physics Prof. Myer Bloom has been awarded the highest Danish academic
degree, doctor technices honoris causa, from the Technical University of
Denmark for his outstanding and fundamental contributions to the
physics and chemistry of biological systems.
Members of the Danish Royal Family and the minister of education were
present at the May 6 ceremony. Conferral of this honorary degree is a rare
event. Bloom is the only recipient this year and the last time it was bestowed
was in 1992.
The award recognizes his outstanding research in the use of nuclear
magnetic resonance techniques in chemical physics, condensed matter
physics and biophysics.
Bloom, who is also director of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Program on Science of Soft Surfaces and Interfaces, has collaborated
for 15 years with researchers at the Danish Technical University.
Fearless Flyer
Abe Hefter photo
Secured in a spotting harness, five-year old Pippa Mackie flies through the
air with the greatest of ease while bouncing on a trampoline during a session
at a gymnastics camp, organized by UBC Community Sport Services. The
camp, which is open to all ages, continues until Sept. 2. The fall gymnastics
program begins Sept. 26.  For more information call 822-3688.
UBC athletes, coaches in
Commonwealth Games
by Abe Hefter
Staff writer
Seven athletes and three coaches from
UBC will represent Canada at the 1994
Commonwealth Games, Aug. 18-28, in
Victoria.
Zeba Crook, Graeme Fell and Jeff
Schiebler will take part in the athletics
competition while Paige Gordon is the
only Canadian entered in the three diving
events.
Schiebler and Crook will take winning
performances into the Commonwealth
Games. Schiebler finished first in the
5,000-metre event at the Canadian Track
and Field Championships last month in
Victoria, while Crook won the 3,000-
metre steeplechase.
Fell, the Canadian record holder in the
3,000-metre steeplechase, was selected
after meeting qualification standards for
the 1994 Goodwill Games.
Gordon won a silver medal in the three-
metre springboard event and a bronze in
the 10-metre platform competition at the
Senior Summer Nationals held last month
in Nepean, Ont. She will compete in those
events in Victoria as well as the one-
metre event competition and is a definite
threat to come away as a triple-medalist.
Kevin Draxinger and Turlough O'Hare,
two alumni swimmers, will be heading to
the Commonwealth Games as well, as will
alumni distance runner Carey Nelson.
UBC track and field coach Carmyn
James will be the assistant coach and
jumps coach for the Canadian track and
field team. Mike Murray, who works with
the track and field team at UBC, will be
the sprints and relay coach, while UBC
swim coach Tom Johnson will work as an
assistant coach on the Canadian swim
team.
Gymnastics coach Jeff Thomson will
work the games as the head Canadian
judge for the men's gymnastics competition.
In addition, the Allan McGavin Sports
Medicine Centre will be well represented
at the games with co-directors Dr. Doug
Clement and Dr. Jack Taunton contributing their expertise.
Clement will be co-mayor of the Athlete's Village, along with his wife, Diane,
while Taunton will be a host physician.
They will be joined from the centre by Dr.
Connie Lebrun, who is on the games'
medical commission, physiotherapist
Trish Hopkins, as well Heather Biagi,
Nancy McLaren, Linda Filsinger, and
Suzanne Muir, who will work in doping
control, along with promotions coordinator Malcolm Smillie.
Dr. Bob McCormack, an assistant professor in the Faculty of Medicine, will be
the chief medical officer for the Canadian
team. 20 UBC Reports • August 11, 1994
Forum
Replacing the GST:
Consumption tax alternative
by Jon Kesselman
(Jon Kesselman is a professor of Economics
and director of the Centre for Research and
Economic and Social Policy at UBC. This column
is based on an article to be published in the
Canadian Tax Journal.)
Replacing the Goods and Services Tax (GST)
has turned into a much thornier task than the
federal government ever anticipated. Overlooked
in this exercise is a much simpler, more direct
way of operating a consumption tax. Instead of
applying to each outlay, a Direct Consumption
Tax (DCT) would be applied to the sources of
funds for spending.
A tax like the GST is based on the value
added in a business, which can be divided into
the total labour compensation plus the cash
flows to business. A DCT would tax each of
these components at source at a flat rate. The
tax would be applied to all employee pay and
taxable benefits, all pensions and retirement
benefits, and public transfers that are not
income-tested.
A DCT would also apply to the cash flows of
businesses, whether non-corporate or corporate and regardless of their size. Cash flow is
similar to taxable income except that it allows
full write-off of capital purchases rather than a
depreciation allowance, and it does not allow
deduction of interest expense. As a consumption
tax, the DCT would not apply to capital income
such as interest, dividends and capital gains.
While the DCT would be applied at a flat rate,
households at lower incomes would receive
compensation for their DCT through refundable tax credits. Since these payments could be
based on the actual DCT paid, the compensation would be much better targeted and less
costly than that for the GST.
Careful analysis finds that a DCT would be
similar to the GST in its major economic properties such as incentives for savings, investment, and work effort; labour demand and
unemployment; and international trade competitiveness. Moreover, the DCT's greater neutrality in application to smaller businesses and
across sectors of the economy, including the
public sector, would improve the economy's
efficiency.
The DCT would operate as a supplement to
existing excise, personal, and corporate taxes.
For example, its application to employees would
involve additional sums withheld against taxable compensation and remitted by employers
along with regular personal tax and social
insurance premiums. Business cash flows
would be taxed in the personal and corporate
taxes by a simple add-on using several adjustments to net taxable income.
The DCT would carry far less operational
costs for government and business than the
GST. It would save at least three-quarters ofthe
GSTs $500 million annual administrative costs
and its $1 billion to $1.5 billion compliance
costs. Total savings to the economy would
exceed $1 billion per year.
The transition to a DCT could be extremely
simple, rapid and inexpensive. It would entail
nothing like the disruptions of instituting the
GST, which have caused many groups, particularly from the business community, to oppose
major changes for the GST.
Several options are available for replacing
the GST with a DCT that would raise the same
net revenues. If combined with excise tax increases on alcohol, gasoline, and tobacco products to offset the removal of the GST, the DCT
would need a rate of 2.9 per cent. If further
combined with a continued tax of seven per
cent on new cars and homes (but not home
repairs and renovations), the requisite rate
would drop to 2.2 per cent.
If instead of firing the GST bureaucracy of
some 5,000 employees, they were reassigned to
tougher enforcement of existing tax laws and
an all-out attack on the underground economy,
a DCT rate in the range of 1.5 per cent might be
feasible.
A DCT also offers opportunities for improved
balance in federal-provincial finances. Each
province could set its own rate of DCT, with the
feds operating and collecting the tax for them.
With federal transfers correspondingly reduced,
the provinces would be more accountable for
their spending and taxing decisions. Applied in
this fashion, the DCT might be labelled a National
Health and Education Levy.
A Direct Consumption Tax offers important
advantages over proposals advanced by the
government and the House Finance Committee.
Those proposals focus on the harmonization of
provincial retail sales taxes with the federal GST.
•A DCT would eliminate the complexity and
operational burdens of the GST, which include
special treatment of particular industries and
transactions, such as insurance, real estate,
financial services, the public sector, non-profit
groups, imported services, leasing, fringe benefits, and many others.
•A DCT would remove the remaining economic distortions of the GST, which impose
competitive biases between small firms and
larger firms, the public and private sectors, and
particular industries. This would improve the
economy's efficiency and equity.
•Unlike the GST, a DCT would provide broad
coverage of all goods and services, since it
applies to the sources rather than uses of funds.
A DCT would effectively cover items that are
controversial under an indirect tax, such as
books and groceries.
•A DCT would avoid the need to raise marginal rates of personal income tax that is part of
the government's current proposal. It could
even allow for a reversal of the high-income
surtax hikes that accompanied the introduction
ofthe GST, yielding salutary effects on savings,
avoidance, and evasion behaviours.
•Even with such changes, the DCT would be
substantially less regressive than the current
GST. The DCT would also avoid the GST's tax
burdens and cash flow strains on lower-income
persons reliant on income-tested transfer programs; they would not pay DCT.
•Applied as a direct tax rather than on
individual purchases or at the border, the DCT
would reduce the incentives to smuggle, enhance the attractions of Canada to foreign tourists, and attack the growing numbers of Canadians residing abroad part-year who avoid the
GST both when they earn in Canada and when
they spend abroad.
•A DCT would be much less prone to evasion
than the GST. Tax would be withheld at source
and applied at a much lower rate than the GST,
and a DCT would remove the lever for consumers to bargain. Conversely, GST harmonization
would raise the effective tax rates on many
services, the area ofthe economy most vulnerable to evasion.
•As an explicit deduction from pay cheques
and other taxable payments, a DCT would retain a high degree of visibility while eliminating
the irksome properties of the GST for consumers. This is vital for maintaining the accountability of governments, which would be sacrificed under proposals for tax-inclusive pricing
with a reformed GST.
•Unlike the official proposals, implementing
a DCT would not require agreement of the
provinces. Achieving such assent, if it is possible at all, might entail costly compromises to
other aspects ofthe tax and fiscal systems.
•A DCT would not shift a larger tax burden
from businesses to consumers, which would be
involved under official proposals to harmonize
the provincial sales taxes with a system that
provides input credits for all business purchases.
•While replacing the GST with a DCT would
not harmonize the two indirect taxes, it would
eliminate the indirect tax that is by far the more
costly, complex, and burdensome to operate. It
would also bring Canada's tax mix more into
line with that of our major trading partner and
free up our borders.
The government's current proposal would
serve to enlarge the GST, albeit under a new
name. Instituting a Direct Consumption Tax
would allow the government to deliver on its
original promise to scrap the GST and also yield
significant economic benefits.
Ready For A Crisis
Abe Hefter photo
A member of the Hazardous Materials Response Team
(HAZMAT) practises first aid skills on Dorit Mason, an
assistant in the Dept. of Health, Safety and Environment,
during an emergency drill. University Endowment Lands
Fire Dept. members responded to the staged situation in
which Mason was to have spilled boiling radioactive material
in the Biological Sciences Building.
News Digest
A weekly list of travel bargains highlighting last minute
specials to various destinations and promotional fares on
upcoming departures is available to UBC faculty and staff
from UBC's travel program co-ordinator in the Purchasing
Department.
In addition,  faculty and staff are now eligible to receive
discounts at Vancouver Airport's main and economy parking lots
with presentation of a university identification sticker, also
available upon request from UBC's travel program co-ordinator.
For more information, call 822-5878 or fax 822-3261.
• • • •
U.S. pharmaceutical manufacturer Burroughs Wellcome Inc.
is extending its competitive awards programs to Canadian
researchers in the basic medical sciences.
More than $9 million US in awards, worth more than
$500,000 each, will be available to up to 12 Canadian and
American scientists beginning in 1995.
For more information, write to The Burroughs Wellcome Fund,
Morrisville, North Carolina 27560-9771 U.S.A.; phone (919) 991-
5100 or fax (919) 941-5884. Deadline for applications is Oct. 1,
1994.
• • • •
The B.C. Health Research Foundation, the B.C. Medical
Services Foundation and the P.A. Woodward's Foundation
are collaborating to make $110,000 available to support
nursing research.
Information and application packages for the new initiative,
called the Nursing Research Competition, are available from the
B.C. Health Research Foundation which is administering the
program.
The deadline for submission of proposals is Oct. 17, 1994.
The UBC Project:
Reconciling Human Welfare and Ecological Carrying Capacity
presents:
Dr. Herman E. Daly
School of Public Affairs
University of Maryland
Woodward Instructional Resource Centre
Lecture Theatre 2
Thursday September 8, 1994
8 pm
"Fostering Sustainability"
Herman Daly is one of the founders of the field of ecological
economics. This new vision of economics explores the conflict
between traditional economic goals and ecological constraints to
economic activity. Known for the elegance of his writing and the
clarity of his analysis, Daly is the author of many books and articles.
Twenty years afterthe publication of his visionary work, Steady State
Economics, Daly's analysis is being used as a new framework for
academic research and social policy. Daly's work has been concerned with both the conceptual issues in ecological economics and
with developing policy actions for creating a sustainable economy.
For information call 822-9150

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