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UBC Publications

UBC Reports Nov 30, 1995

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 THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
T TBC REPORTS
Crawlies
Not
Creepy
Entomologist
Karen Needham of
the Dept. of
Zoology lets her
Australian leaf
insects
(Ex tatosoma
tiaratum) out for a
romp. Other
occupants of her
office include:
Miss Muffet, a
pink-toed
tarantula; Elvira
III, the black
widow spider and
a pair of African
praying mantis
named Bonnie and
Clyde.
Charles Ker photo
Campus network spurs
technological initiatives
by Charles Ker
Stciff writer
They're called Evaporating Gaseous
Globules and it is from these EGGs that
newborn stars are hatched.
By coincidence, UBC astronomer
Jaymie Matthews had just finished explaining current theories about the origin
of stars and planets to first-year students
when news arrived that the Hubble Space
Telescope had obtained detailed images
of EGGs on the edge of a vast star-
forming cloud 7.000 light years away.
Within days Matthews had pulled the
spectacular colour images of the cloud,
known as the Eagle Nebula, off the World
Wide Web and presented them, fresh
from orbit, to his Astronomy 101 class.
'Translating our earthbound view of
the night sky with only static overhead
transparencies and clunky old plastic
and cardboard models was a teaching
nightmare," says Matthews. "Computer
simulations and electronic images make
it easier for students to understand what
I'm talking about. It makes it more fun for
them to learn and for me to teach."
For more than two years, the assistant
professor has been introducing multimedia technology into astronomy classes and
labs to make arcane concepts such as star
formation more accessible. Through the
use of laser discs, video and liquid crystal
display (LCD) panels, he successfully
makes abstract ideas come alive.
Matthews is one of several professors
in the Dept. of Geophysics and Astronomy
who are applying technology-enhanced
instruction (TEI) developed at UBC for
use on campus and in B.C. secondary
schools.
TEI projects are among 30 initiatives,
worth $1.3 million, submitted to the province for the 1995/96 Skills Now! Innovation Fund program.
Last year, the university received $2.67
million from the provincial government in
support of its Innovation Fund submission titled "An Integrated Plan to Extend
and Improve University Instruction to British Columbians." The plan consisted of an
initial 33 projects and has sparked a campus-wide drive to improve the human
skills needed to apply new digital media
and the critical networking infrastructures which deliver multimedia services.
Spearheading the "Integrated Plan -
Year 2" is a core group of faculty and staff
which oversees UBC's Media Resources
Network (MRN) at the Media Services
TELEcentre.
Margaret Ellis, MRN co-ordinator, says
the network emphasizes campus collaboration to ensure efficient and effective use
ofthe limited media resources available.
"We have to maximize what we already
have in terms of human resources at the
same time as building up our networking
infrastructure," says Ellis.
Ellis points to the efforts of UBC's Centre for Faculty Development and Instructional Services as a good example of the
kind of collaboration the MRN promotes.
Working with the Media and Graphics
Interdisciplinary Centre (MAGIC), Continuing Studies and the MRN, the centre
has conducted eight instructional technology seminars this year attended by
238 faculty from 70 departments. An
additional 200 faculty, staff and students
have attended four multimedia seminars
held by the MRN. And the waiting lists for
future seminars keep growing.
Barry McBride, dean of Science, heads
the MRN steering committee and cautions
that while there may be a great deal of
enthusiasm for technological initiatives
on campus, enthusiasm only goes so far.
"Having software is one thing," McBride
says. "Our big stumbling block is having
See TECHNOLOGY Page 2
Bressler appointed
new V-P, research
Bernard Bressler, professor and head
ofthe Dept. of Anatomy, has been named
vice-president, Research for a four-year
term that begins Jan. 1.
As vice-president, Bressler will be responsible for promoting and administering research including increasing university-industry linkages within the university and throughout the community and
developing commercial
applications of university-based research.
UBC faculty currently receive more than
$ 125 million in research
grants and contracts
annually and conduct
more than 60 per cent of
all research done in B.C.
"Bernie Bressler is a
top researcher with a
keen understanding of
the complex issues facing our talented research community. His
insight and energy will
benefit all our faculty in
the sciences, social sciences and humanities," said UBC President David Strangway.
Bressler obtained his BSc from Sir
George Williams University (now
Concordia) in Montreal and an MSc in
anatomy and a PhD in physiology from
the University of Manitoba.
After post doctoral studies in the Dept.
of Neuroscience at McMaster University,
he took his first academic position at the
University of Saskatchewan.
Bressler joined UBC's Anatomy Dept.
as an assistant professor in 1976.
As an active research scientist, he has
been funded by the Medical Research Council of Canada for 23 years. He is a muscle
biophysicist whose research has contributed significantly to the development of
Bressler
the cross-bridge model to explain how
force is generated in skeletal muscle.
Bressler's laboratory has also studied the
biophysical and structural alterations of
skeletal muscle in neuromuscular disorders such as muscular dystrophy.
At UBC, Bressler has performed many
administrative and academic duties, including a previous position in the office of
the vice president. Research as associate vice-
president for the Health
Sciences.
He has also served as
; a member of the UBC
Senate and as associate
dean. Research and
Graduate Studies in the
Faculty of Medicine.
Bressler has held numerous professional positions, including president of the Canadian Association of Anatomists
and the Canadian Federation of Biological Sciences. He has also held
positions with SPARK (Strategic Planning
for Applied Research and Knowledge), the
economic development arm ofthe Science
Council of B.C. He has served as a member, scientific officer and. most recently,
chair of the Cell Physiology Committee of
the Medical Research Council of Canada.
Currently, he is MRC regional director for
UBC.
Martha Salcudean, associatevice-presi-
dent, Research, has been vice-president.
Research, pro tern, since the departure of
Robert Miller in September, but chose not
to stand as a candidate for the position.
She postponed her departure from the
office ofvice-president, Research, until the
new appointment had been made and will
be on administrative leave in 1996.
Scholarship memorial to
scientist's commitment
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
Wood Science Prof. Paul Steiner's commitment to education and his field is
being commemorated by his friends and
colleagues through the creation of an
undergraduate scholarship in his name.
Members ofthe Dept. of Wood Science
have pooled their resources to create an
endowment fund in memory of Steiner,
who died May 10 at age 50. The fund,
including a $5,000 donation from Canadian Forest Products Ltd. (CANFOR) and
gifts from graduate students, industry
See SCHOLARSHIP Page 2
Inside
Wise Words
Offbeat: History Prof. Ted Hill guides students down the academic path
Bridge Building 12
Forum: Moura Quayle makes the case for UBC community planning
High Headroom 13
Four departments will enjoy closer collaboration in new AMPEL lab
Beyond Blues 16
Profile: Shaila Misri works for timely treatment of postpartum depression 2 UBC Reports • November 30, 1995
Technology
Continued from Page 1
the equipment to use it."
A recent presentation by Maria
Klawe, vice-president, Student
and Academic Services, to the
UBC Board of Governors, outlined some possible campus infrastructure targets: each faculty
and staff desk equipped with an
up-to-date (less than four years
old) computer connected to the
net; all faculty, staff and students
having e-mail and access to the
Internet; all students owning computers; and ports in campus
buildings for connecting student
computers with a desired ratio of
one port to 10 students.
This wish list is counterbalanced by current campus facts.
A survey Klawe conducted last
summer shows the ratio of ports
to students is presently one to
20. Of 80 major buildings on
campus (including the library
and Continuing Studies labs)
about one-quarter have undergraduate computer labs. Computers in undergraduate labs
number about 1,500 with approximately two-thirds having an
Ethernet connection.
The survey also found that
administrative and academic
service units are generally better
equipped with computers and
better connected electronically
than academic units.
Klawe says rapid changes in
technology make it difficult to
estimate how much it would cost
to attain the targets set out in her
report. Rough estimates indicate
one-time costs might range from
$10-$25 million, with new recurring costs of$5-$ 10 million. Klawe
says this level of funding can only
be achieved through trade-offs
Administrative Units vs. Academic Units
E*J Administrative Units
E3 Science
Q Arts
H Faculties ■ Genera!
% ra !>•> & ,-jff
vwtr crp iter
% Faculty ii Staff
with up-to-date computer
* Faculty » Staff
with high-speed connection
Findings of a recent campus survey suggest the availability
of computing technology varies greatly, not only between
administrative and academic units, but between faculties.
with other important university
priorities—decisions which need
to be made by the university community as a whole.
Klawe has assembled a broad-
based Advisory Committee on
Information Technology (ACIT)
to decide what targets are realistic and desirable and how they
might be achieved. The committee will be seeking input from the
campus on how best to close the
gaps between what people have
and what they need.
As for Matthews, he acknowledges that it's difficult to keep
pace with the changing technology used to incorporate multimedia in the university classroom. Still, he insists the effort is
worthwhile, especially at the
first-year level.
Scholarship
Continued from Page 1
colleagues and friends, now contains more than
$20,000 and will
generate an annual
scholarship of
$1,700 for a second
or third year student
in the Faculty of Forestry's new Wood
Science undergraduate program.
Louisa Steiner
said her husband
was told ofthe scholarship before he died and said he
was particularly happy to hear it
would go to undergraduate students.
"Paul was thrilled that (the
scholarship) was for undergraduate studies because that will help
bring people into advanced research," she said.
Steiner
INC.
•>.
PROFESSIONAL
WORLD   TRAVEL.
Christine Wisenthal
Travel Consultant
200 - 1847 West Broadway
Vancouver, B.C.V6J IY5
Tel: (604) 739-9199
Complete Travel
Arrangements:
Air, Rail, Cruise, Car Rental,
Accommodation.Tours,
Special Interest Travel
Prof. David Barrett, head of
the Dept. of Wood Science, said faculty
members felt the Paul
Robert Steiner Memorial Scholarship in
Wood Science was a
good way to remember
Steiner while also recognizing his interest in
encouraging students
to study wood science
and technology.
Steiner had a long
history of working closely with
industry and was internationally
recognized for his contributions
and pioneering research in the
fields of wood adhesives and wood
composites technology.
Matthews believes that it is
often a let-down for students
arriving at university to encounter old-fashioned teaching tools
like chalkboards and overhead
projectors housed in inadequate
lecture halls. But. he adds, "if
they can see computer
simulations in class, or results
from an observatory halfway
around the world or above it in
real time, that's when they get a
sense of being at the cutting
edge of research and education."
Correction
• UBC has been awarding honorary degrees since 1925. The year
was incorrectly reported in the
Nov. 16 issue of UBC Reports.
• Numerous departments on campus donated items for Creative
Writing's United Way rummage sale
held Oct. 31 - Nov. 1 and not as
prizes for the 50-50 draw as was
stated in the same issue.
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UBC REPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December, June, July and August) for the entire university
community by the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251
Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1.
Associate Director, University Relations: Steve Crombie
(Stephen.crombie@ubc.ca)
Managing Editor: Paula Martin(paula.rnartin@ubc.ca)
Editor/Production: Janet Ansell (janet.anseli@ubc.ca)
Contributors: Connie Filletti (connie.filletti@ubc.ca),
Stephen Forgacs (Stephen.forgacs@ubc.ca)
Charles Ker (charles.ker@ubc.ca),
Gavin Wilson (gavin.wilson@ubc.ca).
Editorial and advertising enquiries: (604) 822-3131 (phone),
(604) 822-2684 (fax).
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in UBC
Reports do not necessarily reflect official university policy.
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. Happy Holidays?
Gavin Wilson photo
Even Santa looks stressed. Students at Speakeasy, the AMS's peer counselling centre, were painting Christmas
decorations on their offices as soon as Halloween was over. Shown here, student volunteer Suzanne Harrington
puts on the finishing touches. Speakeasy is open most days for students who need to talk to someone about
any number of problems, including holiday blues, exam stress, eating disorders, alcohol and drugs, relationships
and homesickness.
Maclean's ranks UBC number 2
UBC has a reputation for being second
to only one, according to the 1995 Maclean s
magazine annual survey of Canadian universities.
The survey, released Nov. 13, says UBC
has the second-best overall reputation in
the category of post-secondary institutions offering medical and doctoral programs. Kingston's Queen's University
ranked number one.
In the same category, Maclean's puts
UBC among the top five universities with
a winning reputation for highest quality,
innovation and leadership.
The magazine bases its results on a
survey of 3,402 high school guidance counsellors, academic administrators and CEOs
of major corporations across Canada.
Top marks in the category for overall
ranking—which measures factors such
as class size, alumni support, operating
budget and faculty awards—went to the
University of Toronto for the second consecutive year, followed by Queen's Uni-
Offbeat
by staff writers
A quarter of the way through the 34-page booklet, A
Handbook for UBC History Students, Prof. Ted Hill gets to a
topic that hits close to home.
Under the title "What Do Historians Do All Day?" Hill
outlines the many obligations of faculty during the teaching
term and their research, writing and reading during the
rest of the year, especially summers and sabbaticals.
"Few students will know as much about these activities
as they should," he says. "A considerable number will ask
during their subsequent lives, as during their university
years, whether at the end of term in the spring, we have
any plans for our vacation, as if the entire period from May
through August was a vacation for faculty."
This is but one lament in the booklet's 1995 edition
which seeks to "help students in all four years of the history
department's courses by providing them with basic and
practical information."
After giving a straightforward introduction about what history is. Hill goes
on to delineate the various varieties of history, divisions of history and a
breakdown of faculty members and their interests.
On the practical side, the booklet provides information on writing term
papers, compiling a bibliography, writing examinations and study or work
abroad.
Before offering advice on how best to take notes in class. Hill offers this
humourous harangue:
"Every year some students dutifully or out of interest sit through our
lectures without taking any notes. Some of us who lecture can perhaps at
first believe that they have total recall of whatever they hear and are so
confident about this admirable capacity that they will not waste paper.
Unfortunately it is never so. These students always turn out to have the
same problems as other normal human beings in recalling what they have
heard. Most of the content of an average lecture is lost to them the moment
they leave class, or at best a few hours or lectures later in the same day."
Apart from their obvious usefulness in studying for exams. Hill also points
out that taking notes keeps students awake, makes them concentrate and
"indeed alert to whatever the lecturer is saying."
Proceeds from the sale of the $3 handbook help fund the Soward and
Upton Prizes for first-year history students.
versity which has held second spot for
three years. McGill University placed third.
This is the fourth consecutive year that UBC
has been fourth in the overall ranking.
The University of Victoria was leader of
the pack in Maclean's comprehensive category—a ranking of those universities that
offer a range of undergraduate and graduate programs. Simon Fraser University
placed second.
New Brunswick's Mount Allison University was first among primarily undergraduate institutions.
This year's survey included 39 universities, or 93 per cent of all English-language
universities in Canada. Eleven universities
did not participate in this year's survey,
including eight francophone institutions.
UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995 3
Physicians
pool HIV
resources
UBC is participating in a new initiative to create a national network of physicians caring for people living with HIV
and AIDS.
Main objectives ofthe Canadian HIV
Care-giving Physician Network (CHAP)
include the publication of a network
directory, said Dr. Robert Hogg, an assistant professor of Health Care and
Epidemiology and CHAP project coordinator.
"The development of a national directory of HIV care-giving physicians will
enable doctors to access advice on HIV
care and treatment, and enhance and
facilitate peer support between members of the profession working in the
field," he said. "It may also serve as a
useful resource for referring patients
who are moving or travelling within
Canada."
Listing in the directory will be voluntary for all CHAP registrants. Each network member may receive a copy of the
book, regardless of whether their name
appears.
CHAP also hopes to provide information about continuing medical education events and mentorship programs
which help train doctors in the management of HIV- and AIDS-related illnesses,
and about clinical trials of drug therapies which may be useful in treating HIV
and AIDS, Hogg said.
He estimates that 3,500 doctors across
Canada are eligible to participate in the
network which he expects to be established by May 1996.
"CHAP will give HIV care-giving physicians a national voice on issues related to HIV and AIDS care and treatment through surveying its membership," Hogg said.
CHAP is a collaborative effort among
UBC, St. Paul's Hospital and the B.C.
Ministry of Health. Funding for the project
is being provided by Health Canada and
the National AIDS Contribution Program
ofthe National AIDS Strategy Phase Two.
Physicians may register with the network or request more information by calling 631-5516 or faxing 631-5464.
Centre expands medical
research opportunities
The Jack Bell Research Centre—hailed
as the latest milestone in the 45-year
working relationship between UBC and
Vancouver Hospital and Health Sciences
Centre—was officially opened Nov. 20.
The centre will be operated in partnership to provide facilities for cancer biology, neuroscience, immuno-transplant
and trauma research.
UBC President David Strangway said
the centre will further expand and enhance UBC's already extensive medical
research program. It is one of the ways
UBC's Faculty of Medicine and Vancouver Hospital are increasing their mutual
co-operation.
The centre was funded by the B.C.
government through the Ministry of Skills,
Training and Labour with a major contribution from Vancouver philanthropist
Jack Bell, who helped finance the original
construction of the centre.
Bell is a long-time supporter of both
the hospital and the university.
The provincial government's contribution of $6.25 million enabled UBC's Faculty of Medicine to complete and occupy
four floors ofthe centre, which is located
at Vancouver Hospital.
This will provide opportunities for scientists and physicians who are members
of both institutions to create new knowledge, stimulate new industries and provide high-value jobs.
Scientists at risk
must act: Perry
Medical researchers in B.C. must
stand up and be counted or risk losing
grant funding to government cuts,
warns MLA Tom Perry (NDP-Vancouver-Little Mountain).
Scientists are facing two potential
sources of cuts—at the federal level to
the Medical Research Council budget
and to the provincially funded B.C.
Health Research Foundation, he said.
"Scientists have historically been too
diffident," said Perry. "We need to get
the message across to politicians of all
stripes that medical research is an essential service."
Perry made his remarks at the opening of the Jack Bell Research Centre.
He said that while B.C. can now
boast an excellent physical infrastructure, such as the Bell lab, the province's intellectual infrastructure is "extremely vulnerable." 4 UBC Reports • November 30, 1995
Calendar
December 3 through December 16
Sunday, Dec. 3
Performance
Dirty Dog River. Originally commissioned by BC Puppets Against
AIDS. MOA, 2-3pm. Free with
museum admission. Call 822-
5087.
Monday, Dec. 4
Seminar
Gut Development In The Nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans. Dr.
Jim McGhee, Dept. of Medical
Biochemistry, U of Calgary.
IRC#4,3:45pm. Refreshments at
3:30pm. Call 822-9871.
Seminar
From Love Scents To Hot Hell -
Maize Stem Borer Projects In Africa. Peeter Pats, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
Uppsala. MacMillan, 318D.
12:30pm. Call 822-9646.
Psychology Colloquium
The North American Polygraph
And Psychophysiology: Disinterested, Uninterested. And interested Perspective. John J.
Furedy. Prof, of Psychology. U of
Toronto and president. Society
for Academic Freedom and Scholarship. Kenny psychology lounge.
12:30pm. Call 822-2755.
Green College Speaker
Series
The Voltaire - Mill Perspective on
Academic Freedom Versus The
Culture Of Comfort Conspiracy
On Canadian Campuses: A
Wake-up Call On The Academic
Community. John Furedy, Prof,
of Psychology, U of T and president, Society for Academic Freedom and Scholarship. Green
College recreation lounge, 4-
5:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Green College Video
Presentation
Mixing Messages: Meddling With
Media. Katherine Dodds. video
producer, SHE TV. Green College recreation lounge, 7:30-9pm.
Call 822-6067.
Tuesday, Dec. 5
Dept. of Animal Science
Seminar Series
Ovarian Follicular Dynamics In
Cattle. Mohan Manikkam, PhD
candidate, Dept. of Animal Science. MacMillan 158. 12:30pm.
Refreshments. Call 822 4593.
Medical Genetics
Departmental Seminar
The Impact Of Endogenous
Retroviruses On The Human
Genome. Dr. Dixie Mager, associate prof.. Medical Genetics.
Wesbrook201, 4:30pm. Refreshments in 226. 4pm. Call 822-
5312.
Seminar
Energy-Use And Behaviour Of
Up-River Migrating Fraser
Sockeye. Scott Hinch. Westwater
Research. BioSciences 1465.
3:30pm. Call 822-2821.
Seminar
Effective Questioning Skills.
Marion Pearson, Instructor, Div.
of Pharmaceutics and
Biopharmaceutics, Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Science. 1RC#3.
12:30pm. Call 822-4645.
Scholarly Colloquia
Overview Of Community Research Funding Opportunities
Available Through The British
Columbia Health Research Foundation. ChrisCrossfield, Program
Co-ordinator, BC Health Research Fdn. Vancouver Hosp/
HSC  UBC  Pavilion. T206.
5:30pm. Call 822-7453.
4:30-
Lectures in Modern
Chemistry
Molecular Conformation. Recognition. And Photochemistry: The
Amide Connection. Prof. Fred
Lewis, Dept. of Chemistry, Northwestern U, Chicago, 111.. Chemistry, D200 (centre block), lpm.
Refreshments from 12:40pm. Call
822-3266.
Green College Writer in
Residence
Seferis And Neruda: Two Voices,
The Earth. Karen Connelly, poet.
Green College recreation lounge,
7:30-9:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Faculty Women's Club
Christmas Boutique, Fund-Rais-
ing Sale. Cecil Green Park House.
9:30am. Annu al fu nd - raising sale;
no admission fee. Crafts, baking,
books, lunch by reservation $10.
Proceeds support students. Call
228-1116.
Wednesday, Dec. 6
Respiratory Research
Seminar Series
Proteoglycans In Fibroproliferative
Lung Diseases. Dr. Clive Roberts,
asst. prof, of Medicine. Respiratory Div. St. Paul's Hospital.
Gourlev conference room. 5-6pm.
Call 875-5653.
Thursday, Dec. 7
Chem/Engineering Seminar
The Unusual Behaviour Of Polymer Blends Near Their Phase Separation. Dimitris Vlassopoulos,
Foundation of Research and Tech.,
Hellas. CHML 206. 3:30pm. Cal
822-3238.
Friday, Dec. 8
Seminar
T Cell Activation. Dr. Tak Mak.
Ontario Cancer Institute. Wesbrook
201, 12pm. Call 822-3325.
Grand Rounds
From Coma To Low Level State To
Consciousness: Approach And
Management. Dr. George Hahn.
Sunny Hill Health Centre for Children. Brain Injury Program. GF
Strong auditorium, 9am. Call 875-
2307.
Health Care and
Epidemiology Rounds
The Return Of: Measuring Stress
With A Blood Test. Clyde Hertzman.
Prof.. Health Care and Epidemiology: Shona Kelly. Research Scientist. Health Care and Epidemiology. Mather253. 9-10am. Call 822-
2772.
Saturday, Dec. 9
Vancouver Institute Lecture
The Canadian Revolution: From
Deference To Defiance 1985-1995.
Peter C. Newman, author. IR('#2.
8:15pm. Call 822-3131.
Women's Basketball
Barbara Rae Cup. UBC vs SFU.
War Memorial Gvmnasium. 7pm.
$6 adults. $4 youths and seniors.
Free UBC students and children
under 12. Call 222-BIRD.
Christmas Craft Fair
Crafts. Food. Music. Raffle. The
Ixmghouse, 10am-4pm. Admission
free. Call 822-5383 or 822-21 15.
ite
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Prizes for
Excellence in Teaching
Once again the University is recognizing excellence in
teaching through the awarding of prizes to faculty
members. The Faculty of Arts will select five (t) winners of
the prizes for excellence in teaching for 19%.
Eligibility: Hligibilitv is open to facultv who have three or
more years of teaching at I'BC. The three years include
1995-%.
Criteria: The awards will recognize distinguished
teaching at all levels: introdtictorv. achanced. graduate
courses, graduate supervision, and anv combination of
lewis.
Nomination Process: Members of faculty, students, or
alumni may suggest candidates to the head ofthe
department, the director of the school, or the chair of the
program in which the nominee teaches. These suggestions
should be in writing and signed by one or more students,
alumni, or faculty, and they should include a very brief
statement ofthe basis for the nomination. Vou may write a
letter of nomination or pick up a form from the office of
the Dean of Arts in Buchanan 15130.
Deadline: The deadline for submission of nominations to
departments, schools or programs is 29 January 1996.
Winners will be announced in the Spring, and they will be
identified as well during Spring Convocation in Maw
For further information about these awards contact your
department or call Dr. F.rrol Durbach. Associate Dean of
Arts at X2.2.-5X2X.
Monday, Dec. 11
IHEAR Seminar
Christmas Social - Networking.
James Mather Portable Annex
classroom # 1. 5:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-3956.
IAM Colloquium
The Stability And Variability Of
TheThermoeline And Circulation,
And Its Relation To Climate. Lawrence Mysak, director Centre for
Climate and Global Change Research, McGill U. Old Computer
Science 301, 3:30pm. Call 822-
4584.
Seminar
Transcription Initiation And Regulation Of Gene Expression In Ha-
lophilic Archaea. Dr. Jorg Soppa.
Max Planck Institute for Biochem-
istry, Martinsried, Germany.
IRC#4. 3:45pm. Refreshments at
3:30. Call 822-9871.
Tuesday, Dec. 12
Dept. of Animal Science
Seminar Series
The Langara Island Rat Armageddon. Gregg Howakl. MSe student.
Depi. of Animal Science. MacMillan
1 58. 12:30pm. Refreshments. Call
822-4593.
Seminar
Effects Of Telazol On Rat Hepatic
Cytochromes P450. Anne Wong.
Grad. Student, Div. of Pharmaceutical Chemistry. Pharmaceutical Sciences. IRC3, 12:30pm. Call
822-4645.
Wednesday, Dec. 13
Respiratory Research
Seminar Series
Inhalable Particles Health Effects: Science And Policy. Dr.
Sverre Vedal. Medicine, Respiratory Div. St. Paul's Hospital,
Gourley conference room, 5-6pm.
Call 875-5653.
Critical Issues in Global
Development Seminar
Discrepancies Between Chinese
Labour Law And Practice. Pitman
Potter, Law. Green College recreation lounge. 8-10pm. Call
822-6067.
Senate
The fourth regular meeting of
Senate. UBC's academic Parliament. Curtis 102.8pm. Call 822-
2951.
Friday, Dec. 15
Grand Rounds
Clinieopathological Conference.
Dr. Gareth Jevon. MB. ChB, clinical instructor. Dept. of Pathology. Dr. Rhonda Mclntyre, paediatric resident. Dept. of Paediatrics. GF Strong auditorium.
9am. Call 875-2307.
Health Care and
Epidemiology Rounds
Smoking Cessation Therapy With
Bromocriptine. Dr. Helene
Bcrtrand, family physician.
Mather 253, 9-10am. Call 822-
2772.
Notices
Art Gallery
The Morris and Helen Belkin Art
Gallery. Current exhibition Nov. 10,
1995 - Jan. 14. 1996. Seeing in
Tongues: A Narrative of Language
and Visual Arts in Quebec. Gallery hours are Tuesday - Friday
10am-5pm and Saturday, 12-5pm.
1825 Main Mall. Call 822-2759.
UBC Nursing and Dept. of
Counselling Psychology
Study
Are you pregnant for the first-
time, currently working, living with
a partner, and intending to return
to work after the arrival of your
baby? I lelp us learn more about
working and parenting so that we
can help you. Volunteer for the
"Transition to Parenthood for
Working Couples Study" by call
ing Wendy Hall. asst. prof., UBC
School of Nursing at 822-7447.
Parents and Teens Needed
for Research Study
An innovative project looking at
conversations that parents and
teens (age 13 or 14) have about
health issues. $40 honorarium.
Volunteers call 822-7430 or 822-
7476.
Christmas at the Shop In
The Garden
Festive Table and Tree Decorations made by the "Friends of
the Garden", also fresh foliage
wreaths, baskets and door
swags, while quantities last!
Exciting selection of gifts too -
books, tools, garden accessories and much more. All proceeds help the garden grow. Shop
In The Garden. UBC Botanical
Garden. 6804 S.W. Marine Drive.
December hours 10am-5pm.
Open daily. Call 822-4529.
■UBCREPORTS
CALENDAR POLICY AND DEADLINES
The UBC Reports Calendar lists university-related or
university-sponsored events on campus and off campus within the Lower Mainland.
Calendar items must be submitted on forms available from the UBC PublicAffairs Office, 310-6251 Cecil
Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1. Phone:
822-3131. Fax: 822-2684. Please limit to 35 words.
Submissions for the Calendar's Notices section may be
limited due to space.
Deadline for the December 14 issue of UBC Reports
— which covers the period December 17 to January 13
— is noon, December 5. UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995 5
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DRAFT MATRIX OF NECESSARY AND DESIRABLE
ELEMENTS IN GRADUATE PROGRAM
The Equity Advisory Committee which was established in August 1995 to advise the Dean of Graduate Studies regarding the suspension of graduate admissions in one
department and equity issues in general has drawn up a matrix of elements that should be useful as a checklist for all graduate programs. The committee believes that
major problems could be avoided if all academic departments implemented at least the necessary elements of the list below.
This matrix is currently at the 5th draft stage. The committee would welcome feedback before the matrix is submitted to Graduate Council. Please submit any comments
and suggestions before Friday, December 15, 1995 to Dean J.R. Grace, Faculty of Graduate Studies, 180 - 6371 Crescent Road, Vancouver. BC, V6T 1Z2. by fax (822-
5802) or by e-mail (jgrace@mercury.ubc.ca).
Necessary and Desirable Features of Graduate Programs and their Administration
This matrix of necessary and desirable features of graduate programs has been prepared in an effort to provide guidelines to departments on common criteria that should
be satisfied by graduate programs in all areas at UBC in order to encourage quality and promote a supportive and equitable learning environment. The formulations are
often rather broad in an effort to encompass the diversity of graduate programs across the campus. It is recognized that different fields and different departments have varying
mandates and different resources. Nevertheless, the expectations under the "Necessary Components" category are reasonable expectations for all graduate programs, and
the "Possible Additional Desirable Features" should be achievable in many cases.
This matrix should be considered together with the Guidelines for Various Parties Involved in Graduate Student Thesis Research, the Policy on Discrimination and
Harassment, the Conflict of Interest Policy, the Calendar, the Faculty of Graduate Studies Policies and Procedures manual and other relevant policies in designing, upgrading
and monitoring graduate programs.
Area
Necessary Components
Possible Additional Desirable Features
Advertising of program and its resources and special
features for prospective applicants
Accurate, useful and up-to-date portrayal of program
characteristics, faculty expertise, resources and
admission criteria. Accurate and up-to-date
portrayal of faculty interests, areas of expertise and
activities. Active encouragement of participation by
qualified women, visible minorities, Aboriginal
students and persons with disabilities.
Helpful and detailed discussion of the particular
strengths and limitations of the program.  Indicate
who is likely to be on leave and which courses are
likely to be given the following year and, if possible,
beyond.
Admissions
Decisions based on criteria in Calendar, with due
allowance for work experience and other special
factors applicable to the field in question. Avoid
negative stereotyping on the basis of race, gender,
age, marital status, etc.
Any criteria in excess of Faculty of Graduate Studies
minima (e.g. when a department sets a minimum
TOEFL score > 550) printed in the Calendar.
Information provided to students being admitted
Clear information on financial support (if any) to be
available or which can be applied for.  Clear outline of
how and when the assignment of supervisor is done
in that department.  If continuation of financial
support is to be dependent on certain conditions,
these must be clearly stated.
Detailed information package on non-academic but
essential matters such as housing and daycare.
Refer international students to info (e.g. on
immigration and health insurance) available through
International Student Services.
Orientation
Basic information package including listing of
courses available, guidelines, and essential
information.
Orientation session or program where new students
meet continuing students and faculty.
Choosing the supervisor
Some choice where possible with opportunity for
students to have up-to-date information on potential
supervisor(s) before choice is made.
Feedback from current students to newly accepted
students to help guide their choice.
Quality of supervision
All faculty and students to receive and be expected to
follow the "Guidelines for the Various Parties involved
in Graduate Student Thesis Research".  Quality of
supervision to be part of teaching evaluation for
considerations of merit, tenure, promotions, etc.
Faculty encouraged to attend TAG workshops on
graduate student supervision.   Feedback on quality of
supervision provided where possible.  Other proactive
measures (o be undertaken to improve supervision.
Credit for graduate supervision
Graduate supervision is an important component of
teaching and should be recognized as such whenever
teaching is evaluated and when other duties are
assigned to faculty.
More recognition of supervision in other ways. e.g. in
nominations for teaching prizes.
Graduate Advisor
Faculty member with strong interest in students
should be chosen.  Relief from other duties.
Knowledgeable about university procedures.
Available on a regular basis.  Duties as specified in
FoGS Policies and Procedures Manual.
May split duties between two persons or have a
small committee, preferably representing a range
of backgrounds.
Graduate Secretary
One (occasionally more for very large programs)
person designated to fill this role for each program.
Proper infrastructure support.  Duties as specified
in FoGS Policies and Procedures Manual.
Wherever possible, choose someone with strong
interest in students.
Policies and procedures in department
Clear up-to-date handbook or other means of
communicating departmental graduate policies
and procedures to faculty and graduate students.
These policies and procedures adhered to except in
truly exceptional circumstances.  Give advance
notice of changes.
Consult with graduate students where possible
regarding changes.  Review policies and
procedures for inclusive language and to eliminate
potential discriminatory effect on women,
aboriginal students, visible minorities and
students with disabilities.  Design policies and
procedures to support educational opportunities
for all students.
Problems involving graduate students.
Students encouraged to take up problems with
supervisor, instructor or other person at source of
problem initially, the graduate advisor, then
department Head if there is no resolution.
Obligation to maintain confidentiality and to
ensure no retaliation. Where there is a conflict of
interest or perception of bias, alternate
arrangements are identified, e.g. if the department
head is also the supervisor, referral to the
appropriate dean.
Departmental ombudspersons. e.g. one faculty
and one senior graduate student, or some
committee structure appropriate to the
department.  Process must be clear. 6 UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DRAFT MATRIX OF NECESSARY AND DESIRABLE ELEMENTS IN GRADUATE PROGRAM
Area
Necessary Components
Possible Additional Desirable Features
Equity issues and policies
Formally and publicly accepted departmental
equity policy or policies consistent with
University's commitments in this area.
Proactive efforts to sensitize and educate faculty,
staff and students, e.g. by encouraging
participation in workshops and presentations on
equity issues.  Distribute information on UBC's
equity-related offices (e.g. Disability Resource
Centre, Equity Office, First Nations House of
Learning, Women Students' Office and
International House).
Harassment and discrimination
All complaints addressed seriously, fairly and
promptly, consistent with University Policy on
Discrimination and Harassment. Help sought from
Equity Office if systemic issues are raised. Head's
responsibilities clearly understood and accepted.
Comprehensive code of conduct consistent with
relevant University policies.   Equity Office may be
consulted for non-systemic issues.
Curriculum and program content
Course offerings provide well-rounded coverage of
key areas of the discipline.  Reasonable overall
pluralism of approach and in subject matter,
consistent with the field and resources available.
Institutionalized continuous or periodic process to
review and update the curriculum, with input from
students as well as faculty.
Breadth
Encouragement to take courses outside the
department in areas not well covered by the
department.
Graduate courses
Respect for diverse viewpoints and all members of
class, coupled with serious pursuit of learning and
excellence.  Discourage inappropriate comments,
terminology or language among the class.
Expectations of faculty member and general
approach to be clearly communicated to students
at the outset.
Grading
Criteria to be clearly communicated and to be
followed.  Fair evaluation of all students.
Consistency within each course and, to the extent
possible, from course to course.
Course evaluations
All graduate courses evaluated using standard
forms.  Ensure that input can be provided without
fear of repercussion.
Encourage constructive feedback which can be
used to improve courses. Allow for qualitative as
well as quantitative input.
Comprehensive exams
Clear and fair published rules adhered to
consistently. Standards high and applied
consistently to all students. Comprehensives
provide learning experiences and constructive
feedback to students. Reasons given in writing for
failures.
Ranking of students
If ranking is needed, criteria should be clearly
articulated, made widely available and performed
consistently from year to year.
Departmental colloquia
Regular (e.g. weekly) talks (or other events as
appropriate) by faculty, students, visitors and
invitees from other departments during fall and
winter terms. Talks should provide varying
perspectives and a range of topics with relevance
to all.
Social interchange among faculty and students
preceding the educational activity.
Conferences
Encourage students to attend and present papers
at conferences.
Support efforts of students to organize their own
conferences.
Feedback to students on progress
Periodic (at least annual) written reports on
progress and cumulative performance of each
student by supervisor and/or graduate advisor, to
be shared with the student.
Efforts to counsel and identify remedial actions for
those having difficulties.
M.A. thesis defenses
Clear and fair rules adhered to consistently.
Standards high and applied consistently.
Each defence provides a learning experience for
the student and involves constructive feedback to
the student.
Doctoral thesis defenses
Careful following of the procedures laid out by the
Faculty of Graduate Studies.
Defenses provide learning experiences and
constructive feedback.
Time-in-program and Retention of students
Keep records on times to completion and on
students withdrawing.
Mentoring system, especially for those having
academic, financial or personal difficulties and for
minority groups.
Career advising
-
Efforts made to inform all students of openings
and career options.
Office space
Allocation procedures are fair and open.  Consider
security issues.
Work space for all graduate students allowing
interchange and sense of community among all
students.
Financial support, scholarships and TA's
Fair and clearly articulated  procedures for
nominating, choosing and ranking students.  All
who meet eligibility criteria should be given an
opportunity to be considered.
Proactive role in helping students apply and in
increasing resources available.
Faculty hiring
Needs of graduate program considered when
deciding on area of hiring.  University employment
equity policy followed.  Direct input from graduate
students in the hiring process. UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995 7
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DRAFT MATRIX OF NECESSARY AND DESIRABLE ELEMENTS IN GRADUATE PROGRAM
Area
Necessary Components
Possible Additional Desirable Features
Hiring of Head
Needs of graduate program and role of Head as
responsible for climate and disciplinary matters
considered as important factors.  Direct input from
graduate students in the selection process.
Departmental administration
Defined committee structure with regular meetings
and input (preferably via direct representation)
from students as well as faculty. Clear decisionmaking responsibilities with accountability for
decisions.
Department/School as a social community
Efforts to welcome all new students and to provide
a hospitable environment. Seek to include all
students.
Proactive events and initiatives to make the
department a welcoming and open community.
Avoid events which are uncomfortable for some
students. Encourage faculty and students to
participate in programs (e.g. AMS Barbeque,
International House orientation) organized to
welcome new students.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Campus Planning and Development
CAPITAL PLAN (FISCAL 1995/96 - FISCAL 2003/04)
Each section of the University's capital submission to the Ministry of Skills, Training and Labour, includes anticipated project cost, a summary of project schedules
and, where applicable, brief project descriptions. This submission continues to reflect the University's priorities as established in the mission statement and strategic
plan which were adopted in 1989. The project schedules are consistent with our very significant needs and it is to these that the University forces are currently working. The President and Board ofGovernors are very anxious to see our schedules maintained. Relative to specific project costs, we have inflated figures from our last
submission and are identifying all project values in September 1995 dollars.
100% Provincial Government Funding
Major Capital Projects
Legend:P = Planning
D= Design Start
C = Contract Award
O = Completion Contract
$ = Funding Delay
EXHIBIT A
MAJOR CAPITAL PROJECTS
1 Forest Sciences Centre
2 Scarfe Building (Expansion/Renovation) Phase II
3 Biotechnology Laboratory (Phase II)
4 Centre for Creative Arts and Journalism (Phase II)
5 Chemical/Bio-Resource Engineering
6 Earth Sciences Building (Phase I)
7 Student Services Centre II (Brock Hall)
8 Health Sciences Facilities
9 Law Building Replacement and Upgrade
10 Earth Sciences Building (Phase II)
11 Research Space
12 Library Centre (Phase II)
13 Buchanan Buildings (Renovation/Upgrade Phase I)
14 Old Chemistry Building Renovations and Removal
1994/1995
1995/1996
1996/1997
1997/1998
1998/1999
1999/2000
2000/2001
2001/2002
2002/2003
2003/2004
$
$   $   $ C
O
C
$   $   $   $
$   $   $   $
$   $   $   $
O
C
C
C
O
O
O
D
$   $
C
O
P
-   -  -   -
D
C
O
P
P
D
D
C
C
O
O
P
-   -   -   -
D
C
O
P
-   -   -   -
D
C
O
P
P
P
D
C
D
D
C
C
O 8 UBC Reports • November 30, 1995
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
CAPITAL PLAN (FISCAL 1995/96 - FISCAL 2003/04)
Legend:
Board 1: Program Approval, Proceed to Design
Board 2:  Design Approval, Proceed to Documents and Tender       Board 3: Construction Contract Award
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
PROJECT
BUDGET
OPERATING
COSTS
BOARD 1
BOARD 2
BOARD 3
COMPL.
COMMENTS
MAJOR CAPITAL PROJECTS
1
FOREST SCIENCES CENTRE
Expanded facilities for Forestry and related Sciences at UBC will
accommodate new areas of research and education such as timber
engineering, harvesting robotics and remote sensing by satellite.
Programs housed in this facility will develop interests in forestry
research among faculties, and with industry and government
agencies.  The Pacific Centre will place UBC in a world class position
in Forestry and related sciences. A net assignable area of 10,071
and a gross area of 16,528 will be constructed with a corresponding
demolition of 1953 gross square meters of huts or temporary
buildings.  See 1993/94 Facilities Inventory Report for further details.
During 1995, the Advanced Wood Processing Centre was added to the
facility which increased its size by 3,033 gross area for a total of
19,561 square meters.
$40,050,000*
(1993)
$7,500,000
(1995)
Combined
Total
$47,550,000
$758,123
Net
1992/05/21
1994/03/17
1996/01
1998/05
"Original allowance
of $40 million
(September 1989
dollars)  inflated @
0.8% per month
to September 1990.
Further inflation of
3.0% included to
September 1992.
Figures revised
downward August
1993 to a
maximum cost of
$40,050,000,
excluding furniture
allowance to be
provided by UBC.
In mid October
1995 additional
funding of $7.5
million was provided for Advanced
Wood Processing.
Tender will be
received December
7, 1995.
2
SCARFE BLDG. EXPANSION/RENOVATION (Phase II)
This is a continuation of the project that began in 1991.   Revisions to
scope have taken place which decreases the amount of new
construction in favour of upgrading existing space.  Net assignable
and gross area requirements are indicated in the functional program.
A corresponding demolition of 2,822 gross square meters of huts or
temporary buildings will occur.  See Facilities Inventory Report for
further details.
$11,880,000
(1994)
N/A
1992/09/17
1994/03/17
1995/01/26
1996/09
Latest scope of
work and budget
for this project
is as per project
brief and
correspondence
of mid 1993.
Construction
proceeding.
3
BIOTECHNOLOGY LABORATORY (Phase II)
This facility is largely new space required to accommodate activities
presently located in substandard space and requiring expansion.
Proposed area of project is 7.419 m2 of construction adjacent to and
over an existing building.
$24,570,000
(1995)
$323,619
1994/01/20
6 months
to complete
11 months
to complete
22 months
to complete
Schematic Design
completed
1995/07.
4
CENTRE FOR CREATIVE ARTS AND JOURNALISM (Phase II)
This is a two phased facility.  Phase I is detailed on the attached fund
raising submission.   Phase II is largely replacement space which will
provide 2,920 NASM, 4,966 GSM to accommodate studio activities for
the Fine Arts, Music and the Theatre department which are currently
housed in inadequate huts which do not meet their specialized needs.
A new Creative Arts Centre will provide efficient centralized space for
workshops, practice, and instruction.  The combination of Phase I and
II will result in demolition of 4,180 gross square meters of existing
temporary space.  Details provided in the 1993/94 Facilities Inventory
Report.
Phase II
$13,000,000
$33,840
Net
1994/01
7 months
to complete
9 months
to complete
17 months
to complete
Fund raising for
Phase I is
underway.
5
CHEMICAL/BIO-RESOURCE ENGINEERING
This facility is largely replacement space intended to replace the
existing Chemical Engineering Building which no longer meets the
standards set by the Accredition Board and W.C.B.  The Chemical
Engineering program is operating on a provisional basis while planning
of new facility proceeds.   Current space housing these programs totals
3,900 net assignable square meters. A net assignable area of
approximately 4,320 and a gross area of approx 7,574 will be
constructed with a corresponding demolition of 3,200 gross square
meters for the old Chemical Engineering and associated Bio-Resource
Engineering building when it is demolished.   See the Facilities
Inventory Report for further details.
$24,875,000
(1995)
$131,737
1993/11/18
6 months
to complete
11 months
to complete
23 months
to compete
Latest scope of
work and budget
for combined
project as per
Project Brief
published in late
1993 and
schematic
design completed
1995/03.
6
EARTH SCIENCES BUILDING (Phase I)
This facility provides significant new and replacement required to
replace an existing, seismieally deficient building which houses
Geophysics and Astronomy 1944 m2 (net), and to accommodate
Oceanography.  Through providing physical links to the Geology
Building, it is anticipated that requirements for teaching, research
and support space will lead to the development of an integrated Earth
Sciences Centre.  Area requirements have been determined in a project
brief dated December 1993.   It is anticipated that a net assignable area
of approx. 7,577 and a gross area of approximately 13,364 will be
constructed in Phase I with a corresponding demolition of 2,789 gross
square meters of huts or temporary buildings. See the Facilities
Inventory Report for further details.
$36,440,000
(1995)
$2,910,000
(1995)
Combined
Total
$39,350,000
(1995)
$425,000
Net
1994/01/20
6 months
to complete
10 months
to complete
25 months
to complete
Latest scope of
work and budget
for this project
is as per project
brief published
in December 1993.
A second
component
of funding was
transferred from
capital line item
for instructional
space $2,910,000.
Schematic Design
completed in
1995/10. UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995 9
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
CAPITAL PLAN (FISCAL 1995/96 - FISCAL 2003/04)
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
PROJECT
BUDGET
OPERATING
COSTS
BOARD 1
BOARD 2
BOARD 3
COMPL.
COMMENTS
7
STUDENT SERVICES CENTRE (Phase II) BROCK HALL
Phase II is required in order to reconstruct the existing structure
(Brock Hall) which cannot be functionally modified in a manner
which is economically feasible.  The facility will be the second phase
ofthe Student Services Centre Project (funded in 1990). and will
result in consolidation of all administrative services for students in
one location.
$10,613,000*
(1995)
N/A
1997/01
1998/03
1999/01
2000/12
*Original allowance
of $8.3 million
(September 1989
dollars) reassessed
to $9.25 million
(September 1991)
dollars and
adjusted by 3.0%
inflation to
September 1995.
8
HEALTH SCIENCES FACILITIES
This project will consist of several portions of new construction
including space for laboratories, allied Health Sciences and health
promotion in several locations, at an assumed cost of $43 million
including finishing of the Jack Bell Research laboratories.   Following
development of the new space, there will be significant renovations
required  through existing Health Sciences space totalling 11,250 m2.
At this time, estimates are not available for this work, rather, an
allowance only is shown.
$42,650,000*
(1995)
TBD
1997/01
1998/09
1999/11
2001/12
*Original allowance
of $43,000,000
less $5,210,000
for Jack Bell Labs
leaves $37,790,000
(September 1991
dollars) adjusted by
3.0% inflation
to September 1995.
9
LAW BUILDING REPLACEMENT AND UPGRADE
An addition to the Faculty of Law will be required in order to house
faculty offices, research and support space, as well as provide
additional teaching facilities.  Project based on: 1. Replacement ofthe
original 1950 building of 2.746 m2 (gross) and temporary trailers of
1,066 m2 (gross) and provision of new facilities (4,600 m2) 2.
$15,570,000*
(1995)
TBD
1998/01
1999/05
2000/03
2001/12
*Original allowance
of $12.7 million
(September 1991
dollars) adjusted
by 3.0% inflation
to September 1995.
10
EARTH SCIENCES (Phase II)
This is a continuation of an earlier project and will result in demolition
of old campus space.   It is anticipated that a net assignable area of
approximately 4.238 m2 and a gross area of approximately 7.175 m2
will be constructed in Phase II.  The relinquished space in the
Geography Building will be used to house Mathematics to facilitate
development ofthe Library Centre Phase II.
$18,000,000
(1995)
$166,160
Net
1994/01/20
1999/05
2000/03
2001/12
Latest scope of
work and budget
for this project
is as per project
brief published
in December 1993.
11
RESEARCH SPACE
This project will consist of one or more facilities, as yet undefined,
which will be required in order to provide updated research space
required on the campus.   Demolition of some old space will result.
$40,000,000*
(1995)
TBD
1999/01
2000/01
2000/11
2002/12
*Original allocation
less $8.5 million
relocated to
Earth Sciences.
Remainder inflated
to 1995 figure of
$49,000,000.
12
LIBRARY CENTRE (Phase II)
In preparing for Phase I Library Centre development, additional
needs were discovered partially due to inadequacies of the Main UBC
Library building (itself a collection of four separate structures).   It is
now urgent that the UBC Library, a provincial and national resource,
be re-housed in more seismically environmentally acceptable and
functionally effective space. At this time, the problem is known to be
large but quantification has only just begun.  Completion of new
library space will allow demolition of existing inefficient space and the
Mathematics Building.
$45,000,000*
(1995)
TBD
2000/01
2001/01
2001/11
2003/12
*Original allowance
$40,000,000
(September 1991
dollars) adjusted
by 3.0% of
inflation to
September 1995.
13
BUCHANAN BUILDINGS RENOVATION/UPGRADE (Phase I)
Renovation/upgrading of the five wings and tower of the Buchanan
complex is overdue at this time, and will be an urgent problem by the
turn of the century.   It is likely that a phased program over eight to ten
years will be required to service these facilities for the future.  A major
first phase should begin as soon as possible.
$28,140,000*
(1995)
TBD
2001/01
2002/01
2002/09
2004/08
*Original allowance
of $25,000,000
(September 1991
dollars) adjusted
by 3.0% inflation
to September 1995.
14
CHEMISTRY BUILDING RENOVATIONS AND REMOVAL
Restoration and upgrading ofthe historic Chemistry Building, located
at the heart of the University is long overdue.   Completion of this
project will enable the preservation of a principle campus facility,
the functional reorganization of its space, and the modernization of
its services.
$28,140,000*
(1995)
TBD
2001/01
2001/11
2002/07
2004/06
*Original allowance
of $25,000,000
(September 1991
dollars) adjusted
by 3.0% inflation
to September 1995. 10 UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
CAPITAL PLAN (FISCAL 1995/96 - FISCAL 2003/04)
100% Provincial Government Funding
Minor Scope Capital Projects
Legend:P = Planning
D - Design Start
C = Contract Award
O = Completion Contract
$ = Funding Delay
MINOR SCOPE CAPITAL PROJECTS
1   Buchanan Tower Upgrade
2  IRC Classroom Renovation
o„ Classroom Master Plan - Classroom Upgrades
Unit "E"
iu Classroom Master Plan - Classroom Upgrades
Unit "K"
3c Classroom Master Plan - Lecture Room Upgrades
4 Hennings Renovation
5  Buchanan Block C & E
1995/1996
1996/1997
1997/1998
1998/1999
1999/2000
2000/2001
2001/2002
2002/2003
2003/2004
2004/2005
P _ D
C
O
P _ D
C      O
P _ D
C           O
P _ D
C           O
P _ D
C           O
-  -  -  -
D           C
O
-  -  -  -
D            C
O
Legend:
Board 1: Program Approval, Proceed to Design
Board 2: Design Approval, Proceed to Documents and Tender      Board 3: Construction Contract Award
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
PROJECT
BUDGET
OPERATING
COSTS
BOARD
1
BOARD
2
BOARD
3
COMPL.
COMMENTS
MEDIUM SCOPE CAPITAL PROJECTS
1
BUCHANAN TOWER UPGRADE
$1,800,000
(1995)
N/A
1996/03
1996/05
1996/09
Improve utilization
building upgrade.
2
IRC CLASSROOM RENOVATION
$2,650,000
(1995)
N/A
1996/03
1996/05
1996/09
Curriculum change
smaller rooms
needed.
3a
CLASSROOM MASTER PLAN
CLASSROOM UPGRADES UNITS "E"
$2,000,000
(1995)
N/A
1996/03
1996/05
1996/09
Improve quality
and utilization.
3b
CLASSROOM MASTER PLAN
CLASSROOM UPGRADES UNITS "K"
$2,000,000
(1995)
N/A
1996/03
1996/05
1996/09
Improve quality
and utilization.
3c
CLASSROOM MASTER PLAN
LECTURE ROOM UPGRADES
$2,000,000
(1995)
N/A
1996/03
1996/05
1996/09
Improve quality
and utilization.
4
HENNINGS BUILDING RENOVATIONS
$1,400,000
(1995)
N/A
1996/06
1997/03
1998/08
Renovate vacant
area.
5
BUCHANAN BLOCK C&E
$1,500,000
(1995)
N/A
1996/06
1997/03
1998/12
Improve utilization.
Campaiqn Legend:P - Planning
D= Design Start
50% Provincial Government Funding/50% University Development        c = contract Award
Fundraising (100% University Development) °I^tTe^**
EXHIBIT C
CAMPAIGN PROJECTS
1995/1996
1996/1997
1997/1998
1998/1999
1999/2000
2000/2001
2001/2002
2002/2003
2003/2004
1
Chan Shun Centre
:<*
2
Centre for Creative Arts and Journalism (Phase I)
:&
:0:
3
Walter C. Koerner Library (Phase I)
4
C.K. Choi Building for the Institute of Asian
Research
r
■:•:•.
5
Liu Centre for International Studies (Phase I)
;|
•:•:■:
M
6
Liu Centre Residences
T
B
D
7
St. John's College Phase I
r
■.-.-.
■■(■>
8
St. John's College Phase II
T
B
D
9
Wellness Resource Complex
;i
:
-
T
B
D UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995 11
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAMPUS PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT
CAPITAL PLAN (FISCAL 1995/96 - FISCAL 2003/04)
Legend:
Board 1: Program Approval, Proceed to Design
Board 2:  Design Approval, Proceed to Documents and Tender       Board 3: Construction Contract Award
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
PROJECT
BUDGET
OPERATING
COSTS
BOARD
1
BOARD
2
BOARD
3
COMPL.
COMMENTS
CAMPAIGN PROJECTS
1
CHAN SHUN CENTRE
Currently, the largest facility for performances at UBC is the Old
Auditorium, constructed as a temporary building in the 1920's.
The new Concert and Assembly Hall along with movie and Black Box
theatres will meet the University's needs for ceremonial functions,
music and theatre programs.  With a capacity of 1,400 seats in the
larger house and movie and theatre opportunites in smaller houses,
these facilities will meet specific needs in Greater Vancouver for a
mid-size performance hall, with potential operating cost recovery for
the University.
$29,750,000
$130,937
($30,000 will
be recovered
from other
income)
1990/05/17
1993/11/18
1994/12
1996/11
UBC Campaign
Contribution is
$11.5 million.
Provincial
Government
Contribution
is $11.5 million.
Remainder UBC
sources.
2
CENTRE FOR CREATIVE ARTS AND JOURNALISM (PHASE I)
Phase I of this project provides for 743 NASM, 1,227 GSM which will
house the School of Journalism. This facility will provide instructional
and faculty space for the Journalism program.  Future developments
in Phase II will allow for a synergistic relationship between facilities
required for print media and the studio requirements of multi media
disciplines. The combination of Phase I and II will result in demolition
of 4,180 gross square meters of existing temporary space.  Details
provided in the 1993/94 Facilites Inventory Report.
Phase I
$3,000,000
52.830
1994/01/20
1995/03/16
1996/03
1997/06
Funds are expected
to be available
for Phase I by
December 1995.
3
WALTER C. KOERNER LIBRARY (PHASE I)
The UBC Library is a provincial and national resource. As B.C.'s
primary research library, it is used extensively by professionals from
Simon Fraser University, University of Victoria, teaching hospitals,
colleges and schools across the province. The information explosion
and the development of collections and new technologies has created
an urgent need for additional service and storage space.
$26,850,000
$297,528
1995/11/19
1993/03/25
1994/12/01
1996/11
UBC Campaign
Contribution is $12
million. Provincial
Government
contribution is
$12 million.
Remainder
UBC sources.
4
C.K. CHOI BUILDING FORTHE INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH
This project will include resource and research space required to
support programs involving Asian Studies. 1,272 NSM, 2,222 GSM.
$6,250,000
$95,670
1995/11/14
1993/09/16
1994/12/01
1996/02
Total through fund
raising efforts.
5
LIU CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (Phase I)
This project will include central instructional and office facilities to
support a major thrust in International Studies.   This project
represents Phase I with further residential phase(s) to follow which
are currently in the planning stage. The scope of Phase I was identifiec
in a report dated 1995/05/ 18.   Includes 430 NASM of academic space
for Graduate Research.
$12,000,000
1995/05/18
1996/03
1997/01
1998/07
Fund raising efforts
will be providing $5
million funding, $4
million has been
committed with
another $ 1 million
to be raised.
Remainder from
UBC sources and
loan.
6
LIU CENTRE RESIDENCES (Phase II)
This phase of the project will include residence facilities in support of
visitors taking programs, of varying durations, offered by the Liu
Centre for international studies. Continuing Studies language and
international programs.  At this time the residential component is
expected to include approximately 160 beds.
$8,000,000
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
Source of funds
will include fund
raising and loan.
7
ST. JOHN'S COLLEGE (Phase I)
This facility will provide residential and resource space for graduate
students and post doctoral fellows. This complex will play a key role
in the development of the University in international research and
academic initiatives. The project is expected to be completed in two
phases of approximately $5 million each.
$5,700,000
N/A
1994/05/19
1995/01/05
1996/01
1997/09
This project will
be undertaken
through
fundraising.
8
ST JOHN'S COLLEGE (Phase II)
Completion of the residential component of the Phase I project.
$4,300,000
N/A
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
This project will be
undertaken
through
fundraising.
9
WELLNESS CENTRE
The Centre will accommodate research and service initiatives
focusing on life skills.   It is part of Rick Hansen's legacy of the
"Man In Motion" Tour.
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
TBD
This project will be
undertaken
through fund
raising.
3 STUDENT
DISCIPLINE
REPORT
Under section 58 ofthe University Act the
President ofthe University has authority
to impose discipline on students for academic and non-academic offences. In the
past the nature ofthe offences dealt with
and the penalties imposed have not been
generally made known on the campus. It
has been decided, however, that a summary should be published on a regular
basis ofthe offences and ofthe discipline
imposed without disclosing the names of
students involved.
In the period March 1, 1995 to October
31. 1995. 21 students were disciplined.
For each case, the events leading to the
imposition of the discipline and the discipline imposed are summarized below.
Discipline may vary depending upon all
of the circumstances of a particular case.
1.    A student attached a false bibliogra
phy with an essay he submitted.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
essay and suspension from the University for 4 months.*
2. A student attempted to obliterate his
name and student number on an
examination paper because he could
not deal with questions in the paper.
Discipline: a letter of severe reprimand.
3. A student plagiarized in the preparation of an essav.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 4 months.*
A student had and used unauthorized materials in an examination.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 8 months.*
A student plagiarized in the preparation of a paper.
Discipline:  a mark of zero in the
(Continued next page) 12 UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995
Forum
Future UBC community
is open for discussion
By Moura Quayle
Thefollowing is an excerpt from
Moura Quayle's address to the
university Senate earlier this month.
Quayle, a member of the Official
Community Plan Planning Advisory
Committee, is an associate professor
of landscape architecture in the Dept.
of Plant Science.
The preparation of an Official
Community Plan (OCP) for UBC is
well underway.
An Official Community Plan is a
general statement of the broad
objectives and policies about the
future form and character of a
community's existing and proposed
land use and servicing requirements. Its authority is vested in the
Municipal Act.
UBC is governed under the
Universities Act. However, the
university has entered into a Memorandum of Understanding with the
Greater Vancouver
Regional District 	
(GVRD) in which the ^^^^^
district and UBC
have agreed to work
cooperatively on the
planning of the
campus. This agreement provides an
exciting opportunity
to be part of the
region and to develop        	
our community with
its special purpose
and identity.
The GVRD has hired a team of
consultants to prepare the OCP—
this group has proposed a work plan
which involves both technical
activities and the involvement of the
public and stakeholders. The team is
receiving advice from a Technical
Advisory Committee and a Planning
Advisory Committee of citizens
appointed by the GVRD in consultation with UBC.  The process began
in the summer with collecting.
analysing, and documenting relevant information and carrying out
initial steps in the stakeholder and
public consultation process.
Since September general community consultation has taken place
around the development of a cohesive set of planning principles which
will address issues of land use,
density, open space, transportation,
urban design, landscape, heritage
and others. The principles will
suggest general direction for site
utilization and policy. Focused
workshops have taken place to help
develop these principles.
The consultants are about to
enter the "alternatives" stage where
the planning principles will be
"I cannot stress
enough the
importance of this
process."
Moura Quayle
converted into realistic and viable
land use servicing and transportation
options. Community consultation and
workshops continue through this
phase and into the development of the
draft plan which will be completed by
the end of March 1996. It then goes
through the GVRD. UBC and provincial approval processes.
The community consultation is
open to all of us as members of the
UBC campus. However, the members
of the President's Advisory Committee
on Space Allocation (PACSA), including members of the Senate Academic
Building Needs Committee, want  to
ensure that the university community
gives energetic feedback to the
consultant team.
UBC has already contributed land
use objectives to the process and it is
important for us to continue contributing our ideas and opinions. PACSA
members participated recently in a
lengthy session with the consultants
in which we talked about the process
and visions for the
'^^^^^mmm      campus. We touched
on the importance of
the academic precinct and our academic mandate
which is central to
any community that
develops here. We
discussed a range of
issues from transportation to community
demographics to
making a vibrant community day and
night. We talked about our leadership
role in setting examples for other
communities. Other ideas included
UBC as providing access to learning
for tourists, citizens and students, the
need to celebrate our diversity, the
idea of live-work and maximizing our
student employment capacity and the
importance of basing our planning
decisions on the capacity of the land
to sustain development. Another
session is planned for mid-December.
We see PACSA as a conduit for
university community feedback.
I cannot stress enough the importance of this process. The OCP lays
out the foundation and the principles
upon which we will prepare a UBC
development plan involving more
detail and a comprehensive public
process.
We should see this OCP process as
an opportunity to situate ourselves in
the region as a unique, diverse,
healthy and growing community—
called by one person the "intellectual
community centre of the region"—and
to lead the way in terms of showing
how a socially, ecologically and
economically sustainable community
can be planned and implemented.
Gavin Wilson photo
Deck The Halls
Displaying home-made holiday
decorations are Bette Cotton,
left, and Barbara Daem, both
Friends of the Garden, the
volunteer group that supports
UBC's Botanical Garden. Hurry
if you're interested in purchasing
anything; the garden expects to
sell out early in December,
although other holiday gift ideas
are available at the Shop-in-the-
Garden. All proceeds support the
Botanical Garden.
STUDENT
DISCIPLINE
REPORT (cont.)
course and suspension from the University for 12 months.*
6. A student assaulted an instructor.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 8 months.*
7. A student plagiarized in the preparation of an essay.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 4 months.*
8. A student did not hand in her examination paper and improperly removed
the examination paper from the examination room.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 8 months.*
9. A student had in his possession unauthorized materials during an examination.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 12 months.*
10. A student failed to disclose on a
University application form prior attendance at another post secondary
institution and also misstated other
relevant information.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 12 months.*
11. A student submitted as her own work
the work of another student.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 12 months.* An appeal to
the Senate Committee on Student
Appeals on Academic Discipline was
dismissed.
12. A student plagiarized in the preparation of a paper.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 4 months. An appeal to the
Senate Committee on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline was
allowed in part.
13. A student failed to disclose on a
University application form prior attendance at the University and another post secondary institution.
Discipline: in the special circumstances a letter of reprimand.
14. A student had in his possession and
used unauthorized materials in an
examination.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and a letter of severe reprimand and a record ofthe disciplinary
action entered as a notation on his
transcript and in his files, but that in
the year in which the student expects
to graduate or any time thereafter he
may apply to the President to exercise his discretion to remove the notation from the transcripts and from
the files.
15. A student assisted another student
in writing a quiz.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 12 months.*
16. A student submitted on two occasions plagiarized papers in a course.
Discipline: in the special circumstances a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University
for 4 months.*
17. A student plagiarized in the preparation of an essay.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 8 months.*
18. A student had in his possession and
used unauthorized materials in an
examination.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 12 months.*
19. A student had in his possession unauthorized materials in an examination.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 4 months.*
20. A student received assistance from
another student in a quiz.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 12 months.*
21. A student plagiarized in the preparation of an essay.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the
course and suspension from the University for 12 months.*
* In all cases in which a student is
suspended a notation is entered on
the student's transcript and in the
student's file. At any time after two
years have elapsed from the date of
his or her graduation the student
may apply to the President to exercise his discretion to remove the
notation.
Students under disciplinary suspension from
UBC may not take courses at other institutions for transfer of credit back to UBC.
Tokyo-UBC exchange
fruitful for AgSci students
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
Picking tea leaves, planting rice and
watching auctions at an early morning
fish market were some of the real-life
experiences shared by a group of Agricultural Sciences students on a recent exchange visit to Japan.
The three-week tour was designed to
provide a mix of cultural experiences and
insights into agricultural and
aquacultural practices in Japan.
The group of nine students and faculty
escorts was led by Animal Science Prof.
George Iwama and Lawrence Hurd, a
program manager with the Farm Management Branch of the B.C. Ministry of
Agriculture. Fisheries and Food.
Their hosts were their counterparts at
the Tokyo University of Agriculture.
UBC later reciprocated, hosting an exchange group from the Japanese university on a visit to observe B.C. agricultural
practices.
In Japan, the UBC group visited greenhouses, the Fuji Experimental Animal
Farm, a trout hatchery, the Tokyo Stock
Exchange, a research forest and a cattle
farm.
The UBC group got up at 3:30 a.m. to
see the auctions at the Tsukiji Fish Market, a unique market place that controls
most fish distribution and sales in Japan.
"Seeinga single tuna sellforabout$25,000
made us appreciate the value of fish as a
commodity in Japan," Iwama said.
He added that the way each visit was
conducted, combining lectures and hands-
on experience, was very enriching.
For example, the group started one
day with with a lecture by a professor who
is an expert in tea production. They then
tasted various teas and walked to a tea
field, where they picked tea leaves with
students and university staff.
The students also learned of a progressive public education program for forest
management. At a university research
forest the public is invited to live and
work with foresters to help them maintain a healthy forest.
They hope that such a forest experience will alleviate public alienation and
ultimately save forests from the mounting pressures of urbanization.
To thank their hosts, the UBC group
co-sponsored a farewell reception with
the Canadian embassy at the impressive
new embassy building in central Tokyo. UBC Reports • November 30, 1995 13
Gavin Wilson photo
Tour leader Byron Foster, a research engineer at AMPEL, shows opening day
guests the High Headroom laboratory. With its large space capable of
housing heavy industrial machinery, the lab is one of the specialized
facilities at AMPEL that are not available elsewhere at UBC.
AMPEL to focus on
high tech materials
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
Faculty and graduate students from
four departments will work side by side in
the $21-million Advanced Materials and
Process Engineering Laboratory (AMPEL),
which had its official opening Nov. 17.
Researchers from Chemistry. Electrical
Engineering. Metals and Materials Engineering and Physics will use the new labs
to work on a variety of different materials
including composites, metals, ceramics,
semiconductors and superconductors.
"Research conducted in AMPEL will
generate new discoveries, help create
high-quality jobs for the future and support existing industries." said UBC President David Strangway.
"Knowledge gained through science
and technology research at UBC is a key
element in the university's tremendous
impact on the provincial economy, which
has been estimated at $2.3 billion annually." he added.
AMPEL Director Tom Tiedje said the
building will bring together under one
roof one ofthe best collections of modern
instrumentation in Canada for studying
the properties of materials.
Materials processing will be another
important activity in the new building,
including the development of environmentally sound processes for resource
industries and the fabrication of semiconductor lasers for fibre optic communications systems.
The AMPEL building will have an important educational role. Tiedje added,
especially in graduate education.  Stu
dents will benefit by having better access
to modern equipment and instrumentation that may now be inaccessible to
them in other departments. They will also
benefit from exposure to different disciplines outside their own.
This interdisciplinary emphasis is an
innovative approach to technological research problems rarely found in Canadian universities, said Tiedje, who holds
joint appointments in the departments of
Physics and Electrical Engineering.
"In this building we will be able to pool
resources and bring together activities
that are related in science and technology, but disconnected administratively.
It's a practical approach that's more common in industry than it is in academia."
he said.
Tiedje said the new building will also
allow more efficient operations, appeal to
funding agencies and attract more industry involvement because it is more compatible with their needs.
Covering nearly 8,000 square metres
of space over four storeys, AMPEL will
include specialized facilities not available
elsewhere at UBC. such as high headroom labs that have space for heavy
industrial machinery and a "clean room"
for fabricating electronic devices in a
controlled environment that is sealed off
from the outside and free of dust and
particles.
AMPEL construction was funded by
the government of British Columbia. Also
contributing to AMPEL through t he World
of Opportunity fund-raising campaign
were Stelco Inc.. Inco Limited. Paul Y. Tso
and Xerox Canada Inc.
ISDN service offers fast
alternative to dialling in
to campus by modem
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
Members of the campus community
who rely heavily on the campus computer network and the Internet for work
now have the option of setting up a fast
and direct connection from home.
UBC's Telecommunication Services
has, with industry partners, put together
what may be the first dial-in ISDN/
Internet service bundle in Canada. It is
already gaining national recognition, having recently won the Innovation and Application Award from Canadian TELECOM
magazine.
The service, based on the Integrated
Services Digital Network (ISDN), allows
off-campus access to the campus network without using a modem—a more
common but much slower method of
connecting through standard telephone
lines.
"There's no comparison (with a modem)." said Economics Prof. Ken White,
who is one of the first to use the ISDN
connection from home. "It's pretty close
to being on campus with an Ethernet
connection. Not quite like being on campus, but it's 10 times better than a modem."
The service serves a dual purpose of
providing access to the network to off-
campus users, as well as providing a link
to some ofthe older buildings on campus
that do not have adequate inside wiring
to support a local area network (LAN)
connection, said Jim Tom. director of
Telecommunication Services.
"It means that people who are on campus who don't have the funding or are not
slated for wiring upgrades in their building can get reasonably high-speed access
to the campus network. The off campus
application is that we can hook up people
from home." Tom said.
Tom said working closely with partners in industry—BC Tel. Nortel and
Ascend Communications—allowed Telecommunications Services to offer service from the workstation to the campus
computer network.
The cost to an off-campus user is
$185 per month plus a $350 installation charge. Of the monthly charge.
$122 is BC Tel's standard ISDN line
cost, an amount that Wendy Purdy.
ISDN product manager at BC Tel, said
could drop to the $75 range within the
next year.
If the line cost comes down, said Tom.
so will UBC's fee as service provider.
At present, about a dozen individuals
have signed up for the off-campus service, and the UBC Food Group has also
requested the service at a few locations
on campus.
"We've got several orders on campus,
mainly from places like food services that
have relatively small demand on the network and, because they're ancillary, didn't
get central funding for their network connection. This was a more cost-effective
way to connect them to the campus computer network." Tom said.
A number of people outside the campus community have also expressed an
interest in the service, although Tom said
providing service to outside users is not
being seriously considered.
"There really aren't any competitors
right now. so we are getting calls from
people off campus saying 'hey. I really
want to be connected.' At this point we
have to say no. We want to get the system
established for the campus community
first." he said.
Service subscribers require an ISDN
line and router, both of which are included in installation cost. For further
information contact Telecommunication
Services at 822-2555.
Seniors and students
benefit from info line
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
Students in UBC's Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences are learning that a
SMILE can help prevent a prescription for
disaster and promote good health.
Since its introduction last April, the
Seniors Medication Information LinE
(SMILE) has been providing interested
pharmacy students with a unique opportunity to learn about seniors' health issues, develop research skills, analyse
data and improve their communication
abilities.
A free telephone hotline service. SMILE
is operated by professional pharmacists
in the faculty and was established to
assist seniors, their families and caregivers with drug information.
"Although students involved in the
program are not yet trained to take calls
themselves, they are learning how to
gather drug information," said Elaine
Kam. a clinical assistant professor of
Pharmacy and SMILE co-ordinator.
"As importantly, they are learning how
to use their research in ways that are
most effective in helping the pharmacists
formulate responses for callers who require extensive information," she added.
Kam believes that the practice received
by Ihe participating students in preparing information in lay terms is another
benefit the program offers.
"It is important that we make it easy
for people, especially seniors, to under
stand the information that is being presented to them over the phone," she said.
"SMILE provides students with excellent
experience in translating what they learn
technically to language everyone can
grasp."
Other learning opportunities available
to the students include accompanying
Kam to various community centres
throughout the Lower Mainland where
she addresses seniors' groups on safe
medication use and presents an introduction to SMILE.
The program is also providing three
fourth-year pharmacy students with topics for directed study projects. The one-
year research course will earn each student six credits upon completion.
One directed study project by Diem
Pham involves the development of a teaching module for SMILE which will train
students to work on t he phones. Kam. who
with David Hill, the faculty's associate
dean of Professional Programs, is supervising Pham. hopes that the protocol will
be implemented by September 1996.
SMILE is a collaborative effort among
the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences,
the B.C. Ministry of Health and Ministry
Responsible for Seniors (Phannacare Division), the B.C. Drug and Poison Information Centre, the Canadian pharmaceutical industry and the Science Council of B.C.
To contact the SMILE hotline, call
(604) 822-1330 or toll-free at 1 -800-668-
6233. 14 UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995
News Digest
States Without Law: The Role of Multilateral Intervention to
Restore Local Justice Systems is the focus of a one-day seminar at
Green College on Dec. 9 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of
the United Nations.
Topics will include the complexities of the failed state syndrome
and the roles of immediate intervention and peacekeeping as
prerequisites for reconstruction and reconciliation.The event will
conclude with a panel discussion on the role and capacity of the
United Nations, chaired by Gulzar Samji, president of Vancouver's
United Nations Association.
Panelists include Lucie Edwards, director-general. Global Issues, Dept. of Foreign Affairs and International Trade, and Eduardo
Vetere, chief of the United Nations Crime Prevention and Criminal
Justice branch in Vienna.
For more information, call 822-9875 or fax 822-9317.
• • • • •
B.C.'s Scientists and Innovators in the Schools program was one
ofthe recent winners of a Michael Smith award for science promotion presented by Industry Canada.
The program is designed to send scientists, engineers, technologists and technicians into classrooms throughout B.C. to promote
general science and technology awareness and to act as role models.
Administered by Science World on behalf of the provincial
Ministry of Employment and Investment, the program reached
95,000 students in B.C. last year and enlists the efforts of 400
volunteers, including many from UBC.
The Michael Smith awards recognize the outstanding contribution of Canadian individuals and organizations in promoting science, technology, engineering and mathematics with young people.
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Slide Design / Creation
If you prefer, you can leave the
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Reports) or internal requisition. Advertising enquiries: 822-3131.
The deadline for the December 14, 1995 issue of UBC Reports is noon, December 5.
Services
ESL PRONUNCIATION
WORKSHOPS. Intensive weekly
classes for adult ESL speakers,
starting January 26. Intermediate
or advanced. West End
Community Centre, 870 Denman
Street. Enrolment limited.
Contact instructor: Barbara
Wakal 689-5918.
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Accommodation
POINT GREY GUEST  HOUSE  A
perfect spot to reserve
accommodation for guest
lecturers or other university
members who visit throughout
the year. Close to UBC and other
Vancouver attractions, a tasteful
representation of our city and of
UBC, 4103 W. 10th Ave.,
Vancouver. BC. V6R 2H2. Call or
fax (604)222-4104.
TINA'S GUEST HOUSE Elegant
accom. inPt. Grey area. Minutes to
UBC. On main bus routes. Close to
shops and restaurants. Inc, TV, tea
and coffee making, priv. phone/
fridge. Weekly rates available. Call
222-3461. Fax 222-9279.
GREEN COLLEGE GUEST HOUSE
Five suites available for
academic visitors to UBC only.
Guests dine with residents and
enjoy college life. Daily rate $50,
plus $ 13/day for meals Sun.-Thurs.
Call 822-8660 for more
information and availability.
FALSE CREEKTWO BEDROOM, two
full baths, condo, garage,
balcony, spectacular view. Steps
to Granville Island market.
Available Jan. 1 /96 for 7 months.
Non smoker. $1600/month. Call
739-0302.
KITSILANO 1BD spacious
penthouse for rent. Fully furnished
for visiting faculty, Close to shops
and transportation. 5-6 months
lease from Jan/96. $1100/mo.
Includes heat and hot water. Call
224-8942.
Accommodation
PLEASANT, BRIGHT APARTMENT for
rent. Comfortable one bedroom
apartment, fully furnished and
equipped, close to UBC.
Available for three months or
longer from mid-December or
early January. Reasonable rent
in return for taking care of two
affectionate cats. Call 228-8825.
SUNSHINE COAST ISLAND HOME
to let. Rustic Keats Island 2/bdrm
oceanview home available
January/February/March. $700/
month. Foot ferry service from
Longdate and vehicle on Keats
put Horseshoe Bay within one
hour easy commute. Electricity,
telephone and wood for
fireplace included. Ideal for
student, professor, writer or artist.
Ceiling loft with large window/
doors to deck provide good light.
Call (604)886-8801 daytime, 886-
8200 evenings.
FOR RENT FROM DECEMBER 15.
for one year $1600/m..
Architect's home, furnished. 2
bedrooms plus den. One block
from the sea in Kitsilano. Non/
smok. Refs. Call 731-6937.
Wanted
SINGLE MEN The North Shore
Group -15 year old social group
for business and professional
singles. Activities - dining,
dancing, parties, sports, cultural
events etc. 30 men aged 40-60
needed to balance male/
female ratio. Call 987-0401.
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964-0331 UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995 15
Timely Success
Assoc. Dean Gerald Gorn takes a crack
at breaking a gingerbread replica of
the Ladner Clock Tower into bite-size
pieces to kick off the Faculty of
Commerce and Business
Administration's Bakemeister
Challenge Nov. 8. Deborah Nelson,
director of program development for
the faculty's professional programs,
won first prize for her Deb's Delight
angel food cake. The event raised
$345 forthe United Way. United Way's
campus campaign has reached
$222,000 toward the campaign goal
of $300,000.
Stephen Forgacs photo
GERARD EMANUEL - HAUTE COIFFURE
Grand Opening Special
20% off cuts
Gerard does not cut your hair right away. First he looks at the shape of your
face. He wants to know what you want, the time you want to spend on your
hair, your lifestyle. Once your desires are communicated, Gerard's design
creativity flourishes into action to leave you feeling great by looking your
very best. Gerard uses natural products to leave your hair soft and free of
chemicals. He also specializes in men and women's hair loss using Thymu-
Skin and is the only one in North America using this technique. Gerard was
trained in Paris and worked for Nexxus as a platform artist. Gerard invites
you to his recently opened salon in Kitsilano.
3432 W. Broadway 732-4240
Handmade crafts from around the world.
Helping their native community as well as supporting
our local artists.
Unique, affordable and something for everyone.
We carry
• gifts,
jewellery,
• clothes,
• small musical instruments
• CDs.
Stocking stuffers galore. Free Regal Executive black with gold
pen with $50 purchase.
3427 W. Broadway Vancouver, B.C.   (604) 730-5969
I l-7T-Sat, 12-6 Sun
Candlelight
vigil Dec. 1
The memory of 14 women
killed on $)ec. 6, 1989 at
Montreal's l'Ecole Polytechnique
will be honoured at UBC during
a candlelight vigil on Friday,
Dec. 1.
Everyone is invited to gather
at 12:30 p.m. at the Ladner
Clock Tower in front of Main
Library for a procession to the
Student Union Building.
The campus community is
also welcome to visit the chapel
in the Lutheran Campus Centre at 5885 University Blvd.
which will be open all clay on
Dec. 6 for quiet reflection.
UBC's white ribbon campaign, which remembers the
Montreal victims and all women
who suffer from violence, begins Nov. 30 and continues until Dec. 6. Ribbons are available
at the Women Students' Office
in Brock Hall.
Treats to
Remember
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People
by staff writers
Bernard Sheehan has been appointed president and
chief executive officer for the
Technical University of British
Columbia (TUBC).
Sheehan has been assoc. vice-
president of computing and communications at UBC since 1990. In this role
he has been responsible for restructuring the university's information technology function including its new applications to teaching, learning and administration.
From 1967 to 1990, Sheehan served
in several senior positions at the
University of Calgary.
The Technical University of British
Columbia will serve about 3,300 students with a range of skill-
based programs, advanced technologies and partnerships with
industry and Fraser Valley communities. When the $100-
million campus opens in Cloverdale in 1999, it will deliver a
learning and applied research program using a variety of
methods including new media on campus, in the community
and at a distance.
~- Sheehan assumes his new position January.
Sheehan
Dr. Judith Hall, head ofthe Pediatrics Dept.,
has been honoured with the 1995 Phoenix-Anni
Verdi International Award for Genetic Research.
Hall , who joined UBC in 1981, is the second Canadian
.scientist to receive the award since its inception in 1982.
Her research interests include human congenital anomalies, dwarfism, the natural history of genetic disorders, the
genetics of connective tissue disorders and non-traditional
mechanisms of disease.
Hall, who received the YWCA's Women of Distinction Award
for health, sciences and technology last year, is a member of
the Canadian Human Genome Management Committee, an
international initiative to identify every gene in the human
body.
She was presented with the award at the annual national
meeting of the Federazione Italiana per lo Studio delie Malattie
Ereditarie in Spoleto, Italy earlier this fall.
• • • • •
Prof. Jack Saddler of Forestry's Dept. of Wood Science has
received the Scientific Achievement
Award from the International Union of
Forest Research Organizations (IUFRO)
for his research work in forest products
biotechnology.
Presented every five years, the award
recognizes Saddler's research work on
the bioconversion of wood residues and
applications of enzymes in pulp modification.
The award was presented at the
IUFRO's 20th World Congress in
Tampere, Finland, Aug. 12 - 16.
Saddler is the NSERC-Industry Senior Chair of Forest
Products Biotechnology at UBC.
Saddler
John Dennison. professor emeritus of Higher Education, has been selected as a Distinguished Educator
by the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education
(OISE). The award recognizes his more than 25 years of
research and teaching in the field of post-secondary education.
Dennison's research has focused particularly on the
growth and development of the community college sector in
Canada. He has written four books on the subject, the most
recent being Challenge and Opportunity: Canada's Community
Colleges at the Crossroads (1995), published by UBC Press.
Dennison is currently co-chair of the British Columbia
Council on Admissions and Transfer. The council sets policy
regarding transfer credit for students moving through the
B.C. post secondary system. Dennison received his Distinguished Educator Award on Nov. 29 in Toronto.
Michael Smith, director of UBC's Biotechnology
Laboratory and Nobel laureate, is this year's recipient of the LeSueur Medal presented by the Canadian branch of the Society of Chemical Industry.
Inaugurated in 1939, the medal is awarded every two years
for outstanding sendees to the Canadian chemical industry.
Smith accepted the award in Ottawa on Nov. 15.
Earlier this fall, Smith was honoured by The Ridge Meadows
Hospital Foundation with their Humanitarian ofthe Year
Award which recognizes contributions to the welfare of humanity and individuals who have made a lifetime commitment to
improving the quality of life for people.
Smith received the 1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for his
discovery of site-directed mutagenesis, a technique for manipulating the genetic code which has become a fundamental tool
in biotechnology. 16 UBC Reports ■ November 30, 1995
Profile
Shouldn't I Be Happy?
Postpartum depression needs to be treated seriously, says Shaila Misri
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
Dr. Shaila Misri is very happy.
The clinical professor of
Psychiatry and author of a
newly published book, she has discovered the joys of solitude and the refuge
from telephones and appointments that
writing gave her.
Misri wrote most of Shouldn't / Be
Happy? on Pender Island where she
found time to walk on the beach and
reflect on the need for a book that
offers help to women experiencing
psychiatric illnesses related to pregnancy and motherhood.
Shouldn't I Be Happy? was a logical
title, Misri says. It's a question she
hears often as director of UBC's
Reproductive Psychiatry Program with
offices at St. Paul's Hospital and B.C.
Women's Hospital.
"Many women don't realize that the
frustration, fear and depression they
may feel after childbirth is related to
that experience," Misri says. "When
they do, they feel too much guilt and
shame to admit it. The pressure that
family, society and parenting places on
them to be happy about their baby can
be overwhelming."
The mother of two teenage boys,
Misri is familiar with the rigours that
accompany parenthood. She admits
that even as an educated woman with
a medical degree, specialty training in
obstetrics, gynaecology and psychiatry,
and a supportive spouse, she felt lost
at times.
"As babies, I found my sons' needs
small and primitive. It wasn't very
challenging. It wasn't much fun changing diapers. It was worse not knowing
why my babies were crying. Learning to
be a good parent isn't like studying for
an exam."
Shouldn't I Be Happy? is a reflection
of how passionately Misri feels about
her work and an attempt to reach out
to women who may not know where
else to turn for help.
Although the program was established in 1984, Misri's research indicates that, on average, seven months
elapse after childbirth before a woman
is referred to the clinic for treatment of
postpartum depression.
It's an alarming gap, she says, when
there are 7,000 babies born in Vancouver alone each year and approximately
15 per cent of people suffering from
clinical depression commit suicide.
John Chong photo
Dr. Shaila Misri works tirelessly to raise awareness of psychiatric illnesses
experienced by pregnant women and mothers.
"Not many women recognize what is
happening to them, and it is not
uncommon for emotional disorders
accompanying the reproductive cycle to
go undiagnosed by health professionals," Misri says.
"I wanted to share the experience
and insights gained in a psychiatric
practice almost exclusively concerned
with these disorders."
She is confident, however, that
changing roles and expectations of women in the '90s is
helping win recognition for emotional
disturbances linked to reproduction as
serious illnesses.
"Historically, the problems were
often swept under the rug because
more women than men suffer from
depression. In France, it took the
revolution before completely sane
women were released from French
prisons, some who had been there for
50 years, because they suffered from
postpartum depression," Misri says.
She is ardent about making it
acceptable for women to have emotional difficulties related to the reproductive cycle, and to receive help for
those problems.
Hence her tireless promotion of the
program, the only one of its kind in
Canada. From a tiny pink office, with
photographs of her sons proudly
displayed on her desk, Misri oversees
the day-to-day operations of the
program which has attracted patients
from as far east as Newfoundland, and
also serves clients from California and
Washington State.
Along with an interdisciplinary team
of program associates, Misri counsels
about 500 people a year experiencing
emotional health disorders associated
with everything from miscarriage to
menopause.
She feels that the support of a
woman's partner is a vital step on the
road to recovery and encourages the
husband's involvement in his wife's
therapy.
Misri is currently exploring
this hypothesis in a joint
study with researchers at
Cambridge University. They're looking
at how women who suffer from postpartum depression cope with their
illness when they have partner support
and when they don't.
Despite the increased awareness of
women's emotional health issues—and
the program's growing waiting list—
Misri is adamant that society should
not view reproductive problems as an
epidemic of the '90s.
'These problems have been with us
since recorded history and are here to
stay. The main difference today is that
we are paying more attention to them
instead of just telling women to pull up
their socks and get on with their lives."
When medications are a necessary
part of treating pregnant and postpartum women, Misri is cautious. She
prescribes drugs only in the most
extreme cases where the illness is more
threatening to the patient than drug
exposure. Misri also feels that, in a
percentage of women, antidepressants
are life-saving.
Still, she is alarmed by how "fashionable," in her estimation, drugs like
Prozac have become in our society.
She rates the chapters in Shouldn't I
Be Happy? which deal with getting
professional help, including medications and their alternatives, among the
most valuable to women needing to
take control of their emotional health.
"I'm not advocating that every time
someone says they're blue that they
should seek help. What I do believe is
that women shouldn't have to wait until
they are in crisis," Misri says.
About 80 per cent of women
experience postpartum blues,
or emotional confusion after
childbirth which usually disappears in
a week, she added. Approximately 12
per cent of that group develop acute
symptoms of depression which may
include crying fits, insomnia, obsessive
thoughts and panic attacks.
She stressed that although women of
all marital status, income, ethnic origin
and religion are susceptible to postpartum depression, the illness is more
prevalent among teenagers, single
mothers and women who had unwanted pregnancies. Women with a
family history of mental illness are also
at increased risk.
"The patients won't stop coming,"
Misri says with a momentary hint of
fatigue. She rallies quickly and launches
into plans she's developing to find secure
funding for the Reproductive Psychiatry
Program, which is currently supported
by the two hospitals.
Somehow she is also managing to
write a new book on menopause for the
Johns Hopkins Press, juggle media
interviews and snatch some time to
enjoy the success of Shouldn't I Be
Happy? and the prominence it is giving
to women's emotional health issues.
'The only other time in my life that I
received as much attention was when I
was pregnant," she muses.

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