UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Reports Oct 28, 1993

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcreports-1.0118251.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcreports-1.0118251.json
JSON-LD: ubcreports-1.0118251-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcreports-1.0118251-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcreports-1.0118251-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcreports-1.0118251-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcreports-1.0118251-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcreports-1.0118251-source.json
Full Text
ubcreports-1.0118251-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcreports-1.0118251.ris

Full Text

 *
>,vVk
■r": •. v
THE \UNIVEKSITY OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
T TBC REPORTS
Life of research rewarded
UBC scientist Michael Smith
wins Nobel Prize in chemistry
Martin Dee photo
Biochemistry Prof. Michael Smith meets the world at a hastily organized
news conference introducing UBC's first Nobel laureate. Smith, recipient
ofthe 1993 Nobel Prize in chemistry, pioneered a method for reprogramming
the genetic code, providing scientists with a clearer understanding of how
biological systems function.
Computer Science shows
off new high-tech centre
by Gavin Wilson
Stqf/ writer
When UBC bought a computer in 1957,
people also called it a mechanical brain.
It had 32K of memory and was big enough
to fill the back of a pickup truck.
Senator Pat Carney, then a Province
reporter, challenged the computer to a
game of tick-tack-toe, and won.
It's a far cry from the computer wizardry on display recently at a three-day
open house held to mark the 25th anniversary of the Computer Science Dept.
and the opening of the Centre for Integrated Computer Systems Research and
Computer Science (CICSR/CS) building.
Soccer-playing trucks, fish tank virtual reality and machines that see were
among the high-tech marvels on display
atthe opening of the $17.5-million, four-
storey building.
'This building signifies a lot to us,"
said CICSR Director Jim Varah. "It stands
for the coming of age of computer engineering and computer science at UBC."
Computer Science Head Maria Klawe
said the building represents another step
towards the department's ultimate goal
of becoming "one of the best computer
science departments in the world."
Designed by the architectural firm
Chernoff Thompson and funded by the
provincial government, the building features new laboratories for study in fields
such as scientific computation, robotics,
remote sensing and real-time systems.
It provides space for the entire Department of Computer Science as well as for
CICSR-related research in Electrical and
Mechanical engineering. Its labs house
interdisciplinary projects and industrial
collaborations in fields such as computer
imaging, animation, robotics, artificial
intelligence, computer communications
and educational video games.
As well as labs, the 64,000 sq. ft.
building has offices, a reading room and
space for seminars, graduate students
and visiting researchers — all with state-
of-the-art communications system capabilities.
The building's opening ceremony was
See COMPUTER Page 2
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
Until he won the Nobel Prize
in chemistry earlier this month,
Biochemistry Professor Michael
Smith spent his life, figuratively, behind a microscope.
Now he finds himself in front of
one.
The media have been quick to focus on
Smith's  back-to-ba-     	
sics fashion sense,
right down to his preference forBirkenstock
footwear.
And even the country's national newspaper couldn't resist reporting that Smith
was "stark naked" the
moment he first heard
the news about his
achievement.
Despite the inordinate attention to his
state of dress and undress, Smith accepts
the media ballyhoo as     	
part and parcel of becoming an instant celebrity. And in typical fashion, he's not far behind in poking
a bit of fun at himself.
"The instruction I have from the Nobel
Foundation is that I've got to wear white
tie and tails for the ceremony. Then they
say I can have an advance on my prize money
if I want I presume there are some people
who are wanting to buy a suit of clothes and
are needing the money to pay for it"
Although he may be an unlikely candidate to grace the cover of a fashion magazine, Smith, 61, was an obvious choice to
receive a Nobel Prize.
The award recognizes his discovery of
a    technique    called    site-directed
"Site-directed
mutagenesis has
without a doubt
revolutionized basic
research and entirely
changed researchers'
ways of performing
their experiments."
- The Royal Swedish
Academy of Sciences
mutagenesis which enables scientists to
reprogram the genetic code.
The method, which has hastened the
development of protein engineering, is
used by scientists in laboratories throughout the world in their quest to understand how cancer and virus genes work.
Applications which may result from
Smith's research include a biotechnically
produced hemoglobin to replace blood,
new antibodies to attack cancer cells and
faster-growing crop strains.
"Site-directed mutagenesis has without a doubt revolutionized basic research
and entirely changed
■^^■^^mmbbb researchers' vvavs of
performing their experiments." the Royal
Swedish Academy of
Sciences said in announcing the award.
Smith hopes that
his Nobel Prize, which
he shares with American KaryMullis. alerts
government to the
importance of funding
b;!sic. euriositv-drivon
research.
"What   I   did   was
never       planned."
       Smith   said.   "If you
asked me when we
started in 1969 to design a specific
mutagenic method. 1 wouldn't have
known what to do. I think people have to
know that."
Smith sees a tendency in government
to make academic research more strategic and he says that's a mistake. He
defines the trend as a misanaiysis of how
society best exploits the intellectual property it develops.
"I believe that what we need to do is
find the very best people who are good at
research, whatever it is. and let them do
the best things they can, the things they
are most excited about."
See NOBEL Page 5
Remembrance Day Service
UBC's annual Remembrance Day service will be held in the foyer of
the War Memorial Gymnasium on Thursday, Nov. 11 at 10:45 a.m.
President David Strangway will inspect the troops beginning at 10:15
a.m. All members ofthe community are invited to attend both events.
Refreshments will be served following the service.
Inside
Hello, Operator
Offbeat: The Nobel people get a wrong number
Campus Crusaders
18
The Ubyssey marks 75 years
Copy Cats
20
The Faculty of Arts targets plagiarism
Climate Control
20
Forum:  Campus women feel a chill 2 UBC Reports • October 28,1993
Theorem With
A Twist
Take 30 aluminum pipes, a few bolts
and a mathematical theorem and
what do you get? Why, a twisted
triacontahedron, of course. Jack
Snoeyink, assistant prof, of
Computer Science, used his
computer to design and visualize the
construction. The pipes are painted
in five colors, corresponding to five
different tetrahedron groups that fit
together to make the sculpture,
which illustrates a theorem about
the difficulty of geometric assembly
using robot arms. Fortunately for
Snoeyink, he didn't have to rely on
robots. Eighteen graduate students
lent their arms for the final assembly.
They plan to suspend the 450-pound
model in the atrium of the new
CICSR/Computer Science building.
Gavin Wilson photo
Martin Dee photo
Computer Science graduate student Rob Scharein demonstrates fish tank virtual reality to
a goggle-wearing Chancellor Bob Lee while Dan Birch, vice-president, Academic, and Jim
Varah, at right, director ofthe Centre for Integrated Computer Systems Research, look on.
The demonstration in the Graphics and Film in Computing lab was part of the opening
ceremonies for the new CICSR/Computer Science building.
Computer
Continued from Page 1
held in the BC Tel Atrium, named
to recognize the telecommunications company's major contribution to UBC's World of Opportunity capital campaign.
BC Tel was represented by
Roy Osing, vice-president of the
company's Business Division
and one ofthe very first graduates
of UBC's Computer Science Dept.
"Our future is directly related
to yours," Osing said. "I'm sure
that technological advances developed here will no doubt help
BC Tel and BC Tel customers
down the road."
Darlene Marzari, minister of
Municipal Affairs and MLA for
Vancouver-Point Grey, brought
greetings from Premier Mike
Harcourt.
"Research in computer systems is essential for B. C. to maintain its global competitiveness
in the information age," she said.
During the three-day celebration, CICSR and Computer Science faculty, staff and students
hosted demonstrations and tours
for schools, the public, academics and industry and government representatives.
A keynote academic lecture
preceded the opening ceremony
and a symposium on current
research topics and issues was
held on Saturday.
Letters
Congratulations
to
Dr. Michael
Smith
'Winner of the
9{gbel Prize
in Chemistry
From the Faculty, Staff and Students of the
University of British Columbia
The University of
British Columbia
ALMA MATER SOCIETY
Hats off to huts
Editor:
Destruction of campus
heritage buildings is occurring
at an unparalleled rate.   But
where are the protests, the
preservation/historical societies — the uproar? Surely 50-
plus years of serving the needs
of faculty and students, being
versatile, and accommodating
the changing demands of our
ever-growing center of academic excellence, warrants
some accolades?
The huts have served, since
at least the 1940s, as classrooms, offices, research labs,
storage facilities and probably
a variety of other less official
needs. Why are our beloved
huts being demolished (six
within two days, near the
Kenny Building) without some
recognition and appreciation
for the crucial, yes, crucial role
they have played in UBC's
development?
Ahhh - the memories.  I
propose we alumni all observe
COLOUR
LASERS!
S1.451'Copy
.95 each additional
at least 60 seconds of silence
to pause and reflect.  Where
would UBC stand on the
universities national rating
scale if it weren't for those
unsung heroes of our heritage
- the huts!
In fond farewell.
Lucille Hoover
Psychology Dept.
Correction
An article in the October
14 issue of UBC Reports incorrectly reported the number
of graduate students enrolled
in the School of Family and
Nutritional Sciences. The
correct number of graduate
students is 44.
UNIVERSITYVILLAGE
2ai Floor
2174 Western Parkway
Vancouver. B.C.
■s 224-6225
FAX 224-4492
OPEN EVERY DAY MON-FRI 8-9
SAT-SUN 10-6
E§   Project
Information
Meetings
Nov. 1,1993
12:30-1:30pm
STUDENT UNION
BLDG (SUB)
RM212
Topic
Student Recreation
Centre
A brief slide
presentation will be
followed by a question
and answer period.
For additional information
contact: Campus Planning &
Development, 822-8228 or
Community Relations, 822-3131
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
• research design • data analysis
• sampling • forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508
Home: (604) 263-5394
k-
IJBC REPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December, June, July and August) for the entire
university community by the UBC Community
Relations Office, 207-6328 Memorial Rd., Vancouver
B.C..V6T1Z2.
Managing Editor: Steve Crombie
Editor: Paula Martin
Production: Stephen Forgacs
Contributors: Connie Filletti, Abe Hefter, Charles Ker,
Gavin Wilson
Editorial and advertising enquiries: 822-3131 (phone)
822-2684 (fax).
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in
UBC Reports do not necessarily reflect official
university policy.
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993 3
UBC offers counselling
services to employees
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
UBC and its employment group repre
sentatives are sponsoring a confidential
counselling, advisory
and information serv-    m^^mmi^m^mmmm
ice for university employees   and   their
families.
Called the Employee and Family Assistance Program
(EFAP), the service
provides assistance
for a wide range of issues including stress,
depression,  bereave-    	
ment,      substance
abuse and personal relationships.
"The new benefit recognizes the valuable asset people are to UBC and its
commitment to their well-being," said
Libby Nason, vice-provost.
Interlock, a private, non-profit society
of professionals including psychologists,
social workers, addictions counsellors
and family and relationship specialists,
is providing the service.
EFAP services may be used during
work hours or on personal time if pre-
"The new benefit
recognizes the valuable
asset people are to UBC
and its commitment to
their well-being."
-Libby Nason
ferred. The costof short-term counselling
sessions up to a maximum of 12 visits per
family per year is covered by the program.
Anyone requiring long-term or specialized counselling will be referred to an
affordable commu-
hmb^^bbmi^^hi     nity resource by Interlock counsellors.
"Utilization of the
program   is   completely voluntary, no
one can be required
to participate," Nason
said.
"Information
about participation
and  treatment will
     not be available to the
university unless the
member voluntarily provides it. The program is entirely separate and apart from
any work performance or disciplinary
issues."
UBC is offering the program in conjunction with the Association of Administrative and Professional Staff, Research
Assistants and Technicians, the International Union of Operating Engineers Local 882 and locals 116, 2950 and 2278 of
the Canadian Union of Public Employees.
For assistance, call 431-8200.
Offbeat
by staff writers
Winning the Nobel Prize in chemistry was a complete surprise for Michael
Smith, and not just because he thinks there are other deserving scientists.
Like most people, Smith heard the announcement on an early morning
radio newscast.
As Smith later discovered, the Swedish ambassador had tried to notify him,
but had mistakenly called another Michael Smith, who, coincidentally, lives
on the same street.
Rather than being annoyed by the miscue, Smith demonstrated the considerate nature he's famous for.
"I called (the other Smith's) wife the other day to apologize for the inconvenience. She said she quite enjoyed it."
Within minutes of learning of his award, Smith's home phone started
ringing, beginning a relentless barrage of calls.
UBC's Media Relations office received 150 calls that day, and Smith's own
office was inundated, not just with calls from reporters and well-wishers from
all over the world, but with hordes of television cameras and reporters who
staked out his office.
Calls continued to pour in all day, even after a hastily arranged news
conference. Radio Caracol in Bogota, Columbia, the BBC World Service, the
Associated Press, New Scientist magazine, and the CBC's Peter Gzowski all
wanted to talk to him.
Smith said the strangest request came from an individual who wanted him
to record a song with someone who was promoting a cause.
"Anybody who knows me will tell you that I can't sing two notes, so I
regretfully declined," he said.
• • • •
In Toronto last week, Smith visited the radio news announcers who had
informed him of his prize that fateful morning — Judy Maddren and Russ
Germain. They presented him with a cassette of the newscast.
• • • •
UBC has a Nobel laureate, so how about a poet laureate? Smith's accomplishment inspired this bit of verse by University Professor Peter Larkin.
He says he has a low I.Q.
But I suspect that isn't true,
Perhaps the case is just that he,
Is not the same as you and me.
He doesn't have the kind of genes,
Of presidents, or heads or deans,
His are those that live in sleuths,
Who go about unearthing truths.
So starting soon, why not today,
Let's take apart his D.N.A.,
Let's find the locus of the gene.
That makes his science lean and mean.
If perchance we find the locus,
For his science hocus-pocus,
We can clone all shapes and sizes,
And win lots of Nobel Prizes.
The poem was read by Science Council of B.C. President Ron Woodward to
550 guests, including Smith, at the recent B.C. Science and Engineering
Awards dinner.
Visit From A Big Bird
Abe Hefer photo
Thunderbirds defensive back Andrew Walters joined about a dozen of his
teammates for a visit to B.C.'s Children's Hospital Sept. 30. Here, Walters
chats with six-year-old Joy Burslem of Coquitlam.
Survey: climate chilly
for female faculty
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
One-half of female faculty who responded to a survey designed to assess
the climate for faculty women on campus
feel that they work in a non-supportive
professional and social atmosphere.
"Only 23.8 per cent ofthe respondents
agreed that the climate for women at UBC
is supportive, while 50.8 per cent disagreed," said Florence Ledwitz-Rigby, advisor to the president on women and
gender relations.
She recently surveyed all 344 tenure
track female faculty who had been employed at UBC at least one year.
Fifty-eight per cent responded to the
multiple choice, open-ended questionnaire which covered seven subject areas
including working conditions, lifestyle
issues and attitudes towards women.
Salary and promotion received the most
negative responses when respondents
were asked if women in their academic
units were evaluated fairly in relation to
men. The majority agreed that recruitment was managed justly and more than
half felt welcomed and accepted as a
faculty member.
"In addition to academic issues, sexist
behaviours and sexual harassment also
had an impact on whether women felt
that they were accepted and treated properly," Ledwitz-Rigby said.
Almost 40 per cent of the respondents
said that they were often the target of two
or more of the 14 inappropriate behaviours listed in the questionnaire, ranging
from the devaluation of scholarship about
women to persistent emphasis on sexuality. Only 5.1 per cent ofthe respondents
indicated that they never experienced
any of the behaviours.
The behaviour most frequently cited
as experienced often was sexist language,
humour or comments. Inappropriate or
unwanted comments on personal appearance or flattery was experienced by 53.2
per cent of the respondents either a few
times or often.
Florence Ledwitz-Rigby
discusses the survey
findings, Page 20
"Although faculty women commonly
experience sexist behaviours, fewer have
been targets of the most overt aspects of
sexual harassment," Ledwitz-Rigby said.
"Approximately 80 per cent of the respondents reported that they had never
been the target of seductive remarks,
including attempts to establish a sexual
relationship despite discouragement."
Ledwitz-Rigby added that 65 per cent
of the women taking part in the survey
indicated that they experienced attempts
by undergraduate students to intimidate
them, more frequently from male than
female students.
"This survey reminds us all that many
women experience this campus quite differently from men," said Dan Birch, vice-
president, Academic and provost.
"No matter how much has been
achieved, there is much more to be done
to provide a nurturing environment for
work and study," he said.
Ledwitz-Rigby said that university-wide
education is needed about the nature of
chilly climate behaviours and their impact on the individuals who are the targets. 4 UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993
News Digest
Premier Mike Harcourt has named Forestry Prof. Fred
Bunnell as chair of the Scientific Panel for Sustainable
Forest Practices in Clayoquot Sound.
The panel will build on the forest practices set for the area last
June by the provincial government.
"The creation of this independent panel is another major step
toward providing a sustainable future for Clayoquot. and ensuring that forestry activities in the sound stand up to world scrutiny," Harcourt said.
The 19-member panel, which will consist of scientists from
B.C. and Washington State with expertise in biodiversity, fisheries, wildlife, forest harvest planning and scenic resources, will
provide progress reports on Jan. 31 and March 31 of next year.
The panel's final recommendations on new forest practices for
Clayoquot are due on June 30, 1994.
Bunnell, a professor of Forest Wildlife Ecology and Management and director of UBC's Centre for Applied Conservation
Biology, will be joined on the panel by UBC Geography Prof. Mike
Church.
• • • •
Kaleidoscope, the latest publication from The Brock House
Writers, is out.
Written by a group of seniors from the seniors recreation
centre on Point Grey Road, this third anthology of stories,
articles, memoirs and anecdotes will be officially launched at
Brock House on Nov. 12.
The 127-pages of "life writing" was edited by Prof. Syd Butler
from the Dept. of Language Education. Butler has been involved
with the group on a voluntary basis since he gave his first guest
lecture on writing in 1984.
UBC was one of seven universities to participate in an
international varsity debate held recently in Hong Kong.
Speaking in Mandarin, competitors debated whether
the benefits ofthe proliferation of satellite TV outweigh the costs.
UBC was represented by students Tess Chang, Vivian Cheng,
Sophia Huang and Diane Lin, three of whom are not native
speakers of Mandarin. They were coached by Robert Chen, a
language instructor in the Dept. of Asian Studies.
The debate was sponsored and televised by the Singapore
Broadcasting Corporation. The winning team came from the
University of Singapore. Other teams included those from
Malaysia, Hong Kong, Taiwan, China, England, and Austrailia.
UBC Is the recipient of a 1993 Air Quality Award honourable
mention.
The award is given by the Greater Vancouver Regional
District for significantly contributing to finding long-term solutions for improving air quality and traffic congestion in B.C.
through employee trip reduction programs.
In 1991, the university embarked on a program of reducing
single occupant vehicles on campus in an effort to improve air
quality, reduce rush hour lineups and ease the strain on campus
parking facilities.
As a first step, UBC formed a transportation committee
consisting of representatives from all sectors of the campus
community to explore ideas and co-ordinate activities, with an
overall objective of reducing vehicle trips.
Initiatives have Included portable parking permits which offer
staff members car pooling convenience; a student commuting
matching program organized by the Alma Mater Society; improved bicycle facilities; and the Jack Bell Foundation's van pool
program which is quickly gaining momentum on campus.
In addition, the transportation committee has obtained the
support of B.C. Transit with the implementation of improved bus
services on several routes.
UBC
Multicultural
Liaison Office
Working in a Multicultural Classroom:
Workshop for Canadian & International TAs
November 8, 6 -9pm, Patio Room,
Graduate Student Centre
Explore  ways  to  working  effectively  and
respectfully in multicultural academic situations.
Call 822-9583 to register.
Co-sponsored   by   the   Centre   for   Faculty
Development  and Instructional Services
John Chong photo
Rick Spratley, director of Research Services, and Marcia Boyd, dean of Dentistry, serve up
some fixins' at the IRC-Health Sciences United Way pancake breakfast, held Oct. 13.
United Way hits half-way mark
by Abe Hefter
Staff writer
UBC's United Way campus
campaign is more than half-way
to its $300,000 goal.
So far the campaign has received more than 1,000 pledges
totalling almost $180,000.
'The response on behalf of
UBC students and staff has been
tremendous," said campaign co-
chair Doug Napier.
"As this is a one mailout
campaign, which was implemented this year to cut down
on the paper flow, it's important for those who plan to make
a donation to return their
pledge cards to Financial Services at their earliest convenience," he added.
Napier said events such as
the pancake breakfast, the CUPE
2950 bake sale, the Plant Operations Oktoberfest, and the car
wash in front of the Old Administration Building have helped
generate interest in the United
Way cause.
"We thank all those who
have donated their time and
effort to make the campaign
events a huge success," said
Napier.
The winner ofthe CUPE 2950
bake sale draw was student
Wendy Letoria, who won a trip
for two to Victoria's Harbour
Towers, with transportation provided by B.C. Ferries.
B.C. Rail will wisk Karen
MacLeod from the Centre for
Human Settlements to Whistler.
She had her name picked in the
early-bird draw for a trip for two
to the Listel Whistler Hotel.
The grand prize, a trip for two
to anywhere in the world Canadian Airlines flies, will be drawn
Nov. 5.
"Thank you again on behalf of
the United Way and get those
pledge cards in," said Napier.
Bursary offered to help single parents
A non-repayable bursary of
up to $6,000 per year is available to a UBC student whose
responsibility as a single parent to provide child care impedes their ability to begin or
continue studies at UBC.
Past recipients of the bur
sary are given preference in subsequent years assuming they
meet eligibility criteria.
Application forms are available from the ACCESS Foundation, P.O. Box 48448, Bentall
Post Office, Vancouver, B.C. V7X
1A2, or from UBC's Awards and
Financial Aid Office, Room
1036 Brock Hall, 1874 East
Mall.
Completed application
forms must be received by the
ACCESS Foundation at the
above address by October 31,
1993.
THEUNIVERSITYOFBRITISH COLUMBIA
The Cecil and Ida Green Visiting Professor
WALLACE S. BROECKER
Newberry Professor of Geology
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory
Columbia University, New York
Heinrich Events: Fresh Water Pulses from Glaciers Melting
into the North Atlantic triggering Global Change
Tuesday, November 2 at 3:30 PM (Oceanography Seminar)
Biological Sciences Building, Room 1465
N.B. BUILDING AND ROOM#CHANGED FROM EARLY ADVERTISING
Scarfe Building, Room 100
Ice Age Earth: World Climate and Oceans during the last Ice Age
Thursday, November 4 at 12:30-2:30 PM
Scarfe Building, Room 100
Is Fossil Fuel Greening the Earth?
The Vancouver Institute
Saturday, November 6 at 8:15 PM
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, Hall 2
ALL LECTURES ARE FREE UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993 5
Prize offers chance to promote sciences
Continued from Page 1
Smith advocates a system that carefully monitors scientific research activity, looking for potentially useful technologies, but without setting the research
agenda.
"Let the scientists do the foraging and
you come along and pick up the kernels
that they turn up. 1 think that's a much
more effective way of exploiting our intellectual capabilities in this country."
Smith laments that becoming a Nobel
laureate will likely put his own research
endeavours on hold for the next year.
But he does welcome the opportunity,
now that he has been vaulted into public
life, to communicate about science with a
variety of people, including the general
public.
"I hope to provide inspiration to young
Canadians. We have the resources and
the opportunity to do things that are
world class. I hope that would encourage
people not to be intimidated or have an
inferiority complex."
Smith's reputation as head of the
Biotechnology Laboratory and scientific
director of the Protein Engineering Network Centre of Excellence based at UBC
has already attracted a pool of talented
young scientists to campus.
"All of Michael's colleagues at UBC are
proud of his accomplishments and recognition," said UBC President David
Strangway. "It is a privilege to be able to
bask in the reflected glory. Michael is a
role model for the coming generation of
students in Canada. He has shown them
that it is possible to aspire to the highest
peaks of excellence and this aspiration
can be realized right here at UBC and in
Canada."
Smith has never forgotten the help he
received during his own academic pursuits. The son of working-class parents, his
education was funded by scholarships.
His first bursary enabled him to go to a
private secondary school in Blackpool, Smith's
birthplace, when he was 11 years old.
"I remember being bitterly unhappy
about going because I grew up in a small
village and because doctors' sons and
lawyers' sons went there and people said
they were snobs. I remember crying but
my mother said I had to go.
"I was lucky there because they had a very
good chemistry master. Sidney Law turned
me on to chemistry. That got it going."
Martin Dee photo
Michael Smith:   "I hope to provide inspiration to young Canadians. We have the
resources and the opportunity to do things that are world class."
The memories make Smith thoughtful.
"The one downside of this whole
thing..." He pauses. "If I were getting a
Nobel Prize, I would have liked a few
people to still be alive. My mother and
father. Gordon Shrum. He offered me a
job here as a postdoctoral fellow. And my
chemistry master. I wish they could have
enjoyed my pleasure."
After high school Smith won another
scholarship, this time to the University of
Manchester where he did his undergraduate and graduate training.
Receiving his BSc in 1953 was another
tearful experience, this time for a different reason.
"I guess I blew some exams for my
undergraduate degree in science and I
only got second class standing. I was so
upset. I think I was in tears and went to
see the head ofthe department to ask him
what was going to become of me.
"He said to carry on and go to graduate
school and things will turn out all right."
He took the department head's advice
and enrolled in graduate school where he
recalls having a less than ideal relationship with his PhD supervisor.
"My supervisor and I didn't get along
too well. I remember at Christmas, just
before I was going to finish my PhD, him
calling me in for an interview and telling
me that he didn't think I was doing too
well and would probably have to leave
without a PhD. I didn't cry about that. I
was just annoyed."
Offering these personal glimpses into
his life reflect Smith's kindness, compassion and warmth, traits which combined
with his Intellect, have earned him the
respect and goodwill of friends and colleagues from all walks of life in every
comer of the world. But he has another
compelling reason for sharing the intimacies.
"If young people realize that life has its
ups and downs -- but if they keep going
and they have a reasonable objective --
things can work out.
"I had this feeling when I was their age
that if I identified something I could do
and worked hard at it I would be able to
achieve it. I don't think that's quite the
same now.
"I think there's more of a challenge for
younger people. But you have two choices
in life — you can try and do your best or
you can not bother. It seems to me that no
matter how bad a situation is you are
going to be better off if you try to do the
best you can in whatever area you have
talent or interest or enthusiasm."
Winning the Nobel Prize may have
changed his life, but it is his induction in
1986 as a Fellow of the Royal Society,
London, that remains the most stirring
experience in his life.
"I had to sign a book, a 300-year-old
book. When I saw the other names in it —
Newton, Huxley, Darwin — well, it was
the most moving thing."
As his old department head at the
University of Manchester predicted exactly 40 years ago, things did turn out all
right for Michael Smith after all.
John Chong photo
Nobel Visitor
University Prof. Emeritus Charles McDowell, left, shares a private moment
with Swiss scientist Richard Ernst, 1991 recipient ofthe Nobel Prize in
chemistry, who recently visited campus to deliver the annual McDowell
Lecture. McDowell, who was head of the Chemistry Dept. for 28 years
before his retirement, continues to operate a productive research lab.
Enzyme abnormality may cause
Lou Gehrig's disease: study
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
The onset of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) may occur much earlier than
current medical research suggests, says
a team of UBC neuroscientists.
ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's
disease, is a neurological syndrome
marked by neural degeneration, muscular weakness, atrophy and spasticity.
The ALS Society of Canada estimates
that six to seven people in every 10,000
Canadians are newly diagnosed with the
disease each year.
A recent study by Dr. Christopher
Shaw, Dr. Charles Krieger, medical student Ruth Lanius and research associate
Venska Wagey indicates that an abnormality of a regulatory enzyme may be
responsible for inducing an alteration of
specific receptors in the spinal cord.
Receptors assist in communication
between cells and control how cells respond . A particular subtype, called NMDA
receptors, decrease rapidly in the disease, Shaw explained.
"We can't grow the nerve cells back
once ALS has progressed to this point.
However, we have been able to reverse the
depletion of the receptors by  treating
them with an enzyme activator."
Shaw added that once the specific
enzyme is found and isolated, an antibody could be developed for it almost
immediately. He hopes to identify the
enzyme within the next year.
"This would allow for medical intervention
at a much earlier stage of the disease and
possibly provide a way to screen chemically
before the nerve cells die," he said.
Shaw also hopes that it will be possible
to flag ALS in people with a family history
ofthe disease, and produce a drug therapy
to contain it.
Krieger said that it would be "very
optimistic" to talk in terms of a cure for
ALS at this point.
"We're excited by the progress we've
made to date, but there is a need for more
tissue and further tests in order to find
the enzyme."
During the six-month study, funded
by the B.C. Health Research Foundation,
Krieger and Shaw compared spinal cord
tissue taken from 10 patients, including
people with ALS and individuals who
were disease-free.
Krieger stressed the need for more
spinal cord tissue, citing the limited
amount available for the research team to
continue its studies. 6 UBC Reports • October 28, 1993
Calendar
October 31 through November 13
Monday, Nov. 1
Plant Science Seminar
The Interior Fruit Industry Of
BC: Current State/Future Prospects. Henry Markgraf, BC Fruit
Packers Co-op. MacMillan 318D
at 12:30pm. Refreshments. Call
822-9646.
Mechanical Engineering
Seminar
Fluid Film Lubrication. Dr.
Keith Brockwell, National Research Council. Civil/Mechanical Engineering 1202 from 3:30-
4:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-
6671.
Biochemistry /Molecular
Biology Seminar
Role Of The Histone Tails In
The Modulation Of Chromatin
Dynamics. Dr. Juan Ausio. Biochemistry/Microbiology, U. of
Victoria. IRC #4 at 3:45pm. Refreshments at 3:30pm. Call 822-
5925.
Astronomy Seminar
ZEBRA Earns Its Stripes:
ZEeman BRoadening Analysis Of
Magnetic White Dwarfs. Jaymie
Matthews, Geophysics/ Astronomy 260 at 4pm. Coffee from
3:30pm.  Call 822-2696/2267.
Tuesday, Nov. 2
Botany Seminar
Molecular Phytogenies In The
Legume Family And Their Uses
In Testing Evolutionary Hypotheses. Dr. Jeffrey J. Doyle, Bailey
Hortorium, Cornell U.
BioSciences 2000 from 12:30-
1:30pm.  Call 822-2133.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
Crystallinity Changes And
Phase Transitions Of Pharmaceutical Solids With Processing.
Marion Wong, Mallinckrodt
Specialty Chemicals Co., St.
Louis, MO. IRC #3 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-4645.
Lectures In Modern
Chemistry
Silicon-Carbon Double Bonds.
Photochemical Methods in the
Study of the Chemistry of Reactive Silenes. Dr. William Leigh,
Chemistry, McMaster U. Chemistry 250 south wing at lpm.
Refreshments at 12:40pm. Call
822-3266.
Oceanography Seminar
Heinrich Events: Freshwater
Pulses from Glaciers melting into
the North Atlantic triggering Global Change. W. Broecker,
Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, Columbia U., NY. Scarfe
100 at 3:30pm.  Call 822-3626.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
Should Anyone Receive
Antiarrhythmic Drugs? Margaret
Ackman, Pharm. D. student.
Pharmaceutical Sciences. Family/Nutritional Sciences 30 from
4-5pm. Call 822-4645.
Statistics Seminar
Engle And Granger Tests: The
Correct Approach For
Cointegrated Non-Linear Time
Series? Catherine Minett-Smith.
Angus 413 from 4-5:30pm. Refreshments.  Call 822-2234.
Centre For Applied Ethics
Colloquium
The Moral Dimensions Of Organizational Life. Fred Bird, Religion, Concordia U.  Angus 225
from 4-6pm.   Call 822-5139.
International Teaching
Assistant Program
Sponsored by UBC Continuing
Studies (MLO). Section I runs to
Nov. 30. Old Auditorium Annex
221, consecutive Tuesdays from
6-9pm .   Call 822-9583.
School of Rehabilitation
Sciences
Information Night. The
Schools's BSc. Programs in Occupational/Physical Therapy open
to faculty, admissions personnel,
students. Get the most current
information on criteria for admission to the School's program. IRC
#2 from 7-9pm.   Call 822-7392.
Faculty Women's Club
General Meeting
Virgins, Wives Or Widows: The
Role Of Women In Medieval Law
And Culture. J. De Lloyd Guth.
visiting assoc. prof.. Law. Cecil
Green Park at 7:30pm. Coffee and
dessert party. Husbands and
guests welcome.  Call 535-7995.
Movie Documentary
Because Of That War. Jewish
Students Assoc./Hillel House presentation. SUB Theatre at 7:30pm.
Tickets $5.  Call 224-4748.
President's Lecture Series In
Lesbian/Gay Studies
Together And Apart: Inside
Collaborative Writing. Daphne
Marlatt/Betsy Warland. Angus
110 at 7:30pm. Call L. Weir at
822-2942.
Wednesday. Nov. 3
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
Foot And Ankle Service. Dr.
Richard Claridge. Eye Care Centre Auditorium at 7am. Call 875-
4272.
Wednesday Noon Hour Series
Camille Churchfield, flute: Beth
Orson, english horn; Miranda
Wong, piano. Music Recital Hall at
12:30pm. Admission $2. Call
822-5574.
Microbiology Seminar
The SH2 Domain Containing
Protein Tyrosine Phosphatases.
Dr. Frank Jirik, UBC Biomed Research Centre. Wesbrook 201 from
12:30-l:30pm.   Call 822-3308.
French Lectures
Mythe Et Histoire Dans
Salammbo De Flaubert. Suzette
Bahar, French Dept. Buchanan
Tower 799 at 2pm. Call 822-
4025.
Faculty Development/
Instructional Services
Workshop
The Multicultural Classroom:
Part 2. Recognize and develop
intercultural communication skills
in multicultural academic settings.
Facilitators: Keith Hoy/Mackie
Chase, Intercultural Training/Resource Centre; Katherine
Beaumont, Multicultural Liaison
Office. Social Work 324 from 3-
5pm.  Call 822-9164.
Applied Mathematics
Colloquium
An Analysis Of Morphogenetic
Stability Of Liposomes Based On
The Principle Of Minimum Bending Energy. Dr. Toshio Sekimura,
College of Engineering, Chubu U.,
Kasugai, Japan. Mathematics 203
at 3:30pm.   Call 822-4584.
Geography Colloquium
Studies Of Ozone Pollution In
The Ixiwer Fraser Valley.   Douw
Steyn, Geography. Geography 201
from 3:30-5:00pm. Refreshments
at 3:25pm.   Call 822-5612.
Geophysics Seminar
Seismic Imaging Of The East
Pacific Rise: Method And Results.
DougToomey, U. of Oregon. Geophysics/Astronomy 260 at 4pm.
Coffee at 3:45pm. Call 822-3466.
Thursday, Nov. 4
Academic Lecture Series 93/
94
Neurobiology Of Violence. Dr.
Pierre Flor-Henry, Psychiatry, Alberta Hospital Edmonton.
Detwiller Pavilion, University Hospital from 9-10am. Call 822-7314.
Travel Seminar Series
Three Seasons In The Wind.
Six Weeks By Canoe Down Northern Canada's Thelon River.
Kathleen, Computer Science.
Michael Pitt, Plant Science.
MacMillan 158 at 12:30pm. Call
822-9646.
Academic Women's
Association
Informal brown bag lunch.
Topics of mutual interest to all.
Family/Nutritional Sciences 40
from 12:30-2pm.   Call 822-3830.
Arts One Lecture
Clayoquot Sound: The Ecology
Of A Conflict. Brent Ingram, Faculty of Forestry. Arts One Blue
Room, 6358 Univ. Blvd. at lpm.
Call 822-8619.
Physics Colloquium
Magnetic Moments In Metals:
Are The Electrons Really Heavy?
W. Buyers, Physics, UBC and
AECL, Chalk River. Hennings 201
at 4pm.  Call 822-3853.
Friday, Nov. 5
Centre For Research In
Women's Studies Workshop
Resisting Inequity InThe Classroom. Kathryn McCannell, School
of Social Work. Room# TBA from
9am-4pm. Registration req'd. Call
822-9171.
Paediatrics Grand Rounds
Starting A New Epoch: Ending
The Physical Punishment Of Children. Dr. Marie Hay, Prince George
Regional Hospital. G.F. Strong
Auditorium at 9am. Call 875-
2118.
Health Care/Epidemiology
Grand Rounds
Part I: The BC Heart Health
Demonstration Project. An Update From The Community Prospective. Dr. Brian O'Connor,
Medical Health Officer, North Shore
Health Unit. James Mather 253
from 9-10am. Public welcome.
Call 822-2772.
Obstetrics/Gynaecology
Grand Rounds
Cancelled due to the D.A. Boyes
Oncology Conference.
Physiology Symposium
Mandatory Retirement: Is It
Fair? Speakers to include William
Webber, Assoc.VP.Academic; Prof.
Martin Meissner. Curtis 101 at
12:30pm. Free refreshments.
Public welcome.   Call 822-5684.
World University Services Of
Canada Speaker Series
Broadening Perspectives: A
Student's Year Abroad In Japan.
Trevor Morrison. Buchanan A205
from 12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-
2485.
Law Seminar
The Construction Of Health
Cure And The Ideology Of The
Private. Professor Hester Lessard,
Law, U. of Victoria. Cutis Conference Room from 12:30-2pm. Call
822-6506.
Chemical Engineering
Weekly Seminar
Multiple Roles Of Promoted
Molybdenum On Gamma-Alumina
Catalysts And Variable Rates Of
Catalytic Site Deactivation During
Hydrocracking: Hydrogenation
And Hydrogen Atom Transfer. Dr.
Emerson C. Sanford, Syncrude
Canada Ltd., Edmonton Research
Centre. Chem/Engineering 206
at 3:30pm.   Call 822-3238.
Faculty Association Meeting
Ad Hoc Committee on Lesbian
and Gay Issues. Scarfe 2415 at
4pm. Anyone wishing to be on the
Executive, call M. Bryson, 822-
5284 or Doug Sanders at 822-
2335.
Theoretical Chemistry
Seminars
Kinetic Theory Of Sheath Regions In Gas Discharges. K.Leung.
Chemistry. Chemistry 402 south
wing at 4pm.   Call 822-3997.
Saturday, Nov. 6
Vancouver Institute Lecture
Is Fossil Fuel C02 Greening
The Earth? The Cecil & Ida Green
Visiting Professor. Dr. Wallace S.
Broecker, Lamont-Doherty Earth
Observatory, Columbia U. IRC #2
at 8:15pm.   Call 822-5675.
Sunday, Nov. 7
Music Concert
The University Singers, James
Fankhauser, director. Music Recital Hall at 2:30pm. Call 822-
3113.
Museum Of Anthropology
Concert
Rebel Voices, The Seattle Duo.
MOA Great Hall from2:30-3:15pm.
Free with Museum admission. Call
822-5087.
Monday, Nov. 8
Plant Science Seminar
DNA Fingerprinting And
Genome Analysis In Plants. Dr.
John Carlson, Biotech Lab.
MacMillan 318D at 12:30pm. Refreshments.  Call 822-9646.
TAG Seminar For Faculty
Not Just Another Overhead.
Denise Sketches, Biomedical Communications. Angus 109 from 3-
5pm. Registration req'd. No fee.
Call 822-9149.
Hillel House Lectures/
Displays
Holocaust Awareness Days
1993 will focus on how racism/
intolerance continue to reverberate 50 years after the Holocaust.
Continues through Nov. 10. Hillel
House.   Call 224-4748.
Faculty Development
Workshop
Working In A Multicultural
Classroom. A workshop for Canadian and International T.A.'s.
Katherine Beaumont, MLO;
Catherine Pikios, Open Learning
Agency. Grad Student Centre
Patio Room from 6-9pm. Call
822-9583.
Applied Mathematics
Colloquium
Pattern Formation In Generalised Turing Systems: The Role
Of Boundary Conditions/Environmental Inhomogeneities. Dr.
Philip Maini, Math Dept., U. of
Oxford. UK. Mathematics 203 at
3:30pm.   Call 822-4584.
Mechanical Engineering
Seminar
Multi Agent Manipulator Control. Simon Monkton, PhD student. Civil/Mechanical Engineering 1202 from 3:30-4:30pm. Refreshments.   Call 822-6671.
Biochemistry/Molecular
Biology Seminar
Crystallography And The Rational Design OfWhooping Cough
Vacinnes. Dr. Randy Read, Dept.
of Medical Micro/Infectious Diseases, U. of Alberta. IRC #4 at
3:45pm. Refreshments at
3:30pm.   Call 822-5925.
Tuesday,  Nov. 9
Continuing Studies In
Economics
An Introduction Course To
Economics And Financial Strategies. Mr. Les Herbert, BC Tel
Leadership Education. Communications Building 134, 1795
Willingdon Ave., Burnaby from
8am-4pm. Fee $150. Registration and information, call 822-
3347.
Centre For Research In
Women's Studies Lecture
Series
Women And The Tax System:
A Study In Systemic Discrimination. Claire Young, Law.
Buchanan B212 at 12:30pm. Call
822-9171.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
CPS Dosing Is Not For Your
Patient Dr. James McCormack,
Div. of Clinical Pharmacy. IRC
#3from 12:30-l:30pm. Call822-
4645.
Botany Seminar
Lamarck: Evil Genius Or Visionary? Jack Maze, Botany.
BioSciences 2000 from 12:30-
1:30pm.   Call 822-2133.
Lectures In Modern
Chemistry
1993/94 Merck Frosst Lee-
UBCREPORTS
at
6:
85
St
Iii
is
be
CALENDAR DI
Calendar items must be su
)le from the UBC Communit
528 Memorial Road, Vancouv
52-3131. Fax: 822-2684. PI
ibrnissions for the Calendar'
nited due to space.   Deadlii
sue of UBC Reports—which c
;r 14 to November 27 — is n
EADLINES
bmitted on forms avail-
y Relations Office, 207-
er, B.C. V6T 1Z2. Phone:
gase limit to 35 words.
3 Notices section may be
ie for the November 11
;overs the period Novem-
oon, November 2. Calendar
UBC Reports • October 28,1993 7
October 31 through November 13
ture. Femtochemistry. Dr.
Ahmed Zewail, Chemistry,
Caltech, Pasadena. Chem 250
south wing at lpm. Refreshments at 12:40pm. Call 822-
3266.
Statistics Seminar
Some Inequalities For U-Sta-
tistics With Application To Density Examination. Ian McKay,
Statistics. HenryAngus413from
4-5:30pm. Refreshments. Call
822-2234.
Museum of Anthropology
Talk
Tony Hillerman, acclaimed
mystery writer. MOA Great Hall
from 7-9pm. Free to the public.
Call 822-5087.
Wednesday, Nov. 10
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
Vascular Tumors. Combined
Orthopaedic/Pathology Sarcoma
Rounds. Dr. Christopher
Beauchamp, chairman; Dr. John
O'Connell, speaker. Pathology.
Eye Care Centre Auditorium at
7am.  Call 875-4646.
Bookstore Famous Authors
Lee Maracle, one of Canada's
pre-eminent First Nations writers, will be reading and signing
her most recent novels,
Ravensong and Sundogs. UBC
Bookstore at 12:30pm. Call 822-
2665/4799.
Wednesday Noon Hour
Series
Julia Nolan, saxophone; Salvador Ferreras, percussion. Music Recital Hall at 12:30pm. Admission $2.  Call 822-5574.
Oceanography/Zoology
Seminar
The Biology Of
Cadborosaurus. E. L. Bousfleld,
Royal BC Museum, Victoria.
BioSciences 2000 from 12:30-
1:30pm.  Call 822-2496.
Microbiology Seminar
Molecular Mechanisms Of
Bacterial Survival. Dr. Abdul
Matin, Dept. of Bacteriology,
Stanford U.. Palo Alto. Wesbrook
201 from 12:30-l:30pm. Call
822-3308.
Centre For Japanese
Research Seminar
The Search For Paradise:
Japanese Property Investors
Overseas. David W. Edgington,
Geography. Asian Centre 604 from
12:30-l:45pm. Call 822-5612.
Geography Colloquium
Series
Citizens In The Private Sphere:
The City Politic Of Buddying At
AIDS Vancouver. Michael Brown,
Geography. Geography 201 from
3:30-5pm. Refreshments at
3:25pm.  Call 822-5612.
Theatre/Film Production
The Doctor's Dilemma by
Bernard Shaw runs to November
20 inclusive. Frederic Wood Theatre at 8pm. Reservations/ ticket
information call 822-2678/3880.
Thursday, Nov. 11
UBC Annual Remembrance
Day Ceremony
President David Strangway will
conduct an inspection ofthe troops
beginning at 10:15am, followed by
a service at 10:45am. Refreshments will be served following the
service and all members of the
community are invited to attend
both events.  Call 822-2484.
Friday, Nov. 12
Obstetrics/Gynaecology
Grand Rounds
Perinatal Loss: A Challenge
For The Physicians. Dr. D.
Farquharson And Grace Hospital
Perinatal Loss Team. University
Hospital Shaughnessy Site D308
at 8am.  Call 875-3266.
Health Care /Epidemiology
Grand Rounds
Part II: The BC Heart Health
Demonstration Project. An Evaluation Of Community Mobilization
For Heart Disease Prevention. To
include Dr. Lawrence Green, director, The Institute of Health Promotion/Research. James Mather
253 from 9-10am. Everyone welcome.  Call 822-2772.
Occupational Hygiene
Program Seminar
Effectiveness Of Safety Committees And Safety Training: Experiences From BC Forest Product
Mills. Dr. Stephen Havlovic, Business Admin., SFU. Chem/Me-
chanical Building 1202 from
12:30-1:30pm. Free. Call 822-
9595.
World University Services Of
Canada Speaker Series
Indonesia. Alan Dilworth.
Buchanan A205 from 12:30-
1:30pm.  Call 822-2485.
Law Seminar
The Hitchiker's Guide To Ex
pert Systems In Law. Professor
Lilian Edwards, Law, U. of Edinburgh, UK. Curtis Conference
Room from 12:30-2pm. Call 822-
6506.
Chemical/Engineering
Weekly Seminar
Animal Cell Cultural
Bioprocessing. Dr. Amine Kamen,
Biotech. Research Inst., Montreal.
ChemEngineering 206 at 3:30pm.
Call 822-3238.
Theoretical Chemistry Sem.
Asymptotic Behaviour Of Discrete Velocity Models Of The
Boltzmann Equation In An Interval With Stochastic Boundary Conditions. R. R. Illner, U. ofVictoria.
Chemistry 402 central wing at
4pm.  Call 822-3997.
President's Lecture Series In
Lesbian/Gay Studies
Lesbian Bodies And Lesbian
Con/Texts.   Susan Stewart, Kiss
and Tell Collective; Monique
Wittig.U. of Arizona. Hebb Theatre from 7-9pm. Free admission.  Call 822-5358.
Saturday, Nov. 13
Vancouver Institute
Lecture
Genes 'R Us: The link Between
Our Past And Future. Dr. Michael
Hayden, Medical Genetics. IRC
#2 at 8:15pm.  Call 822-5311.
Notices
Student Housing
The off-campus housing listing
service offered by the UBC Housing Office has been discontinued.
A new service offered by the AMS
has been established to provide a
housing listing service for both
students and landlords. This new
service utilizes a computer voice
messaging system. Students call
822-9844, landlords call 822-
9847.
Campus Tours
School and College Liaison tours
provide prospective UBC students
with an overview of campus activities/ faculties/services. Every
Friday at 9:30am. Reservations
required one week in advance. Call
822-4319.
Disability Resource Centre
The Centre provides consultation and information for faculty
members with students with disabilities. Guidebooks/services for
student and faculty available. Call
822-5844.
UBC Bookstore
Open Mon/Tue/Thur. and Fri.
8:30am-5pm; Wed., 8:30am-
8:30pm; Sat., 9:30am-5pm. Call
822-2665/4749.
English Language Institute
Professional development for
language teachers. Continuing
classes through November. Call
222-5208 to register or receive a
brochure.
Sixth Annual Health Policy
Conference
At the University Golf Club from
8:30-4pm Friday, Nov. 26. Fee
$90, students$60. Call 822-4969.
Free Hearing Assessments
Now through December 17.
Open to all UBC students/staff/
faculty. Sponsored by the UBC
Hearing Access Project. By appointment.   Call 822-5798.
UBC Student Health
Outreach
Shopping tours are planned
to help you get the best buy for
your dollars; decipher food labels; choose nutritious and tasty
food. Tours held at Safeway on
West 10th, Nov. 3rd at 7pm/Nov
4th at 2pm. To register call 822-
4044.
Women Students' Office
Advocacy/personal counselling services available. Call 822-
2415.
Fine Arts Gallery
Tues.-Fri. from 10am-5pm.
Saturdays 12-5pm. Free admission. Main Library. Call 822-
2759.
Male Experience Research
Project
Are contemporary ideas about
men's lives truths or stereotypes?
Counselling psychology student
is looking for volunteers to take
part in this study. If you're
straight, white, 25-35, and interested in sharing your story,
call Lawrence at 822-5259.
Clinical Trials in
Dermatology
Athlete's Foot Study requires
volunteers aged 18-65 yrs. Must
be able to attend 6 visits over 6
weeks.  Lab tests required.
Study on Acne Gels
Aged over 16 yrs. with bad acne
and not currently under a physician's care. 5 visits over 2-month
period.
Psoriasis Studies
Aged over 18 yrs. and not currently under a physician's care. 5-
10 visits over a 2-month period.
Division of Dermatology, VGH, 855
West 10th Ave.  Call 875-5296.
Sexual Harassment Office
Advisors are available to discuss questions or concerns and
are prepared to help any member of the UBC community who
is being sexually harassed find a
satisfactory resolution. Call
Margaretha Hoek at 822-6353.
Psychology Study
Looking for female heterosexual volunteers who are experiencing sexual difficulties to
participate in confidential research on physiological sexual
arousal. Honorarium. Mon-Thu
4-6pm.  Call 822-2998.
Drug Inter-Action Study
Volunteers at least 18 years
required for participation in Pharmacology/Therapeutics Study.
Eligibility screening by appointment. Honorarium upon completion of study. Call 822-4270.
Statistical Consulting/
Research Laboratory
SCARL is operated by the
Dept. of Statistics to provide statistical advice to faculty/graduate students working on research
problems. Call 822-4037.
Surplus Equipment
Recycling Facility (SERF)
Disposal of all surplus items.
Every Wednesday, 12-5pm. Task
Force Bldg., 2352 Health Sciences Mall. Call Vince at 822-
2582/Rich at 822-2813.
Badminton Club
Faculty/Staff are welcome to
join in the fun at the Robert
Osborne Centre-Gym A, on Fridays now through Mar/94 from
6:30-8:30pm. Cost is $15, plus
library card. Call John at 822-
6933.
Nitobe Garden
Open weekdays only from
10am-3pm.  Call 822-6038.
School of Human Kinetics
New name better reflects school's range of study
by Abe Hefter
Staff writer
In previous years, the School
of Physical Education and Recreation focused on exactly that:
the study of physical education
and recreation.
These days, it's just part of
the story.
Now called the School of Human Kinetics, the school studies
human movement from the life,
physical, social and behavioural
sciences, as well as from a humanities frame of reference.
In the past, students of the
school often became physical
education instructors and gym
teachers, resulting in the perception that only "jocks" studied physical education and recreation.
"The nature of our field has
changed, especially in the last
20 years, and the school's name
change reflects that," said school
Director Bob Schutz. "We've
evolved from strictly game-
sports athletics to the systematic study of movement and
sport."
Physical education is just one
ofthe four undergraduate components of the field of human
kinetics at UBC, explained
Schutz, the others being exercise science, health and fitness,
and leisure and sport management.
'The teaching, research and
professional activities in our
school, while including traditional physical education, encompass a much broader field.
Our four undergraduate
specializations, as well as our
graduate degree areas of
bioenergetics, socio-cultural research and behavioural research, all fall under human kinetics: the study of human
movement in all its forms."
The name change also reflects
a change in the school's curriculum and philosophy. In addition
to a streamlining of the under
graduate program and offering
greater distinction among undergraduate specializations, the
school now offers a master's degrees in Arts, Science and Physical Education, soon to be renamed Master of Human Kinetics. A PhD program approved by
the school is currently undergoing external review.
In the past, six faculty held
joint appointments with the
school and the Dept. of Athletics
and Sport Services.
"These faculty members were
having a hard time meeting the
expectations of each unit," said
Schutz.
"With  the  support of Bob
Philip, director of Athletics and
Sport Services, three faculty
have moved into the school full-
time, two others have moved
full-time into Athletics, and one
remains as a split appointment.
This offers a much more effective use of individual faculty
members."
Schutz said the next phase in
the "new-look" school will centre
on improvements to facilities.
The recently completed
Osborne Feasibility Study contains plans for renovations or
replacement ofthe Unit Two complex at the Osborne Centre in
order to house all the school's
faculty labs. 8 UBC Reports • October 28,1993
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES - draft
Subjects: Records Management / Research Grants as Payment During Study Leave
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
October 28, 1993
Dear Colleagues:
At the initiative of the University Archives Committee, a records
management policy has been drafted and is here for your review.
In 1992/93, a records survey was conducted at UBC which revealed
an astonishing rate of new records generation, the existence of many
idiosyncratic record-keeping systems and the absence of general
appraisal or retention guidelines for University records.
The draft policy would result in the development of guidelines for
records retention, disposal and for ensuring that the University's
permanently valuable records are identified and preserved. In addition,
a records management program will help UBC prepare for the requirements ofthe Freedom of Information legislation which will be extended
to universities in Fall 1994.
Please forward all comments to Libby Nason, Vice Provost, President's Office.
Yours sincerely,
David W. Strangway
President
INITIAL DRAFT
Policy on Records
Management
RESPONSIBLE VICE PRESIDENT:
Vice President Academic
Vice President Administration & Finance
Vice President Student & Academic Services
PURPOSE:
• to promote economy and efficiency in
the creation, maintenance, storage,
retrieval and disposal of University
records;
• to ensure preservation of records of
permanent value ;
• to support both protection of privacy
and freedom of information services
throughout the University.
POLICY:
All records, regardless of physical form or
characteristics, created or received by
University officers or employees in the
course of their duties on behalf of the
University, are the property of the University and subject to its overall control.
The University will provide guidelines for
the retention of records based on legal,
operational, financial, administrative and
other considerations through the development of classification systems and
schedules, including the destruction or
transfer of records to the University Archives after the retention periods have
expired. The University Archives will
coordinate the University's records management program and preservation of
permanently valuable records ofthe University.
PROCEDURE SUMMARY:
A standard records management program will be developed in order to permit
the efficient maintenance and retrieval of
information to help meet the operational
needs ofthe University and UBC's obligations under the Freedom of Infomation
and Protection ofPrivacg Act. Elements
for consideration in such a system will
include:
• development of a standard classification system for administrative records
retained throughout the University;
• design of schedules for retention and
destruction of records based on the
standard classification system;
• provision of advice and assistance in
the development of classification
systems and accompanying schedules
for operational records specific to each
unit;
• training of staff in records
management;
• development of standards for supplies
and equipment used in maintaining
records including the implementation
and use of micrographics and
microimaging systems;
• institution of forms management (to
help avoid the creation of unnecessary
records);
• provision of advice about storage for
semi-active or inactive records;
• provision of advice concerning specific
protection for vital records;
• preservation of and access to
permanently valuable records;
• promotion of records management
requirements in future system
development.
DETAILED PROCEDURES:
Until standard detailed procedures are
developed, the University will establish a
University Records Disposition Committee to which administrative units may
apply for authorization to dispose of
records. The committee will have responsibility for determining which records
should be retained and which may be
safely destroyed or archived.
Development ofthe records management
program will be coordinated by the University Archives.
DEFINITIONS:
Records, created or received by University officers or employees in the course of
their duties on behalf of the Unviersity,
can be in a variety of physical forms. In
accordance with the definition of records
in the legislation pertaining to freedom of
information, records includes books,
documents, maps, drawings, photographs, letters, vouchers, papers, and
any other thing on which information is
recorded or stored by graphic, electronic
or mechanical means, but does not include computer programs or other mechanisms that produce records.
Active records are records which are required and referred to constantly for cur
rent use, and which need to be retained
and maintained in office space and equipment close to users.
Semi-active records are records which are
referred to infrequently and are not required constantly for current use. Semi-
active records are removed from office
space to lower cost off-site storage until
they are no longer needed.
Inactive records are records for which the
active and semi-active retention periods
have lapsed and which are no longer
required to carry out the functions for
which they were created.
Permanentlg valuable records include
those with cultural, social, scientific,
administrative, financial, operational and
legal significance.
Records management is the application
of systematic control to recorded information which is required in the administration and operation of University activities. The services provided through a
records management program include
correspondence management, manuals
and directives management, forms management, files management, records retention scheduling, disaster planning,
vital records programs, semi-active
records storage, records conversion, and
archival programming.
Records Retention Schedule means an
established timetable for maintaining the
organization's records, transferring inactive records to storage and permanently
valuable records to the Archives, and
destroying records which are no longer
valuable to the organization.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
October 28, 1993
Dear Colleagues:
At the request of the Office of Research Services, Policy #37,
Research Grants as Part Payment During Study Leave, is being
revised to reflect current practices.
A draft is published here for your review. If you have any
comments, please forward them to Libby Nason, Vice Provost,
President's Office.
Yours sincerely,
David W. Strangway
President
DRAFT REVISION TO POLICY #37
Research Grants as Payment During Study Leave
RESPONSIBLE VICE PRESIDENT: Vice
President Research
PURPOSE: To provide opportunity for
Revenue Canada-approved tax savings
for applicants for study leave.
POLICY: UBC permits applicants for
study leave to designate part of their
study leave salary as a research grant in
order to take advantage of Revenue
Canada-approved tax savings.
PROCEDURE SUMMARY:
The Income Tax Act, Section 56(1) (o),
states that certain costs of research may
be considered as deductible for income
tax purposes. Therefore, applicants for
study leave for the purpose of conducting
research may wish to request that part of
their study leave salary be designated as
a research grant.
DETAILED PROCEDURES:
The applicant applies for study leave in
the usual way. Following granting of the
leave, an application for a Study Leave
Research Grant (SLRG) may be made on
forms obtained from the Office of Research Services.
The SLRG application includes a description of the reserach work that the applicant proposes to carry out while on leave,
the description as fully detailed as would
be required by an fund-granting agency
(NSERC, MRC, SSHRC, etc.) and an estimate of legitimate research costs which
may include:
•   all travel expenses for the applicant
(but not for the applicant's
family), including return travel from
UBC to the place of his/her research
(economy airfare) and all side trips
during the leave in the course of the
research;
• a reasonable allowance for meals and
hotels for the applicant while on the
side trips mentioned above;
• any incidental costs directly related to
the research such as secretarial
assistance, supplies, etc.
The SLRG application is returned to the
Office of Research Services at least one
month before commencement of the study
leave. If the application has the approval
of the applicant's Head/Director and
Dean, and meets the requirements stated
above, the Office of Research Services
arranges for the applicant's study leave
salary to be divided into two components,
a Research Grant in the approved amount
and the remainder as normal leave salary.
The SLRG component is paid through
payroll as part ofthe applicant's monthly
salary payment but is not subject to
income tax witholding.
It is the responsibility of the applicant to
make his/her own claim for deductions
to the Revenue Canada, which may require documentation supporting the claim
for research-related costs.
The University continues its fringe benefits as before based upon the applicant's
regular salary when not on leave.
DEFINITIONS:   None UBC Reports • October 28,1993 9
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DRAFT REPORT OF THE COORDINATING COMMITTEE,
UBC INSTITUTE OF ADVANCED STUDIES
Proposed Operating Mode for the Institute   (draft)
In April 1991, Peter Wall announced
his intention to provide $15M to the
University of British Columbia to endow
an Institute of Advanced Studies. This
announcement followed several meetings
between Mr. Wall and President David
Strangway. Details of how the Institute
would operate were not agreed in advanced, but it was clear that the endowment, the largest single gift in the World
of Opportunity Campaign, was intended
to bring top-rank scholars to UBC and to
encourage scholarly research and publications of the highest calibre.
Because of its role in bridging Faculties and encouraging interdisciplinary
endeavours, Dr. Strangway and Vice President Birch asked the Faculty of Graduate
Studies to manage the new institute for
the University in consultation with the
Board of Trustees, established by the
Deed of Trust for the Peter Wall Endowment. The Deed of Trust also calls for the
appointment of a prestigious Advisory
Panel, composed of some of the world's
most distinguished scholars, to provide
advice in selecting the best possible programs, projects and people, and a Management Committee to handle the finances
and investments of the Peter Wall Endowment. The Deed of Trust further
establishes that the Endowment will provide a minimum annual cash flow of
$1,000,000 (in 1991 dollars) from April 1,
1996 and a pre-1996 total (cumulative)
cash flow of $1,500,000 to provide for
start-up of the new Institute. However,
the need to establish a firm financial base
for the Institute has led to a decision to
spend considerably less money during
the start-up phase.
The Peter Wall endowment gives the
University of British Columbia a remarkable opportunity to build an Institute of
the highest possible quality with direct
and beneficial impact on scholarship and
research. A Coordinating Committee has
been given the challenging task of proposing the mode of operation of the new
Institute. This committee has been asked,
in particular, to consider alternate operating models for the Institute of Advanced
Studies, so that the endowment funds
can provide maximum benefit to the University and the wider community. This
report presents the recommendations of
the Coordinating Committee. In particular, we propose a set of guidelines, procedures and objectives for discussion by
the Board of Trustees and the University
community. If adopted, we believe that
our proposals, properly implemented,
would lead to a dynamic, flexible and
unique Institute, with major potential
impact on a wide range of areas of research, in particular, novel areas and
those that stand to benefit from
multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary
activity.
Constraints
There are a number of constraints on
the new Institute which have limited the
scope of our discussions:
(1) The income from the endowment
is to be used for operating expenses
only. It cannot be used for bricks and
mortar.
(2) The expected and minimum
annual operating budget is $1M
Cdn. beginning in 1996.  (Over
time, this income may increase, so
that there should be flexibility to
allow for an increase in the level of
activities).
(3) The operations of the Institute must
be acceptable both to the Board of
Trustees and to the University community.
(4)  The new Institute should be in
operation by April 1, 1996.
Governing Principles
The following guiding principles have
emerged from the discussions ofthe Committee and from the input received from
those consulted:
(1) The Institute of Advanced Studies
must enrich the University of British
Columbia, adding to its overall
academic excellence and enhancing
its scholarly reputation.
(2) The Institute should also be of
direct benefit to the intellectual life
of Vancouver, Canada and, indeed,
the world.
(3) The Institute should build on areas
where UBC has already achieved
excellence. Emphasis should be on
new or underdeveloped fields which
are related to existing strengths and
where knowledge/research is ripe for
major development.
(4) The Institute should have a
coherence and character of its own.
It should not function simply as a
source of funds for disparate
activities.
(5) The Institute must be designed to
enable it to keep up with the rapidly
changing worlds of research and
ideas.  In particular, it must be
capable of meeting new challenges
and of actively seeking opportunities
in emerging research areas.
(6) The Institute should attract to UBC,
for periods of various durations,
scholars of the highest international stature who would not
otherwise come.
(7) There should be direct benefits for
graduate students, post-doctoral
fellows and other members of the
university community, as well as
faculty.
(8) The Institute should enhance
existing departments and other
units, not compete with them.  It
should act as a bridging mechanism
and promote interdisciplinary work.
(9) The Institute should not be the
preserve of a single discipline or
group on campus, but should be of
value to a broad range of fields.
(10) Because of relative underfunding
in some areas and the fact that the
Wall endowment cannot be used
for equipment or space, the Institute
should be of special interest and
benefit to the humanities, social
sciences and aspects of science and
the professions which do not rely on
laboratory work.
Proposals for the new Institute should
be consistent with these principles.
Other Models
It is clear that there are lessons to be
learned from other institutes of advanced
studies and similar units operating elsewhere. This committee has therefore
made a point of familiarizing itself with a
representative sample of institutes, outside and inside Canada, which have been
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
October 28, 1993
Dear Colleagues:
The University of British Columbia is in the initial stages of
establishing an Institute of Advanced Studies. A copy of the
draft report of the Coordinating Committee has been published here for your perusal and comments. We have had
many suggestions which have already been incorporated and
would like to give the university community an opportunity to
provide further input. Please send your comments to me at
the Faculty of Graduate Studies, General Services Administration Building, Zone 1.
Yours sincerely,
Grace
Chair, Coordinating Committee and
Dean of Graduate Studies
"~      John R.
established to foster research in a variety
of areas. Information provided by the
International Federation of Institutes for
Advanced Studies was also considered.
By means of interviews of UBC faculty
members with experience at the various
institutes, visits to six ofthe most prestigious ones in the U.S., Germany and England, and printed annual reports, brochures, etc., detailed information was
gathered on fifteen units as follows:
B.C. Advanced Systems Institute
Calgary Institute for the Humanities
Canadian Institute for Advanced
Research
Centre de Recherches Mathematiques,
Universite de Montreal
Hoover Institution on War, Revolution
and Peace, Stanford
Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton
Institute of Advanced Studies,
Australia National University,
Canberra
Institute of Advanced Studies,
University of Malaya
Institute of Social and Economic
Research, Memorial University of
Newfoundland
International Development Research
Centre
King's College Cambridge Research
Centre
Mathematisches Forschungsinstitut
Oberwolfach, Germany
Max Planck Institute for Foreign and
International Criminal Law,
Freiburg, Germany
Resources for the Future,
Washington, DC
Stanford Humanities Center
These cover a wide range—inside and
outside Canada, well known to lesser
known, well endowed to low budget, successful to disappointing in achievement,
specific to broad in focus. Information
gathered on the objectives, histories, resources, activities and management structures of these units is included in summary form in the Appendix of the full
report.
Some lessons which we might venture
to draw from these other entities, as well
as from interdisciplinary units operating
at UBC, are as follows:
Coherent vision and strong leadership appear to be two vital elements in
achieving significant impact.
A number of the units investigated
are widely regarded as having been successful, but their success has been
achieved in very different ways with widely
differing structures and resources. There
is no single way of achieving success.
Success in the short term does not
assure long term success. There is a risk
that an institute will fossilize where its
design does not incorporate mechanisms
for keeping it current.
While additional resources open up
new possibilities, there is not a one-to-
one correspondence between the level of
funding and the impact achieved.
Facilitation of contacts and working
relationships between colleagues around
themes of common interest can be stimulating and lead to significant achievements. Informal social events, such as
lunches and afternoon tea, are important
stimuli to development of effective exchange of ideas.
Access to excellent library and other
facilities is vital if one wishes to attract
top scholars to visit and work with institutes.
Involvement of graduate students in
institute activities is generally not a central aspect of the units examined, but
graduate student involvement can be of
major benefit to those involved.
Publication, under the Institute
name, of significant books or proceedings
can greatly enhance the reputation ofthe
Institute and provide natural "products"
for the deliberations held under its auspices.
These lessons have helped in the shaping of our own recommendations for the
UBC Institute of Advanced Studies.
Possible UBC Models
The Committee considered two distinct models for operation ofthe Institute
and then concluded that a hybrid model
would be most appropriate.
Model A: "Star Model": In Model A. the
Institute would seek to hire as "permanent" (until retirement) faculty members
3 or 4 internationally recognized scholars
of the highest calibre. For example, it
could try to attract winners of top international awards (e.g., Nobel, Pulitzer or
Field prizes) to become UBC faculty members. These persons would be given
cross-appointments in existing departments. Teaching would be done in the
relevant department and, when applicable, research equipment would be located there and obtained through grant- 1 0 UBC Reports • October 28, 1993
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Report of the Coordinating Committee, UBC Institute of Advanced Studies
ing councils or other regular channels.
These appointments would greatly enhance the reputation of UBC, leading to
improved opportunities for recruiting
excellent faculty members, students,
postdoctoral fellows and visiting scholars. Excellent people would be drawn to
work with the distinguished appointees,
further enhancing the quality of the research staff and student body. The specific areas where the appointees are well
established would receive a particular
boost.
The drawbacks of this model are that,
given the amount of funds available, only
a small number of fields would benefit
directly, each with a single appointee,
that the Institute would have little coherence or raison d'etre as a unit, and that
there would be very little flexibility to
respond to new initiatives or novel areas.
In addition, "stardom" in this age of rapid
advancement and change is an increasingly transient phenomenon, so that it is
not clear that permanently appointed
"stars" are appropriate building blocks
for ensuring long-term institutional excellence.
Model B: "Thematic Model": In Model
B, the Institute would coordinate, at the
rate of approximately one per year, concentrated interdisciplinary thematic activities of extended duration focusing on
major topics of the day. Proposals for
these would come from groups of individuals or from interdisciplinary units on
campus; these proposals would bejudged
according to established criteria. Each
successful proposal would involve a process of detailed planning lasting at least a
year, a one-year period of intense research activity, and a period of wind-
down of at least a year during which
reporting and final publications would be
prepared. The period of intense research
activity would involve key UBC faculty
members (who would be given teaching
release time), top visiting scholars brought
in from other institutions, and graduate
students, postdoctoral fellows and research assistants. During the most active year there would be major events
(e.g., public lectures, symposia, workshops, a conference) some of which would
be open to the larger community. At least
one Vancouver Institute lecture would be
given and at least one major publication
would emerge from each thematic concentration. Model B would provide for
considerable involvement of a wide spectrum of UBC faculty and students over a
period of time and would greatly enhance
the extent of interdisciplinary and
multidisciplinary work.
Disadvantages of Model B would be
that it might well take longer for the
Institute to have a positive impact on the
reputation of UBC and that a larger non-
academic support structure and staff
would be needed to coordinate the activities ofthe Institute, given the much greater
complexity ofthe program.
Model C: "Hybrid Model": The committee respectfully submits a hybrid model
as the model which it believes is best able
to achieve significant gains for UBC, combining the best aspects of both of the
above models, while at the same time
being capable of gaining the acceptance
of both the Board of Trustees and the
university community. We propose an
Institute which would have a single distinguished interdisciplinary scholar combined with thematic activities. Key features ofthe Institute would be as follows:
Distinguished Institute of Advanced
Studies Professor: One distinguished
scholar, an internationally recognized
leader and intellectual figure, would be
recruited to join UBC as the Distinguished
Institute of Advanced Studies Professor
or Distinguished Wall Professor. The
person to be chosen must have an international reputation of the highest order
for scholarly achievements in fields where
UBC is actively engaged. S(he) must have
a breadth of interest, creativity and intellectual involvement which transcends
several disciplines. S(he) must have vision, energy and enthusiasm, with interest in students and the ability to communicate and interact with colleagues and
students in a broad range of disciplines.
While we hesitate to provide names, we
would suggest that such scholars as
Northrop Frye, Simone de Beauvoir and
F.S.C. Northrop, during their lifetimes,
would have had the stature and breadth
needed for such a position.
The Distinguished Professor would not
be directly involved in every thematic
area to be explored under the auspices of
the Institute, but would be expected to be
an inspirational role model, not only for
the Institute and for UBC, but also for
Canadian intellectual life. Such an individual would enhance the reputation of
both the Institute and the University,
while helping to create a standard of
excellence and a climate of intellectual
excitement. S(he) would also be an associate member of one or more academic
department and could supervise graduate students there, as well as through the
Individual Interdisciplinary program. The
presence of such a person in the Institute
and at UBC would also help promote the
breaking down of barriers between traditional disciplines on campus.
Institute of Advanced Studies Faculty
Associates: Top UBC scholars, such as
those who are Fellows of the Royal Society and who have won Killam Research
Prizes or other major awards, would be
invited to become Associates ofthe Institute of Advanced Studies. It would be
important to assure a balance by gender,
age and discipline in the group of associates. Emeritus Professors would not be
excluded. A committee of Associates,
with representation also from directors of
interdisciplinary institutes/centres,
would adjudicate thematic proposals and
provide internal advice to the Director.
Committee members should be appointed
for terms of three years, with possibility
of one three-year renewal. All Associates
would be invited to participate in Institute activities.
Thematic Concentrations: Multi-disciplinary groups of UBC faculty members
or existing interdisciplinary centres and
institutes would be invited to submit
proposals for designation and funding as
Institute of Advanced Studies thematic
concentrations. Criteria and application
procedures would include the following
features:
Maximum total Institute of Advanced
Studies funding for each theme would be
$500,000, to be spent over a period of three
years, or somewhat longer in special cases.
Themes must be in new or emerging
areas or areas where major advances
might occur as a result of unique approaches or a new combination of inputs.
Initial approval would be given to
hold a workshop, bringing together key
individuals who would be involved. Final
approval would be given only after the
initial proposal had been refined after
this initial workshop.
In one of the years, the theme would
be in the most active phase. (Only one
theme would be in this most active phase
each year). At least 80% of the Institute
funds dedicated to the theme would normally be spent during this year. Items
eligible for funding would include travel
funds, salaries and stipends for distin
guished visiting scholars from other institutions; teaching time release stipends
for UBC faculty members to be involved;
expenses for workshops, symposia and
lectures associated with the theme; subsidies for one major conference; purchase of key library materials and software; subsidies for publication costs;
salaries for graduate students,
postdoctoral fellows or other research
assistants to work on the theme; secretarial support; subsidies for regular occasions (such as daily or weekly tea) and
special events to bring together theme
participants for informal discussions.
The proposing group, institute or
centre would, with the support of the
Institute of Advanced Studies staff, continue to act as the coordinating committee for the theme once approved. The lead
applicant would be designated as the
"theme coordinator".
Whenever appropriate, theme coordinators would be required to seek additional funding from granting councils,
foundations, industry, etc.
Budgets and expenditures would be
carefully monitored to ensure effective
use of funds. The final 10% of funds
would not normally be released until a
final report had been received and all
publications were in press.
Criteria to be used in choosing themes
would include:
(a) The excellence of the researchers
involved, both those from inside UBC
and those committed to take part
from outside.
(b) The originality, topicality and
potential impact of the theme.
(c) The breadth of approach to be used.
Normally it is expected that the theme
should involve, to a significant
degree, at least three academic
disciplines and that the UBC
involvement must include two or more
departments.
(d) The coherence and viability of the
research plan.
(e) Ability of the thematic concentration
to have a lasting impact on UBC and
on the wider community.
(f) The ability of the proposers to
provide leadership and effective
management.
(g) Active involvement of graduate
students and, where relevant,
postdoctoral fellows.
(h)  Where applicable, inputs and
financial support from other sources.
If no proposals of adequate quality are
received in a given year or if it is essential
to accumulate funds for a particularly
large proposal, the Institute may decide
to support no theme in a given year.
Director: The director would be a respected academic with administrative
ability and experience, interdisciplinary
interests, leadership qualities and vision.
Excellent communication skills and ability to motivate and work with other people would be vital. Experience at several
different institutions, especially if there
had been an international component,
and experience in dealing with the media
would be assets. S(he) must be compatible with the Distinguished Professor.
Reporting to the Dean of Graduate
Studies, the director would coordinate
the affairs of the Institute, assuring that
criteria for choosing themes are applied
equitably, that themes and other activities are administered effectively, that the
distinguished IAS professor is taken care
of properly, and that the other staff are
effectively hired and coordinated. The
director should establish good working
relationships with those on-campus and
off-campus involved with other institutes
and centres, Vancouver Institute lectures,
etc. The director would be engaged 60%
of time in Institute activities, with a 40%
cross-appointment in a regular academic
department. He/she would be chosen
using standard procedures for choosing
directors in the Faculty of Graduate Studies, involving a broad-based committee
chaired by the Dean and reporting to the
Vice President Academic.
Administrative Assistant: The administrative assistant would be a full-time
employee of the Institute. S(he) would
assist the director in day-to-day administration of the affairs of the Institute,
maintain financial accounts, assure that
up-to-date publicity is prepared and disseminated, provide continuity from theme
to theme, assist theme coordinators, arrange for travel for Advisory Panel meetings and act as a source of information on
all aspects of Institute affairs.
Other Support Staff: There would be
one full-time secretary for the Institute.
S(he) would act as secretary to the Distinguished professor and to the director.
Where possible, help would also be given
to theme coordinators. Other part-time
staff or temporary staff could be hired as
part ofthe thematic concentration budgets to help with special events such as
workshops, conferences and publications.
Institute Publications: Results of the
thematic concentrations, as well as conference proceedings and key lectures,
would be published in an Institute series,
possibly through UBC Press.
Other Institute Activities: From time to
time, the Institute would sponsor or co-
sponsor other events, e.g., lectures or
conferences of major interest and intellectual value.
Physical Facilities: In the short term,
the Institute might be able to occupy
administrative space in Green College.
Many of the visitors could be accommodated there and most workshops and
activities could be held there. Given the
interdisciplinary focus of the College, affinities with Green College would be natural. However, it would be important to
maintain (e.g., via signage) distinct identities for both the Institute and the College. In the longer term, it is important
that a new and separate home be provided for the Institute in a central location or near Green College.
Relationship of Proposed Model to
Constraints and Governing Principles
The Committee believes that the operating model proposed herein meets the
constraints and governing principles
enunciated at the beginning of this report:
Constraint 1: All of the funds would be
spent on operating expenses.
Constraint 2: The Institute could operate within a total annual budget of $1M.
Increases in the budget would allow more
ambitious themes to be tackled and/or a
second distinguished professor to be
added.
Constraint 3: This draft report is for
discussion and evaluation by the Board
of Trustees and the University community. We look forward to receiving comments  and  incorporating  suggested UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993 11
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Report of the Coordinating Committee, UBC Institute of Advanced Studies
changes that will make the proposal widely
acceptable.
Constraint 4: The Institute as proposed
could be in operation by April 1, 1996.
Proposed start-up procedures are outlined below.
Principle 1: The proposed Institute would
enrich the substance and reputation of
UBC by adding a scholar of the highest
international standing and by sponsoring exciting thematic explorations in areas of key interest and novelty leading to
wide dissemination of results.
Principle 2: World class scholars from
outside UBC would be brought to the
campus to interact with UBC faculty and
students. Public events would permit
participation from the wider community.
Principle 3: Key criteria in the selection
of themes would include the strength of
the UBC group making the proposal, the
strength of the non-UBC participants
and the novelty ofthe area. These criteria
will assure that the Institute will build on
areas where UBC already has strength
and that significant areas will be chosen.
Principle 4: The Institute would develop
its own coherent structure and character. It would become known as a promoter of exciting intellectual interdisciplinary activities.
Principle 5: Because of its concentration on topical themes, the Institute would
have the capacity to be flexible and to
respond to new areas and challenges.
Principle 6: The Institute would lead to
the addition of a very distinguished
scholar to the full-time academic staff of
the University and would attract a series
of outstanding visiting scholars for shorter
stays of up to one year.
Principle 7: Graduate student and postdoctoral fellow involvement would be encouraged through the selection criteria
for thematic concentrations.
Principle 8: The Institute would not
compete with departments for resources,
but would enhance existing research activities and lead to bridges between departments. The thematic concentrations
could be especially important for existing
institutes and centres which already have
structures in place for coordinating interdisciplinary activities. These thematic
concentrations could also prove to be an
excellent launching pad for new centres
and institutes. In many cases the Institute funding would have a catalytic effect,
stimulating financial and other inputs
from elsewhere.
Principle 9: Through the breadth of the
distinguished scholar and of the various
themes tackled, the Institute would be of
value, over a period of time, to a significant number of scholars from different
disciplines.
Principle 10: The themes and types of
research which will be likely to find the
Institute most appealing will be those of
a non-experimental nature. Humanities,
social sciences and aspects of science
and the professions which do not rely on
laboratory work would likely benefit most.
Implementation Schedule
We propose the following timetable
and milestones for start-up of the new
Institute:
January, 1993 — Input from Deans, and
Associate Vice Presidents Academic followed by revision of report.
February, 1993 — Further discussion by
Board of Trustees.
March-May, 1993 — Input from Heads
and Directors followed by revision of report.
September-November, 1993 — Input from
campus at large including Graduate
Council and Senate followed by final revision of report.
December, 1993 — Final approval of report by Board of Trustees.
Spring, 1994 — Search process begins
for both Director and for Distinguished
Professor.
January. 1995-
tion.
Director takes up posi-
January-August, 1995 — Director involved in refining and carrying out the
vision of the Institute. Secretary hired.
Establish International Advisory Panel.
Criteria for thematic concentrations are
refined and disseminated to the campus
and beyond. Invite initial group of Faculty Associates to participate in committees and activities.
Fall, 1995 —Initial Workshops. Choice
of first themes. Hire administrative assistant.
Early 1996 — Planning for first theme.
Competition for second theme.
April, 1996 — Opening Event: Major
lecture or symposium, first meeting of
International Advisory Panel, beginning
of first thematic concentration.
July 1, 1996 — Distinguished Professor
takes up position. First thematic concentration reaches most active phase.
Some adjustment of this schedule will
almost certainly be required, but this
framework appears to allow the Institute
be fully operational on April 1, 1996
within the budgetary constraints imposed.
Respectfullg submitted bg:
H. Alan C. Cairns, Professor, Political
Science
Marketa C. Goetz-Stankiewicz, Emerita
Professor, Germanic Studies
John R. Grace (Chair), Dean of Graduate
Studies and Professor, Chemical
Engineering
Dagmar Kalousek, Professor, Pathology
Charles J. Krebs, Professor, Zoology
Olav Slaymaker, Associate Vice- President
Research and Professor, Geography
Joseph C. Smith, Professor, Law
Bruno Wall, Executive Vice-President,
Wall Financial Corporation
James V. Zidek, Professor, Statistics
Acknowledgements
We acknowledge with gratitude input from
the following persons in helping us understand constraints and in informing us
about other institutes that might provide
useful lessons as we considered alternate
models for the UBC Institute of Advanced
Studies:
Tess Adkins, Senior Tutor, King's
College, Cambridge
Daniel R. Birch, Vice-President
Academic
David W. Boyd, Professor, Mathematics
A. Eser, Director, Max Planck Institute
for Foreign and International
Criminal Law, Freiburg
Irving K. Fox, Professor Emeritus,
Westwater Research Centre
Bruno Freschi, Dean of Architecture,
State University of New York,
Buffalo
Jane Gaskell, Professor and Head,
Social and Educational Studies
(now Associate Dean, Faculty of
Education)
Ivan Head, Professor, Political Science
and Law
Robert H. Jackson, Professor, Political
Science
Charles Junkerman, Associate
Director, Stanford Humanities
Center
M. Patricia Marchak, Dean of Arts and
Professor, Sociology
Terence G. McGee, Director, Institute of
Asian Research and Professor,
Geography
Norman McNatt, Development and
Public Relations Officer, Institute
for Advanced Study, Princeton
Charles G. Palm. Associate Director,
Hoover Institution on War,
Revolution and Peace
D. Petroll, Mathematisches
Forschungsinstitut Oberwolfach
Anthony D. Scott, Professor Emeritus,
Economics
David W. Strangway, President
James M. Varah, Director, Centre for
Integrated Computer Systems
Research and Professor, Computer
Science
STUDENT
DISCIPLINE
REPORT
Under clause 58 of the University Act the
President of the University has authority to
impose discipline on students for academic
and non-academic offences. In the past the
nature of the offences dealt with and the
penalties imposed have not been generally
made known on the campus. It has been
decided, however, that a summary should be
published on a regular basis of the offences
and of the discipline imposed without disclosing the names of students involved.
In the period October 1, 1992 to September
30, 1993, 28 students were disciplined. For
each case, the events leading to the imposition
ofthe discipline and the discipline imposed are
summarized below. Discipline may vary depending upon all of the circumstances of a
particular case.
1. A student handed in an examination booklet after an examination, falsely claiming that
the booklet had been written during the examination and had not been handed in through
oversight.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 12
months.*
2. A student plagiarized in the preparation
of a paper.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 12
months.* An appeal to the Senate committee
on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
was dismissed.
3. A student had another student write an
examination.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 16
months.* An appeal to the Senate committee
on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
was dismissed.
4. Four students were held responsible for
physical harassment of another student.
Discipline: a letter of reprimand to be
placed in each student's file.
5. A student was careless in the preparation
of an essay and an inference of plagiarism
could have been drawn from the essay.
Discipline: a letter of reprimand to be
placed in the student's file and the student to
submit an acceptable essay at least 5000
words in length to the President on plagiarism.
6. A student copied answers from another
student during an examination.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 8 months.* An appeal to the Senate
committee on Student Appeals on Academic
Discipline was dismissed.
7. A student had unauthorized materials (a
"cheat sheet") in an examination.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 12
months.*
8. A student had another student write an
examination on two occasions and in one case
removed the paper containing the examination questions from the examination room.
Discipline: suspension from the University for two years.*
9. A student attempted to obtain money
from a funding organization by sending requests for payments which purportedly came
from the University.
Discipline: given extenuating circumstances, a notation of academic discipline was
placed on the student's transcript and file but
the student may apply to the President after
one year to exercise his discretion to remove
the notation.
10. A student had unauthorized materials
(two "cheat sheets") in an examination.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 4
months.*
11. A student plagiarized an essay.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 12
months.*
12. A student exchanged an examination
booklet with another student during an examination and handed in the booklet received
from the other student.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 12
months.* An appeal to the Senate committee
on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
has not yet been heard.
13. A student wrote a fictitious name and
student number on an examination paper and
handed the paper in.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 12
months.* An appeal to the Senate committee
on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline
was dismissed.
14. A student altered a transcript of another
student, without that student's knowledge,
and submitted it to a prospective employer.
Discipline: suspension from the University for five years.*
15. A student plagiarized essays in two
courses.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the courses and
suspension from the University for 12 months. *
16. A student assaulted another student on
the University campus.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 12 months.*
17. A student exposed a paper during an
examination to another student.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 8
months.*
18. A student forged an instructor's signature to a University document.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 2 years.*
19. A student submitted another student's
examination paper.
Discipline: suspension from the University for
two years.*
20. A student prepared answers prior to a
mid-term examination and copied them into
the examination booklet during the examination.
Discipline: Extenuating circumstances
resulted in a mark of zero in the examination
and a letter of severe reprimand.
21. A student wrote two examinations for
another student.
Discipline: given extenuating circumstances, suspension from the University for 12
months.*
22. A student copied answers from another
student during an examination.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 8 months.* An appeal to the Senate
committee on Student Appeals on Academic
Discipline was dismissed.
23. A student had unauthorized materials (a
"cheat sheet") in the examination.
Discipline: a mark of zero in the course
and suspension from the University for 12
months.*
24. A student copied answers from another
student during an examination.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 8 months.*
25. A student who completed a course the
previous year, wrote an examination in that
course the following year and permitted that
examination paper to be submitted by another
student.
Discipline: suspension from the University for 12 months.*
* In all cases in which a student is suspended a notation is entered on the student's
transcript and in the student's file. At any time
after two years have elapsed from the date of
his or her graduation the student may apply to
the President to exercise his discretion to
remove the notation.
Students under disciplinary suspension
from UBC may not take courses at other
institutions for transfer of credit back to UBC. 12 UBC Reports • October 28,1993
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAPITAL PLAN SUBMISSION 1993/94
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
September 9, 1993
Mr. R. J. Parker
Director, Facilities Branch
Ministry of Advanced Education
Training & Technology
838 Fort Street
Victoria, B.C.
V8V 1X4
Dear Sir:
RE:CAPITAL PLAN SUBMISSION 1992/93
On behalf of the University of British Columbia I enclose our Capital Plan
Submission amended to 1993 08 31.   The Plan covers ten years from the
current year 1993/94 forward to the year 2002/03 and is divided into three
sections as follows:
A.MAJOR CAPITAL PROJECTS:
Large projects for which 100% Provincial Government funding is
anticipated.
B.CAMPAIGN AND FUNDRAISING PROJECTS:
The current Ust of case statement projects for which 50% Provincial
Government funding on a matching basis is anticipated plus other
projects which are fully funded by donations.
CADDITIONAL CAPITAL PROJECTS
Projects which are being undertaken by UBC.
Page 2
This Plan continues to reflect the University's priorities as established in the
Mission Statement and Strategic Plan which was adopted in 1989. Each
section of the Plan included a summary of project schedules and, where
applicable, brief project descriptions. Also included are anticipated project
costs linked to time frames for reference purposes.
Relative to specific project costs, in the main we have not inflated the figures
from our last submission and are continuing to identify the project values as
at 1992 09 01. We feel strongly that a discussion of this subject should take
please between your Department and all universities with a view to adopting a
common inflation factor for the period 1992 09 01 to 1993 09 01.
As further reference information pertaining to this submission we are including
a chart demonstrating expected cash flow covering all major Capital Projects.
Since little change has occurred over the year this chart is a copy of that
submitted last year. Also, to be forward to you before the end of September, we
are updating and reprinting our Facilities Inventory Report. The data contained
in the FIR is currently being adjusted to match information contained in this
Capital Plan Submission.
Please advise if further information is required.
Yours truly,
A. Bruce Gellatly
Vice-President, Administration & Finance
Legend:  P = Planning
D = Design Start
T = Tender Period
O = Occupancy Date
CAPITAL PLAN (FISCAL 1992/93 - FISCAL 2003/03
100% PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT FUNDING
A
MAJOR CAPITAL PROJECTS
1993/1994
1994/1995
1995rl996
1996/199'
r
1
997/1996
1
996/1999
1999/20O
9
2000/2001
2001/2002
2
002/2003
l
TrRJniversity Waste Disposal Facility
(Incinerators)
■ ■ \—
T~
i
i
I
.   i
■    '  '   r —i
— ■   1	
i
'     I      ■     1
--:   ■  f--   •
i      i
2
Advanced Materials and Process Engineering
Laboratories (AMPEL)
T
r*
&~-
O
i
-f-|-^--
-i-TT-
i    '
!
■-f  '  --"-
i
i
3
Scarfe Building (Expansion/Renovation - Phase I)
T
S
** i
»,!'
O
■    --j ;      ■
- -H
■4- -
—\—-
4
Forest Sciences Centre
■    j  ■
r ■
-Hi
fc
o
5
Jack Bell Research Laboratories (Interior Finishing)
• i
T
il*
1
}'.
0
6
Scarfe Building (Expansion/Renovation - Phase Tt)
-
i
'it
Y
5
3
0
'
7
Biotechnology Laboratory (Phase U)
V
r-
i
f
f ?■
<*■*
i
*
O
8
Chemical Engineering
" I" f
0
-
T
i°l
I
,
9
Earth Sciences Building (Phase I)
k
T
O
10
StudentServkesCentrell (Brock Hall)
P    -
!
'!>'■
T
I
p
i
--
.  .1	
n
Health Sciences Facilities
p
-
-
—
p -
D
f;
~:\
0
—-
12
Faculty of Law Expansion
D
T
0
13
Earth Sciences Building (Phase II)
D
T
0
— -    -
u
Instructional Space
—
P    -    -
P
■
D
T
p
—
15
Research Space
--
D
D
T
O
16
library Centre (Phase 11)
._..   _
—
Pi-
!
T
i
0
17
Buchanan Buildings (Renovation/Upgrade Phase I)
j
p   -
■ —
-      -   !   -
...
D
T
18
(3d Chemistry Building Renovations
!
p
D
:T UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993 1 3
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAPITAL PLAN SUBMISSION 1993/94
Provincial Government Funding
PROJECT      DESCRIPTION
MAJOR    CAPITAL    PROJECTS
PROJECT    ! OPERATING
BUDGET   [$]  i    [$]   1992/93
DESIGN
START
TENDER
AWARD
CONSTRUCTION
START
1 TRI-UNIVERISTY    WASTE    DISPOSAL    FACILITY    (Incinerators)
j
This facility will provide controlled  disposal service to SFU, U/Vic and !
UBC  for  handling of liquid  and  pathological wastes.  Outdated  existing
incinerators will be replaced by two aestate of the art^E units capable of
: safely  and  efficiently burning  the  noted  wastes.  Effective  stack scrubbers       !
are included in the project such that all contaminants will be removed from
stack    effluent.
2 I ADVANCED    MATERIALS    AND    PROCESS    ENGINEERING j
; LABORATORIES       (AMPEL)
This important facility will provide critical  space in which to carry design
i projects  through  the  process  development  stages   to  the  industrial i
prototype level.  It will also meet the urgent needs of continuing faculty,
technical     support staff and  graduate students  for shared  office  and
laboratory   space.   The   required   expensive   pieces   of  capital   equipment
cannot be justified on the basis of individual research programs or single
discipline  efforts.  In  response  to  the  need  for  interdisciplinary efforts  and
shared   resources,   this   project   would   create   an   adequately  equipped
multi-disciplinary  centre   for  materials  science  at  UBC.   It  would   include
faculty and  students from six  departments in  the  Faculties of Science and
Applied  Science,  as  well  as  from TRIUMF.
3 SCARFE    BLDG    EXPANSION /RENOVATION    (Phase    I)
An addition to  the Scarfe Building  is urgently required  to replace
substandard   temporary  buildings   presently  occupied  by   the   Faculty  and   to
consolidate   activities   presently   housed   in   nineteen   locations.   This   new ;
i construction   must   take  place   ahead   of,   and   concurrently  with,  renovations    !
and  deferred  maintenance  upgrading  to  the Scarfe  Building  in order  to
allow   for   functional   and   cost   effective   development.   Deferred   maintenance
and  renovation costs associated with this project are included  in Phase II.  It ;
is anticipated that a net assignable area of 2,162 and a gross area of 2,874       i
meters will be constructed  in  Phase  I  with a corresponding demolition of
1455 gross  square  meters  of huts  or temporary buildings.  See  1993/94
Facilities   Inventory   Report   for   further   details.
4 FOREST    SCIENCES    CENTRE j
Expanded   facilities  for Forestry  and  related  Sciences at  UBC will ;
accommodate  new  areas  of research  and  education  such  as  timber
engineering,   harvesting   robotics   and   remote   sensing   by   satellite.   Programs
housed  in  this  facility will  develop  interests  in  forestry  research  among
faculties  and  with   industry   and   government  agencies.   The  Pacific  Centre
will place UBC in a world class position in Forestry and related sciences. It
is anticipated that a net assignable area of 10,071 and a gross area of 16,528
will be constructed  with  a corresponding  demolition  of  1953  gross  square
meters  of  huts   or  temporary  buildings.   See   1993/94  Facilities   Inventory
Report   for   further   details.
$6,750,000*
(1991)
TBD
COMPLETION
COMMENTS
1990/04
Hold
Hold
Hold
j *Original  estimate  of  $5.0  million
I (September   1989   dollors) '
: reassessed  by  quantity  survey   to
Nov.   1991.   Project  cost  inclusive  of
i all  major  equipment.   Project  on
! hold  while  public  consultation   in
progress.
$20,990,000*
(1992)
$308,623
1991/09
1993/09
1993/10
1995/06
; "Original   estimate   of  $17.1   million
(September   1988   dollars)   inflated
i @ 0.8% per month to September
j 1990. Further inflation of    3.0%
! included   to Sept   1992.
$15,000,000*
(1992)
$12,958
1991/09     1993/07       1993/08
1995/05
•12,000,000   (Sept.   1991   dollars)
adjusted by 3% for inflation to
Sept.   1992.   Estimate   increased   for
inclusion   of  seismic   work.
$40,050,000*
$615,321
1992/08     1994/09       1994/10
•Original   allowance  of  $40  million
(September   1989   dollars)   inflated
@ 0.8% per month to September
1990.   Further  inflation  of 3.0%
1996/07 included   to  Sept   1992.   Figures
revised   downward   August   1993   to
a maximum cost of the amount
shown    excluding    furniture
allowance  to be provided by  UBC.
JACK   BELL   RESEARCH   LABORATORIES   (Interior   Finishing)   (Previously
included   under   general   heading  of  Health  Sciences  Facilities)
Unfinished   space  has  been  provided  at  Vancover General   Hospital  for
medical  research by  UBC  departments  and  staff.  The  space is currently
being constructed  and  finished.  The  funds  to furnish and  equip the space
are  urgently  required   Current  policy  suggests  that   funds  to  complete  this
space  should  flow  through  the university side of the  partnerships  and
hence  from  the  Ministry  of Advanced   Education,   the  cost  of maintaining
, the space will be shared with VGH. This will be the only space provided by
UBC at the VGH site.
$6,565,000*
(1992)
$293,345
1993/04     1993/11  .    1993/12
1994/11
*Project cost  inclusive of all major
equipment.   Estimate   of   $6,375,000
i (Sept.  1991  dollars)  is  adjusted bv
3.0% to Sept  1992.
6 SCARFE     BLDG.     EXPANSION/RENOVATION     (Phase     II)
This  is  a  continuation  of the  project  that began  in  1991.   Revisions  to  scope   .
have   taken   place   which   decreases   the   amount   of   new   construction   in
favour   of   upgrading   existing   space.   Net   assignable   and   gross   area
| requirements   are   currently   being   determined   in   the   functional   program.   It
I is  expected   that  a   corresponding  demolition  of  2822   gross   square  meters  of
huts   or   temporary   buildings   will   occur.   See   1993/94   Facilities   Inventory
Report   for   further   details.
7 , BIOTECHNOLOGY      LABORATORY      (Phase      II)
This   facility   is   required   in   order   to   accommodate   activities   presently
located   in   substandard   space   and   requiring   expansion.   Proposed   area   of
: project   is   8740   m2   of   construction   adjacent   to   and   over   an   existing
building.
8 CHEMICAL      /      BIO-RESOURCE      ENGINEERING
This   facility   is   planned   to   replace   the   existing   Chemical   Engineering
Building   which   no   longer   meets   the   standards   set  by   the   Accreditation
: Board   and   W.C.B.   The   Chemical   Engineering   program   is   operating   on   a
i provisional   basis   while   planning   of   a   new   facility   proceeds.   Current   space
housing   these   programs   totals   3900   net   assignable   square   meters.
Following   further   investigation   the   viability   of   demolition   vs   adaptive
reuse*  will  be  explored.   It  is  anticipated  that  a  net assignable  area  of
! approx 4,150  and  a  gross  area  of     approx  7,340  will be constructed  with  a
corresponding   demolition   of   765   gross   square   meters   of   huts   or   temporary
buildings,   and   an   additional   3,770   gross   square   meters   for   the   old   chemical
engineering   building   when   it   is   demolished.   See   1993/94   Facilities
. Inventory    Report   for   further   details.
$11,000,000*
(1992)
N/A
1993/09     1994/11  :    1995/01
1996/05
♦Original allowance of $8,000,000 j
! (Sept. 1991 dollars) adjusted by 3% '
; to   Sept   1992.   Quantity   survey
estimate   updated   as   a   result  of
i revised     development     strategy
| including   the   undertaking   of
!■ seismic  work  in  Phase   I.
$28,300,000*
(1993)
$303,894
1993/09     1994/07        1994/09
1996/03
Latest   scope   of   work   and   budget
as   documented   in   Project   Brief
dated   June   1993.
$23,000,000
(1993)
TBD
1994/04 1995/07 1995/08
1996/12
Latest scope of work and budget
for   combined   project   is   emerging
! in Project Brief to be published in
late 1993. *Should adaptive reuse
be possible it would be for
: temporary,   low   service   use   only.
9      EARTH    SCIENCES    BUILDING    (Phase    I)
This   facility   will   be   required   to   replace   an   existing,   seismically   deficient
' building   which   houses   Geophysics   and   Astronomy   1944   m2   (net),   and   to
accommodate    Oceanography.    Through    providing    physical    links    to    the
Geology   Building,   it   is   anticipated   that   requirements   for   teaching,   research
and   support   space   will   lead   to   the   development   of  an   integrated   Earth
Sciences   Centre,   including   a   fully   functional   observatory.   Final   area
requirements   are   currently   being   determined   and   a   project   brief   should   be
available  in  early  1994.   It  is  anticipated  that  a  net  assignable  area  of
approx 5,979  and  a  gross  area  of     approx   10,463  will  be constructed  in
Phase   I   with   a   corresponding   demolition   of   2,789   gross   square   meters   of
huts   or   temporarv   buildings.   See   1993/94   Facilities   Inventory   Report   for
further     details.
$29,750,000*
(1992)
TBD
1994/04     1995/11       1996/01
1997/08
10     STUDENT   SERVICES   CENTRE    II    (Brock    Hall) i
Phase   II   is   required   in   order   to   reconstruct   the   existing   structure   (Brock
Hall)   which   cannot   be   functionally   modified   in   a   manner   which   is
1 economically   feasible.   The   facility  will   be   the   second   phase   of  the   Student
Services  Centre   Project     (funded   in   1990),   and   will   result   in  consolidation  of
all   administrative   services   for   students   in   one   location.
$9,528,000*
(1992)
TBD
1995/04     1996/09       1996/10
1998/04
11     HEALTH      SCIENCES      FACILITIES
This   project   will   consist   of   several   portions   of   new   construction   including
space   for   laboratories,   allied   Health   Sciences   and   health   promotion   in
several   locations,   at   an   assumed   cost   of  $43   million   including   finishing  of
the   Jack   Bell   Research   laboratories.   Following   development   of   the   new
space,   there   will   be   significant   renovations   required   through   existing
Health  Sciences  space   totalling   11250  m2   .   At   this  time,  estimates  are  not
I available   for   this   work,   rather,   an   allowance   only   is   shown.
$37,724,000*
(1992)
TBD
1996/04     1997/11       1998/01
1999/10
•Original    allowance    of    $25,000,000
(September    1991    dollars)    adjusted
by 3%  for inflation  to  Sept   1992
plus   $4,000,000   is   added   for
program    adjustment    to    partially
accomodate        Geography
•Original   allowance   of   $8.3   million
(September    1989    dollars)
reassessed   to   $9.25   million
(September    1991)    dollars    and
adjusted  by  3.0%   inflation  to  Sept
1992.
•Original    allowance    of    $43,000,000
less   $6,375,000  for  Jack   Bell   Labs
leaves     $36,625,000     (September
1991   dollars)   adjusted   by   3.0%
inflation   to   Sept   1992. 14 UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAPITAL PLAN SUBMISSION 1993/94
PROVINCIAL GOVERNMENT FUNDING
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
PROJECT      OPERATING
BUDGET [$]      [$] 1992/93
DESIGN         TENDER
START           AWARD
C0NSTA^TT,0N ! COMPLETION 1                  COMMENTS
A
MAJOR CAPITAL PROJECTS
:
1                                           :
12
FACULTYOF LAW EXPANSION
An addition to the Faculty of Law will be required in order to house
faculty offices, research and support space, as well as provide additional
teaching facilities. Project based on: 1. Replacement of the original 1950
building of 2746 m2 (gross); and temporary trailers of 1066 m2 (gross) and
temporary trailers of provision of new facilities (4600 m2) 2. Renovate
existing facilities (7000 m2) at approximately 25% cost of new facilities.
$13,080,000*  i         _„
(1992)       |        TBD
1997/04
1998/07
1998/08
'Original allowance of $12.7
iQQQ               million (September 1991 dollars)
adjusted by 3.0% inflation to Sept
1992.
13
EARTH SCIENCES BUILDING (Phase II)
This is a continuation of the project that began in 1994 and will result in
demolition of old campus space. It is anticipated that a net assignable area
of approx 3,632 and a gross area of approx 6,174 will be constructed in
Phase 11. The relinquished space in the Geography Building will be used to
house Mathematics to facilitate the development of the Library Centre
Phase II. See 1993/94 Facilities Inventory Report for further details.
1
$11,500,000*
(1992)
1997/04
1998/09
1998/10
•Allowance only (September 1992
dollars).  $3.0 million removed
from 'Instructional Space' - #14
and $8.5 million removed from
'Research Space'- #15 to create this
allowance.
•Current allowance adjusted by
3.0% inflation to Sept 1992 based
1999/11          on an original allowance of
. $5,500,000 in 1991 dollars less $3.0
million reallocated to #13.
14
INSTRUCTIONAL SPACE
This project will consist of one or more facilities required in order to
address the requirement for adequate instructional space appropriately
distributed on campus.
$2,665,000*
(1992)
TBD
j
1997/04     '      1998/07
1998/08
15
RESEARCH SPACE
This project will consist of one or more facilities, as yet undefined, which
will be required in order to provide updated research space required on
the campus. Demolition of some old space will result.
$36,820,000*
(1992)
TBD               1998/04            1999/11
*Current allowance adjusted by
3.0% inflation to Sept 1992 based
2000/01                   2001/12          on original allowance of
$44,000,000 in 1991 dollars less
$8.5 million reallocated to #13.
16
UBRARY CENTRE (Phase II)
In preparing for Phase I Library Centre development, additional needs
were discovered largely due to inadequacies of the Main UBC Library
building (itself a collection of four separate structures). It is now urgent
that the UBC Library, a provincial and national resource, be re-housed in
more environmentally friendly and functionally effective space. At this
time, the problem is known to be large but quantification has only just
begun. Completion of new Library space will allow demolition of existing
inefficient space and the Mathematics Building.
$41,200,000*
(1992)
TBD
1999/04
2000/04
2000/11
2001/01
•Original allowance of $40,000,000
2003/01          (Sept.1991 dollars) adjusted by
3.0% inflation to Sept 1992.
17
BUCHANAN BUILDINGS RENOVATION/UPGRADE (Phase I)
Renovation/upgrading of the five wings and tower of the Buchanan
complex is overdue at this time, and will be an urgent problem by the turn
of the century. It is likely that a phased program over eight to ten years will
be required to service these facilities for the future. A major first phase
should begin as soon as possible.
$25,750,000*
(1992)
TBD
TBD
2001/09
2001/10
•Original allowance of $25,000,000
2003/06       1 (Sept. 1991 doUars) adjusted by
3.0% inflation to Sept 1992.
18
CHEMISTRY BUILDING RENOVATIONS
Restoration and upgrading of the historic Chemistry Building, located at
the heart of the University is long overdue. Completion of this project will
enable the preservation of a principle campus facility, the functional
reorganization of its space, and the modernization of its services.
$25,750,000*
(1992)
2000/04    '     2001/09
2001/11
•Original allowance of $25,000,000
2003/08         (Sept. 1991 dollars) adjusted by
3.0% inflation to Sept 1992.
Legend:  P = Planning
D = Design Start
T = Tender Period
O = Occupancy Date
CAPITAL PLAN (FISCAL 1992/93 - FISCAL 2001/02
CAMPAIGN (50% PROV. GOVERNMENT FUNDING/50 % UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT)
♦FUNDRAISING (100% UNIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT)
B
CAMPAIGN      PROJECTS
1993 / 1994
1994 / 199
5
995/1996
1996 /
1997
1
Green   College
"Si'
Wi
I
2
Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery
f 1
T
■ST
in
fs^j
.0
3
Chan Shun Centre
\
4lf
0
*   !
*4
Centre for Creative Arts and Journalism (Phase I)
1   .
-
D
■?
T?
i
0
5
Walter C.  Koerner Library Centre  (Phase I)
T
O
6
Student   Recreation   Centre
'£:
O
_     C.K. Choi Building for the Institute of Asian
Research
,T
°
•8
Liu  Centre  for  International  Studies
p
■       -      •      -
-  -  -
1997 / 1998
1998 / 1999
1999 / 2000
2001 / 2002
Legend:   P = Planning
D = Design Start
T = Tender Period
O = Occupancy Date
CAPITAL PLAN (FISCAL 1993/94 - 2002/03)
UBC PROJECTS
c
ADDITIONAL PROJECTS
1993/1994
1994/1995
1995/1996
1996/1997
1997/199
8
1998/1999
1999/2000
2000 / 2001
2001 / 2002
2002/2003
1
University Apts II
i#1
d
;
I
2
3
Thunderbird Housing
Marine Drive Parkade
*
V
]
1  :
O
-■ f   ;    —
i
4
University Blvd. Parkade
p
-
tf
■t
©
!
5
Wesbrook Parkade
P
I
*»i
,T
Ji
6:
'
6
Discovery Park Multi-Tenant Facility
-
S3
:    ■
<    1
t
P.
|
i
!
Note:  Description sheets are not provided for this work UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993 1 5
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
CAPITAL PLAN SUBMISSION 1993/94
UBC CAMPAIGN AND FUNDRAISING
PROJECT DESCRIPTION
PROJECT
BUDGET [S]
OPERATING
[S] 1992/93
DESIGN
START
TENDER
AWARD
CONSTRUCTION
START
COMPLETION
COMMENTS
CAMPAIGN PROJECTS
GI^EEN COLLEGE   This facility will provide residential and resource space for
approximately 100 graduate and post doctoral fellows. This complex will play a key
role in the development of the University in advanced research and academic
initiatives.
$14,000,000*
$121,297 (no
cost to GPO)
1990/09
1992/09
1992/10
1993/11
•Project allowance of $14.0 million is
expressed in March 1990 dollars. UBC
Campaign Contribution is $7.0 million.
Provincial Government Contribution is
$7.0 million.
MORRIS AND HELEN BELKIN ART GALLERY The present UBC Fine Arts Gallery
is located in the basement of the Main Library. It consists of approximately 3,000 sq. ft.
of low-ceiling display space, with inadequate office, preparation and storage areas.
Despite these conditions the Gallery has, over the years, provided a valued program
! of exhibitions for scholars, tourists and the public. With new facilities the Gallery will
establish a more visible presence and enlarge its contribution to the cultural life of the
University and Vancouver by providing professionally mounted exhibitions. The
proposal for new space meets international standards for display, security, care,
handling, conservation and storage of materials and artwork.
$3,000,000*
1,917 (no cost
to GPO)
1991/02
1993/09
1993/10
1994/10
"Original allowance of $3.0 million is
expressed in 1989 dollars. UBC
Campaign Contribution is $1.5 million.
Provincial Government Contribution is
$1.5 million.
CHAN SHUN CENTRE Currently, the largest facility for performances at UBC is the
Old Auditorium, constructed as a temporary building in the 1920/Es. The new Concert
and Assembly Hall along with Movie and Black Box theatres will meet the
University/Es needs for ceremonial functions, music and theatre programs. With a
capacity of 1,400 seats in the larger house and movie and theatre opportunities in
smaller houses, these facilities will meet specific needs in Greater Vancouver for a
mid-size performance hall, with potential operating cost recovery for the University.
$23,000,000*
$125,965
(562,982 will be
recovered from
other income)
1992/08
1994/05
1994/06
1995/12
"Original allowance of $15.0 million has
been revised through program
adjustment to $23.0 million expressed
in September 1989 dollars. UBC
Campaign Contribution is $11.5
million. Provincial Government
Contribution is $11.5 million.
CENTRE FOR CREATIVE ARTS AND JOURNALISM (Phase I) Already noted for its
creative achievements in writing theatre, music and fine arts, UBC needs to expand
its ability to contribute to the community in both its established fields and in the areas
of increasing economic importance to the province, such as film production. Studio
space for the Fine Arts, Music and Theatre departments is inadequate. These
departments do not have access to appropriate space to meet their specializied needs.
A new Creative Arts Centre will provide efficient, centralized space for workshops,
practice, and instruction. An additional component to house a school of Journalism
lias been added to this project with fund raising support. The project is expected to
I proceed in 2 phases, the smaller School of Journalism proceeding first. The
i combination of Phases I and 11 will result in the demolition of 4,180 gross square
meters. See 1993/94 Facilities Inventory- Report for further details.
53,000,000 +
$13,000,000*
TBD
1994/01
1995/03
1995/04
1996/118
•Original allowance of $10.4 million has
been revised through Creative Arts
program adjustment to S13 million
expressed in September 1989 dollars.
These projects will be undertaken in
phases through fundraising. An
additional component with assumed
cost of S3 million has been joined to this
project.
5    WALTER C. KOERNER UBRARY CENTRE (Phase 1)
The UBC Library is a provincial and national resource. .4s B.C.'s primary research
i library, it is used extensively by professionals from Simon Fraser University,
University of Victoria, teaching hospitals, colleges and schools across the province.
The information explosion and the development of collections and new technologies
has created an urgent need for additional service and storage space.
$24,000,000*
$286,230        ;       1992/02
STUDENT RECREATION CENTRE
This facility is urgently required to accommodate the extensive intramural activities of
the UBC Student Community. It is not intended that this replace existing facilities for
high performance athletics.
C.K. CHOI BUILDING FOR THE INSTITUTE OF ASIAN RESEARCH (Phase I)
This project will include resource and research space required to support programs'
involving Asian Studies as well as an expansion of the Asian Library.
$9,000,000*
$196,398 1992/10
$5,000,000*
$59,937 1993/02/01
UU CENTRE FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDIES
This project will include central instructional and office facilities to support a major
thrust m International Studies. This project represents Phase I with furhter residential
phase(s) expected to follow
1993/11
1994/05
1994/05
1994/01
1995/09/30
'Onginal allowance of 524 million
is expressed in 1989 dollars. UBC
Campaign Contribution is 512
million. Provincial Government
contribution is S12 million.
1994/07
1995/09
1994/06
1995/10
"Project allowance is $9.0 million
expressed in September 1990
dollars. Student contribution is
$4.5 million and Provincial
Government contribution is $4.5
million.
•Project estimate is $5.0 million
expressed in June 1990 dollars.
UBC Campaign contribution is
$2.5 million. Provincial
Government contribution is $2.5
million.
55,000,000*
TBD
1997/06/01
1999/05
1999/06
2000/12
•Project allowance of 55.0 million
is expressed in June 1993 dollars.
Fund raising efforts will be
providing full funding. 1 6 UBC Reports • October 28, 1993
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC PROPOSED CONSTRUCTION AND DEMOLITION FOR 1993/94 - 2002/03
UBC                                                         Estimated
UBC
Estimated
Proposed                                                Completion
Proposed
Demo.
Construction                                        Date
Demolition
Date
100% Provincial Government Funding
Jack Bell Labs (VCH I)                             Nov-94
Scarfe Building
(Expansion/Renovation - Phase I)     May-95
"Hut (1-1. Education"
Sept-93
May-95
"Hut O 2. Botanv"
Sept 93
May-95
"Hut 0-21. Soil Sciences"
Sept -93
May-95
"Hut 0-3. Education"
Sept 93
Advanced Materials
and Process Engin. Lab                       Jun-95
Poultry Products Building
Sep 93
Biotechnology Lab - Phase 11               Mar-96
B-8 Huts (Partial)
Sep-96
Scarfe Building
(Expansion/Renovation - Phase II)   May-96
"Hut 0-26. NITEP"
Sep-96
"Hut 0-4. PP Annex 'A'"
Sep-96
Counselling Psychology
Sep-96
Adult Educ. Research Centre
Sep-96
South Staff Office Block
Sep-96
Scarfe Annex
Sep-96
Forest Sciences Centre                       Jul-96
Forest. & Ag Huts 3 - Forestry
Sep-96
Communications Trailers (2)
Sep-96
Forest Harv & Wood Sc Tr
Sep-96
Forestry Annex
Sep-96
Forest. & Ag Huts 4 - Forestry
Sep-96
Forestry Annex '6'
Sep-96
Forestry Header House
Sep-96
Apiary/Shed - Plant Science
Dec-96
For & Ag Huts - Soil Sc. An. #2
Dec-96
Forest. & Ag Huts - An Sc
Dec-96
Soil Science Annex '3'
Dec-96
Plant Science Annex
Dec-96
Chemical/ Bio-Resource Engineering Dec-96
Bio Resource Eng Annex
Jun-97
Bio-Resource Trailers (2)
Jun-97
Chemical Engineering
Jun-97
Earth Sciences Building (Phase I) Aug-97
Student Services Centre II
(Brock Hall) Apr-98
Health Sciences Facilities Oct-99
Instructional Space Nov-99
Faculty of Law Expansion Dec-99
Earth Sciences Building (Phase II)    Aug-00
Research Space Dec-01
Walter C. Koerner
Library Centre (Phase II) Jan-03
Buchanan Bldgs
(Renovation/Upgrade Phase I) Jun-03
Old Chemistry Building Renovations Aug-03
Tri-University Waste Disposal Facility TBD
UBC Projects
Geophysics & Astronomy Bldg
Brock Hall (Partial)
Brock Hall Annex
Law Trailer I
Law Trailer II
Law Bldg (Old Section)
Main Library (N or S Wings)*
Marine Drive Parkade
Sep-94
Thunderbird Housing
Sep-94
Discovery Park
Multi-Tenant Facility
June-95
University Apts.  II
Dec-93
University Blvd. Parkade
Sep-96
Wesbrook  Parkade
Mar-99
Liu Centre Residence (Phase II)
TBD
Campaign Projects
Green College
Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery Oct-94
Student Recreation Centre
Walter C. Koerner
Library Centre (Phase I)
C.K. Choi Building for the
Inst, of Asian Research
Chan Shun Centre
Sept-97
Jun-96
Dec-99
Dec-99
Dec-99
Dec-99
Nov-93
Graham House (renov.)
Dec-92
Graham House Garage
Dec-92
Graham House (partial demo)
Dec-92
Oct -94
Sep-95
Sep-95
Aug-95
Dec-95
Auditorium
Feb-96
Fund Raising Projects
Centre for Creative Arts
and Journalism (Phase I)
Aug-96
Armoury
Sep-93
Hut M-21
line Arts
Sep-96
Hut M-22
Fine Arts
Sep-96
Liu Centre for
International Studies (Phase I)
Others
Dec-00
West Mall Hut Demolition
"Hut 0-17. Education "
Sept-93
"Hut O-20, Key Control Centre"
Sept-93
"Hut M-35, M-36"
Sept-93
Hut M-31
Sept-93
Horticulture Gmhses (partial)
Apr-94
* Further planning necessary
to determine if Phase III is
required to support demolition of one wing plus South
Wing. UBC Reports • October 28,1993 1 7
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
OPERATING COST OF NEW BUILDING SPACE FOR CAPITAL PROJECTS COMPLETED
OVER THE SEVEN-YEAR PERIOD 1989-90 TO 1995-96
BACKGROUND
The attached schedule is the first
edition presenting the plant operating costs of new facilities. It
shows the additional gross area
less associated demolitions in
gross square meters. Therefore,
the additional operating cost is
based on the net increase after
deducting demolitions. Recovered
cost applies to sources of funds
such as residence fees for
Thunderbird Housing. Please see
the explanatory notes at the end
of the schedule.
The schedule will be updated as
additional buildings are built in
future years.
PROJECT/BUILDING NAME
STATUS
COMPLETN
DATE
GROSS
AREA
(SQ M )
ASSOCIATED DEMOLITION
NET NEW
AREA
(SQ  M )
OPERATING
COST($)
RECOVERED
COST(S)
GPOF
NET
COST($)
BLDG.
NAME
BLDG
NO
DEMO
DATE
GROSS
AREA
(SQ M )
Acadia Park Family Housing
complete
Jun-89
9,340
9,340
381.913
381,913
0
Chemical Waste PCB Storage
complete
Jun-89
119
119
4,866
4,866
Child Care Services
complete
Jun-89
1,881
1,881
76,914
76,914
0
Forest Harvesting & Wood Sc Trailer
complete
Aug-89
178
178
7,278
7,278
Gas Gun Facility
complete
Aug-89
203
203
8,301
8,301
Chemistry fi. Physics Building
complete
Aug-89
7,927
Home Economics Bldg
2.049
5,878
240,351
240,351
Audiology & Speech Sc  Trailer
complete
complete
Nov-89
Nov-90
196
196
8,014
	
8,014
Bio-Resource Eng Annex 2
234
234
9,568
9,568
57,65~5
Botanical Gardens
complete
Apr-90
1,410
1,410
57,655
Child Study Centre
complete
Feb-90
1,462
1,462
59,781
59,781
Disability Centre
complete
Jul-90
298
298
12 185
12.185
University Computing Services Annex
complete
Aug-90
321
321
13,126
13,126
Forest Sciences Storage & Greenhouse
complete
Aug-90
208
208
8,505
8,505
Forestry  Pilot Plant
complete
Aug-90
258
258
10,550
10,550
Museum of Anthropology Addition
complete
Feb-90
920
920
37,619
37,619
NCE (Bookstore addition)
complete
Oct-91
3,172
3,172
129,703
129,703
Acadia Park Faculty Housing
complete
Nov-91
10,224
10,224
418.059
418,059
0
IBM Law 8. Computer Ctr Trailer
complete
Jan-91
533
533
21,794
21,794
Plant Sciences Field Station
complete
Sep-91
147
147
6,011
6,011
David Lam Mgmt  Resource Centre
Law Trailer 2
complete
Mar-92
6.448
Old Bookstore
Sep-91
3,010
3,438
140,580
140,580
complete
Jan-92
503
503
20,568
20,568
Engineering High Head Lab
complete
Sep-92
198
198
8,096
8,096
Ritsumeikan/UBC  House
complete
Apr-92
7,030
7,030
287,457
287.457
0
University Services Building
complete
Feb-92
11,076
CPD Inspectors Trailer
Hut M-35. M-36
Hut O-20, Key Control Centre
Hut M-31
Hut M-33. PP Garage
Hut M-37. M-38, PP
Hut M-39. PP Mech
PP Vehicle Garage
327
321
030
602
634
639
642
637
Mar-93
Aug-93
Aug-93
Aug-93
Jan-92
Jan-92
Jan-92
Jan-92
30
312
126
172
572
535
346
336
8,647
353,559
353,559
West Parkade
complete
Nov-92
35,488
35,488
70,976
70,976
0
Plant Op. Exterior Storage Shed
complete
Nov-92
681
681
27,846
27,846
Social Work Building
complete
Dec-92
2,979
Graham House (Now charged to
Green College)
412
Dec-92
2,789
190
7.769
7.769
GROSS
ASSOCIATED DEMOLITION
NET NEW
GPOF
GROSS
COMPLETN
AREA
BLDG
BLDG.
DEMO
AREA
AREA
OPERATING
RECOVERED
NET
PROJECT/BUILDING NAME
STATUS
DATE
(SQ. M.)
NAME
NO
DATE
(SQ. M.)
(SQ  M )
COST($)
COST($)
COST($)
First Nations Longhouse
complete
Mar-93
2.040
HutO-17, Education
260
Jul-93
150
1,890
77,269
77,269
Student Services Building
complete
May-93
5.633
Arts Hut
Brock Hall (partial)
474
112
Mar-91
Mar-91
102
939
4,592
187,787
187,787
Dentistry Building Upgrade
complete
Jun-93
497
497
20,322
20.322
Biomedical Research Centre
complete
Jun-93
3.878
3,878
210,000
210.000
0
CICSR7CS Building
const
Aug-93
10,204
Vivarium Hut North
Vivarium Hut South
Vivarium (partial)
Trailer-Rec Fisheries
925
924
857
384
Nov-91
Nov-91
Nov-91
Nov-91
161
161
168
232
9,483
387,770
387,770
University Apartments II
const
Sep-93
13,471
13,471
550,829
550.829
0
Jack Bell Labs (VGH)
const.
Nov-94
7,174
7.174
293,345
293,345
Green College
const.
Aug-93
5,756
5.756
235.347
235,347
0
Marine Drive Parkade
design
Aug-94
30,000
30,000
60,000
60,000
0
Belkin Art Gallery
design
Oct-94
2,003
2,003
81.917
81,917
Thunderbird Housing
design
Aug-94
25,855
25,855
1,057,208
1,057,208
0
Advanced Materials Building
design
Jun-95
8,085
Poultry Products Building
680
Sep-93
537
7,548
308,623
308,623
Student Recreation Centre
planning
Sep-95
4,803
4,803
196,398
196.398
Faculty of Education -Phase 1
design
May-95
2,874
HutO-1, Education
Hut 0-2, Botany
HutO-21. Soil Sciences
Hut 0-3, Education
Counselling Psychology
Hut 0-26, NITEP
HutO-4, PP Annex'A'
259
072
093
464
187
731
037
Aug-93
Aug-93
Aug-93
Aug-93
Sep-96
Sep-96
Sep-96
678
286
268
223
575
241
286
317
12,958
12.958
Water C. Koerner Ubrary Centre - Phase I
design
Sep-95
7.000
7,000
286,230
286.230
C. K. Choi Bldg. forthe Inst, of Asian Research
planning
Oct-95
1,466
1,466
59.937
59,937
Chan Shun Centre
design
Dec-95
5.624
Auditorium
Old Fire Hall Trailer 1
Old Fire Hall Trailer 2
Old Fire Hall Trailer 3
044
380-1
380-2
380-3
Feb-96
Feb-96
Feb-96
Feb-96
2.454
30
22
37
3,081
125,965
125,965
GROSS
ASSOCIATED DEMOLITION
NET NEW
GPOF
GROSS
COMPLETN
AREA
BLDG.
BLDG.
DEMO
AREA
AREA
OPERATING
RECOVERED
NET
PROJECT/BUILDING NAME
STATUS
DATE
(SQ. M.)
NAME
NO.
DATE
(SQ. M.)
(SQ. M.)
COST($)
COST($)
COST(S)
Forestry Sciences Centre
design
Jul-96
17,000
Forest Harv & Wood Sc Tr
Forest. & Ag Huts 3 - Forestry
Forest. & Ag Huts 4 - Forestry
Forestry Annex
Forestry Annex "6'
Forestry Header House
Communications Trailers (2)
Apiary/Shed - Plant Science
For & Ag Huts - Soil Sc An. #2
Forest. & Ag Huts - An Sc
Plant Science Annex
Soil Science Annex '3'
359
361-3
361-4
360
578
866
326
025
361-1
361-2
669
579
Sep-96
Sep-96
Sep-96
Sep-96
Sep-96
Sep-96
Sep-96
Dec-96
Dec-96
Dec-96
Dec-96
Dec-96
178
85
85
187
134
297
184
35
85
85
330
268
15,048
615,321
615,321
Total All Projects 1989/90 To 1995/96
256,797
19,779
237,018
7,196,272
3.348,703
3.847,569
Less Grants And Income
Provincial Recurring Grants For Facilities Costs
1990/91                                                  $319,162
1993/94                                                 $480,000
Estimated Operating Income
Chan Shun Theatre                             $30,000
-829.162
Total                                                      $829,162
Net General Purpose Operating Fund Cost
3.018,407
1. Operating cost is based on an average cost per gross square metre of $40.89 in 1992/93 dollars except for parkades which are estimated to cost $2.00 perg.s.m.
2. The Dupre Report recommends that the Provincial Government provide a separate grant funding envelope for net new space to be funded from General Purpose Operating Funds.
The Joint Universities' Annual Grant Request will include such a request.
3. Total net cost of $3,018,407 amounts to 0.879% of the 1992/93 General Purpose Operating Fund.
4. Later projects in the University capital plan will be added to this schedule when more information is known. 18 UBC Reports • October 28, 1993
Ubyssey continues legacy
of pranks and controversy
"The vilest rag west of Blanca,"
otherwise known as The
Ubyssey, marked its 75th anniversary this month.
It may be old, but it's certainly not complacent, tired or
boring. UBC's student newspaper of record remains the topic of
controversy and heated debate.
It was ever thus.
"We've been allowing students
to express themselves for 75
years," said Ubyssey news coordinator, Graham Cook. "We're
still here and still being read, so
we must be doing something
right."
Over the years, the paper has
been known for its crusades,
whether it is condemning fraternity hazing, advocating the rights
of interned Japanese-Canadians
during the war, lobbying for a
permanent campus for the university or denouncing a plan to
ban women from holding student council seats.
Not surprisingly,  the paper
has always had its share of critics.
In 1955, the Rev. E.C. Pappert
called The Ubyssey, "the vilest
rag you can imagine and the
best argument for censorship
that could be produced" — a
quote relished by Ubyssey staffers ever since.
Sometimes the criticism has
become so vehement The
Ubyssey has been shut down
and censored. In a recent and
controversial move, the paper is
now published under the auspices of an AMS-appointed publications board.
The Ubyssey debuted as a
weekly student newspaper on
Oct. 17, 1918 and quickly became known for its humor, wit
and pranks. One Seattle TV station sent a camera crew to UBC
after a gag story appeared saying kidnapped heiress Patty
Hearst was seen on campus.
Many former Ubyssey staffers have gone on to greater glory.
including humourist Eric Nicol,
poets Earle Birney and Tom
Wayman, politicians John
Turner and Pat Carney, and a
long list of journalists including
Pierre Berton, Joe Schlesinger.
Allan Fotheringham. Michael
Valpy, Peter Worthington and
Stan Persky.
The university has changed
greatly in the years since The
Ubyssey was first published,
when there were just 831 students and the campus was located in temporary buildings in
Fairview, but some things never
change.
"We've gone from typewriters
to word processors but the things
that are important to Ubyssey
staffers — good writing and investigative journalism, are the
same today as in 1918," said
news writer Rick Hiebert, who
waded through decades of back
issues as coordinator ofthe paper's anniversary issue, published Oct. 13.
Pipin' Hot
Charles Ker photo
Retired UBC employee Danny Graham plays the bagpipes at the Plant Operations United
Way Oktoberfest party.  The UBC campaign has raised two-thirds of its $300,000 goal.
White-coat hypertension said
needless health care cost
by Charles Ker
Staff writer
Women falsely diagnosed with
high blood pressure during pregnancy are being subjected to
undue stress, as is the provincial health care system, says a
UBC psychologist.
Prof. Wolfgang Linden is trying to find out just how prevalent
the phenomenon of "white-coat"
hypertension is among pregnant
patients. The white-coat effect
refers to the blood pressure of
otherwise healthy people shooting up mysteriously in the presence of a physician.
If the condition afflicts would-
be mothers at anything near the
estimated 25 per cent of nonpregnant individuals, Linden
says the associated costs of hospitalizing these women for rest
and observation could be astronomical.
"It's distressing to be diag
nosed with hypertension even if
you aren't pregnant and doubly
so if you are," he said.
According to Linden, who has
been researching stress and
pregnancy since 1987, a false
diagnosis of high blood pressure
can result in a woman being
hospitalized for up to three
months prior to delivery at an
estimated daily cost of $1,000.
At Grace Hospital, where close
to 8,000 babies are born each
year. Linden said between six
and eight per cent of pregnant
women are diagnosed as hypertensive.
Linden added that apart from
the personal distress caused by
the diagnosis to the mother and
the incurred cost, there is also
the accompanying stress put on
other family members who suddenly find themselves motherless.
Linden hopes to find 20 pregnant volunteers for his study.
Participants would wear a small
monitor which automatically
measures blood pressure at various times during a normal working day. They would also have their
pressures checked at the clinic.
A report of the monitoring results would then go to each participant's obstetrician or family
physician. Linden pointed out that
his study is not offering treatment
but is simply trying to improve
the quality of the diagnosis.
More than five million Canadians have been diagnosed with
the normally symptomless condition of hypertension. If left
untreated, however, hypertension can greatly increase the rate
of kidney failure, stroke and heart
attack.
There is currently no simple
method for screening out white-
coat hypertension from a normal case of high blood-pressure.
Those interested in more information can call 822-4156.
Classified
The classified advertising rate is $ 15 for 35 words or
less. Each additional word is 50 cents. Rate includes
GST. Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to the UBC Community Relations
Office. 207-6328 Memorial Road. Vancouver. B.C..
V6T 1Z2, accompanied by payment in cash, cheque
(made out to UBC Reports) or internal requisition.
Advertising enquiries: 822-3131.
The deadline for the Nov.   11,   1993
issue of UBC Reports is noon, Nov. 2.
Services
DO IT RIGHT! Statistical and
methodological consultation;
data analysis; data base
management; sampling
techniques; questionnaire
design, development, and
administration. Over 15 years of
research and consulting
experience in the social sciences
and related fields. 433-7807.
STATISTICAL CONSULTING  PhD
thesis? MSc? MA? Research
project? I cannot do it for you
but statistical data analysis,
statistical consulting, and data
management are my specialties
Several years experience in
statistical analysis of research
projects. Extensive experience
with SPSS/SAS/Fortran on PCs and
mainframes. Reasonable rates.
Call Henry at 685-2500.
EDITORIAL SERVICES Substantive
editing, copy editing, rewriting,
grant proposals, dissertations,
reports, books. I would be
delighted to look at your
manuscript,showyouhowlcould
improve it, and tell you what I
would charge. Please call me for
more information. Timothy King,
263-6058.
TYPIST Efficient, accurate typist
available for preparing reports,
resumes, essays, etc. Reasonable
rates. Resident in Richmond.
Please call 273-6190 or 273-4798.
Bed & Breakfast
GARDENS END Bed and Breakfast
in self-contained cottage.
Breakfast ingredients supplied.
Kerrisdale area. No oets or
smokers. $60 single, $15 each
additional person. (Maximum
four people.) 263-7083.
Accommodation
TORONTO Short-term faculty
house rental next to University of
Toronto or near subway to York
University, January 1 -July 1,1994.
100-year-old, much loved house
on quiet street, friendly
neighbours Spacious, semidetached, fully furnished,
renovated. Two bedrooms,
study, 1 1 /2 baths, fully equipped
kitchen/dining room combined,
high-ceilinged living room,
fireplace, piano, garden.
Parking. No smoking. References.
$ 1700/month. Leave message at
416-977-8329.
Accommodation
Wanted
CONDO,     APT.     OR    HOUSE
(furnished) needed for January
to April 1994, dates flexible, Senior
professor, no children, non-
smoker, very responsible.
Professor Ben Singer, (519) 660-
0671 (home) or Sociology Dept.,
UWO, fax: (519)661-3200.
News Digest
For the fifth straight year, the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration has outranked other Canadian
business schools in research grants awarded by the Social
Sciences and Humanities Research Council in the area of
administrative studies and industrial relations.
The faculty received $400,750 in grants for 1993-1996,
followed by Concordia with $155,000, McMaster with $142,000
and McGill with $123,900.
The faculty was also number one in the number of grants
received with eight, followed by Concordia with five, and
McMaster, McGill and Queen's with four each.
• • • •
Rick Hansen's wheelchair odyssey around the world in 1985
is being made into a feature film.
Earlier this month, a Toronto-based production company announced plans to dramatize Hansen's 40,000-km trek
for spinal cord research.
Filming is expected to start next year and will deal with the
Man in Motion tour as well as Hansen's life following the 1973
accident that left him without the use of his legs.
As first incumbent of the Rick Hansen National Fellowship at
UBC, Hansen continues to work as an advocate on behalf of the
disabled on a national and international basis.
Hansen will address Faculty of Education students in lecture
room 6 ofthe IRC Tues., Nov. 16, 3:30-5:30 p.m. and in room 200
ofthe Hennings Building, Nov. 18, 8:30-10:30 a.m.
• • • •
Chair Wilson Parasiuk and senior staff from the B.C. Trade
and Development Corporation met with representatives
from UBC Sept. 28 in a round table discussion to inform
government about UBC activities in Asia and for UBC to hear
about the province's priorities and initiatives in the region.
Representatives from the faculties of Commerce and Business
Administration, Arts, Law, the centres for Asian Research and for
Human Settlements, and the vice-presidents of Research and
External Affairs met with the government delegation, which
expressed an interest in following up on UBC expertise in many
areas of mutual interest. UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993 1 9
Hash Kanjee replaces Gail Wilson as UBC women's field hockey coach. Wilson coached the
team through five Canadian Interuniversity Athletic Union Championships. Kanjee has
coached men's teams at the provincial and national levels.
Coach inherits winning team
by Abe Hefter
Staff writer
Don't look for any superstars
when you're running down the
UBC women's field hockey team
roster.
There are none, according to
head coach Hash Kanjee, which
is just fine by him.
"Make no mistake about it,
we have some very talented athletes on this team," explained
Kanjee. "However, we don't have
the ego problems that can be
associated with superstar status.
'The players recognize field
hockey is a team sport and work
hard to help each other. As a
coach. I'm very fortunate to be in
this position."
Kanjee joined UBC in July
after six years with the provincial men's team in British Columbia, and three years with the
Canadian national men's squad.
If there's one adjustment he's
had to make since taking over
from head coach Gail Wilson,
who guided the team for 16years,
it's this: Team members are students first and athletes second.
"Gail's emphasis was on education rather than recruitment,
and it's one I plan to follow," said
Kanjee.
"Her success with the team,
which included five Canadian
Interuniversity Athletic Union
championships, is an indication
of her strengths as a coach. Gail
also promoted the club and its
inherent positive athletic and
social values for the field hockey
player."
With the constant turnover in
university athletics, Kanjee says
it is difficult to build a championship calibre team unless there
are eight or nine players to form
the core of the squad in any
given year.
"The key is to make sure the
remaining six or seven players
reach their true potential with
help and encouragement from
their teammates."
Kanjee feels the 1993-94 edition of theThunderbirds includes
a solid core, with Leslie
Richardson, Sam LeRiche, and
Heather Matthews leading the
way. Lisa Eastman. Laura
Prellwitz and Ayra Davy are be
ginning to hit form, and Heather
Andrews and Sarah Franks
strengthen the team's offence,
he added.
The club's 5-1-2 start to the
Canada West season would appear to support that.
'The competition in Canada
West is fierce. The University of
Victoria, the CIAU champion
three ofthe last five CIAU titles,
is always in the hunt. The University of Alberta, guided by national under-21 team coach Dru
Marshall, fields a strong club as
well."
Despite his team's success
this season, Kanjee admits he
didn't have an opportunity to
work with his players as much
as he would have liked to. as a
result of the structure of the
CIAU season which calls for three
Canada West tournaments in
the first six weeks of the academic year.
He hopes to implement an
annual training program during the off-season to provide
some continuity for those athletes who plan to continue to
play the game.
The Changing Face of UBC
... a regular column to keep you informed and up to date
Ullder COnStrilCtiOn...Green College: 100 residents moved in. Completion: '93/11
...Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery: watch for construction activity within the next two
weeks at Main Mall adjacent to the Frederic Wood Theatre. Completion: '94/10...Rose
Garden Parkade: a 950 car underground parkade and complete Rose Garden Restoration.
Beside the Faculty Club. Completion: '94/08...Scarfe Expansion & Renovation (phase I):
expansion of the Teacher Education Office and excavation for the new Education Library. At
the corner of Main Mall and University Blvd. Ongoing construction and renovation until
'95/05...Thunderbird Student Housing: along Thunderbird Blvd. Completion '94/08.
Complete. CICSR/CS: Centre for Integrated Computer Systems Research/Computer
Science. At the end of Main Mall at Agronomy.
UemOlltlOnS...One ofthe basic planning objectives in the UBC Capital Development
Program is the removal of temporary trailers and huts from the post war years for new
facilities. In September the Botany, Education, and Soil Sciences hut demolitions occurred
to make way for the Scarfe Expansion; the Key Control Centre and three huts along West
Mall for future projects; and the Armouries building for the construction ofthe Creative Arts
and School of Journalism project. The demolition of this building is unique as it involves
careful deconstruction to salvage the large timbers and flooring for the new C.K. Choi
Building for Institute of Asian Research.
InfraStrUCtlire PrOieCtS...Roads: Upgrades to Wesbrook Mall, Thunderbird Blvd, Health
Sciences and West Mall. Lighting Pilot Project: Agricultural Road. Will light the walkway
from the Student Union Building, along Agricultural Rd, past the First Nations House of
Learning to Place Vanier Residences. This project will act as an example for all future
campus lighting. Watch for construction to begin in December.
PrOJeCt Information Meeting.Topic: Student Recreation Centre, November 1, 1993,
12:30 - 1:30, SUB, Room 212.
Information compiled by Campus Planning & Development. For detailed
information contact: K. Laird-Burns, 822-8228, or 3-0811.
E-mail:laird@unixg.ubc.ca or "View UBC".
People
by staff writers
Tony Warren, a professor in the Dept. of Microbiology
and Immunology and a member of the Protein Engineering Network Centre of Excellence, is the 1993 recipient
ofthe New England BioLabs Award.
Presented by the Canadian Society of Microbiologists, the
award is sponsored by the Canadian division of New England
BioLabs, an international company specializing in the
development of products for molecular biology.
Warren has made major contributions at both the fundamental and applied levels in the understanding of cellulases,
an important class of enzyme.
The award was presented for the first time last year, when
it was won by Bob Hancock, also a UBC microbiologist and
scientific director of the Canadian Bacterial Diseases Network
Centre of Excellence.
• • • •
Prof. Gene Namkoong. head of the Forest Sciences
Dept., has been awarded the Marcus Wallenberg Prize
for scientific research in forestry.
Namkoong was cited for his
groundbreaking contributions to
quantatative population genetics, tree
breeding and management of genetic
resources, which form a solid scientific
basis for the maintenance of biological
diversity in forests around the world.
It's believed his development of
models for breeding many forest
populations simultaneously will be
important in the development of the
earth's forest resources and forest
conservation.
Namkoong received his doctorate in
genetics at North Carolina State University.   He has served in
a number of genetic research capacities with the Forest
Service ofthe U.S. Dept. of Agriculture and was a professor of
genetics, forestry and biomathematics at North Carolina
State University before joining the Faculty of Forestry at
UBC.
He is the author of more than 150 scientific papers in the
field of forest genetics.
The prize, worth $168,000, will be presented to Namkoong
in the fall of 1994 in Stockholm. Sweden. The award was
established in 1980 by Stora Kopparsbergs Bergslags
Aktiebolag of Sweden to honour Dr. Wallenberg, a former
company chair.
• • • •
Ron Dumouchelle, director of Development, has been
elected to the board of the Canadian Council for the
Advancement and Support of Education (CCAE) as vice-
president for the 1993-94 academic year.
Dumouchelle has been a member of the board for the past
three years and with the university since 1988.   Prior to that,
he was campaign director with the United Way of Windsor-
Essex County in Ontario.
The CCAE represents alumni, development and public
affairs professionals at more than 150 universities and
colleges in Canada.
Namkoong
Vancouver Foundation
celebrates anniversary
The Vancouver Foundation,
which has contributed a total of
$4 million to UBC's World of
Opportunity fund-raising campaign, will celebrate its 50th
anniversary with an entertainment showcase and dinner at
the Vancouver Trade and Convention Centre Nov. 9.
The foundation, which provides community assistance in
the areas of education, health,
welfare, youth, the environment,
the family, and arts and culture,
donated $3 million to the President's Opportunity Fund and $ 1
million to the Disability Resource
Centre.
The foundation grants an average of $ 1 million a year toward
medical research projects at
UBC, and approximately
$100,000 yearly toward scholarships and bursaries for students studying at UBC.
The Vancouver Foundation's
generous donation to the campaign was key in encouraging
strong support for the opportunity fund, particularly from
alumni," said President David
Strangway.
The foundation's significant
donation helped establish the
Disability Resource Centre, the
first of its kind in the world, and
an important resource for both
the campus and the community.
"We congratulate the Vancouver Foundation on its half-century of work to improve the quality of life in the community."
The Vancouver Foundation
Society was formed in 1943, with
an initial contribution by W.J.
VanDusen, who recognized that
a changing society would mean
changing needs. He envisioned
a permanent endowment, the
income from which, would provide funds to a wide range of
charitable causes across British
Columbia.
The society became the Vancouver Foundation in 1950.
VanDusen and nine other generous donors provided the base
for what has become one of North
America's largest community
foundations.
Fifty years after its inception,
the foundation is the custodian of
some 500 permanent and perpetual
funds with capital of $345 million. 20 UBC Reports ■ October 28,1993
Forum
Campus needs to
welcome women
by Florence Ledwitz-Rigby
Florence Ledwitz Rigbg is the
advisor to the president on women
and gender relations and chair of the
President's Advisory Committee on
Safety. She recently conducted a
survey designed to gauge the social
and professional climate for women
facultg at UBC.
Many women at UBC perceive the
climate for them to be lukewarm if
not quite chilly. Focus groups of
faculty, librarians, management and
professional staff, as well as interviews with union members, indicate
several areas of concern.
Issues common to all workers
including salary, pensions and job
security are important to women at
UBC. Many feel that they are particularly disadvantaged
in these areas.
Concern about
personal safety is
also high on the list
of all the groups
surveyed, while the
need for mentoring
and more information
about what is required for career
advancement was
identified by faculty,
management, custodial and clerical
workers.
Women responding
to the questionnaire
indicate that they feel
excluded by their
male colleagues from
informal activities,
such as discussions
and mealtimes, and that their jobs do
not provide opportunities for contact
with other women.
The survey of faculty women
identifies inadequate social resources
as another significant problem.
Respondents view mentoring, appreciation of research specialty, informal
advice, collegial respect and opportunities for leadership to be less
available to women than men.
Women's greater interest in interdisciplinary studies was suggested as a
reason behind the lack of appreciation for research specialty.
While 54 per cent of the respondents agree with the statement "I have
felt welcomed and accepted as a
faculty member," 30 per cent disagree. Female faculty have the impression that male colleagues are more
frequently included in informal social
gatherings and invited to collaborate
on research projects with senior
faculty.
Information such as where to
apply for grants, where to publish
and how to earn tenure appears to be
shared more often with men. Several
respondents report arriving at
meetings to discover that important
departmental issues had been settled
in discussions from which they were
excluded. However, women in units
with a female majority such as the
Library or School of Nursing experience a more supportive collegial
environment.
Backlash, comments about
political correctness and ridicule of
Ledwitz-Rigby
women's issues contribute to the
impression of a non-supportive
climate. Lack of respect for faculty
women, female students and staff,
exploitation of sessional instructors,
safety concerns and attitudes unfavourable to family responsibilities add
to the picture.
Women faculty, clerical and
custodial workers speak of being
intimidated and verbally harassed by
male co-workers and students.
Behaviours such as sexist language,
humour or comments, not taking
women seriously and expecting
women to behave in stereotyped ways,
such as passive or deferential, are
experienced on campus by the
majority of the respondents to the
survey and by many of the female
staff who were interviewed.
Faculty women are
— more positive when
asked to rate their
own academic units
for the fairness with
which women are
evaluated compared
to men. and in regard
to the fairness of the
distribution of
tangible resources
such as supplies,
equipment and space
between genders.
A number of
individual academic
units are cited as
I iroviding positive
environments for
women. Specific
(leans and heads of
both genders are
described as being
personally responsible for the positive
climate.
On many issues regarding individual units, librarians express a
greater degree of satisfaction than
faculty. Again, the quality of leadership is an important factor.
The positive aspects of the climate
for women at UBC need to be extended. The problems cited are
common to members of any group on
campus whether defined by gender.
race, language, disability or sexual
orientation. Raising awareness at the
university about the isolation felt by
all groups may increase their voluntary inclusion in informal gatherings.
Senior faculty and staff should be
encouraged to share their knowledge
about the university and their professions with all new colleagues. Providing formal programs for mentoring
and career development for all would
ensure that no one is left out. Expanded education about the nature
and impact of sexist behaviour,
flexibility and understanding regarding the balance of career and family
responsibilities and the improvement
of personal safety on campus would
all help to warm the climate for
women.
Enhanced efforts at networking by
university women have already
begun. The university has made a
good start by hiring many qualified
women. To ensure its investment in
them, it needs to make an additional
effort to provide a more supportive
environment in which all can achieve.
Charles Ker photo
//
Koichi Takano studies hard at Ritsumeikan-UBC House.
Japanese "mature
student sets example
by Charles Ker
Staff i vriter
A faint rock-and-roll beat thumps outside Ritsumeikan-UBC House as Koichi
Takano. slippers on and books in hand,
pads quietly down the hall to his dorm.
Even Friday sunshine, curiosity and a
good cause couldn't lure the 62-year-old
exchange student to the United Way
Oktoberfest party in a neighboring parking lot.
No. it was time to hit the books, again.
"He studies very hard, every day." says
Eiichi Kuroda, one of Takano's three,
twenty-something room-mates. "He's a
good influence."
Takano and Kuroda are among 93
second- and third-year students from
Japan's Ritsumeikan University sharing
50, four-bedroom apartments with Canadian counterparts. Despite having nobody close to his age in the UBC/
Ritsumeikan Academic Exchange Program. Takano says he's very comfortable
in his surroundings.
"Here, I'm always having fun," said
Takano. seated in the sparsely furnished
living room. "Mentally, I feel very strong
and very young."
It isn't the first time Takano has left his
wife, an elementary school teacher in
Kyoto, to pursue higher education. Earlier this year, he spent five weeks on an
exchange program in Illinois to improve
his English.
Majoring in Japanese history, Takano
returned to university in 1991 after a 40-
year career at the Matsuzakaya Department Store in Kyoto. Hard economic times
forced him to drop out of the National
Tokyo University ot Foreign Studies in
the early 1950s. He vowed to finish his
degree when he retired.
UBC's three-year-old academic exchange program, co-developed and taught
by UBC instructors and visiting professors from Ritsumeikan. has three components: language education courses
conducted in a sophisticated language
lab in the residence's basement, cross-
cultural courses in the Faculty of Arts
and related field work.
A quarter of t he way through his eight -
month stay. Takano has written papers
on the Museum of Anthropology, the influence of Confucianism on modern Japanese Society and a detailed report on
Vancouver's Chinatown. He's currently
wrestling with a 15-page essay outlining
the changing status of Japanese immigration on Vancouver and another on the
difference in verbal communication between Canada and Japan.
And how does he sustain himseli?
When Eiichi emerges from the kitchen
with two meticulously built cheeseburgers, Takano confides that his own culinary skills are limited to boiled oatmeal in
the morning. He prefers to dine at Totem
Park cafeteria.
Home cooking may be on the menu for
Christmas when his wife visits for two
weeks. Apart from sharing favourite walks
around the University Endowment Lands,
Takano has planned a trip to Yellowknife
for a glimpse of the aurora borealis.
Said Takano: "I already have many
vivid impressions of Canada and still
many more to look forward to."
Plagiarism on rise at UBC
by Charles Ker
Staff writer
Plagiarism, the most heinous of intellectual crimes, is on the rise at UBC.
A growing number of students accused of taking the thoughts and words
of others and passing them off as their
own have prompted the Faculty of Arts to
produce a 10-page pamphlet, Plagiarism:
What It Is and How To Avoid It. The
bright, red document is sold at the Bookstore for 50 cents.
"It's a terrible problem given that many
of these people don't really understand
what it is they've done wrong," said Peter
Simmons, a member of the President's
Advisory Committee on Student Discipline. "Even after speaking with them
about it, a few still don't understand."
Simmons, a professor in the School of
Library Archival and Information Studies, said much ofthe problem stems from
the fact that many campus plagiarists
come from cultures where copying something which fits the assignment is seen as
resourceful, not dishonest.
While he wouldn't comment on the
number of plagiarism cases the advisory
committee handles each year, Simmons
did say the problem is escalating and
would probably continue to do so if class
sizes keep growing.
"Often students in classes with more
than 100 feel anonymous and that their
work will not be treated as that of an
individual," said Simmons. "Although
some know better and are simply dishonest, others come from educational systems where they've never been taught to
take notes and don't know how to credit
others."
Penalties for plagiarism include losing
credit for an assignment, receiving a mark
of zero in the course and suspension from
the university for as little as a term or as
long as a couple of years. In its introduction, the plagiarism pamphlet warns that
most cases handled through the dean's
office result in at least a temporary suspension (noted on the student's transcript) and a mark of zero.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcreports.1-0118251/manifest

Comment

Related Items