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Array UBC REPORTS
VOLUME   56    |    NO   01    |   7   JANUARY   2010    |   WINTER   GAMES   EDITION
a place of mind
Get Ready,
Get Set:
This issue profiles
the UBC learning,
research and
community service
sparked by the
upcoming 2010
Games.
UBC and the 2010 Games:
www.ubc.ca/2010
2010 Media Centre:
www.ubc.ca/2010media
Engineering a competitive edge
in international competition, the difference between a
gold medal and missing the podium is often measured in split
seconds. A team of UBC engineers is developing solutions to trim
milliseconds from finishing times with the goal of providing a
competitive edge for Canadian athletes, by erinrose handy page 4
Engineering Prof. Savvas Hatzikiriakos (above) leads a team that has copied nature to create
a super-low friction surface on metals and polymers.
Torch fires up nursing student's Olympic aspirations
Treanna Delorme is a member of the First Nations Snowboard Team.
BY JODY JACOB
A COMPETITIVE SNOWBOARDER with
the First Nations Snowboard Team
(FNST), Treanna Delorme will carry
the Olympic torch for one kilometre
in Lillooet, B.C., on Feb. 6.
The UBC Okanagan first-year
Nursing student says carrying the
torch is a thrilling opportunity and
one she believes could further
inspire her own dreams of someday
representing Canada on the Olympic
podium.
"I was so stoked when I found out
I was chosen for this honour," she
says. "It's going to be an awesome
experience."
Despite having an injury last
year that kept her from competing
at provincials, and consequently
nationals, Delorme was ranked
33rd in Canada in her niche
competition, boardercross, which
requires snowboarders to race down
an obstacle course, maneuvering
through sharp turns and riding
bigjumps while at the sametime
avoiding collisions with fellow
competitors.
"First one to cross the finish line
wins," says Delorme. "It's pretty
intense. You go full tilt, and it can get
pretty physical at times."
Delorme, who is Cree and
originally from the Cowessess First
Nation in Saskatchewan, has been
snowboarding for about eight years.
She joined the FNST three years ago
after moving to Kelowna from North
Vancouver. During winter months
she spends countless hours on the
mountain, while off-season training
includes dry-land and trampoline
exercises.
As a first-year student athlete,
Delorme admits it can sometimes be
a challenge finding balance between
academics, training, competition, and
maintaining a social life. However,
this year she received a scholarship
of $3,750 from the National
Aboriginal Achievement Foundation
and a $3,500 B.C. Aboriginal
Student Award, which she says
helped support her development and
allowed her to focus on achieving her
professional and personal dreams.
"The scholarships help me so much,
as I was able to quit my job as a server
and concentrate solely on school and
snowboarding."
Delorme trains year-round with the
FNST, which is the only snowboard
body in Canada run by First Nations
people. Formed in 2004, the
organization's goals are to create
the conditions for an Aboriginal
person to win an Olympic medal in
snowboarding as well as to inspire
youth to increase physical activity,
develop healthy habits, and achieve
personal excellence. ■ 2    I    UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
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IN THE  NEWS Highlights of UBC media coverage in
December 2009. COMPILED BY SEAN SULLIVAN
Human Kinetics Prof. Rob VanWynsberghe and his Olympic Impact research team caught the attention of world media.
People hear with their skin
Research by UBC's Bryan Gick and
Donald Derrick flips the traditional view
of how we perceive the world on its
head, news service LiveScience reported
this month.
The researchers found that people
can hear with their skin, suggesting our
brains take in and integrate information
from various senses to build a picture of
our surroundings.
"[That's] very different from the
more traditional ideas, based on
the fact that we have eyes so we
think of ourselves as seeing visible
information, and we have ears so
we think of ourselves as hearing
auditory information. That's a little bit
misleading," Gick said.
The New York Times, US News and
World Report, Fox News, the Toronto
Star, BBC, Boston Globe and others
reported on the research.
New hope for MS patients
UBC made headlines across Canada
when it announced plans to begin
patient trials to test a potentially
groundbreaking method of diagnosing
and treating multiple sclerosis, a
disease that afflicts up to 75,000
Canadians.
The Globe and Mail reported that it's
the first research proposal in Canada
to suggest evaluating the findings of
Italian doctor Paolo Zamboni, whose
early studies indicate that multiple
sclerosis might be caused by vein
blockages.
Anthony Traboulsee, medical
director ofthe UBC MS Clinic, said
Zamboni's studies have caused both
hope and anxiety among people with
MS. "MS is a lifelong disease. Young
people are hungry for hope," he said.
The Vancouver Sun and CTV also
covered this story.
Psychotropic drugs boost fall risk in
the elderly
Certain types of widely prescribed
drugs, such as antidepressants and
sedatives, can increase the risk of falling
in older people, reported Carlo Marra
of UBC and his colleagues in a study for
the Archives of Internal Medicine.
Reuters, The Canadian Press, CTV
and fhe Globe and Mail picked up on the
team's findings, which analyzed the risk
of falling associated with nine classes of
drugs by reviewing 22 studies published
between 1996 and 2007.
Falls often have serious
consequences for older people, such
as injuries leading to disability, or even
death. Older people who are taking any
of the drugs associated with falls should
talk about the medication with their
physician and their pharmacist, Marra
told Reuters.
The impact of the Games
The latest Olympic Games Impact
report, which measures the effects of
the Olympic Games on its host city and
region, garnered headlines around the
world last month.
The New York Times, The Canadian
Press, Associated Press and Reuters
L/Kwere among the media outlets
that seized on the findings by UBC
Prof. Rob VanWynsberghe and his
multidisciplinary team of researchers.
Their report is the second of a four
part study required by the International
Olympic Committee. It found "a very
slight positive impact" on Vancouver
by the lead-up ofthe Games while
cautioning that much of the data
analyzed is inconclusive.
Clumsy kids' brains work differently
UBC researchers are shining
a new light on a condition called
developmental co-ordination disorder
(DCD) that affects children's ability to
print, tie their shoes or play sports, CBC
reported.
Researchers performed scans to see
how the brains of children with DCD
were functioning while trying to trace
objects on a piece of paper.
"We can see that the children with
developmental co-ordination disorder
are not activating the same brain
areas as typically developing children,"
said Jill Zwicker, a PhD candidate in
rehabilitation sciences at UBC.
UBC REPORTS
Executive Director    Scott Macrae scott.macrae@ubc.ca
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Can sports advance world peace?
UBC engages athletes, academics in dialogue
BY SEAN SULLIVAN
academics and innovators are joining
athletes for a series of Olympic
events at the University of British
Columbia that will contribute to a
forum for national dialogue on issues
surrounding the 2010 Winter Games.
At the forefront is UBC's Sport
and Society series, beginning in
February at the Chan Centre for the
Performing Arts. The five events
present discussions led by high-
profile Olympic and Paralympic
athletes including such heavyweights
as Rick Hansen, Richard Pound and
Johann Koss.
"We wanted to choose athletes,
both Olympic and Paralympic, who
have used their celebrity to make a
difference," says Sid Katz, executive
director of UBC Community Affairs.
"This series is meant to inspire and
engage Canadians through an open
dialogue about sport and the social
impacts of the Olympic Games."
Pound, a former Olympic swimmer
and chair of the World Anti-Doping
Agency, will lead off the seminar
series on Feb. 8 by exploring the
intersection of sport, ethics and
technology. What advances in
science, equipment and technology
will change the competitive playing
field, and what impact do these have
on ethics and fairness?
"The Olympics provide a unique
opportunity to talk more in depth
about issues related not only to
sports and athletics, but provocative
topics like doping and ability," says
Robert Sparks, director of UBC's
School of Human Kinetics.
"We're proud to help host a forum
that will give the people of this
country a chance to take part in a
discussion with such high-calibre
athletes, activists and educators."
Johann Olav Koss, a four-time
Olympic gold medalist in speed
skating and the CEO and president of
Right to Play, will lead a discussion
on the opening day of the Games,
Feb. 12, on how sport can contribute
to positive social change.
Right to Play is an international
humanitarian organization that
uses sport and play to improve the
lives of disadvantaged children in
23 countries around the world. Koss
will be joined by Stephen Lewis,
Canada's former special envoy to the
UN on HIV and AIDS for Africa, and
Wilfried Lemke, an advisor to the
UN Secretary-General on Sport for
Development and Peace.
One participant, however, will help
bring the topic home for audiences:
Benjamin Nzobonankira is a former
child refugee from Burundi who
was first introduced to UN Sport for
Development and Peace programs
while living in a refugee camp in
Northern Tanzania. When he steps in
front of the microphone at the Chan,
it will be as a Right to Play coach
trainer.
"This gets to one of the most
important topics: whether sport has
been a mechanism for peace and
development around the world," Katz
explains. "Are we deluding ourselves,
or is it really happening?
"These are very key issues I feel
the university should be exploring,
especially since they're the questions
on people's minds. We want to
help spur a global dialogue on the
usefulness ofthe Games and the
Four-time Olympic gold medalist Johann Olav Koss, president of Right to Play, will lead a discussion at UBC on Feb. 12 on how sport can contribute to social change.
myriad issues that surround this
event," he says.
Waneek Horn Miller will lend
an Aboriginal perspective as she
relates her story of being inspired by
seeing fellow Mohawk Alwyin Morris
compete in the 1984 Games. As a
former Olympic athlete (water polo),
activist and television personality,
Miller will kick off a discussion about
sports and inclusion (March 5).
The talks will close with
discussions of challenge and legacy
with former Paralympian and Man in
Motion Rick Hansen (March 5), as
well as Bruce Kidd, a former track
and field athlete (March 13).
announce a special "hashtag" — a
keyword that identifies a topic of
discussion on the Internet — for
Twitter users to discuss topics raised
by the Sport and Society series,
while schools can take advantage
of a special Intellectual Muscle/
Sport and Society teachers' guide
developed by Vancouver 2010 in
partnership with UBC.
The UBC Winter Games Event
Series, meanwhile, brings 13
existing UBC speaker series under
one umbrella. They include the
relationship between sport, art and
politics; technology and the body;
symbolism in sport; ethics of the
42T&
UBC Faculty of Medicine
> Through knowledge, creating health.
"We wanted to choose athletes,
both Olympic and Paralympic, who
have used their celebrity to make
a difference."
Head, Department of Radiology
The Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia (UBC) invites
applications and nominations for the position of Head ofthe Department of
Radiology at UBC. The successful applicant would have administrative
academic linkages with all six Health Authorities in British Columbia, with the
expectation of a principal leadership position in one Health Authority.
We seek an academic leader to be responsible for directing and developing the
teaching, research and service programs ofthe Department. The Department
has 16 full-time, 9 part-time and 113 clinical faculty members and attracts
strong research support. There is an extensive undergraduate education
endeavour and an excellent residency program. The successful candidate
should have broad and proven administrative experience, substantial academic
and clinical experience, a proven record of scholarly activity with demonstrated
excellence in teaching, and a commitment to undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate medical education. Anticipated start date will be July 1, 2010 or upon
a date to be mutually agreed.
The successful candidate will be accountable for professional issues relevant to
the strategic directions ofthe Department. The candidate is responsible for
quality of patient care and professional standards and collaborates with the
senior executives in the Health Authority for physician workforce planning,
recruiting and performance management.
Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. It is expected
that the successful candidate will qualify for and be offered a full-time
appointment at the rank of Professor with Tenure.
For more information about the position and the department, please visit
www.radiology.ubc.ca.
Sport and Society will be the
feature Games-time program on
Intellectual Muscle: University
Dialogues for Vancouver 2010.
Developed by Vancouver 2010
and UBC, in collaboration with
universities across Canada and
the Globe and Mail, Intellectual
Muscle already includes more than
20 podcasts by prominent and up-
and-coming Canadians, including
podcasts by UBC professors Judy
Illes and Jim Rupert.
UBC's Sport and Society podcasts
will be loaded on to Intellectual
Muscle, along with polls, starting on
Feb. 11, 2010. An online discussion
forum will be added at the end ofthe
Games in April 2010.
UBC is also throwing open the
door to further online participation
beyond the talks through the use
of social media. The university will
Olympic Games; and the historical
context of the Games.
The annual Ziegler Visiting
Speaker Series returns with a
focus on sport, culture and body
politics, culminating with a Jan.
14 talk on Poland and the 1936
Winter Olympics. The School of
Human Kinetics' annual seminar
series includes "Genetics in Sport:
Detection, Correction, Perfection"
and the influence of globalization
and new social movements on the
Games.
The Joan Carlisle-Irving Lecture
Series focuses on art history,
with upcoming talks that include
"The Aesthetics of Performance"
and "Bodies on Display: Gender
Ambiguities and Riefenstahl's
Olympia."
Follow the events on
www.ubc.ca/2010 ■
www. med. ubc. ca
Application letters, accompanied by
detailed curriculum vitae, a teaching
dossier, and names of four
references, should be directed to:
Gavin Stuart, MD, FRCSC
Dean, Faculty of Medicine
c/o Darcie Prosser
Room 317, IRC, UBC
2194 Health Sciences Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3.
(email:
sea rches@medd.med.ubc.ca
with subject line: Head,
Radiology)
Review ofthe applications will begin
on January 31, 2010 and will
continue until the position is filled.
The University of British Columbia is
Canada's third largest university and
consistently ranks among the 35 best
universities in the world. Primarily
situated in Vancouver, UBC is a research-
intensive university and has an economic
impact of $4 billion to the provincial
economy.
The Faculty of Medicine at UBC, together
with its partners including B.C.'s Health
Authorities, provides innovative programs
in the areas of health and life sciences
through a province-wide delivery model.
The Faculty teaches students at the
undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate
levels and generates more than $240
million in research funding each year,
throughout the province.
UBC       THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
\.     ,/ UBC hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity. All
qualified persons are encouraged to apply.  UBC is strongly committed to diversity
within its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority
group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of
any sexual orientation or gender identity, and others who may contribute to the
further diversification of ideas. However, Canadian andpermanent residents of
Canada will be given priority.
www.ubc.ca & www.med.ubc.ca 4
UBC    REPORTS    |    JANUARY    7,    2010
competitive edge
continued from cover
The research is funded by Own
the Podium (OTP), a technical sport
program that is a partnership of
Canada's 13 winter national sport
organizations, the Canadian Olympic
Committee, the Canadian Paralympic
Committee, Sport Canada and the
Vancouver Organizing Committee for
the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic
Winter Games (VANOC). Research
being done for the OTP program
is providing innovative new
performance tools and knowledge
to Canada's winter sports teams to
help improve performance during
the 2010 Games, although some of
the technology will be implemented
looking toward the 2014 Games.
The UBC engineering research
focuses on improving speed on snow
and ice by minimizing friction — the
force that causes an object in motion
to slow or stop.
Working closely with Canada's
snow and ice sport national teams
— alpine skiing, cross-country skiing,
snowboard, biathlon, speed skating
and luge — the UBC experts have
been investigating ways to reduce
friction at both the microscopic and
macroscopic levels.
Inspired by the lotus-leaf: creating
super low-friction surfaces
Taking a lesson from nature, UBC
engineers have mimicked the
structure of the lotus leaf to create
an edge for our athletes.
When a drop of water falls on
a lotus leaf, it beads and rolls off
the superhydrophobic — or super
water-repellent — surface. The
lotus' surface structure, composed
of a unique nanopattern that under
an electron microscope looks like
■V; *  '      *
7* *
The surface of the lotus leaf creates optimal
a field of cone-shaped pom pom
balls [see slide 3], creates minimal
friction and allows the droplet of
water to maintain a perfect bevel
or roundness. With minimal friction,
optimal glide exists, allowing the
bead of water to roll off.
"We have mimicked nature to
create a low-friction surface on
various metals and polymers," says
Prof. Savvas Hatzikiriakos. "We've
copied the nanopatterns ofthe
lotus leaf to engineer materials that
reduce friction on both snow and ice."
Led by Hatzikiriakos, the
microscopic friction team includes
co-investigator Prof. Peter Englezos
and PhD students Anne Kietzig —
who specializes in metals — and
Christos Stamboulides — who
focuses on polymers — all from
the Department of Chemical and
Biological Engineering.
In the case of metals, the team
engineered a new material, laser-
structured stainless steel, using
glide, allowing a droplet of water to maintain perfect roundness and roll off.
%  UBC Faculty of Medicine
> Through knowledge, creating health.
The Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia invites applications and
nominations for the position of Head of the UBC Department of Pediatrics and
Chief of Pediatrics, BC Children's Hospital. The successful applicant is expected
to establish strong clinical and administrative linkages with all six Health
Authorities in British Columbia.
As a recognized clinical and academic leader in Pediatrics, you will have the
opportunity to share your vision and utilize your leadership skills in the
development of teaching, research and clinical service programs in a
Department with 153 site-based faculty (15 PhD scientists and 138 academic
clinicians) and 119 community based clinical faculty.
In this challenging role, you will be accountable for the leadership and
administration of the Department and for overseeing the quality of pediatric
medical care. Your ability to be innovative and foster collaboration will be key
in promoting pediatric academic excellence and partnerships in undergraduate,
graduate and post graduate medical education programs and support for
research across British Columbia.
The successful candidate will bring to this vital position a proven track record of
success in senior clinical, academic and administrative leadership roles,
demonstrated success in supporting the career development of MD and PhD
faculty members and a proven record of scholarly achievement with
demonstrated excellence in teaching. The anticipated start date will be July l,
2010 or upon a date to be mutually agreed.
Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. The successful
candidate will qualify for and be offered a full time appointment at the rank of
Professor with Tenure.
For more information about the position and the department, please visit
www.pediatrics.med.ubc.ca.
www.med.ubc.ca
Application letters, accompanied by
detailed curriculum vitae, a teaching
dossier, and names of four
references, should be directed to:
Gavin Stuart, MD, FRCSC
Dean, Faculty of Medicine
c/o Darcie Prosser
Room 317, IRC, UBC
2194 Health Sciences Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3.
(email:
searches @medd.med. ubc.ca
with subject line: Head,
Pediatrics)
Review ofthe applications will begin
on January 31, 2010 and will
continue until the position is filled.
The University of British Columbia is
Canada's third largest university and
consistently ranks among the 35 best
universities in the world. Primarily
situated in Vancouver, UBC is a research-
intensive university and has an economic
impact of $4 billion to the provincial
economy.
The Faculty of Medicine at UBC, together
with its partners including B.C.'s Health
Authorities, provides innovative programs
in the areas of health and life sciences
through a province-wide delivery model.
The Faculty teaches students at the
undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate
levels and generates more than $240
million in research funding each year,
throughout the province.
UFjC
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity. All
qualified persons are encouraged to apply.  UBC is strongly committed to diversity
within its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority
group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of
any sexual orientation or gender identity, and others who may contribute to the
further diversification of ideas. However, Canadian andpermanent residents of
Canada will be given priority.
www.ubc.ca & www.med.ubc.ca
the laser facilities in the UBC
Department of Physics. "We were
extremely surprised to find out that
the laser-irradiated metallic surfaces
turn superhydrophobic after a few
days," says Hatzikiriakos.
Compared to the traditional steel
used in skates, the new material
has a much greater contact angle,
which means that a bead of water
stays more rounded on the surface
and rolls off more easily. The new
material drastically reduces friction
and essentially repels water; the
surface structure of the traditional
material absorbs a bit of each
droplet, creating friction that slows
motion.
"The greatly increased
researchers developed a new base
modification for skis. With the
plasma treatment, low-friction
molecules attach to the exposed
surface of the ski base, which
renders the material nearly
superhydrophobic.
Like the newly engineered steel,
the plasma treatment for skis also
increases the contact angle of a
droplet of water, reducing friction
by up to 25 per cent from previously
used polymers.
Beyond the Olympics, these
innovative materials can have
broader applications. Essentially
self-cleaning, superhydrophobic
metals could improve surgical
instruments and implants. The
"The greatly increased
hydrophobicity of the laser-
structured steel increases the
slider's ability to 'float'
upon the ice..."
hydrophobicity ofthe laser-
structured steel increases the slider's
ability to 'float' upon the ice, rather
than become wetted into it," explains
Hatzikiriakos. "This research enables
the development of new skate bases
with smaller friction coefficients,
compared with the existing bases.
With less friction, they simply go
faster."
Hatzikiriakos and his team have
also been developing ways to reduce
friction of polymers — used for ski
bases — on snow.
Using a plasma (ionized gas)
treatment method to increase
the level of water repellency, the
extreme water-repellent properties
can also be applied to paper, offering
a sustainable alternative to plastics.
Reducing friction by understanding
snow conditions
In-depth knowledge of local snow
and weather conditions at the venues
could prove a home-field advantage
for Canada in the upcoming
Olympics.
Mechanical engineering Professor
Sheldon Green and research engineer
Dan Dressier (MASc '06) have
studied drag-reduction at the macro
(snow-surface) level, creating tools
to assist athletes and ski technicians
in making the most informed
decisions when selecting which
materials — skis, snowboards, waxes
and grinds (base structure of skis) —
will perform best.
Through their comprehensive
analysis of snow properties and
conditions, the engineers have
discovered ways to minimize friction
at the ski-snow interface, enabling
athletes to go faster.
Green and Dressier have worked
extensively with Canada's Olympic-
bound teams at the Olympic venues
— Whistler Blackcomb, Callaghan
Valley and Cypress Mountain Resort
— to implement various tools for the
teams to use for selecting the best
materials.
One such tool is a database that
includes variable conditions like air
and snow temperature, wind speed
and humidity. By entering the race-
day conditions into the database,
technicians and coaches will be
able to obtain information on which
materials will work best. For example,
if the current snow is old and crystallike, a hard wax will best reduce
friction, helping to overcome the
abrasiveness and slowing properties
of this type of snow.
The team's research has also led to
the development of a new approach
for measuring the hydrophobicity of
skis. Through the use of a portable
high-resolution imaging system
combined with image processing
software, tests can be done on site
at a fraction of the cost of other
systems. The test includes measuring
the contact angles of a water droplet
on a ski surface. The greater the
contact angle, the less friction. This
information is especially useful
for selecting materials for distance
racers who depend on the longevity
of a wax for optimal performance.
"Snow is an incredibly complex
substance whose structure is
dependent on temperature, relative
humidity, stresses and a host of
other factors. It is amazing how
little was, and still is, known about
the fundamental science of snow
friction," says Green, an expert in
fluid mechanics.
Many are hopeful the Own The
Podium research will help Canada's
athletes shine during the Winter
2010 Games and beyond.
"Our friction research and new
materials could have a significant
impact in the years a head in racing
that measures in split seconds,"
explains Hatzikiriakos. "It could be
the difference between fourth and
first place for Canadian athletes in
the years ahead." ■
UBC's Own The Podium engineering research team: (back) Profs. Savvas Hatzikiriakos and Peter Englezos; (front) Research engineer Dan
Dressier (MASc '06), Prof. Sheldon Green, Phd students Anne Kietzig and Christos Stamboulides. UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
The Olympic torch will pass through UBC's Vancouver campus on Feb. 11. A Paralympic torch flame will be lit at UBC on March 11.
UBC members feel torch
relay magic
BY HILARY THOMSON
THE OLYMPIC FLAME HAS IGNITED interest
within the UBC community to serve
as torch-bearers, helping to carry the
Olympic Torch on its journey across
Canada. The torch will pass through
UBC's Vancouver campus on Feb. 11,
and reach B.C. Place Stadium on Feb.
12 when the Olympic Cauldron will
be lit, marking the official start of the
2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter
Games.
The route through UBC's campus
has not yet been disclosed, but the
UBC 2010 Olympic and Paralympic
Secretariat and UBC REC are
planning to mark the torch's passing
through campus with an outdoor
evening celebration near UBC
Bookstore.
A number of students, faculty,
staff and alumni are participating as
torch-bearer in many other locations.
Ten members ofthe Faculty of
Medicine will be part of a 20-runner
BC Medical Association relay team
Bates is actively involved in Street
Soccer Canada, which offers social
inclusion through sport for people
who struggle with homelessness and
other challenges, and he organized
the first Vancouver Street Soccer
tournament.
"The torch relay highlights a spirit
of community engagement, healthy
living and teamwork," says Gavin
Stuart, UBC Vice-Provost, Health
and Dean ofthe Faculty of Medicine.
Stuart is part of the Faculty of
Medicine relay team in Whistler.
"These same elements motivate us as
educators and clinicians so it seems
a great fit — and an honour — for us
to participate."
More than 1,000 communities and
12,000 torch bearers are involved in
the 45,0 00-kilo met re-trans-Canada
trek.  Begun on Oct. 30, 2009, the
relay will be the longest in history
to be contained within the Olympic
host country.
John Egan of the Office of Learning
Technology says he entered the
Faculty of Medicine Dean Gavin Stuart will help carry the flame in Whistler.
that runs at Olympic Park in Whistler
on Feb. 5. Each team member will
run 50 metres for a total of one
kilometre.
Clinical Associate Prof. Tyler
Dumont, of the Dept. of Physical
Therapy, will carry the torch for
a 300-metre segment in North
Vancouver on Feb. 10. Dr. Dumont's
participation recognizes the
department's equipment loan to the
Games.
UBC psychiatry resident Dr. Alan
Bates carried the torch on Dec. 14
in Cornwall, Ontario as part ofthe
Canadian Medical Association team.
torchbearer selection competition
more than 90 times. His persistence
paid off with an opportunity to run
between Whistler and Merritt on Feb.
6. When he got the congratulatory
e-mail, he was moved to tears.
"For me, the torch relay is one of
the most magical aspects of the
Olympics," says the 45-year-old. "It's
perhaps the most tangible way a
non-athlete can feel connected to
the Games."
Alumna Amanda Yuen, who runs
Feb. 10, graduated in May 2009 with
a Bachelor of Arts in Economics and
Music.
"I have watched the Olympics
since I was very young," says the
23-year-old. "I believe that the
Games represent the ideals of human
nature: inspiration, camaraderie and
achieving your best."
Yuen says she was "absolutely
ecstatic" when notified of her
selection. Currently working for
Certified General Accountants-
Canada, Yuen will also volunteer at
UBC Thunderbird Arena during the
Paralympic Games.
Marisa luvancigh of UBC's Alumni
Association will carry the torch on
Feb. 11.
"I was absolutely elated to find out
I was going to be carrying the torch,"
says the 28-year-old. "It's a once-in-
a-lifetime opportunity and will be a
very special memory to have."
luvancigh, who joined UBC in
2007, has completed seven half-
marathons, a triathlon and hopes to
run a full marathon, but feels that
carrying the torch for 300 metres
will mean more to her than any of her
long-distance accomplishments.
[Yuen and luvancigh run locations
were not known at press time]
A Paralympics Torch flame will
be lit at the Vancouver campus on
March 11 in an Aboriginal lighting
ceremony followed by a torch run.
The flame will then be relit at UBC's
Robson Square campus. Torch
bearers for the Paralympics Torch
relay have not yet been selected.
University Neighbourhoods
Association (UNA) is part of the
events planning team for both relays.
"We're really gearing up for this
and excited that an Olympic venue
is only two blocks away," says Jan
Fialkowski, UNA executive director.
"We want our kids to remember the
year the Olympics came to UBC."
A variety of community
celebrations are planned, including
open-air parties and welcoming
residents to a theatre-style screening
of televised events at the Old Barn
Community Centre. UNA has also
been giving away Games tickets as
prizes in competitions that involve
community members of all ages.
More information on UBC's
involvement in the 2010 Olympic
and Paralympic Torch Relays may be
found at www.ubc.ca/2010. ■
Magnificent
canoe will carry
torch
A magnificent 38-FT canoe carved by Calvin Hunt that was
displayed last year at the UBC Museum of Anthropology will
be part of the Olympic Torch Relay celebration in Port Hardy on
Tuesday, Feb. 2. Hunt's long-tail canoe will carry the Olympic
torch across Hardy Bay and be transported to the Civic Centre
for an evening of celebration.
Born in 1956, Hunt is the youngest son of Kwagu'l hereditary
chief Thomas Hunt, and grandson of renowned carver Mungo
Martin and grandmother, Abayah. Born into a wealth of
traditional knowledge, Hunt started carving at the age of 12. He
continues working with wood, as well as silkscreening, jewelry-
making, and stone carving. ■
www.mediagroup.ubc.ca
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COLOUR
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Creative Services
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Photography
• award-winning images captured in studio
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• featured in UBC Reports, Focus, and more
Medical Illustration
• combining technology, art skills and
detailed knowledge for a variety of
medical disciplines
Video & Media Production
• complete digital video and multimedia
production from concept to completion
Graphic Design
• specializing in design & layout for the
academic, educational & healthcare
communities
Situated on campus at:
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Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3
Email: mediagrp@interchange.ubc.ca
T: (604) 822-5561
F: (604) 822-2004
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-Media
iTOlip	 UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
Research by UBC Okanagan Human Kinetics professors Gareth Jones and Jennifer Jakobi explores how we become frail and what interventions, such as exercise, can be done to prevent frailty.
Fit or frail? UBC Okanagan researchers recommend
Olympic approach to aging well
BY BUD MORTENSON
FOR MANY OLDER ADULTS, aging with
chronic disease, disability and frailty
requires a daily Olympian effort just
to survive. Exercise training inspired
by Olympic regimens can allow
older adults to turn back the clock
on frailty, according to researchers
Gareth Jones and Jennifer Jakobi,
4£ %■  UBC Faculty of Medicine *-, p™..*-. «.«„
yt       ] Swvtc** Authority
> Through knowledge, creating health. K>_V«2^""»*""
Head, Department of Medical Genetics
The Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia and the Provincial
Health Services Authority (PHSA) invite applications and nominations for the
position of Head ofthe Department of Medical Genetics.
We seek an academic leader responsible for directing and developing the
teaching and research programs ofthe Department, as well as providing
leadership to the clinical Provincial Medical Genetics Program. The Department
has 46 full-time and 32 clinical faculty members and attracts strong research
support.
The successful candidate should hold a PhD and/or MD degree or equivalent
with a proven record of scholarly achievement involving biomedical, clinical and
translational research, with demonstrated excellence in teaching undergraduate,
graduate and post graduate education.
Anticipated start date will be July l, 2010 or upon a date to be mutually agreed.
Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. It is expected
that the successful candidate will qualify for and be offered a full time
appointment at the rank of Professor with Tenure.
For more information about the position and the department, please visit
www.medgen.ubc.ca.
Faculty of Medicine
ilication letters,
accompanied by detailed
curriculum vitae, a teaching
dossier, and names of four
references, should be directed
to:
Gavin Stuart, MD, FRCSC
Dean, Faculty of Medicine
c/o Darcie Prosser
Room 317, IRC, UBC
2194 Health Sciences Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3.
(email:
searches@medd.med.ubc
.ca with subject line: Head,
Medical Genetics)
Review of the applications will
begin on January 31, 2010
and will continue until the
position is filled.
www.med.ubc.ca
The University of British Columbia is Canada's
third largest university and consistently ranks
among the 35 best universities in the world.
Primarily situated in Vancouver, UBC is a
research-intensive university and has an
economic impact of $4 billion to the provincial
economy.
The Faculty of Medicine at UBC, together with its
partners including B.C.'s Health Authorities,
provides innovative programs in the areas of
health and life sciences through a province-wide
delivery model. The Faculty teaches students at
the undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate
levels and generates more than $240 million in
research funding each year throughout the
province.
Provincial Health Services Authority (PHSA) is
one of six health authorities in B.C. With 10,000
employees, a $l.6B budget and a strong academic
focus, PHSA's primary role is to ensure B.C.
residents have access to a coordinated network of
high-quality specialized health care services.
UBC
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity. All
qualified persons are encouraged to apply. UBC is strongly committed to diversity
within its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority
group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of
any sexual orientation or gender identity, and others who may contribute to the
further diversification of ideas. However, Canadian andpermanent residents of
Canada will be given priority.
www.ubc.ca & www.med.ubc.ca
assistant professors of Human
Kinetics at UBC Okanagan.
"In many ways, frailty is a natural
part of aging — it's where we end
up — but we all get there at different
rates, and we move through different
stages of it," says Jones. "At some
point people just can't cope with
the environment around them. Our
research looks at how older adults
progress towards becoming frail
and what interventions, specifically
exercise, might prevent people from
ending up there.
Older people who are active can
have a better quality of life, Jones
says. "Exercise is the best medicine
to reduce the impact of chronic
disease. If we don't take the exercise
medicine, we are more likely to
become dependent longer, and
become a greater burden to society."
Jakobi and Jones are currently
studying the physiological changes
that occur as people transition
through stages of frailty and how
healthcare providers recognize
it. They say it is possible to reduce
the impact of frailty and transform
frail seniors into active, healthy
and independent persons through
daily exercise training that improves
fitness.
The Olympic movement's motto
Citius, Altius, Fortius can provide
guidance for fitness for older adults:
• Citius (faster) — walk briskly,
pick up the pace, and increase the
intensity.
Currently, the majority of
Canadians over age 65 live with
chronic disease, almost half live
with disability and the majority are
inactive. More activity is important
— but Jones and Jakobi advise that,
at any age, for exercise to produce
fitness benefits it needs to be done
for a minimum of 30 minutes most
days of the week, at moderate to
vigorous intensity such as a brisk
walk. Start with 30 minutes and
progress to 60 minutes.
The keys to building fitness are the
frequency, intensity, and duration of
physical activity, says Jakobi.
• Altius (higher) — set higher
goals. "It is remarkable what can
be achieved," says Jones. "People
think what Olympians do is out
of reach, but really what they are
doing is what we need to be doing
in our society and in our lifestyles to
maintain our health and improve our
fitness.
"The only way to make a change is
to add structured time into our day
for exercise. We have to think about
it like daily hygiene. As important
as brushing your teeth morning and
night, or flossing, exercise has to be
structured into your day," he says.
"The Olympian prepares their body
for one event in time, but you need
to physically and mentally train your
body to support you for the rest of
your life."
The researchers cite the example
can't get your heart rate up if you
can't support your body weight."
Resistance training can produce
extreme gains in muscle strength
and can increase a person's ability to
perform aerobic exercise -- leading
to better balance, or the ability to do
more brisk walking, for example.
The researchers note that high-
intensity resistance exercise is
well tolerated by frail older adults,
and even novice older exercisers
will benefit from any progressive
resistance training.
Strength is important as we age:
a healthy 80-year-old woman, for
example, may have to use most or
all of her leg strength to rise from
a common armless chair. The same
movement would demand only a 50
per cent effort in a young, sedentary
female.
"Even a 10 or 20 per cent increase
"If older adults were to adopt
these Olympian values, aging
may become a positive
life experience..."
of Sister Madonna Budah, a 79-year-
old Roman Catholic nun and
triathlete from Spokane, Washington,
who has completed 39 Ironman races
and is expected to participate in the
Penticton Ironman Canada again
next summer at the age of 80.
• Fortius (stronger) — building
strength can ward off disability and
keep aging muscle moving the way
we want it to.
"For most older adults, it is a
gradual decline and they become frail
before they realize it," says Jakobi.
"You start to decline at about 30
years -- but it is not recognized until
cardiovascular and strength changes
become functionally noticeable."
To thwart the slow decline
in function, aerobic exercise is
important, says Jakobi, "but you
in strength would be enough to
postpone this 80-year-old woman
from dropping below the critical
threshold required for maintaining
functional independence," says Jones.
"If older adults were to adopt these
Olympian values, aging may become
a positive life experience rather
than one that is often associated
with decline," Jones says. "We'll see
more older adults doing things we
never believed they could achieve. It
is remarkable how well our bodies
adapt to exercise, no matter what
age we are.
"Exercise is the best medicine we
know," he says. "If we can get
our bodies moving and working
at intensities that engender
fitness we're going to reverse the
progression to frailty." UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
Design students light up Vancouver for Games
BY BRIAN  LIN
ANY DESIGNER WILL TELL YOU that
lighting makes or breaks a space.
This February, the UBC Spacemakers
will welcome Olympic visitors
with Northern Lights, a series of
architectural lanterns that will
brighten downtown Vancouver.
The three "landform lanterns,"
resembling curvy icebergs rising
from the ground, are constructed
of B.C. wood and recycled PVC,
illuminated by LED lights. Ranging
from six to 12 metres in length and
one to two metres tall, they will greet
an estimated 6,000 pedestrians per
hour on Granville Street between
Dunsmuir and Georgia, a special car-
free corridor during the Games.
More than 30 UBC architecture,
landscape architecture and urban
planning students in seven teams
competed amongst themselves in a
24-hour "charette," or collaborative
design workshop, for the winning
design, aimed at animating the street
with light and showcasing the quality
of UBC designers.
Brady Del Rosario, an architecture
Master's student and founding
director of Spacemakers, says what
began as casual conversation has
turned into one ofthe most valuable
learning experiences for him and
his peers. "From finding sponsors
for the $50,000 project, to applying
for city permits, to working with
contractors, the project has shown
us what it takes to build things in the
real world," says Del Rosario. "Not to
mention this is a once-in-a-lifetime
opportunity to show Vancouver,
Canada and the world what UBC
students have to offer."
Del Rosario approached the
Downtown Vancouver Business
Improvement Association, which
endorsed the team's bid to City Hall
for a public exhibition that creates
visual and spatial interest without
obstructing foot traffic to the Canada
Line Skytrain station and shops.
Special considerations were also
paid to choosing materials that are
recyclable and reusable.
The designers sourced Barrisol,
a water-resistant material made
of recycled PVC typically used
for interior ceiling finishes, as the
"lamp shade" to protect the lighting
mechanism. The structures are
weighted and secured using sand
bags.
"We want to show the world
that we can be part of the two-
week celebration without being a
detriment to the environment," says
Del Rosario.
The UBC Spacemakers will install
the lanterns in time for the Opening
Ceremony on Feb. 12. The structures
will be dissembled shortly after the
Closing Ceremony on Feb. 28. ■
% UBC Faculty of Medicine
> Through knowledge, creating health.
Director, School of Population and Public Health
The Faculty of Medicine at The University of British Columbia invites
applications and nominations for the position of Director, School of Population
& Public Health (SPPH). The appointment is for a five year term and is
expected to commence July l, 2010 or upon a date to be mutually agreed.
Located within the Faculty of Medicine, SPPH draws faculty and participation
from seven different Faculties and two Colleges at the University. The resulting
mix of professions and disciplines is seen as a means of connecting individuals
and small research units to enhance learning, and galvanize the relationship
between health research and health services. The School currently has 41 full-
time, 58 clinical and 57 adjunct faculty members.
We seek an academic leader with strong leadership, interpersonal, and
administrative skills who will be responsible for facilitating the integration of
multiple academic units focusing on excellence in scholarship across multiple
disciplines while promoting interdisciplinary and interprofessional education
and research. The successful candidate will report to the Dean of Medicine and
will be responsible for maintaining positive and constructive relationships on
behalf of the Dean, and lead the School in obtaining additional operating
funding, build consensus in the School and champion public and population
health in the University. The Director ofthe School will also be expected to play
a leadership role in relation to the Province's public health system, working with
the Government and the six Health Authorities in B.C. The ideal candidate
should have broad and proven administrative experience, substantial academic
and professional experience, and a proven record of scholarly activity with
demonstrated excellence in teaching. It is expected that the successful
candidate will qualify for and be offered a full-time appointment at the rank of
Professor with Tenure. Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and
experience.
Candidates must have an MD or PhD in a health-related discipline and also a
minimum of 10 years of professional/administrative experience working in a
complex health environment.
Application letters, accompanied by
detailed curriculum vitae, a teaching
dossier, and names of four
references, should be directed to:
Gavin Stuart, MD, FRCSC
Dean, Faculty of Medicine
c/o Darcie Prosser
Room 317, IRC, UBC
2194 Health Sciences Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3.
(email:
searches@medd.med. ubc.ca
with subject line: Director, SPPH)
Review ofthe applications will begin
on January 31, 2010 and will
continue until the position is filled.
UESC
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity. All
qualified persons are encouraged to apply.  UBC is strongly committed to diversity
within its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority
group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of
any sexual orientation or gender identity, and others who may contribute to the
further diversification of ideas. However, Canadian andpermanent residents of
Canada will be given priority.
www.ubc.ca & www.med.ubc.ca
Writing Centre
Academic Development
• preparation for university writing and the LPI
• grammar and writing with style
• writing for graduate students
Professional Development
• report and business writing
• freelance article writing
Personal and Creative Writing
• short fiction, novel and screenwriting
• journal writing and autobiography
Register now! Courses start in January.
The University of British Columbia is
Canada's third largest university and
consistently ranks among the 35 best
universities in the world. Primarily
situated in Vancouver, UBC is a research-
intensive university and has an economic
impact of $4 billion to the provincial
economy.
The Faculty of Medicine at UBC, together
with its partners including B.C.'s Health
Authorities, provides innovative programs
in the areas of health and life sciences
through a province-wide delivery model.
The Faculty teaches students at the
undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate
levels and generates more than $240
million in research funding each year,
throughout the province.
BOOK SALE-Jan 14 and 15
Ponderosa Annex C, 2021 West Mall
UBC students have designed a series of architectural lanterns called Northern Lights to welcome visitors to downtown Vancouver.
writingcentre.ubc.ca/ur
or 604-822-9564
yp] Continuing Studies
V  Writing Centre UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
take-off on Thunderbird
Boulevard is made from car
parts by Haida artist Michael
Nicoll Yahgulanaas and youth
from the Urban Native Youth
Association.
Made in partnership
with UBC's Museum of
Anthropology, it is one of
seven pieces of Aboriginal
artwork at UBC's Doug
Mitchell Thunderbird
Sports Centre, which will
host Olympic hockey and
Paralympic sledge hockey
during the 2010 Winter Games.
The permanent installations
are part of the Vancouver
2010 Venues' Aboriginal Art
Program, which features art
from more than 90 Aboriginal
artists. First Nations, Inuit
and Metis artists involved in
the program hail from every
province and territory in
Canada. ■
I'd like to speak
.Espanol
.Frangais
.Deutsch
...BMI
...plus more
&
UBC researchers help cyclists
avoid Olympic road closures
w*£r;
Non-credit conversational courses in 18
languages are held at the UBC Point Grey
and UBC Robson Square campuses.
Courses start January 18.
Register today!
i
languages, ubc.ca/ur
or 604-822-0800
IS] Continuing Studies
yy    Languages, Cultures & Travel
Neville's
located at Scarfe on Main Mall
HOURS:
7:45am - 4:00pm (M-F)
Sauder Exchange Cafe
located at Henry Angus on Main Mall
HOURS:
7:45am - 8:00pm (M-Th)
7:45am - 6:00pm (F)
10:00am - 5:00pm (Sat & Sun)
www.food.ubc.ca
Opening January,2010
Math Centre
Non-credit courses designed to help UBC
students meet the challenge of first-year
math. Classes are small and offer individual
attention to each student.
MATH 002: Precalculus
- starts January 4
MATH 004:
Differential Calculus Part 2
- starts January 12
Register today!
mathcentre.ubc.ca/ur
or 604-822-9564
ffi] Continuing Studies
t)   Math Centre
BY CHRISTIE  HURRELL
WORRIED THAT GETTING AROUND the city
could be the toughest event of the
2010 Winter Games? Thousands
of athletes and visitors, along with
road and parking restrictions, will all
contribute to increased congestion in
Metro Vancouver. A UBC research
team is encouraging people to use
their bikes to get around, and they've
designed a special web-based tool to
help cyclists plan hassle-free trips.
The route planner, located at www.
cyclevancouver.ubc.ca, was first
launched in spring 2008 and has
become popular with local cyclists
(and pedestrians, who find it useful
0    for planning walking routes).  Now.it
°    is being updated to reflect all known
u    Olympics-related road restrictions,
-    so that cyclists can find efficient
o
o    ways to get to their destination.  The
Olympics edition of the route planner
launches this month, and will be
available throughout the Olympic
and Paralympic Games.
"Besides being able to plan a
route that isn't affected by road
restrictions, users can also choose
routes that avoid hills, stick to
designated cycle paths, or connect
with public transit," says UBC
researcher Meghan Winters, who
helped develop the planner. The
web-based tool, which uses the
familiar Google Maps interface,
also shows the location of covered
bike storage facilities near Olympic
venues.
Funding for the Olympics version
of the route planner comes from the
City of Vancouver and TransLink.
Michael Brauer, professor at the UBC
School of Environmental Health and
leader of the route planner project,
says that choosing to cycle during
the Olympics contributes to both
personal and environmental health:
"Active transportation provides health
benefits for individuals, and also
cuts down on the amount of traffic-
related air pollution in our region." ■ UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
We asked UBC international
students to share their
unique perspectives on the
2010 Games
BY BASIL WAUGH
UBC is home to more than 7,000 international students
from 155 countries. Read more of their stories at:
grad.ubc.ca/international/meetstudents.asp
Aligarh, India
Arvind Saraswat, PhD candidate
College of Interdisciplinary Studies
Resource Management and
Environmental Studies
Researching urban air pollution, human
health and policy in India
"My advice to people coming to
Vancouver for Games? Make sure to
visit Stanley Park, Whistler and UBC,
especially Nitobe Garden and, my
favorite, Koerner's Pub. Bring lots of
warm clothes. Don't worry about the
food or people in Vancouver because
they are the best. I am really looking
forward to when the Olympic torch
comes to UBC."
Kaifeng, China
Wei Shi, PhD Candidate
Faculty of Applied Science
Electrical and Computer Engineering
Researching next generation
communication technologies
"My friends and I are getting tickets
for a Chinese women's hockey game
at UBC Thunderbird Arena. I also want
to be a guide for Chinese people. UBC
has a Chinese scholars' and students'
association, so I am checking with
them to see how I can best support my
country. I didn't get to experience the
Beijing Games first-hand because I was
in Vancouver."
Arcore, Italy
Costanza Casiraghi, PhD Candidate
Faculty of Graduate Studies
Microbiology and Immunology
Researching the involvement of
viruses in the development of multiple
sclerosis
"These will be my second Olympics
because I lived in Italy during
the Torino Games. I will always
remember the closing ceremonies,
when former Vancouver mayor Sam
Sullivan appeared on the stage in his
wheelchair to accept the Olympic
flame. We saw this as very progressive,
because leaders with disabilities are
unheard of in Italy."
Blaubeuren, Germany
Hannes Dempewolf, PhD candidate
Faculty of Science, Botany
Biodiversity Research Centre
Researching crop evolution and
agriculture biodiversity conservation
"My sister lives in the town where
Germany's national speed-skating
team trains, so I will definitely be
cheering for them. My fiancee - I met
her at UBC - is a huge hockey fan, so
we'll be watching that too. We are also
going to try to check out some of the
cultural events. I am really curious to
see what life will be like during the
Games."
Stoke-on-Trent, United Kingdom
Katie Morton, PhD Candidate
I   "         hL|
Faculty of Education
School of Human Kinetics
_\______\
Exercise and Sport Psychology Lab
Researching transformational
leadership and adolescent health
promotion
"Normally you just hear the good
*"_-                                             \^^^^m
things about the Olympics, but living in
a host city has kind of opened my eyes.
(W
You get exposed to some of the more
negative things, like homelessness and
the environmental impacts of some of
the big construction projects."
New York, United States
Sophia Woodman, PhD
Faculty of Arts, Sociology
Has researched social rights and social
welfare in China on a US Student
Fulbright Award
"I did fieldwork in China starting
just after the Beijing Games, so it
was interesting to hear people's
thoughts. I was in Tianjin, about 160
km southeast of Beijing. Banners and
slogans welcoming the Olympics were
still visible everywhere. Generally,
people were enthusiastic, proud of
hosting the Games and spoke of a
sense of ownership. Bear in mind
though, leading up to the Games
people elsewhere in the country who
were critical of the Olympics were
suppressed or imprisoned."
1
f*\
Tokyo, Japan
1
1 -~     .1
Yuki Shirato, MBA Candidate
'
«r>     *^ T
Sauder School of Business
\
Researching business strategy and
management
~
"1 follow figure skating, so 1 am really
^
i    ^W^
excited to see Mao Asada and Miki
Ando of Japan take on their big rivals
.-- /
L             %^
Joannie Rochette of Canada and Yu-
/
& _m,l
Na Kim of Korea. During the Games,
I
m wt 1
my plan is to volunteer, hopefully as a
1
III
Japanese-English translator." 10    I    UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
& UBC Faculty of Medicine
> Through knowledge, creating health.
The Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia invites applications and
nominations for the position of Head of the Department of Obstetrics and
Gynaecology. The successful applicant would have administrative academic
linkages with all six Health Authorities in British Columbia, with the expectation
of a principal leadership position in one Health Authority.
We seek an academic leader to be responsible for directing and developing the
teaching, research and service programs of the Department. The leader will be
responsible for supporting the highest standards of patient care, education and
research. The Department is extensively involved in undergraduate and
postgraduate education as well as continuing professional development. The
Department has 23 full-time and 95 clinical faculty members and attracts strong
research support. The Department has a presence across all facilities in
Vancouver and is developing an academic Provincial profile.
The successful candidate should have clinical experience and credibility,
significant administrative experience, a proven record of scholarly achievement,
a commitment to and demonstrated excellence in teaching and proven
communication skills.  Anticipated start date will be July l, 2010 or upon a date
to be mutually agreed.
Salary will be commensurate with qualifications and experience. It is expected
that the successful candidate will qualify for and be offered a full-time
appointment at the rank of Professor with Tenure.
For more information about the position and the department, please visit
www. ob stgy n. ca.
v.med.ubc.o
Application letters, accompanied by
detailed curriculum vitae, a teaching
dossier, and names of four
references, should be directed to:
Gavin Stuart, MD, FRCSC
Dean, Faculty of Medicine
c/o Darcie Prosser
Room 317, IRC, UBC
2194 Health Sciences Mall
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z3.
(email:
searches@medd.med.ubc.ca
with subject line: Head, Obst &
Gyn)
Review of the applications will begin
on January 31, 2010 and will
continue until the position is filled.
The University of British Columbia is
Canada's third largest university and
consistently ranks among the 35 best
universities in the world. Primarily
situated in Vancouver, UBC is a research-
intensive university and has an economic
impact of $4 billion to the provincial
economy.
The Faculty of Medicine at UBC, together
with its partners including B.C.'s Health
Authorities, provides innovative programs
in the areas of health and life sciences
through a province-wide delivery model.
The Faculty teaches students at the
undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate
levels and generates more than $240
million in research funding each year,
throughout the province.
UBC       THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
V      ./ UBC hires on the basis of merit and is committed to employment equity. All
qualified persons are encouraged to apply. UBC is strongly committed to diversity
within its community and especially welcomes applications from visible minority
group members, women, Aboriginal persons, persons with disabilities, persons of
any sexual orientation or gender identity, and others who may contribute to the
further diversification of ideas. However, Canadian andpermanent residents of
Canada will be given priority.
www.ubc.ca & www.med.ubc.ca
^ezmJwdjb
Qfb
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uA
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I
wescadia
The Dickens Luncheon Buffet-$45/person
at Cecil Green Park House on December 9. 11:00am & 1:30pm
Holiday Banquets
anywhere on campus including Sage Bistro, Botanical Garden,
Cecil Green Park House & Ponderosa Centre
Reservations and Holiday Banquets:   B04.e2S.20l B
^teteSyt
Book your holiday get together
at your neighbourhood White Spot on Main Mall
Call 604-822-3631 or speak to a supervisor on site
Swirls Christmas Bakeshop
November 17 - December 23
Take home a UBC Tradition this holiday season.
www.food.ubc.ca op 604.822.3649
The Rev. Father David Bauer's 1964 UBC-based Olympic hockey team.
How UBC has shaped Canada's
role in Olympics
BY GLENN  DREXHAGE
ubc's rich Olympic leqacy is on display
for those wanting a closer look at the
athletes and academics who have
helped shape Canada's role in the
global sporting event.
The Olympic Legacy Exhibit,
undertaken by UBC Library,
University Archives and UBC Public
Affairs, features an array of images
and documents that focus on UBC's
sporting history, with exhibits of
medalled athletes, athletes-turned-
scholars, UBC research, influential
alumni and sports teams, and
multicultural traditions.
Highlights include photos of
Quene Yip, described as "UBC's first
Chinese-Canadian Sport Star," and
Harry Warren, a Rhodes Scholar and
sprinter who in 1928 became the
first UBC athlete to compete in the
Olympics. (Warren also participated
in the Great Trek, an event held
in 1922 to spur completion ofthe
Point Grey campus, and went on to
become a UBC professor.)
Various influential teams are
featured, including UBC's "Cinderella
Rowers," a four-man crew that won
the gold at the 1956 Melbourne
Olympics, despite having trained
for a mere nine months. Also on
the roster is the UBC-based 1964
Olympic hockey team, established
by the late Rev. Father David Bauer
and UBC Sports Hall of Famer Bob
Hindmarch.
Behind-the-scenes figures
include veteran UBC and Olympic
swim coach Tom Johnson; Doug
Clement, a former Olympic athlete
and coach who became a sports
medicine pioneer; and Bob Osborne,
a founder and long-time director of
UBC's physical education faculty
who played and coached Olympic
basketball.
Among the featured scholars are
Andrei Krassioukov, an associate
professor in UBC's Department of
Medicine; Margot Young, associate
professor in the Faculty of Law; and
Bob Sparks and Rob VanWynsberghe,
both ofthe School of Human
Kinetics.
Meanwhile, the multicultural
aspect of theGames will be
illustrated by displays of Chinese-
Canadian soccer players (courtesy
of the Chung Collection, located at
UBC Library's Rare Books and Special
Collections) and Q'aysca:m, a stone-
carved female figure who played
an important role in Musqueam
sporting culture.
Material is provided by University
Archives, Rare Books and Special
Collections, Public Affairs,
Musqueam Indian Band, cIRcle
(UBC's digital repository), and
Athletics and Recreation.The exhibit
is located at the Learning Centre
Gallery, located on level two ofthe
Irving K. Barber Learning Centre,
adjacent to the circulation desk.
For more information, contact
Jessica Woolman at 604-827-4275
or Jessica.woolman@ubc.ca, or visit.
www.ikebarberlearningcentre.ubc.ca/
ps/Olympics2010_event.html. ■
?/////
ch 18,000 people,
for less, in a special February
GOLD EDITION
of UBC Reports.
www.publicaffairs.ubc.ca/ubc-reports/advertising
Ad Deadline: 14 January 2010
From the Chung Collection: Chinese-Canadian soccer players. ii    I    UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
Robert Sparks, director of the UBC School of Human Kinetics and Prof. Rob VanWynsberghe want to help understand the effects of sport and mega sporting events.
Games inspire new research centre for sport
BY SEAN SULLIVAN
THE INTERPLAY OF SPORT and
sustainability is being put under
the microscope at the University of
British Columbia, where a new, one-
of-a-kind research centre is analyzing
the opportunities and effects created
by sport and mega sporting events.
The UBC Centre for Sports and
Sustainability tackles questions
about the environmental impacts of
Olympic Games, society's perception
of Paralympic athletes and how to
give youth opportunities to learn
through sport, among other topics.
"There's a growing need to better
understand how sport transforms
people, communities and cultures to
deliver lasting economic, social and
health benefits," says UBC President
Stephen Toope.
"As a UBC legacy project from the
2010 Winter Olympic Games, the
centre will fill an important niche as
an international hub for knowledge
on this very specialized area of
research."
The centre already exists —
virtually. Through a joint project
between UBC and the Vancouver
Organizing Committee (VANOC),
the university is formalizing an
existing network of researchers
who are engaged in sport and
sustainability research and
instruction.
Researchers are considering
how a large-scale sport event or
infrastructure project can spur
innovation in urban design, and
what factors influence national pride,
social cohesion and the inclusion
in sport of groups such as new
immigrants, indigenous populations
and the economically disadvantaged.
"This is about more than sport
itself," says Robert Sparks, director
ofthe UBC School of Human
Kinetics. "This is sport as it
links to economic sustainability,
environmental sustainability and
social development in communities."
"How do you 'green' sports
facilities and how do you use sport
programs to foster community
development and healthy lifestyles?"
Part of the centre's mandate will
be to ensure this new knowledge is
made available to local, national and
international event organizers and
host cities so they might optimize
their planning and provide an
enduring legacy. Already underway is
the Paralympic Games Impact Survey,
which looks at how the Paralympic
Games impact the social perceptions
of persons with a disability. A post-
Paralympic Games survey will study
changes in these perceptions.
"The overall idea is to look at
how society might change its views
of people with disabilities upon
watching the quality performances
of Paralympic athletes," says Rob
VanWynsberghe, lecturer in Human
Kinetics and Educational Studies and
UBC lead for the project.
Paralympics, and from a research
perspective, consider the social
perceptions that follow." This is
baseline work for the Olympic
Games Impact study, which is also
being conducted at UBC and led
by VanWynsberghe. The massive
study was developed by the
International Olympic Committee
(IOC) to introduce a standardized
cross-Games method of monitoring,
measuring and reporting on the
economic, social and environmental
impact of hosting the Olympic
Games.
UBC and VANOC will also present
a three-part think-tank series to
analyze lessons learned from the
2010 Games, new precedents for
large scale sport event sustainability,
and the use of sustainability
indicators in planning future Olympic
bids.
"We want to capitalize on our
research with the Olympics and
Paralympics to become a knowledge
hub capable of helping groups down
"How do you use sport programs
to foster community development
and healthy lifestyles?"
Researchers are also looking
around the country to find
programs that teach others how
to coach athletes with a disability,
Vanwynsberghe says. "We suspect
that many Paralympic coaches
are experts in a sport for athletes
without disabilities. They'll draw
on these skills to teach Paralympic
athletes, but the cross-over isn't
easy; sledge hockey and hockey,
for example, are two very different
things," he says.
"We want to make sure there
are enough programs in place to
train coaches and athletes for the
the road who want to take on similar
projects," Sparks says.
Another project under the centre's
umbrella — the nascent Coaching
Sustainability Initiative —has a
local connection in Vancouver. By
creating community service learning
placements in the Downtown
Eastside, this UBC legacy project
supports leadership development
and physical activity among
secondary school students in
Vancouver.
For more information, visit
ubc.ca/2010 ■
UBC considers
Olympic impact
BY SEAN SULLIVAN
A groundbreaking study that shows the impact of the
Olympic and Paralympic Games on its host city has found the
2010 Games have had a marginal impact on Vancouver so far,
though researchers say the study's most important findings may
be yet to come.
The Olympic Games Impact (OGI) Pre-Games Report, the
second of four mandated by Olympic officials, sets the stage for
two more detailed reports that will create a standard by which all
future Games will be measured.
UBC Prof. Rob VanWynsberghe, from the School of Human
Kinetics and Department of Educational Studies in the UBC
Faculty of Education, is leading a multidisciplinary team of
sociologists, engineers, creative writers and kinesiologists in
exploring what impact the Games may have on its host city.
All Olympic organizing committees are required to undertake
the OGI Study, which was developed by the International Olympic
Committee (IOC) to introduce a standardized cross-Games
method of monitoring, measuring and reporting on the impact of
hosting the Olympic Games.
"The project allows the IOC to build a long-term understanding
of Games impacts, which will also help guide future bidders and
organizing committees to maximize the benefits of the Games,"
Vanwynsberghe says.
The Pre-Games report, released in December, found benefits
for economic growth and sport development so far, including
a higher medal count for Canada in the Winter Games and an
increase in the number of businesses in Vancouver and Whistler.
In controversial areas such as effects on housing and the
environment, the results were inconclusive, Vanwynsberghe says.
"What this means is that as a research group, we were not
confident in the data that we were gathering, so in order to be
more conservative, to play it safe, we did not roll these up into our
assessment of the overall impact," he says.
The OGI uses 126 IOC-mandated indicators to measure the
economic, social and environmental conditions of the host city,
region and country. The current study measures changes in the
Metro Vancouver area between 2002 and 2006, compared to
baseline data from 2001.
The next volume will be published in 2010 and the final report
in 2013. ■ J2    I    UBC    REPORTS    I    JANUARY    7,    2010
Surrounded by beauty, it is no wonder innovative thinkers and doers at UBC are taking on towering environmental challenges. In 1997, UBC was
the first university in Canada to make a commitment to sustainability. The community has extensively reduced campus emissions to below 1990
levels. And UBC professors and students came up with the concept of "our ecological footprint," launched the carbon offset company used by the
Vancouver 2010 Olympic Games, and are developing what may be the greenest building on Earth. It's part of our nature.
UBC       a place of mind

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