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UBC Reports Mar 4, 1981

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 March 4, 1981
Volume 27, Number 5
Open House:  Have a look at the future
Lasers, live animals and the latest in
logging management are among
features at this year's open house at
UBC.
Hosts this year are the applied
sciences — agriculture, engineering
and forestry. The three faculties will
show current research in their areas
which will give a peek at the future of
Grant Ainscough, a 1951 UBC
Forestry grad who now is vice-
president and chief forester of
MacMillan Bloedel Ltd., will give this
year's H.R. MacMillan Lecture in
Forestry. He speaks at 12:30 p.m.
March 12 in Room 166 of the
MacMillan Building on 'The Designed
Forest System of MacMillan Bloedel
Limited — an Example of Industrial
Forest Management in Coastal British
Columbia.' It's free.
Rockefeller,
UCBC select
Bill Gibson
William C. (Bill) Gibson, former
head of the department of the history
of medicine and science at UBC, has
been appointed to the Council of the
Rockefeller University in New York
(formerly the Rockefeller Institute for
Medical Research).
The university is a post-graduate
institution offering Doctor of
Philosophy degrees in bio-medical
sciences.
Dr. Gibson has also been reappointed to a second five-year term
as chairman of the Universities
Council of B.C.
each industry.
A number of exhibits will include
visitor participation, particularly in
computer simulations and games.
Open house will be held Friday,
March 6, from 10 a.m. to 10 p.m.
and Saturday, March 7, from 10 a.m.
to 8 p.m.
There'll be real fires and forest fires
simulated on a computer, wind
turbines and wind tunnels, talking
typewriters for the blind, ultrasonics,
pollution engineering, plasma jets and
satellite photography and imagery.
Professors and students will be on
hand to discuss solar heating and
other energy research, bio-medical
engineering, production of energy and
other useful products from garbage
and other pollutants, the Agricultural
Land Reserve and management of vast
tracts of forests.
Also featured will be the latest on
coal research.
Visitors will receive while they last
free gold-plated coins, mineral
specimens, tree seedlings and plants.
Two UBC grads named to Board
Two well-known B.C. businessmen
who graduated from UBC in the late
1940s have been appointed to the
Board of Governors by the provincial
government.
Kelowna businessman Richard
Stewart, a former alderman of that
Okanagan city and chairman of the
1980 Summer Games, will fill the
unexpired term to March 15, 1982, of
Stanley Weston, who died suddenly on
Jan. 6.
Vancouver businessman William L.
Sauder, president of Sauder Industries
Ltd. and Whonnock Industries, major
B.C. lumber firms, replaces George
Morfitt, who had served the maximum
term of six years allowable under the
Universities Act.
Sauder will serve a three-year term
on the Board as one of two nominees
of the UBC Alumni Association
appointed by the provincial
government, as provided for under the
Universities Act.
Stewart holds the UBC degrees of
Bachelor of Science in Agriculture and
Bachelor of Commerce, both awarded
in 1949. Sauder, a former president of
Research
UBC researchers were granted more
than $31 million last year, with the
natural and health sciences accounting
for some $21 million of the total.
The most heavily funded of the
natural sciences at UBC was chemistry
at $2.2 million. Among the health
sciences, medicine's total of $2.4
million was the largest.
Among sources of funds, federal
government sources provide more than
$18 million or nearly 60 per cent of
the total.
the Young President's Organization,
was awarded the degree of Bachelor of
Commerce in 1948.
The provincial government
appointments bring the Board up to
its full strength of 15.
$31 million
The provincial government
accounted for nearly $5.5 million,
slightly ahead of the $4.9 million from
Canadian companies and foundations.
The single largest source of
provincial research money came from
the B.C. Health Care Research
Foundation which distributes part of
the proceeds of B.C. Lotteries.
The total amount of research money
received last year by Simon Fraser
University was $4 million and by the
University of Victoria $3 million.
Libraries to be linked in new plan
A Library development plan that
will cost close to $50 million to
implement has been approved by the
UBC Board of Governors.
The proposal is outlined in some
detail on the centre pages of today's
edition of UBC Reports.
The proposal is the result of more
than six months of study and analysis
of various Library development
alternatives. The study was undertaken
and prepared by Facilities Planning in
consultation and cooperation with the
Librarian, several standing and special
committees, and design and landscape
consultants.
A model of the proposed design
scheme will be on display in the Main
Library until the end of March.
Under the plan, the Main Library
will be linked to the Sedgewick
Library, underground. This is stage
one of the development and will
provide 110,000 net square feet of new
space.
The proposal also calls for
demolition and rebuilding of the two
wings of the Library, with a new
entrance from East Mall. The original
Library will be retained and
renovated.
The proposal has been forwarded to
the Universities Council of B.C. for
approval.
Centre block of Library will stay. So will the pool. UBC Reports March 4, 1981
DCADUNCS
Faculty members wishing more
information about the following
research grants should consult the
Research Administration Grant
Deadlines circular which is available in
departmental and faculty offices. If
further information is required, call
228-3652 (external grants) or 228-5583
(internal grants).
April 1
• Hannah Institute Fellowships.
• Hannah Institute Grants-in-aid.
• Hannah Institute Scholarships.
• Medical Research Council of
Canada INSRM/MRC Exchange.
• Medical Research Council of
Canada Symposia and Workshops.
• Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada
Career Development Grants.
• Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada
Post-doctoral Fellowships.
• Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada
Research.
• Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada
Research Studentships.
• SSHRC: Negotiated Grants Division '
Major Editorial Grant.
• SSHRC: Negotiated Grants Division
Program Grant.
April 10
• Association of Commonwealth
Universities Administrative
Travelling Fellowships.
• UBC SSHRC Travel Grant.
April 15
• Canada Council Translation Grant.
• Donner Canadian Foundation
Research Grant.
• Medical Research Council of
Canada Travel Grant.
• Secretary of State Canadian Ethnic
Studies Program: Professorships.
• Secretary of State Canadian Ethnic
Studies: Research.
• UBC NSERC Equipment Grant.
April 16
• Ontario Economic Council Contract
Research in Manpower and
Education.
April 24
• Canada Mortgage and Housing
Corporation Research Grants Type
A (to $2,500).
Botanical guide
has the answers
Ever wondered what the common
name or the botanical name is for
those curious shrubs and odd-looking
trees that dot the UBC campus?
The answer to your question is
probably noted on a new self-guided
tour of campus trees and shrubs
prepared by the UBC Botanical
Garden. The tour map will enable you
to become familiar with approximately
170 different plants found on the UBC
campus.
Maps are available from the
Botanical Garden offices at 6501
Northwest Marine Drive.
Engineering used to solve medical problems is one of the features of UBC's Open House this Friday and Saturday. The
applied sciences — Agriculture, Engineering and Forestry — host Open House this year. Here the fluid dynamics of a
heart valve are tested by mechanical engineering professor V.J. Modi, left, and Ph.D. candidate Toshi Akutsu.
Senate approves new Law curriculum
UBC Senate has approved the
second and final stage of a
comprehensive curriculum review of
the Faculty of Law.
The stage two proposals approved at
Senate's February meeting represent a
"reordering, reshaping and updating
of the Law curriculum of the upper
years," Law dean Kenneth Lysyk told
UBC's academic parliament.
Senate last year approved extensive
revisions of the first-year Law
curriculum, which were implemented
in the 1980-81 academic year.
Senate was told that the upper-year
revisions assumed a generalist
approach to legal education and
recognized that the law is in a
constant process of change. The
proposals are also based on the
assumption that the faculty should
continue to offer "a well-rounded legal
education that recognizes that most
students will enter the practice of
law."
Dean Lysyk said the changes
involved introduction of new courses in
such areas as industrial and
intellectual property, the law of the
sea, Japanese law, competition policy
and a series of courses dealing with
specific topics of contemporary interest
which allow for experimentation in the
presentation of a subject.
In addition to deleting 20 courses
from the Law curriculum, the changes
involve a renumbering of all courses as
well as a restructuring of existing
course material and Calendar
descriptions to reflect more accurately
what is being taught.
Specific terms of reference and a set
of procedural rules have been
approved for the UBC Senate's
standing committee on appeals on
academic standing.
Law professor A.J. McClean,
speaking to the committee policies and
procedures proposals at the February
Senate meeting, said the generality of
the committee's terms of reference and
the lack of precise procedural rules
"have been a source of difficulty to the
committee, a source of annoyance and
frustration for both students and
faculty . . . involved in appeals, and
could cause problems for the
University if ... a decision of the
committee is the subject of an appeal
to the courts."
The committee proposals, Prof.
McClean said, were "in many respects
... a statement of current practices
and procedures of the committee."
In laying down some fairly precise
guidelines, they also try to build in
some flexibility so that they can be
relaxed in any given appeal to ensure
that an appeal is fairly conducted.
In speaking to proposed terms of
reference for the committee, Prof.
McClean said the committee hears
appeals because students feel they've
been unfairly treated in comparison
with other students, where there's been
a personality clash with an instructor,
or because fair consideration has not
been given to a paper or some
performance.
He emphasized that the committee
has taken the view that it was not
within their terms of reference to hear
an appeal where that matter "is simply
one of the bona fide exercise of
academic judgment on, say, an exam
paper."
A set of 10 procedures to be
followed prior to a hearing involve
three principals, Prof. McClean said: a
reasonable time frame for appeals; an
indication of the information the
committee would find useful; and a
built-in flexibility clause allowing the
UBC registrar to extend time
limitations set out in the regulations.
Only one regulation proposed by the
committee was challenged with an
amendment, which was lost.
Student senator Chris Niwinski
proposed that a regulation calling for
the dismissal of an appeal in the event
of a tie vote by the committee should
be amended so that the appeal would
be allowed.
CAMPUS
—PGDPKE—
Prof. William S. Griffith, director
of adult education in the Faculty of
Education, has been honored by the
Adult Education Association of the
United States. He was the recipient
recently of the association's Research
to Practice Award for his significant
leadership and research contributions
to adult education over a period of 20
years.
The honorary degree of Doctor of
Laws was conferred on Prof. A.D.
"Tony" Scott, a member of UBC's
economics department, by Guelph
University in Ontario during recent
fall Convocation ceremonies. Prof.
Scott also gave the Convocation
address at the ceremony.
Prof, of Dentistry Dr. S. Wah
Leung, former dean of the Faculty of
Dentistry, has been honored by the
Chinese Benevolent Association of
Vancouver. He received the
association's Outstanding Citizen
Award for leadership and organizing
ability.
Allan R. Crawford, a member of
UBC's Board of Governors, has been
appointed for a two-year term as a
member of the Natural Sciences and
Engineering Research Council, which
promotes and assists scientific research
in Canada. Mr. Crawford is the
founder and chairman of the board of
Anatek Electronics of North
Vancouver, and is a member of the
Canadian Association of Physicists and
the Association of Professional
Engineers in Ontario. ■•:«sSfi»*>is»ri,
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UBC Reports March 4, 1981
Living, Learning, Remembering
Income
seminars
planned
Two public seminars related to the
controversial idea of a guaranteed
annual income will be held at UBC on
March 12 and 13.
The overall policy implications of a
three-year experiment in Manitoba
with a guaranteed income will be
discussed by Prof. Derek Hum, a
University of Manitoba economist who
was a key figure in the federally
funded experiment.
Prof. Hum will speak on Thursday,
March 12, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 102
of the Buchanan Building on the
Manitoba experiment, which saw
several hundred low income people
receive income supplements from 1976
to 1978.
UBC economist Prof. Robert Ctark,
who has organized the seminars, said
the Manitoba scheme was "the most
sophisticated research experiment ever
tried in this controversial field in
North America. While the experiment
was virtually completed, the results
have not been published."
Among other things, he said, the
experiment was designed to test how
the guaranteed income affected an
individual's incentive to seek work.
The policy implications of a credit
income tax, an alternative to the
guaranteed income proposal, will be
discussed at a second seminar to be
given on Friday, March 13, at 3:30
p.m. in Room 102 of the Buchanan
Building by Prof, Jonathan Kesselman
of UBC's Department of Economics.
General discussion will follow the
presentation of both papers.
Students earned more, saved more in 1980
Robert England, Living, Learning,
Remembering, Vancouver, UBC
Centre for Continuing Education,
1980, 209pp., $10.
This book contains the memoirs of
Robert England, an outstanding
Canadian who has had many
connections with British Columbia
over the years and who now lives in
retirement in Victoria.
England has written many books
and articles in his lifetime, most of
them scholarly ones, on aspects of his
work and on enterprises with which he
has been connected. Best known
among these are The Colonization of
Western Canada, about immigration
into the prairie region and settlement
programs in the new communities
there (1937); and Discharged.
published during the Second World
War and laying groundwork for the
program of veteran rehabilitation with
which he had so much to do. But his
latest book is different. It is a highly
personal record of a long and
productive life, of motivating ideas,
projects undertaken, people known
and places visited.
This reviewer, having a particular
interest in the field of adult education,
is greatly impressed with the concern
for adult education and adult
development which runs as a thread or
theme through England's life.
Involvement in adult education in
terms of classes and programs is a
minor part of the story but is
represented here in various forms,
most notably for us at UBC in terms
of England having been the first
director of our Extension Department
(1936 37). He remained in that post
for only a year, but during that time
set the direction for much subsequent
Robert England
development.
But England's main contributions to
Canadian society have been elsewhere,
in the broader field of social policies
and services. They have had an
important impact on our national
development. As a young man, he and
his wife were pioneers in the "lighted
schoolhouse" movement in
Saskatchewan, turning their small
rural school into a cultural and social
centre for the whole community. For
most of the following decade he
worked with the CNR, being
concerned with the recruitment of
immigrants in Europe and the
UBC students earned more and
managed to save more in the summer
of 1980, but only 21.7 per cent of
male and 7.7 per cent of female
students earned at least $3,500, the
estimated minimum amount necessary
to Finance a university year.
Figures compiled by UBC's Student
Counselling and Resource Centre show
that median 1980 earnings for
employed undergraduate men were
$3,551, an increase of $282 over the
1979 median. This same group of
male students reported mean savings
of $2,275, an increase of $179 over
1979.
Women undergrads earned a
median amount of $2,469 in 1980, an
UDC
CalcndaR
increase of $266 over the 1979
median. Women undergrads reported
mean savings of $1,621, up $170 over
1979.
As in the past, students in Forestry
and Applied Science reported the
highest median earnings. Nearly 29
per cent of the students — 32.2 per
cent of the women and 24.6 per cent
of the men      said they had a part-
time job during the winter session.
program ot social development for
immigrant communities in Western
Canada.
Soon after his time at UBC, he was
drawn into the orbit of the federal
government, his three great
contributions there having to do with
the organization of the Canadian
Legion Educational Services, the
creation of the rehabilitation program
for veterans of the war (including
particular reference to the universities'
role in this work) and the organization
of the Citizenship Branch of the
government, leading to the Citizenship
Act of 1947.
One of the unique dimensions of
Robert England's life has been the
extent to which he has been an
"insider" in terms of the workings of
large corporations and the federal
government, and yet has made such
leading and continuing contributions
to the development of voluntary
services of many kinds, the Boy Scout
movement, local library activities, the
Canadian Council on Education for
Citizenship, the Canadian Association
for Adult Education ,-md many others.
As a nation, we have been slow in
Canada to get around to doing justice
to our social and cultural history.
Robert England's career has been
concerned with a number of
significant dimensions of that story
since the 1920s, His many writings,
including this latest, most personal
volume, constitute important
contributions to our knowledge of
Canada, its people and its history.
Living, Learning, Remembering,
like all England's writings, is a work of
scholarship and contains much useful
information. But it is more; it is a
statement, expressed in terms of how a
life was spent, of what is most to be
treasured and worked for in the
Canadian story.
Gordon Selman
Faculty of Education, UBC
Living, Learning, Remembering is
available from the Publications
Division of UBC's Centre for
Continuing Education, 5997 Iona
Drive, Vancouver, telephone 228-2181.
UBC Reports March 4, 1981
UBC Calendar Deadlines
For events in the weeks of March 22 and March
29, material must be submitted not later than
4 p.m. on March 12.
Send notices to information Services, 6328
Memorial Rd. (Old Administration Building).
For further information, call 228 3131.
The Vancouver Institute.
Saturday, March 7
The State of the
Welfare Slate. Prof,
Robert Leaper, C.B.E.,
Social Administration.
University of Fjccter.
Saturday, March 14
New Frontiers in
Biofeedback and
Behavioral Medicine,
Prof. Gary Schwaru,
Psychology, Vale
University.
Both lectures are in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre at 8:15 p.m.
SUNDAY, MARCH 8
B.C. Gardens.
Eighth in a series of CBC television programs
featuring the UBC Botanical Garden as an anchor point for a province wide look at hor
tkulture. Hosts: David Tarrant, Botanical
Garden educational co ordinator, and CBC per
sonality Bob Switzer. Today's program looks at
Nitobe Garden. CBC, Channel 3. 3:00 p.m.
Hillel House.
Speaker Lynn Gottlieb, storyteller in (he ancient
tradition of chanting, sign language and movement to relate siories inspired by biblical sources
and inner imagination. For more information,
call 228-4748. Temple Shalom, 4426 W. 10th
Ave. 7:30 p.m.
Guest Artist Josef Suit.
Music of Mozart, Brahms, Dvorak and
Beethoven. Josef Suk, violin, and Jane Coop,
piano. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8:00 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 9
Cancer Research Seminar.
Persistent Rubella Virus Infection in CNS.
Diane Van Alstyne, Neurology, UBC. Lecture
Theatre, B.C. Cancer Research Centre, 601 W.
10th Ave, 12:00 noon.
Planetary Economics Series.
Niagara for Sale. Room 308, Library Processing
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Lectures Committee Lecture.
Protecting Women or Preserving the Family?
The Campaign for Protective Labor Legislation
in France, 1874-1914. Dr   Mary Lynn
McDtJugall, Women's Studies Programme, SFU.
Room 204, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Political Science Lecture.
The Soviet Role in the Mideast Conflict. Prof.
Theodore Friedgut, Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. Room 102, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Exceptional Person's Week.
Keynote speaker: Jill Kinmont (12:30 to
1:30 p.m.) in the Ballroom, Student Union
Building. Wheelchair tour of UBC: (1:30 to
2:30 p.m.) leaves from the foyer of the Student
Union Building. For more information, call
228-4942.
Human Nutrition/Home Economics
Lecture.
Dietary Allowances and Dietary Guidelines. Dr.
Alfred E, Harper, University of Wisconsin. Lee
ture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. 1:30 p.m.
French Lecture.
Situation de la Langue Francaise au Quebec.
Prof. J.D. Gendron, directeur. Centre du
Bilinguisme de l'Universite Laval. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Eigenvalue Problems on Infinite Intervals. Dr.
Peter Markowich, Mathematics Research
Center, Madison, Wise. Room 203, Mathematics
Building. 3:45 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
A Crisis in the Theory of Stellar Evolution. Dr.
lcko Iben, Jr., Astronomy, University of Illinois.
Room 318, Hennings Building. 4:00 p.m.
Lectures Committee Seminar.
Toxico Dynamics and Toxico Kinetics. Dr.
Frederick Sperling, professor emeritus, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Howard University,
Washington, D.C. Auditorium, B.C. Research
Building. 5:00 p.m.
Home Economics Lecture.
National Nutrition Policies and Dietary
Guidelines for the Public. Dr. Alfred E. Harper,
Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin. Lecture
Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. 8:00 p.m.
Centre for Continuing Education
Lecture.
Otello. Prof. French Tickner, Music, UBC. Ad
mission is $5. Room 339, Music Building.
8:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, MARCH 10
Asian Research Noon-Hour Series.
Islam. Room 106, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
|    Continued on page 7
j	
Federal
funding
critical
If the federal government withdraws
its support of post-secondary education
in a precipitous way, some Canadian
universities will go under, President
Doug Kenny told the UBC Senate at
its February meeting.
"Some provinces don't put a nickel
into universities," Dr. Kenny said. "It
is all federal money."
Noting that the current 'Established
Programs Financing' (EPF) scheme
expires at the end of March next year,
he expressed concern that anticipated
changes will further erode the already
poor financial position of Canadian
universities.
President Kenny said few people in
Canada are aware of the enormous
increase in federal funding of
universities since the end of the Second
World War. Without that funding, he
said, Canada would not have a
network of excellent universities.
In the immediate postwar years, he
said, Ottawa paid the universities $150
for each war veteran enrolled. From
1951 to 1967, the federal government
paid a per-capita grant direct to the
universities, and then from 1967 to
1977 Ottawa paid 50 per cent of
operating costs,
"They wrote a blank cheque to the
provinces," Dr. Kenny said.
There was no ceiling, and it was a
straight dollar for dollar match-up.
"Regrettably, this system was
abandoned in 1977," he said.
The EPF system introduced in 1977
is not based on operating costs of
universities, and the federal
government imposes no restrictions on
the money it turns over to the
provinces. The provinces are not
obligated to match the federal
contribution.
In 1979 80, Dr. Kenny said, federal
transfer payments totalled $2.78
billion, and total grants to universities
that year totalled $3.15 billion,
making Ottawa the major giver.
President Kenny said the federal
government has never really received
credit for what it has done for
Canadian universities, and he agreed
that the EPF system may not be the
best way to go. He added, however,
that the future welfare of Canada is
dependent upon continued federal
involvement.
"Universities are important to this
nation as a whole," he told Senate.
Dr. Kenny said the federal
government was setting up a seven-
member parliamentary committee to
review the funding arrangements. This
group would have until June 26 to
report to the cabinet on the stand
Ottawa should take in negotiations
with the provinces.
Dr. Kenny urged senators to write to
the task force, to the minister of state,
the minister of finance, and to the
prime minister. "I urge you to make
your views known," he said.
Convocation senator Mary Bishop
said the support of university women's
clubs should be sought. She said there
were a thousand members of the
University Women's Club of
Vancouver, and they were graduates
of 45 universities.
UBC horticulturalists Elaine LeMarquand, left, and Margaret Coxon put the finishing touches on the UBC Botanical
Garden's display at the 1981 Home and Garden Show which continues until Sunday (March 8) at the Pacific National
Exhibition. Garden staff will provide free advice on plant propagation and invite you to bring samples of any plant
problems.
NGW'
AWARDS
Beta Mothers' Auxiliary Award
An award in the amount of $250 has
been made available by the Mothers'
Auxiliary of Beta Theta Pi Fraternity.
The award will be made to the
neophyte Beta who, in his first year in
the fraternity, has demonstrated to the
Selection Committee appropriate
standards of scholarship, university
activity, and service within the
fraternity.
British Columbia Society of
Orthodontists Charles C. Craig
Memorial Scholarship — A
scholarship in the amount of $300 has
been established by the B.C. Society of
Orthodontists in recognition of the
valuable contributions of Dr, Charles
C. Craig to UBC and to the field of
Orthodontics.
Ruth S. Bryson Soroptimist
Scholarship in Home Economics —
A scholarship in the amount of
approximately $400, the gift of the
Soroptimist Club of New Westminster,
will be made available to a student
entering first year in the School of
Home Economics.
Burnaby Public Library Picard
Memorial Bursary — A bursary in
the amount of $500 has been made
available by the Trustees of the
Burnaby Public Library, in memory of
Marcelle Lucienne Eleonore Picard.
The award will be made to a student
entering second year in the School of
Librarianship, in need of financial
assistance, and demonstrating a
particular interest in public
librarianship.
W.G. Mitchell Memorial Service
Scholarship — A scholarship in the
amount of $1,000 will be awarded
annually by Thorne Riddell, to a
graduate student entering the first
year of the MBA or M.Sc. program,
and who has expressed an interest in
pursuing a career in Chartered
Accountancy, An offer of summer
employment between the first and
second year of the program is included
if the student is interested.
George L. Pickard Scholarship in
Oceanography — This scholarship in
the amount of approximately $300 has
been endowed by Dr. Pickard's many
friends, colleagues and former
students, on the occasion of his
retirement in 1979. The award will be
made to a student who has completed
at least two years of graduate studies
and who has displayed outstanding
originality and promise of success in
studies involving two or more of the
multidisciplinary areas of
oceanography.
Jessie Richardson Scholarship -- An
annual scholarship in the amount of
approximately $200 has been made
available by her friends and colleagues
in honor of Jessie Richardson's
distinguished contribution to the
development of theatre in British
Columbia. The award will be made to
a student entering the final year in the
Department of Theatre who, in
addition to achieving a high standard
in Theatre Studies, has contributed
generously and effectively to the
department's program of stage
production.
Suncor Fellowship in Business
Administration — A fellowship
totalling $10,000 per annum has been
made available for a three-year period
commencing in the 1981/82 academic
year, by Suncor, Inc. The award will
be made on the recommendation of
the faculty to a student in a doctoral
program in the Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration.
Kimmy Y.C. Tong Memorial
Bursary — As a memorial to Kimmy
Y.C. Tong, who was a third-year
student in Music at the time of her
death in 1980, a bursary of
approximately $400 has been
established for an undergraduate
Music student majoring in General
Studies, normally with concentration
in piano.
UBC Association of Administrative
and Professional Staff Scholarship —
The Association of Administrative and
Professional Staff at UBC has
established a scholarship in the
amount of $500 for students beginning
or continuing full-time studies at this
university, Applicants will be
considered in the following order:
(1) children or spouses of AAPS
members (2) AAPS members who
have enrolled part-time in credit
courses at UBC in the past year and
are proceeding to a year of full-time
studies.
Don Wright Scholarship in Music
Education — This scholarship in the
amount of $500 has been established
by Mr. Don Wright with the aim of
strengthening instrumental music in
the schools. The scholarship will be
awarded to a full-time student in the
music education program who has
demonstrated a talent and
achievement in the field of practical
instrumental arranging and
orchestration, with particular
reference to music education.
Don Wright Scholarship in Vocal
and Choral Music       This scholarship
in the amount of $500 has been
established by Mr. Don Wright with
the aim of strengthening the teaching
of vocal and choral music in schools,
especially in Grades 5 to 9. The
scholarship will be awarded to a full-
time student in the music education
program who has demonstrated a
special aptitude for vocal and choral
music and the teaching of the same.
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UBC Reports March 4, 1981
Living, Learning, Remembering
Income
seminars
planned
Two public seminars related to the
controversial idea of a guaranteed
annual income will be held at UBC on
March 12 and 13.
The overall policy implications of a
three-year experiment in Manitoba
with a guaranteed income will be
discussed by Prof. Derek Hum, a
University of Manitoba economist who
was a key figure in the federally
funded experiment.
Prof. Hum will speak on Thursday,
March 12, at 3:30 p.m. in Room 102
of the Buchanan Building on the
Manitoba experiment, which saw
several hundred low income people
receive income supplements from 1976
to 1978.
UBC economist Prof. Robert Ctark,
who has organized the seminars, said
the Manitoba scheme was "the most
sophisticated research experiment ever
tried in this controversial field in
North America. While the experiment
was virtually completed, the results
have not been published."
Among other things, he said, the
experiment was designed to test how
the guaranteed income affected an
individual's incentive to seek work.
The policy implications of a credit
income tax, an alternative to the
guaranteed income proposal, will be
discussed at a second seminar to be
given on Friday, March 13, at 3:30
p.m. in Room 102 of the Buchanan
Building by Prof, Jonathan Kesselman
of UBC's Department of Economics.
General discussion will follow the
presentation of both papers.
Students earned more, saved more in 1980
Robert England, Living, Learning,
Remembering, Vancouver, UBC
Centre for Continuing Education,
1980, 209pp., $10.
This book contains the memoirs of
Robert England, an outstanding
Canadian who has had many
connections with British Columbia
over the years and who now lives in
retirement in Victoria.
England has written many books
and articles in his lifetime, most of
them scholarly ones, on aspects of his
work and on enterprises with which he
has been connected. Best known
among these are The Colonization of
Western Canada, about immigration
into the prairie region and settlement
programs in the new communities
there (1937); and Discharged.
published during the Second World
War and laying groundwork for the
program of veteran rehabilitation with
which he had so much to do. But his
latest book is different. It is a highly
personal record of a long and
productive life, of motivating ideas,
projects undertaken, people known
and places visited.
This reviewer, having a particular
interest in the field of adult education,
is greatly impressed with the concern
for adult education and adult
development which runs as a thread or
theme through England's life.
Involvement in adult education in
terms of classes and programs is a
minor part of the story but is
represented here in various forms,
most notably for us at UBC in terms
of England having been the first
director of our Elxtension Department
(1936 37). He remained in that post
for only a year, but during that time
set the direction for much subsequent
Robert England
development.
But England's main contributions to
Canadian society have been elsewhere,
in the broader field of social policies
and services. They have had an
important impact on our national
development. As a young man, he and
his wife were pioneers in the "lighted
schoolhouse" movement in
Saskatchewan, turning their small
rural school into a cultural and social
centre for the whole community. For
most of the following decade he
worked with the CNR, being
concerned with the recruitment of
immigrants in Europe and the
UBC students earned more and
managed to save more in the summer
of 1980, but only 21.7 per cent of
male and 7.7 per cent of female
students earned at least $3,500, the
estimated minimum amount necessary
to finance a university year.
Figures compiled by UBC's Student
Counselling and Resource Centre show
that median 1980 earnings for
employed undergraduate men were
$3,551, an increase of $282 over the
1979 median. This same group of
male students reported mean savings
of $2,275, an increase of $179 over
1979.
Women undergrads earned a
median amount of $2,469 in 1980, an
UDC
CalcndaR
increase of $266 over the 1979
median. Women undergrads reported
mean savings of $1,621, up $170 over
1979.
As in the past, students in Forestry
and Applied Science reported the
highest median earnings. Nearly 29
per cent of the students — 32.2 per
cent of the women and 24.6 per cent
of the men      said they had a part-
time job during the winter session.
program ot social development for
immigrant communities in Western
Canada.
Soon after his time at UBC, he was
drawn into the orbit of the federal
government, his three great
contributions there having to do with
the organization of the Canadian
Legion Educational Services, the
creation of the rehabilitation program
for veterans of the war (including
particular reference to the universities'
role in this work) and the organization
of the Citizenship Branch of the
government, leading to the Citizenship
Act of 1947.
One of the unique dimensions of
Robert England's life has been the
extent to which he has been an
"insider" in terms of the workings of
large corporations and the federal
government, and yet has made such
leading and continuing contributions
to the development of voluntary
services of many kinds, the Boy Scout
movement, local library activities, the
Canadian Council on Education for
Citizenship, the Canadian Association
for Adult Education ,-tnd many others.
As a nation, we have been slow in
Canada to get around to doing justice
to our social and cultural history.
Robert England's career has been
concerned with a number of
significant dimensions of that story
since the 1920s, His many writings,
including this latest, most personal
volume, constitute important
contributions to our knowledge of
Canada, its people and its history.
Living, Learning, Remembering,
like all England's writings, is a work of
scholarship and contains much useful
information. But it is more; it is a
statement, expressed in terms of how a
life was spent, of what is most to be
treasured and worked for in the
Canadian story.
Gordon Selman
Faculty of Education, UBC
Living, Learning, Remembering is
available from the Publications
Division of UBC's Centre for
Continuing Education, 5997 Iona
Drive, Vancouver, telephone 228-2181.
UBC Reports March 4, 1981
UBC Calendar Deadlines
For events in the weeks of March 22 and March
29, material must be submitted not later than
4 p.m. on March 12.
Send notices to information Services, 6328
Memorial Rd. (Old Administration Building).
For further information, call 228 3131.
The Vancouver Institute.
Saturday, March 7
The State of the
Welfare Slate. Prof,
Robert Leaper, C.B.E.,
Social Administration.
University of Exeter.
Saturday, March 14
New Frontiers in
Biofeedback and
Behavioral Medicine.
Prof. Gary Schwaru,
Psychology, Vale
University.
Both lectures are in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre at 8:15 p.m.
SUNDAY, MARCH 8
B.C. Gardens.
Eighth in a series of CBC television programs
featuring the UBC Botanical Garden as an anchor point for a province wide look at hor
tkulture. Hosts: David Tarrant, Botanical
Garden educational co ordinator, and CBC per
sonality Bob Switzer. Today's program looks at
Nitobe Garden. CBC, Channel 3. 3:00 p.m.
Hillel House.
Speaker Lynn Gottlieb, storyteller in the ancient
tradition of chanting, sign language and movement to relate siories inspired by biblical sources
and inner imagination. For more information,
call 228-4748. Temple Shalom, 4426 W. 10th
Ave. 7:30 p.m.
Guest Artist Josef Suit.
Music of Mozart, Brahms, Dvorak and
Beethoven. Josef Suk, violin, and Jane Coop,
piano. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8:00 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 9
Cancer Research Seminar.
Persistent Rubella Virus Infection in CNS.
Diane Van Alstyne, Neurology, UBC. Lecture
Theatre, B.C. Cancer Research Centre, 601 W.
10th Ave, 12:00 noon.
Planetary Economics Series.
Niagara for Sale. Room 308, Library Processing
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Lectures Committee Lecture.
Protecting Women or Preserving the Family?
The Campaign for Protective Labor Legislation
in France, 1874-1914. Dr   Mary Lynn
McDrjugall, Women's Studies Programme, SFU.
Room 204, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Political Science Lecture.
The Soviet Role in the Mideast Conflict. Prof.
Theodore Friedgut, Hebrew University of
Jerusalem. Room 102, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Exceptional Person's Week.
Keynote speaker: Jill Kinmont (12:30 to
1:30 p.m.) in the Ballroom, Student Union
Building. Wheelchair tour of UBC: (1:30 to
2:30 p.m.) leaves from the foyer of the Student
Union Building. For more information, call
228-4942.
Human Nutrition/Home Economics
Lecture.
Dietary Allowances and Dietary Guidelines. Dr.
Alfred E, Harper, University of Wisconsin. Lee
ture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. 1:30 p.m.
French Lecture.
Situation de la Langue Francaise au Quebec.
Prof. J.D. Gendron, directeur. Centre du
Bilinguisme de l'Universite Laval. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Eigenvalue Problems on Infinite Intervals. Dr.
Peter Markowich, Mathematics Research
Center, Madison, Wise. Room 203, Mathematics
Building. 3:45 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
A Crisis in the Theory of Stellar Evolution. Dr.
lcko Iben, Jr., Astronomy, University of Illinois.
Room 318, Hennings Building. 4:00 p.m.
Lectures Committee Seminar.
Toxico Dynamics and Toxico Kinetics. Dr.
Frederick Sperling, professor emeritus, Pharmacology and Toxicology, Howard University,
Washington, D.C. Auditorium, B.C. Research
Building. 5:00 p.m.
Home Economics Lecture.
National Nutrition Policies and Dietary
Guidelines for the Public. Dr. Alfred E. Harper,
Biochemistry, University of Wisconsin. Lecture
Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. 8:00 p.m.
Centre for Continuing Education
Lecture.
Otello. Prof. French Tickner, Music, UBC. Ad
mission is $5. Room 339, Music Building.
8:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, MARCH 10
Asian Research Noon-Hour Series.
Islam. Room 106, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
|    Continued on page 7
j	
Federal
funding
critical
If the federal government withdraws
its support of post-secondary education
in a precipitous way, some Canadian
universities will go under, President
Doug Kenny told the UBC Senate at
its February meeting.
"Some provinces don't put a nickel
into universities," Dr. Kenny said. "It
is all federal money."
Noting that the current 'Established
Programs Financing' (EPF) scheme
expires at the end of March next year,
he expressed concern that anticipated
changes will further erode the already
poor financial position of Canadian
universities.
President Kenny said few people in
Canada are aware of the enormous
increase in federal funding of
universities since the end of the Second
World War. Without that funding, he
said, Canada would not have a
network of excellent universities.
In the immediate postwar years, he
said, Ottawa paid the universities $150
for each war veteran enrolled. From
1951 to 1967, the federal government
paid a per-capita grant direct to the
universities, and then from 1967 to
1977 Ottawa paid 50 per cent of
operating costs,
"They wrote a blank cheque to the
provinces," Dr. Kenny said.
There was no ceiling, and it was a
straight dollar for dollar match-up.
"Regrettably, this system was
abandoned in 1977," he said.
The EPF system introduced in 1977
is not based on operating costs of
universities, and the federal
government imposes no restrictions on
the money it turns over to the
provinces. The provinces are not
obligated to match the federal
contribution.
In 1979 80, Dr. Kenny said, federal
transfer payments totalled $2.78
billion, and total grants to universities
that year totalled $3.15 billion,
making Ottawa the major giver.
President Kenny said the federal
government has never really received
credit for what it has done for
Canadian universities, and he agreed
that the EPF system may not be the
best way to go. He added, however,
that the future welfare of Canada is
dependent upon continued federal
involvement.
"Universities are important to this
nation as a whole," he told Senate.
Dr. Kenny said the federal
government was setting up a seven-
member parliamentary committee to
review the funding arrangements. This
group would have until June 26 to
report to the cabinet on the stand
Ottawa should take in negotiations
with the provinces.
Dr. Kenny urged senators to write to
the task force, to the minister of state,
the minister of finance, and to the
prime minister. "I urge you to make
your views known," he said.
Convocation senator Mary Bishop
said the support of university women's
clubs should be sought. She said there
were a thousand members of the
University Women's Club of
Vancouver, and they were graduates
of 45 universities.
UBC horticulturalists Elaine LeMarquand, left, and Margaret Coxon put the finishing touches on the UBC Botanical
Garden's display at the 1981 Home and Garden Show which continues until Sunday (March 8) at the Pacific National
Exhibition. Garden staff will provide free advice on plant propagation and invite you to bring samples of any plant
problems.
NGW'
AWARDS
Beta Mothers' Auxiliary Award
An award in the amount of $250 has
been made available by the Mothers'
Auxiliary of Beta Theta Pi Fraternity.
The award will be made to the
neophyte Beta who, in his first year in
the fraternity, has demonstrated to the
Selection Committee appropriate
standards of scholarship, university
activity, and service within the
fraternity.
British Columbia Society of
Orthodontists Charles C. Craig
Memorial Scholarship — A
scholarship in the amount of $300 has
been established by the B.C. Society of
Orthodontists in recognition of the
valuable contributions of Dr, Charles
C. Craig to UBC and to the field of
Orthodontics.
Ruth S. Bryson Soroptimist
Scholarship in Home Economics —
A scholarship in the amount of
approximately $400, the gift of the
Soroptimist Club of New Westminster,
will be made available to a student
entering first year in the School of
Home Economics.
Burnaby Public Library Picard
Memorial Bursary — A bursary in
the amount of $500 has been made
available by the Trustees of the
Burnaby Public Library, in memory of
Marcelle Lucienne Eleonore Picard.
The award will be made to a student
entering second year in the School of
Librarianship, in need of financial
assistance, and demonstrating a
particular interest in public
librarianship.
W.G. Mitchell Memorial Service
Scholarship — A scholarship in the
amount of $1,000 will be awarded
annually by Thorne Riddell, to a
graduate student entering the first
year of the MBA or M.Sc. program,
and who has expressed an interest in
pursuing a career in Chartered
Accountancy. An offer of summer
employment between the first and
second year of the program is included
if the student is interested.
George L. Pickard Scholarship in
Oceanography — This scholarship in
the amount of approximately $300 has
been endowed by Dr. Pickard's many
friends, colleagues and former
students, on the occasion of his
retirement in 1979. The award will be
made to a student who has completed
at least two years of graduate studies
and who has displayed outstanding
originality and promise of success in
studies involving two or more of the
multidisciplinary areas of
oceanography.
Jessie Richardson Scholarship -- An
annual scholarship in the amount of
approximately $200 has been made
available by her friends and colleagues
in honor of Jessie Richardson's
distinguished contribution to the
development of theatre in British
Columbia. The award will be made to
a student entering the final year in the
Department of Theatre who, in
addition to achieving a high standard
in Theatre Studies, has contributed
generously and effectively to the
department's program of stage
production.
Suncor Fellowship in Business
Administration — A fellowship
totalling $10,000 per annum has been
made available for a three-year period
commencing in the 1981/82 academic
year, by Suncor, Inc. The award will
be made on the recommendation of
the faculty to a student in a doctoral
program in the Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration.
Kimmy Y.C. Tong Memorial
Bursary — As a memorial to Kimmy
Y.C. Tong, who was a third-year
student in Music at the time of her
death in 1980, a bursary of
approximately $400 has been
established for an undergraduate
Music student majoring in General
Studies, normally with concentration
in piano.
UBC Association of Administrative
and Professional Staff Scholarship —
The Association of Administrative and
Professional Staff at UBC has
established a scholarship in the
amount of $500 for students beginning
or continuing full-time studies at this
university, Applicants will be
considered in the following order:
(1) children or spouses of AAPS
members (2) AAPS members who
have enrolled part-time in credit
courses at UBC in the past year and
are proceeding to a year of full-time
studies.
Don Wright Scholarship in Music
Education — This scholarship in the
amount of $500 has been established
by Mr. Don Wright with the aim of
strengthening instrumental music in
the schools. The scholarship will be
awarded to a full-time student in the
music education program who has
demonstrated a talent and
achievement in the field of practical
instrumental arranging and
orchestration, with particular
reference to music education.
Don Wright Scholarship in Vocal
and Choral Music       This scholarship
in the amount of $500 has been
established by Mr. Don Wright with
the aim of strengthening the teaching
of vocal and choral music in schools,
especially in Grades 5 to 9. The
scholarship will be awarded to a full-
time student in the music education
program who has demonstrated a
special aptitude for vocal and choral
music and the teaching of the same.
kin KtfjiiHt jieiuSr « UBC Reports March 4, 1981
UDC
CalcndaR
Continued from page 6
Tuesday, March 10 continued
Weekly Weather Briefing.
Weekly lunch hour weather map discussions are
held every Tuesday. All interested students,
faculty and staff are invited to attend. Room
215, Geography Building. 12:30 p.m.
Exceptional Person's Week.
The following lectures will be taking place from
12:30 to 1:30 p.m.: Linda Jentsch on Music and
the Visually Impaired. Room 1317, Scarfe
Building; Barbara Dalrymple on Designing a
Barrier Free Environment. Room 107, Lasserre
Building; Glenn Williams on An Exceptional
Student in Your Class? Room 219, Buchanan
Building. The following lectures will be taking
place from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.: Social Planning
and Review Council of B.C. on Services for the
Exceptional in B.C. Room 210, Scarfe Building;
Betty lfe on Experiencing Hearing Impairment.
Room 204, Scarfe Building; Dr. Peggy Koop
man on The Learning Disabled University Stu
dent. Room 201, Scarfe Building.
Undergraduate Physics Lecture.
Research on Controlled Fusion Using Magnetic
Confinement — The Varennes Tokamak Pro
ject. Dr. H.W.H. Van Andel. University of
Montreal. Room 201, Hennings Building.
12:30 p.m.
Linguistics Colloquium.
Features of the Larynx: Evidence from Dakota.
Patricia Shaw, Linguistics, UBC. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
The Doctor and the Others Series.
Clinical Medicine in the Pre-Scientific Age. Dr.
John Norris. First in a series of nine illustrated
lectures on the history of medicine. Lecture Hall
B, Vancouver General Hospital. 12:30 p.m.
Religious Studies Lecture.
From Paul to Batman: Paul's Struggle with the
Superapostles and Its Bearing on Modern Entertainment. Dr. Robert Jewett, New Testament
Interpretation, Garrett-Evangelical Theological
Seminary. Room 100, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Hillel House Lecture.
Louise Mandel, lawyer for B.C. Union of Indian
Chiefs. Hillel House. 12:30 p.m.
Slavonic Studies Seminar.
Plays from the Underground — Czech Theatre
Today. Dr. Marketa Goetz-Stankiewicz, head,
Germanic Studies, UBC. Room 2202, Buchanan
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Large Internal Solitons Observed in Davis Strait.
Dr. DO. Hodgins, Seaconsult Marine Research
Ltd., Vancouver, B.C. Room 1465, Biological
Sciences Building. 5:50 p.m.
Chemistry Research Conference Series.
We've Put our Hopes on Fischer-Tropsch: The
Hydrogenation of Carbon Monoxide. Dr. K.G.
Caulton, Chemistry, Indiana University. Room
250, Chemistry Building. 4:30 p.m.
Zoology Seminar.
Heat and Cold: Strategies for Survival. Dr. K.
Schmidt-Nielsen, Zoology, Duke University.
Room 2000, Biological Sciences Building.
4:30 p.m.
Lectures Committee Seminar.
Toxicology: Applications to Occupational Exposures. Dr. Frederick Sperling, professor
emeritus. Pharmacology and Toxicology,
Howard University, Washington, D.C.
Auditorium, B.C. Research Building. 5:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11
Human Nutrition/Home Economics
Lecture.
Diet, Blood and Brain Amino Acids and
Feeding Behavior. Dr. Alfred E. Harper,
University of Wisconsin. Lecture Hall 1, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
10:30 a.m.
Science and the Citizen.
Discovering the Limits of Science and
Technology. Dr. Edwin Levy, Philosophy, UBC.
Robson Square Media Centre. 12:00 noon.
Exceptional Person's Week.
The following lectures will be taking place from
12:30 to 1:30 p.m.: People First on Rights of
the Mentally Handicapped. Room 204,
Buchanan Building; Peggy Sax on The Parent
Professional Partnership. Room 204, Scarfe
Building; Lois Meyerhoff on The Law and the
Exceptional. Room 225, Buchanan Building.
Classics/French Lecture.
Tertullien et La Culture Antique. Prof. Jean-
Claude Fredouille, Latin, University of Lyon.
Penthouse, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Simulation and Modelling in
Science.
Identification of Parameters in Models of
Population Dynamics. Dr. Carl Walters, Animal
Resource Ecology, UBC. Ralph York Conference
Centre, Hut B-8. 12:30 p.m.
Ascent of Man Series.
World Within World. Room 308, Library Pro
cessing Building. 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday Noon-Hour Concert.
Chinese Music for Winds and Strings. Ming
Yueh Liang and Chu i Tao. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Hispanic and Italian Studies Film.
Vivaldi's Venice. Room  102.  Buchanan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
The Doctor and the Others Series.
The Wedding of Clinical and Scientific
Medicine. Dr. John Norris. Lecture Hall B,
Vancouver General Hospital. 12:30 p.m.
Health Sciences Students Committee
Lecture.
Coping with Stress. Ada Butler, Nursing, UBC.
Lecture Hall 3, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Management Science Seminar.
Generalized Convexity of Special Functions.
Prof. Siegfried Schaible. Business Administra
tion and Commerce, University of Alberta.
Room 312, Angus Building. 3:30 p.m.
Statistics Workshop.
Some Methodologie Aspects of Large-Scale
Double-Blind Trials. Prof. T.W. Anderson,
head, Health Care and Epidemiology, UBC.
Room 239, Geography Building. 3:30 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology Seminar.
Lake Tahoe — 20 Years of Change in a
Nitrogen-Deficient Oligotrophic Lake. Dr.
Charles R. Goldman, Environmental Studies.
University of California, Davis. Room 32, Hut
B-2. 4:00 p.m.
Librarianship Lecture.
An Holistic View of Librarianship. Prof. Rose
Vainstein, Library Science, University of
Michigan. Admission is free. Room 1, Robson
Square Media Centre. 8:00 p.m.
Cinemawest.
Easy Rider. Admission is JI with AMS card.
Auditorium, Student Union Building. 8:00 p.m.
French Lecture.
La Planification Linguistique au Quebec. Prof.
J.D. Gendron, directeur, Centre du Bilinguisme
de l'Universite Laval. Room 106, Buchanan
Building. 8:30 p.m.
UBC Public Affairs.
Understanding the Polish Experiment. Dr. An-
toni Kaminski, Sociology, University of Warsaw,
and Prof. Bogdan Czaykowski, Slavonic Studies,
UBC, with host Gerald Savory. Cable 10, Vancouver Cablevision. (Program will be repeated
on March 11 at 3:00 p.m.) 9:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 12
Medical Grand Rounds.
Review and Update of Thyroid Hormone
Physiology and Tests. Dr. S.C. Thorson,
Medicine, VGH. Lecture Hall B, Vancouver
General Hospital. 9:00 a.m.
Human Nutrition/Home Economics
Lecture.
Metabolism of Branched-Chain Amino Acids in
Muscle: Experimental Observations and Clinical
Implications. Dr. Alfred E. Harper, University
of Wisconsin. Room G-55, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. 10:30 a.m.
Fine Arts Faculty Lecture.
Pre-European Contact Masks of the Northwest
Coast. Prof. Alan Sawyer. Room 104, Lasserre
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Faculty Recital.
Music of Schumann and Schubert. Lee Kum-
Sing, piano. Recital Hall, Music Building.
12:30 p.m.
H.R. MacMillan Lecture.
The Designed Forest System of MacMillan
Bloedel Limited  -   an Example of Industrial
Forest Management in Coastal British Columbia. Grant Ainscough, vice-president, MacMillan Bloedel. Admission is free. Room 166,
MacMillan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Cinemawest.
Easy Rider. Admission is $1 with AMS card.
Auditorium, Student Union Building.
12:30 p.m.
The Doctor and the Others Series.
Clinical Medicine in the last part of the Twentieth Century: The Prospect Before Us. Dr. John
Norris. Lecture Hall B, Vancouver General
Hospital. 12:30 p.m.
Lectures Committee Lecture.
Visual Rhetoric in Julius Caesar and Hamlet.
Prof. David Bevington, English, University of
Chicago. Room 202, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m. '
Religious Studies Lecture.
From Samson to the Hulk: Delimiting the
Superheroes in Ancient and Modern Culture.
Dr. Robert Jewett. New Testament Interpretation. Garrett-Evangelical Theological Seminary.
Room 100, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Exceptional Person's Week.
The following events will be taking place from
12:30 to 1:30 p.m.: Wheelchair Basketball
Game in War Memorial Gymnasium; Dr. G.
Szasz on Sexuality and the Exceptional. Room
201, Scarfe Building.   The following events are
taking place from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m.: Rick
Hansen and Stan Stronge on Wheelchair Sports.
War Memorial Gymnasium; Visually Impaired
Student Association on The Visually Impaired
on Campus        How Can You Help--;   Tim Lewis
on Rights of the Exceptional. Room 219,
Buchanan Building.
Fine Arts Lecture.
Making a Picture of Haussmann's Paris. Dr.
Timothy J. Clarke, Fine Arts, Harvard University. Room 102, Lasserre Building.  12:30 p.m.
Faculty Association General Meeting.
Room 100, Mathematics Building.  1:00 p.m.
Physics Condensed Matter Seminar.
Fluctuation Induced First Order Phase
Transitions. David Mukamel, I.B.M. Yorktown
Heights. Room 318, Hennings Building.
2:30 p.m.
Management Science Seminar.
Prof. R. Grinold, University of California.
Berkeley, and Cermade, University de Paris,
Dauphine. Room 312, Angus Building.
3:30 p.m.
Physics Colloquium.
Some Medical Aspects of the Applied Science
Program at TRIUMF. Dr. B.D. Pate, associate
director, TRIUMF. Room 201, Hennings
Building. 4:00 p.m.
Distinguished Medical Research
Lecture.
Calcium and the Kidney. Dr. Roger Sutton,
Medicine, UBC. Lecture Hall B, Vancouver
General Hospital. 4:00 p.m.
Planning Lecture.
Mayor Michael Harcourt speaks on Government
Turned Private Developer. Room 110, Angus
Building. 7:00 p.m.
Subfilms.
The Shining. Continues until Sunday, March
15. Admission is $1 with AMS card.
Auditorium, Student Union Building. Showings
are at 7:00 and 9:45 p.m.
CUSO Jamaica Night.
Speaker Noga Gayle and film: Rastaman — on
the Rastafarian Movement in Jamaica.
Admission is $1. You can pre-register by calling
228-4886. Upper Lounge, International House. .
7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, MARCH 13
Pediatric Grand Rounds.
I gE Regulation and the Clinical Significance of
I gE-Testing in Children. Dr. Bengt Bjorksten,
director. Explorative Biology, Pharmacia
Allergy, Uppsala, Sweden. Lecture Hall B,
Heather Pavilion, Vancouver General Hospital.
9:00 a.m.
Religious Studies Presentation.
Desa Bakan, Indonesia: the Mixture of Islam
with Magic. Illustrated with slides and a film.
Religious Studies 100 students presentation.
Marcia Whitaker, Tazmin Damji and Farouk
Mitha. Room 102, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Exceptional Person's Week.
Attitudes Toward the Exceptional. Donna
Pistell. Party Room, Student Union Building.
12:30 p.m.
Women's Studies/Slavonic Studies
Lecture.
The Rise of Feminism in the USSR. Tatiana
Mamonova. Co-sponsored by the AMS Women's
Committee. Women's Studies department and
the Slavonic Studies department. Room 202.
Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Hereditary Liver Disease in Childhood. Dr. J.
Dimmick. Fourth Floor Conference Room,
Health Centre for Children. 1:00 p.m.
Developmental Medicine Seminar.
Transition: Water to Air Breathing. Dr. David
Randall, Zoology, UBC. First Floor Seminar
Room. Willow Pavilion, Vancouver General
Hospital. 1:00 p.m.
Management Science Seminar.
Prof. R. Grinold, University of California,
Berkeley and Cermade, University de Paris,
Dauphine. Room 412, Angus Building.
3:30 p.m.
Linguistics Colloquium.
Classifier Categories in Thai: or What Have Oxcarts, Candles, Umbrellas and Souls to Do With
Each Other? Jim Placzek, Linguistics, UBC.
Room 2225, Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
Chemical Engineering Seminar.
A Digital Analog Simulation of a PWR Secondary Coolant System. S. Howell. Room 206.
Chemical Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
International House.
Folk Night. Contemporary and traditional
music. Gate 4, International House. 7:00 p.m.
UBC Chamber Singers.
Cortland Hultberg, director. Recital Hall. Music
Building. 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, MARCH 14
German Contribution to B.C.
Culture Seminar.
Sponsored by the Canadian Association of
Universitv  Teachers of German and the Centre
lor Continuing F.ducation.   The seminar continues Sunday. March  15 from 9:30 a.m. to 1:30
p.m. Fee is $12; $lf» at door. For more information, call 228 6403. International House. 9:30
a.m. to evening.
German Poetry and Prose Readings.
Readings by contemporary German authors, Andreas Schroeder and U. Schaffer. For more information, call 228-6403 or 228-2181. Conference Room, Centre for Continuing Educa
tion. 8:00 p.m.
SUNDAY, MARCH 15
B.C. Gardens. t
Ninth in a series of CBC television programs
featuring the UBC Botanical Garden as an
anchor point for a province-wide look at
horticulture. Hosts: David Tarrant. Botanical
Garden educational coordinator, and CBC
personality Bob Switzer. Today's program looks
at Oliver Orchardists. CBC, Channel 3.
3:00 p.m.
MONDAY, MARCH 16
Planetary Economics Series.
The Good Life. Room 308, Library Processing
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Lunch time Theatre.
Very, Very Fragile, a one-act play by local
playwright, Ann St. James. Admission is free.
Dorothy Somerset Studio. (Show will be repeated
on Tuesday and Wednesday). 12:30 p.m.
Leon & Thea Koerner Foundation
Lecture.
Sade: Des Chiffres, des Lettres, de
Tenfermement. Marcelin Pleynet, Editor, Tel
Quel Magazine, Paris. Room 102, Lasserre
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Anthropology and Sociology/Theatre
Presentation.
Presentation of ethnographic films, Imaginero
and Luther Metke at 94. Jorge Preloran,
Theatre, University of California. Room 151,
Brock Hall. 1:30 p.m.
Computing Centre Lecture.
MIDAS. The first in a series of 6 lectures on the
Michigan Interactive Data Analysis System, by
Mr. P. de Jong of the UBC Computing Centre.
Advance registration required: call 228-6611.
Room 447, Computer Sciences Building.
2:30 p.m.
History Colloquium.
Graffiti in History: The Beginnings of Dutch
Resistance to the Nazis, 1940-1941. Prof. Peter
N. Moogk, History, UBC. Room 221, Buchanan
Building. 3:50 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Non-linear Hyperbolic Equations and Waves.
Prof. Alan Jeffrey, Engineering Mathematics,
University of Newcastle-upon-Tyne. Room 203,
Mathematics Building. 3:45 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
Ultraviolet Spectrophotometry of Nuclei of
Spiral Galaxies. Dr. P.M. Gondhalekar, IUE,
Villafranca, Spain. Room 318, Hennings
Building. 4:00 p.m.
Zoology "Physiology Group"
Seminar.
Hot and Cold-Blooded Flying Insects. Dr. B.
Heinrich, Zoology, University of Vermont,
Burlington, Vermont. Room 2449, Biological
Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Recreation and Leisure Studies
Lecture Series.
Ocean Kayaking. Venezeula to Florida by
Kayak: a lecture and slide presentation with an
opportunity for questions and comments.
Presented by John Dowd, a freelance
photographer/writer who recently earned his
place in the Guinness Book of Records with this
expedition. Lecture Hall 3, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 7:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, MARCH 17
Asian Research Noon-Hour Series.
Taoism. Room 106, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Weekly Weather Briefing.
I     Weekly lunch hour weather map discussions are
held every Tuesday. All interested students,
faculty and staff are invited to attend. Room
215. Geography Building. 12:30 p.m.
Continued on page 8 UBC Reports March 4, 1981
UDC
CalcndaR
continued from page 7
Tuesday, March 17 continued
Hewitt Bostock Lecture.
The Tragedy of German Liberalism, 1848 1871.
Dr. Adolf Birke, History, University of Toronto.
Room 100, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
The Doctor and the Others Series.
Galenism and its Survival. Dr. John Norris.
Lecture Hall B, Vancouver General Hospital.
12:30 p.m.
Computing Centre Seminar.
Producing Papers with FMT. A 2 hour seminar
on how to produce large documents or theses
with FMT, by Mr. J. Nightingale of the UBC
Computing Centre. Advance registration
required: call 228-6611. Room 447, Computer
Sciences Building. 2:30 p.m.
Anthropology and Sociology/Fine
Arts/Political Science Lecture.
The Political Sociology of the State (in French).
Henri Lefebvre, Paris. Room 207, Anthropology
and Sociology Building. 2:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Barium as a Biological Productivity Indicator in
Pelagic Sediments. Dr. E. Suess, School of
Oceanography, Oregon State University. Room
1465, Biological Sciences Building. 3:30 p.m.
Biomembrane Discussion Group
Seminar.
The Production, Physical-Chemical Properties
and ATP-ase activities of Fatty Acid,
Homogenous Acholeplasma Laidlawii B. Dr.
R.N. McElhaney, Biochemistry, University of
Alberta. Lecture Hall 1, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 4:00 p.m.
Chemistry Research Conference
Series.
Oxygen       A Toxic Element? Dr. H.A.O. Hill,
Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford
University. Room 250, Chemistry Building.
4:30 p.m.
Faculty Recital.
Music of Hotteterre, Blavet, Mondonville,
Boismortier and Dieupart. The Baroque Flute in
18th-Century France. Paul Douglas, baroque
flutes; Doreen Oke, harpsichord; Nan Mackie,
viola de gamba and John Sawyer, baroque
violin. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 18
Science and the Citizen.
Genetic Engineering: Present and Future. Prof.
Robert C. Miller, Microbiology. UBC.
Auditorium, Robson Square Media Centre.
12:00 noon.
Ascent of Man Series.
Knowledge or Certainty. Room 308, Library
Processing Building. 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday Noon-Hour Concert.
Music of Schubert and Brahms. Detlef Kraus,
piano. Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
The Doctor and the Others Series.
The Evolution of a Scientific Pathology. Dr.
John Norris. Lecture Hall B, Vancouver General
Hospital. 12:30 p.m.
Geophysics Seminar.
Mechanics of Glacial Erosion. Dr. Bernard
Hallet, University of Washington, Seattle,
Washington. Room 260, Geophysics and
Astronomy Building. 4:00 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology Seminar.
Exploiting a Patchy Environment: A Field Study
of the Black Oystercatcher Foraging in the
Rocky Intertidal. Dr. Sarah Groves, Zoology,
UBC. Room 32, Hut B 2. 4:00 p.m.
Senate Meeting.
A limited number of tickets for the observers'
gallery are available and must be applied for at
least 24 hours in advance of the meeting. Call
Frances Medley, clerk to Senate, 228 2951.
Senate meets in the Board and Senate Room,
Old Administration Building. 8:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, MARCH 19
Energy Management Program.
Sponsored by the Centre for Continuing
Education. Playing Energy to Win is a two-day
program on energy management for
municipalities. You must register by March 5.
Fee is $125. The program runs from 9 am   to
10 p.m. today and from 9 a.m. to 3.30 p.m. on
Friday, March 20. For more information, call
228-2181. locals 259 or 260   Sheraton Landmark
Hotel,  1400 Robson Street.
Medical Grand Rounds.
Multiple Sclerosis. Dr. D.W. Paty, Neurology,
Vancouver General Hospital. B Lecture Hall,
Vancouver General Hospital. 9:00 a.m.
Information Display and Craft Fair.
To increase awareness of exceptional people in
the 1981 International Year of Disabled Persons,
students in the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine are co-ordinating a display and craft
fair to give exceptional people an opportunity to
share their abilities and needs with the general
public. For more information, call 228-7392.
Conversation Pit, Student Union Building,
12:00 noon to 9:00 p.m.
Fine Arts Faculty Lecture.
An Art Historian's View of Early Chinese
Bronzes. James Caswell. Room 104. Lasserre
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Simulation and Modelling in
Science.
Computers and Artificial Intelligence. Dr.
Raymond Reiter, Computer Science, UBC.
Room 1100, Mathematics Annex. 12:30 p.m.
Resource Management Science/Soil
Science Lecture.
Integrated Land Use in Switzerland. Dr. H.
Schreier. Room 154, MacMillan Building.
12:30 p.m.
University Choral Union.
Music of Britten, Vaughan Williams, Gabrieli
and Bartok. James Fankhauser, director. In
Memoriam of Kimmy Y.C. Tong (1958  1980).
Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
World University Services of
Canada.
To Live in Freedom. Room 205, Buchanan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
The Doctor and the Other Series.
Disease, Diagnosis and Treatment: the Example
of Syphilis. Dr. John Norris. Lecture Hall B,
Vancouver General Hospital. 12:30 p.m.
Women Students' Office Lecture.
Interview Techniques. Dr. Lorette K. Woolsey,
director, Women Students' Office. Room 223,
Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Physics Condensed Matter Seminar.
Quantum Size Effects in Metals. Jos Perenboom,
UBC. Room 318, Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
Slavonic Studies Seminar.
Yugoslavia After Tito. Dr. Lenard Cohen,
Political Science, SFU. Penthouse, Buchanan
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Physics Colloquium.
The Study of Molecular Reorientation in
Liquids. Dr. F.G. Herring, Chemistry, UBC.
Room 201, Hennings Building. 4:00 p.m.
Subfilms.
Close Encounters of the Third Kind. Continues
until Sunday, March 22. Showings are tonight at
7:00 p.m., 7:00 and 9:30 p.m. on Friday and
Saturday, and 7:00 p.m. on Sunday. Admission
is $1 with AMS card. Auditorium, Student
Union Building.
Vanier Institute of the Family
Lecture.
The Place of the Family in Times of Transition.
Dr. Elise Boulding, Sociology, Dartmouth
College. Admission is free. For more
information, call 228-2181, local 261. Lecture
Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. 8:00 p.m.
FRIDAY, MARCH 20
Pediatric Grand Rounds.
A Perspective of Head Injuries in Childhood.
Dr. Leslie Andrews. B Lecture Hall. Heather
Pavilion. Vancouver General Hospital 9:00 a.m.
Developmental Medicine Seminar.
Serendipity and Calcium Regulation. Dr. D.H.
Copp, Physiology, UBC.   First Floor Seminar
Room, Willow Pavilion, Vancouver General
Hospital. 12:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Clinical Investigation of Hereditary
Neurodegenerative Diseases. Dr. P.M. MacLeod.
Fourth Floor Conference Room, Health Centre
for Children. 1:00 p.m.
Geological Sciences Seminar.
Canadian Deepwater Carbonate Deposits;
Distinction from Analogous Siliclastic Deposits
and their Hydrocarbon Potential. Dr. Ian
Mclrath. Agat Consultants Ltd., Calgary,
Alberta. Room 330A, Geological Sciences
Building. 2:30 p.m.
Linguistics Colloquium.
Acquisition of Cantonese Phonology; a Case
Study. Sou-mee Tse, Linguistics, UBC. Room
2225. Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
Women's Invitational Tennis
Tournament.
Tennis teams from UBC, the University of Puget
Sound and Washington State and Portland State
Universities will compete in this two-day
tournament, which continues tomorrow. Play
begins today at 4:00 p.m. and last match is
scheduled for 10:00 p.m. UBC Armory.
You Don't Retire Alone.
A weekend retreat for couples approaching
retirement. Sponsored by the Centre for
Continuing Education. Runs from 7:00 p.m.
tonight to 1:00 p.m. on Sunday, March 22, For
more information, call 228 2181, local 285.
Harrison Hot Springs.
University Choral Union.
Repeat Program of March 19th. James
Fankhauser, director. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, MARCH 21
Women's Invitational Tennis
Tournament.
Second and final day of play gets underway at
8:00 a.m. Last match is scheduled for 6:00 p.m.
UBC Armory.
Rugby.
UBC Thunderbirds vs. Kats Rugby Club.
Thunderbird Stadium. 2:30 p.m.
Notices...
Fine Arts Gallery
The Exoskeletons of Evil, an exhibition by Jan
Menses runs until March 28 in the UBC Fine
Arts Gallery, located in the basement of the
Main Library.
Asian Centre Inaugural Activities
To celebrate the completion of the Asian Centre, Asianists on the UBC campus will be
presenting a number of inaugural activities
preceeding and following the official June 5
opening ceremony. These will include lectures,
artistic performances, exhibitions, movies, etc.
The committee co-ordinating the events consists
of professors Ashok Aklujkar (Asian Studies),
Tissa Fernando (Anthropology-Sociology), M.Y.
Liang (Music), Terence McGee (Geography and
Institute of Asian Research), and Mr. Gerald
Savory (Continuing Education). Interested individuals or organizations are invited to contact
one of the members of the committee for more
information.
Doctoral Oral Exams
Tuesday, March 10: David Shaun Gray,
Psychology, on Antinociceptive and other
Behavioral Effects of Abnormal Vestibular
Stimulation in the Rat. 1:30 p.m.
Friday, March 13: Francis J. Wilfling,
Psychology, on Psychophysiological Correlates of
Low Back Pain. 3:30 p.m.
Faculty and Staff Golf Tournament
All faculty and staff, active and retired, are invited to the 25th annual golf tournament on
Thursday, April 30 at the University Golf
Course, if you don't play golf, join in later for
the silver anniversary dinner at the Faculty
Club. Tee-off times are 9 a.m. to 12 noon.
Green fees, $8; dinner, $17. For advance tee off
reservations, call Dr. Whittle, 228 5047 or
228 3838.
Campus Religious Services
Vancouver School of Theology       Anglican rite
at 7:30 a.m. Monday  Friday (Eucharist on Monday, Wednesday, Friday; morning prayer on
Tuesday and Thursday); Ecumenical community
worship at 10:15 a.m. on Thursday; United
Church service at 8:30 a.m. Tuesday. Chapel of
the Epiphany, Chancellor Boulevard.
St. Mark's College       Mass at 12:30 and 4:30
p.m. Monday Saturday and at 9:30 and 11:30
a.m. and 4:30 p.m. on Sunday. 5935 Iona
Drive.
Regent College       Service at 11:30 a.m. Tuesday. 2120 Wesbrook Mall.
St. Andrews Hall Service at 11 a.m. Sunday.
6040 Iona Drive.
Lutheran Campus Centre       Sunday services at
9:30 and 11:30 a.m. and 7 p.m. and Eucharist
on Tuesdays at 12:30 p.m., 5885 University
Boulevard.
Quaker Worship Group Meets Wednesday at
12:30 p.m. in Room 213 of The Student Union
Building.
Christian Science Organization       public
meetings held each Thursday at 12:30 p.m. in
Room 117 of the Student Union Building.
Faculty Club Display
An exhibition of contemporary tapestries woven
by Madeline Darling and Varda Ben T al will be
on display at the Faculty Club until March 14.
English as a Second Language
Starting Feb. 23, the Language Institute will be
offering part-time courses for the student whose
second language is English. 'Effective Com
munication" and "Practical Spoken English" are
amongst two of these 24- and 36-hour courses
being offered. For registration information, call
228-2181, local 285.
Frederic Wood Theatre
The Frederic Wood Theatre presents The Rivals
by Richard Brinsley Sheridan Wednesday,
March 4 through Saturday, March 14 (except
Sunday). Admission is $5.50; $3.50 for students.
For ticket reservations, call 228-2678 or drop by
Room 207 of the Frederic Wood Theatre
Building.
Functional Fitness Appraisal
Available
The John M. Buchanan Fitness and Research
Centre is administering a physical assessment
program available to students, faculty, staff and
the public. A complete assessment takes approximately one hour and encompasses various
fitness tests, an interpretation of results, detailed
counselling and an exercise prescription. $15 for
students; $20 for others. For more information,
call 228-3996 or enquire at Recreation UBC.
Room 203, War Memorial Gymnasium.
Library Exhibit
Four Women        F'our Arts. An exhibition of ar
chival and library materials relating to the works
of Ethel Wilson, writer; Jean Coulthard Adams,
musician; Emily Carr, writer and painter; and
Joy Coghill Thorne, actress and director. The
exhibition runs until March 14 in the special
collections division, top floor, Main Library.
Nitobe Garden Hours
Nitobe Garden will be open 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
weekdays, and from 10 a.m. to half an hour
before sunset weekends.
World University Sejrvices of Canada
World University Services of Canada has job
openings for teachers and technical staff in
various third world countries. They are also administering applications for United Nations
Volunteer Service. For more information, contact WUSC, Box 3000. Stn. C, Ottawa, K1Y
4M8. Information is also available at the UBC
Student Counselling and Resources Centre.
Language Courses
Centre for Continuing Education offers conversational French and Spanish courses and
language teaching technique courses (non-credit)
for six weeks beginning the week of March 2.
For more information, call 228-2181. local 227.
Museum of Anthropology
Exhibits: Salish Art: Visions of Power, Symbols
of Wealth; Kwagiutl Graphics: Tradition in a
New Medium; West Coast Graphics: Images of
Change; Imperial Power: Coins, Keys, Seals,
Weights and Sculptures from the Roman and
Byzantine Courts.
Free Identification Clinics: March 31, April 28
and May 26 from 7:00 to 8:30 p.m.
Snake in the Grass Moving Theatre: Clowns
Garbanzo and Koko give Sunday performances
at 2:00 p.m. until March 29. Free with museum
admission.
Museum of Anthropology community video programs: Programs air  Tuesday evenings at 7:00
p.m. on Cable 10 on March 10, 24 and April 7,
14. Shows will be repeated at 4:30 p.m. on the
following Thursdays and at 6:00 p.m. on the
following Saturdays. Cable 10 Northshore shows
the programs 12 days after original broadcasts
on alternate Sunday evenings at 10:30 p.m.
Museum hours are: noon to 9:00 p.m. on
'Tuesdays; from noon to 5:00 p.m. Wednesdays
through Sundays, and is closed Mondays.
Residence Applications
Applications for accommodation on campus for
the 1981-82 winter session are now being accepted. Space is limited so submit applications
as soon as possible. Applications for the 1981
summer residence program will be accepted
starting March 16. For more informa;ion, call
228-2811.
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