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UBC Publications

UBC Reports Oct 3, 1991

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Array •
KAON decision welcomed by UBC
By GAVIN WILSON
Senior UBC administrators are
welcoming the decision ofthe
federal and provincial governments to fund the
TRIUMF KAON factory, saying it
will bring many of the world's best
scientists to campus.
"We are honored to be host to
Canada's national particle physics research laboratory and to play
a role in managing the facility on
behalf of the two levels of government," said UBC President
David Strangway.
'This decision is not only important
for UBC and the other universities involved in the project, it is also important for British Columbia and the rest of
Canada."
This marks the first time in Canadian history that a consortium of universities has been asked to manage a
major national laboratory on behalf
of government, Strangway said. This
approach is commonly used in other
countries, such as the United States,
and has led to outstanding research
and development.
Strangway added that UBC looks
forward to the opportunity to negotiate
with the new corporation on the terms
and conditions under which it will need
RiUMFANT!
Photo by Abe Hefter
Education Minister Stan Hagen, a longtime KAON factory backer, is presented with a "Mr. KAON" licence
plate by TRIUMF Director Erich Vogt at announcement federal funding commitment.
access to UBC resources, including a ernment had made "a firm offer" of eluding international contributions, are
suitable site. $236 million toward the capital costs of continuing.
Justice Minister Kim Campbell an- constructing the KAON facility and CampbeU said federal funding for the
nounced Sept. 19 that the federal gov- that negotiation on operating costs, in- KAON project will be in addition to exist
ing science and technology budgets.
Speaking to TRIUMF staff and
project supporters shortly after
Campbell's announcement in Ottawa,
provincial Education Minister Stan
Hagen said KAON would help diversify the B.C. economy.
"We're on our way," he said, adding that KAON will "launch this nation
into a new and exciting era of discovery."
Hagen, who has been the minister
responsible for KAON since 1987, said
the KAON factory means 17,000 person-years of new jobs during its six-
year construction phase and another
2,000 jobs annually once it is operational.
The KAON factory will put Canada
at the front line of basic scientific research and attract scientists from around
the world to the UBC campus, said
Daniel Birch, vice-president, academic,
and provost.
"This is an international signal that
Canada is willing to play its role at the
highest levels of scientific endeavor,"
he said.
Robert Miller, vice-president, research, said, "KAON will move
Canada to the front in the next generation of particle physics research. This
See KAON on Page 2
New advisor on women
takes on the 'chill factor'
Two faculty members
win science awards
By CONNIE FILLETTI
Florence Ledwitz-Rigby has been
appointed to the newly created position of Advisor to the President on
Women and Gender Relations.
The part-time position was established in response to concerns raised
by women faculty, staff and students
during round table discussions, initiated by President David Strangway
last year, to pinpoint issues of particular concern to women.
"I have identified a number of
I:
5'.?-'
I Inside
\ CLASS ACT: The largest
- class on campus deals with
■ the human aspects of engi-
\ neering. Page 2
COMFORT: During the Gulf;
War, Hillel House provided an
outlet for feelings of members'
■ ofthecampusJewishcommu-;
| ratyconcemedabouteventsinf*
■ tlie Middte East Proffie,page3
I  HELPING HAND: A scientist I
j from Poland uses UBC fa-1
cilities for important research in agriculture. Page 8
m
steps which have been and will be
taken to enhance the environment for
all members of the UBC community," Strangway said. "These steps
will be elements in a larger strategy
to which I have assigned a very high
priority."
In 1975 Ledwitz-Rigby was the
first female faculty member in biological sciences to be on tenure track
at Northern Illinois University (NIU).
She was also the first woman promoted to full professor in NIU's Biology Department in 1987.
In addition to working to establish
a Women's Studies Program at NIU,
Ledwitz-Rigby was active in organizing workshops and panel discussions
promoting women in science.
She was a member ofthe steering
committee of the Organization for
Academic Womens' Equality which
advised the president on the status of
women.
Ledwitz-Rigby will advise President Strangway on the status of
women at UBC and on the effect
gender relations have on women's
work and study. In additon, she will
recommend strategies to reduce gender discrimination.
As well as chairing the President's Advisory Committee on the
Status of Women, she is currently
establishing a President's Advisory Committee on Safet).
Ledwitz-Rigby explained that
Ledwitz-Rigby
her main goal is to contribute to
the development of policy at UBC
which will enable all women on
campus to fully achieve their potential.
Specifically, she will work with
units on campus, such as the Women
Students' Office and the Sexual Harassment Office, which are concerned
with improving the environment on
campus for women.
Ledwitz-Rigby is meeting with
various offices to find out what they' re
doing.
"I don't want to reinvent the wheel.
There are lots of wheels turning on
campus but few axles. I hope to build
See ADVISOR on Page 3
By GAVIN WILSON
Two UBC faculty members are
winners of gold medals from the
Science Council of British Columbia.
Martha Salcudean, head of Mechanical Engineering, has won the
1991 B.C. Science and Engineering
Award in Applied Science and Engineering.
And retired Chemistry Professor Douglas Hayward, who inspired
the Scientists in the Schools program, is this year's winner of the
Eve Savory Award for Science
Communication.
Both Salcudean and Hayward will
receive their awards at the B.C. Science and Engineering Awards dinner in Vancouver Oct. 22.
Salcudean
is being recognized both for
her outstanding research
achievements
and her administrative talents.
Born and
educated in
Romania, she
came to Canada in 1976 and joined
U BC in 1985. She is the only woman
in the country to head up an engineering department, and is likely the
first woman in North Anmericu to be
Hayward
Salcudean
appointed to
such a position.
Salcudean
has won wide
acclaim for
her research
on designing
computer
simulations of
the flow of
fluids, a field
which has important industrial applications. Financial support for her re
search is among the highest of any
engineering research in Canada.
She was recently appointed to the
governing council of the National
Research Council and the National
Advisory Panel on Advanced Materials. I
Since he retired from UBC'st
Chemistry Dept. in 1984, Haywardf
has spent hundreds of hours talking!
about chemistry, and science in gen
eral, to an estimated 12,000 elemen-i
tary school students throughout the!
province. He was originally spon-.
sored by the Chemical Institute of
Canada. ;
Hayward says his message is toj'
show students, teachers and parentSj
that chemistry is "fun, interesting andj
safe."
He was the model for the prov-
See HAYWARD on Page 2 2    UBC REPORTS October 3.1991
I'Sivto by Media Services
Students jam into a lecture hall to attend Applied Science 121. The largest single section class on campus, the course deals with the non-technical aspects of engineering.
Course examines engineer's role in society
By GAVIN WILSON
Students start lining up outside
the lecture hall well before the 12:30
p.m. start of Applied Science 121.
They have to, if they want to get a
seat.
The course, Society and the Engineer, is the largest taught in a
single section at UBC. There are
617 students packed into Woodward
IRC 2.
The aim ofthe course, which did
not exist two years ago, is to show
that engineering is not just a technical, scientific and mathematical pursuit, but that it relates to people,
says Axel Meisen, dean of Applied
Science. Meisen is one of two course
instructors. The other is John Meech,
of the Department of Mining and
Mineral Process Engineering. In addition, there are several guest lecturers.
The course looks at engineering's
role and responsibilities in society
and also includes topics such as sexual
harassment, multiculturalism and employment equity.
"It's a great challenge to attempt to
deal with a difficult range of subjects
in a very large group," said Meisen.
'There's no easy route for feedback.
It's hard to engage the professor in
discussion in a class that size."
Still, he feels the course is successful in making the students think
about the topics and is prompting
discussion outside of the clasroom.
In one part of the course, case
studies are used to look at major
engineering projects and the impact
they have on the environment and on
Native Indians.
"In the case of Native Indians, it's
not only a matter of land and resource ownership, but also a matter
of how to relate to those communities," said Meisen. "You must, as an
engineer, respect and understand their
local social fabric, values, and way
of life.
"One needs to be aware of these
aspects of a project just as much as its
technical feasibility or economic attractiveness."
The course also examines
multiculturalism, as changes in the
engineering workforce reflect the
changing makeup of Canadian society.
Pointing out the "tremendous diversity" in race and ethnic background before him in the lecture hall,
Meisen says, "this is the engineering
workforce of the future."
He said it is a testament to the
engineering profession that is actively reaching out to include
underrepresented groups.
Gender relations and sexual harassment issues are also taught, topics that are just as important at the
university as they are in the
workplace.
"We teach students not just rules
and regulations, but also how
sexual harassment manifests itself
and what obligations they have as
citizens, co-workers and employers," he said.
Letters to the Editor
Thanks for years of service
The Editor
UBC Reports
Nancy Horsman retired on September 27, following a 25-year career at
UBC.
Ms. Horsman spent her career dedicated to working with students in the
Women Students' Office. That office is a critical part of UBC's student
service network and she has contributed a great deal to the work ofthe office
for many years.
I would like to take this opportunity to publicly thank Ms. Horsman, on
behalf of the university and my colleagues, for her years of service.
K.D. Srivastava
Vice-President
Student and Academic Services
KAON puts Canada on
leading edge of research
Continued from Page 1
is most important."
In addition, Miller said, there will
be spin-off benefits for several areas of
high technology, including robotics,
microelectronics and computer software. The KAON factory consequently
will have a strong positive impact on
Canadian high technology companies.
Meanwhile, criticisms of the federal government's decision to contribute $236 million towards the KAON
factory are being shrugged off by
TRIUMF Director Erich Vogt.
ScienceCouncilofCanadaheadJanet
Halli well, some opposition politicians and
columnists in the Globe and Mail have
taken turns bashing the decision. But
Vogt says he's not worried.
"It's no worse than the criticism that
greets the announcement of any other
large project," he said.
Althoughitisbeingassailedbysomein
the House of Commons as patronage,
Vogt points out that prominent members
ofthe opposition, such as John Turner, as
well as provincial NDP leader Mike
Harcourt, are voicing supportforthe project.
"This is not a partisan issue," he said.
And while it is true that there are some
items still to be negotiated, including who
will pay what share of the $90 million
annual operating costs, Vogt said, "these
are not deal stoppers."
The KAON factory is a major expansion of the existing TRIUMF facility.
which is operated by a consortium of
universities including UBC. It is one of a
network of large, new accelerators now
being planned worldwide and will allow
Canada to take a leading role in subatomic particle research.
The new KAON accelerator will
boost TRIUMF's already intense particle beams by 60 times greater energy.
This will allow the beam to reach .999
the speed of light, creating kaons and
other rare, short-lived subatomic particles which are some of the building
blocks of matter. The particles are then
directed into research stations for sophisticated experiments.
Undergrad
enrolment up
11 per cent
Lack of space forced many UBC
faculties to turn away record numbers of qualified students as undergraduate applications rose 11 percent
over last year.
Enrolment pressures upped the
minimum grade point average (GPA)
needed for admission to first year
Arts to 2.83, while the cutoff for
Science jumped to 2.72.
Yet both faculties exceeded their
designated quotas by close to 200
students.
"We're faced with not only an increase in first-year enrolment, but overall enrolment as well," said Registrar
Richard Spencer.
Spencer said that as GPA requirements continue to rise, so too does
the quality of students. The result is
fewer dropouts and more people carrying on into second and third years
of programs.
Spencer added that preliminary
figures show total undergraduate
enrolment climbed about 2.5 per
cent over last year to about 23,850.
Graduates and undergraduates together totalled approximately
28,000, an increase of 3.3 percent.
The university turned away
1,826 qualified undergraduate students due to lack of space. Of that
number, 744 students were in first-
year Arts, 258 in first-year Science (four times as many as last
year) and 188 students (double
last year's total) were refused
entry into the first year of Applied Sciences.
The Department of Physical Education and Recreation turned away
110 first-year students versus 29 refusals last year.
Final enrolment figures will be
released in November.
Hayward brings science
into the classroom
Continued from Page 1
ince-wide program called Scientists
in the Schools, which is co-ordinated
by Science World on behalf of the
Ministry of Advanced, Education,
Training and Technology.
Under the program, hundreds of
scientists and engineers donate their
time to speak about their work and
opportunities for students within their
professions. Similar programs are now
being established elsewhere in Canada.
In addition to his visits to classrooms,
Hayward writes a regular column on
chemistry for several community newspapers, discusses science on radio station
CFM1, and has chaired the Lower Mainland regional science fair. With UBC
Chemistry Professor Gordon Bates, he
recently published a book titled Do-it-
yourself Chemistry.
Hayward is the second winner of
ihe Savory award, which, was instituted in 1989. The award is named for
television reporter Eve Savory, a
Duncan, B.C. native, who, until a recent reassignment, was the national
science reporter for CBC News.
The winner of the B.C. Science
Council's Cecil Green Award for Entrepreneurial Science is Karl
Brackhaus, president and CEO of
Dynapro Systems Inc., of Delta.
Still to be announced are Science
Council awards for career achievement and industrial innovation.
AMS & UBC
present
the
October 9 & 10,1991
Wednesday & Thursday
10:00 AM - 5:00 PM
Student Union Building,
University of B.C., 6138 SUB Boulevard
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Toahiba
UBC Bookstore
UBC Natararking
& Communications
UBC PC Support Centre
WordPerfect
S many /nor*/ UBCREPORTS October3,1991
UBC looks for ways to improve campus safety
By CONNIE FILLETTI
The number of reported sexual assaults at UBC involving adult victims,
to date, has surpassed last year's total,
accordingto statistics recently released
by the university detachment of the
RCMP.
As of Sept. 20, seven sexual assaults were reported for the university
endowment lands, with five occurring
on campus.
In addition, incidents of regular
assault causing bodily harm are on the
rise, from 39 incidents reported in
1987, to 74 assaults reported in 1990.
"Most of the sexual assaults occurred outside in bushy areas and
unlighted sections of the campus,"
said RCMP Const. Bernie Smandych.
She advised everyone to avoid taking shortcuts and to stay on well-travelled paths. Students should be particularly cautious when returning to
campus residences after dark,
Smandych added.
In addition, a number of services
and resources, designed to enhance
personal safety, are available to members of the campus community.
• The year-old AMS Walk Home
Program has over 70 male and female
student volunteers to escort students
to any destination on campus, upon
request. The service is available seven
Advisor studies women's
roles on campus
Continued from Page 1
some axles," she said.
"Coming in new, I have the advantage of being able to take a fresh look,
but it means I have a lot of work to do to
develop an understanding of where the
university has come from and where it
is right now."
She feels her greatest challenge
is dealing with the campus climate,
otherwise known as the "chill factor."
'There are a lot of programs already established and running, but
what we really have to do is change
the attitudes of large groups of people about who women are and what
their roles should be at the university," she explained.
Ledwitz-Rigby received a PhD in
endocrinology and reproductive
physiology from the University of
Wisconsin-Madison.
She has been an honorary professor in the Department of Obstetrics
and Gynaecology in the Faculty of
Medicine since August, 1990, where
she does collaborative research and
is involved with student thesis committees.
Strangway praised Ledwitz-Rigby
for her broadly based and thoughtful
views on the positions of women
faculty, staff and students.
Commerce students
experience 'real world'
By ABE HEFTER
The Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration continues
to open up more windows to the business world.
The faculty has established a set
of programs to help students link
their classroom experiences with their
future business careers.
A career orientation program and
up to three new student internship
programs are being developed
through the university' s teaching and
learning enhancement fund.
"By expanding the faculty's extra-curricular activities with the addition of programs like these, we
hope to give students more of an idea
of what they'll be up against when
they enter the business world," said
Commerce Associate Dean Don
Wehrung.
The purpose of the career orientation program is to help undergraduate and graduate students
make the transition from academic
training to employment, said
Wehrung.
The program focuses on exposing
students to a wide variety of career
opportunities so they can make informed careerchoices. Presentations
and workshops will be established
and speakers will be brought in to
share their experiences with the students, who will also be encouraged
to meet with various individuals in
social settings.
"It's also important for students
to be able to discuss the contemporary issues that affect business and
government in Canada," said
Wehrung. "We'll look at issues like
free trade, ethics and privatization in
a practical manner."
Practical is a key word Wehrung
uses to describe the student internship programs currently available to
commerce students. The faculty has
mounted three successful internship
programs in recent years; the Portfolio Management Society; the Industrial Relations Management Program;
and the Arts Administration Program.
All three offer students a hands-on
opportunity to experience corporate
life.
"Students who enter the Portfolio
Management Society, for example,
are employed by one ofthe corporate
sponsors during the summer months
between each of the two years of the
program," said Wehrung.
"These summer employment
opportunities lead to the development of interpersonal skills and
exposure to industry trends. We
plan to bring three new internship
programs on board with similar
structures."
Wehrung said two of them are
expected to start up this year, with
a third to come next year if funding for the program continues.
The internships will be developed
from such areas as small business, financial regulations, marketing management, and real estate management.
"We hope to generate internship
opportunities for 25 students through
these new programs," said Wehrung.
days a week, between September and
April, from 7:30 p.m. to 11:30 p.m.,
except on Wednesday, Friday and
Saturday, when the hours of operation
are extended to 1:30 a.m. Call 822-
5355 for information.
• UBC Parking and Security Services offers a security bus service during the winter session (Sept. 30 to
April 30) which collects passengers in
front of the Main Library from 4 p.m.
to midnight on school days. Passengers are driven to any campus location, on request. The security bus is
wheelchair accessible. Call 822-4721
for information.
• The AMS Women's Centre will
be offering self-defence classes to
women for a nominal fee. Information
is available at 822-2163.
i
• The UBC Bookstore, in conjunction with campus bookstores
across Canada, is marketing the
Fox 40 Personal Safety Whistle, a
key-ring whistle to promote personal safety awareness. Call 822-
5916 for information.
• The university detachment ofthe
RCMP provides free information sessions on safety and crime prevention
to campus groups and residences, upon
request. Call 224-1322 for details.
• Students are also invited to watch
for special programs, seminars and
workshops which address safety issues, offered throughout the year by
the Women Students' Office, the Student Counselling and Resources Centre and Student Health Services.
• Implementation of UBC' s plan of
Profile
action regarding safety and other issues particularly affecting women on
campus is underway with the appointment of an Advisor to the President on
Women's Issues and Gender Relations.
• A systematic program to improve
campus lighting over the next three
years took its first step Sept. 30. A
team of planning consultants, including a lighting expert, toured the campus, after dark, to identify unsafe areas. They were joined by university
personnel including members of the
AMS, Campus Planning and UBC
women's groups.
• UBC is currently studying a comprehensive plan for parking policies,
practices and facilities in an effort to
heighten personal safety.
Hillel House offers enrichment
By GAVIN WILSON
It is a quiet Friday afternoon at
Hillel House.
A student sprawls across a sofa,
reading a textbook. Someone puts a
kettle on to boil in the kosher kitchen.
Another student taps out a few notes
of Chopsticks on a glossy black piano.
But during the Gulf War, the atmosphere in here was electric.
As Scud mi ssiles rained down on
Tel Aviv last January, horrified Jewish students and faculty flocked to
Hillel House. They gathered grim-
faced around the television screen,
comforting those who had friends or
family in Israel.
"It became a haven," said Hillel
Program Director Eyal Lichtmann.
"Everyone was very, very frightened of what was happening. There
was an incredible sense of hopelessness and guilt. Here we were sitting
comfortably while people were dying."
Hillel House is the cen-     ~"■""
tre of campus life for more
than 600 Jewish students,
as well as many Jewish faculty and staff.
It's part of the world- "*"■"■
wide network of Hillel
Houses, which are found on nearly
every campus in North America and
Europe, as well as parts of South
America.
"We try to be everything for everyone," Lichtmann says. 'This is a
cultural centre where students can
develop their own Jewish identity in
whatever aspect they see fit."
As he offers a visitor a cup of coffee,
Lichtmann appears more relaxed than
someone who's been putting in 16-
hour days has a right to be.
September has been an incredibly hectic month for him.
In his job, Lichtmann is at the
centre of just about every activity at Hillel. (Overseeing all
Hillel operations is executive
director Zac Kaye.)
With the new term beginning
there were parties to plan, weekly
hot lunches for up to 100 people to
organize, meetings to set up, students to advise and a newsletter to
produce.
On top of all this, September was
filled with Jewish holidays such as
Photo h> Ga\ in VV iison
Program Director Eyal Lichtmann extends a welcome to Hillel House.
Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, for
which religious services were held.
And then, of course, Lichtmann is
studying for his MBA in the evenings.
"It's been crazy," he admits wearily.
Born 26 years ago in Israel,
Lichtmann and his family moved to
"There was an incredible sense of hopelessness and guilt. Here we were sitting
comfortably while people were dying."
Canada when he was three.
When he arrived at UBC in 1985,
he and a few friends couldn't find the
kind of Jewish cultural activities they
wanted on campus.
Hillel House was founded by the
B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation in 1947
— a year before the state of Israel was
created. But by the mid-80s, students
such as Lichtmann felt it was no longer
serving their needs.
So he helped set up the Jewish
Students' Association and began to
organize events and programs, many
of which still carry on. In 1986, the
Hillel House building received a long-
overdue renovation, financed by
prominent members of Vancouver's
Jewish community.
The Hillel House movement takes
its name from a rabbi who lived in
Israel many centuries ago. He believed
strongly in the benefits of education
and is famous for a quotation that still
inspires people today.
"If I'm not for myself," he said,
"who will be for me?"
That philosophy of self-improve-       groups.
ment lies behind everything that Hillel
House does: guest speakers, Hebrew
language classes, Torah study sessions.
"It's enrichment," Lichtmann
said.  "That's  what Jews  have
been doing for centuries. That's
why the educational process is
so valued."
Even their weekly hot
lunch program, in which
up to 100 students get
together for a nourishing
meal and to socialize, is
""■"" designed to "enrich the
body and soul."
Hillel House programs also stress
the idea of student leadership. They
feel it's okay to go through school
just attending classes, but it's better
for students to get involved.
Hillel also tries to reach out to the
non-Jewish community at UBC, with
varying success.
"People don't know about us. It's
ironic, considering our location.
We're central, but hidden," said
Lichtmann.
Hillel House does boast a central, if not prominent, site, directly
beside the north parkade across
from the Student Union Building.
But the isolation that does exist
may end when construction of the
new student services building at
Brock Hall is complete. It will put
them smack in the middle of student life on campus.
Hillel is growing, not only at
UBC, where active membership continues to climb, but at SFU and
Langara, where UBC students have
helped organize Jewish student 4    UBCREPORTS October3.1991
October 7 -
October 19
MONDAY, OCT. 7    j
Pediatric Research Seminar Series
Immunology, Networks And Cytokines:
The Push-me Pull-you. Assoc. Professor
David Matheson, Vice-President Medicine, BC Children's Hosp. Children's
Hosp. 3D16 ABC at 12pm. Refreshments
at 11:45am. Call 875-2492.
Astronomy Seminar
Stellar Populations in M31 And M33. Dr.
S. van den Bergh, Dominion Astrophysical
Observatory. Geophysics/Astronomy 260
at 4pm. Coffee at 3:45pm. Call 822-
6706.
Chemistry Seminar
Pulse-Shape Effects In IR
Multiphoton Dissociation.
Dr. Andre Bandrauk, U. of
Sherbrooke, Que. Chem.
D225 at 10:30am. Call
822-3299.
Biochemistry Lecture
Host-Pathogen Interactions In Microbial
Pathogenesis: A Multidisciplinary Approach. Dr. Brett Finlay. IRC #1 at
3:30pm. Call 822-6914.
Mechanical Engineering Seminars
Saw Tensioning And The Light Gap
Method. Peter Lister, MASc student.
Dynamic Modelling Of Variable-
Structure Systems. Jie Peng, PhD
student. Civil/Mechanical Engineering 1202 from 3:30-4:30pm. Call
822-6200/4350.
Applied Mathematics Colloquium
Stability Of Thermocapillary Convection In Crystal Growth. Professor
Hans Mittelman, Arizona State U.,
Tempe, AZ. Math 104 at 3:45pm.
Call 822-4584.
Koerner Memorial Lectures
Greek Coins: A Bridge
Between Art And History.
Dr. Martin J. Price, Deputy
Keeper of the Department
of Coins, British Museum,
London. Lasserre 102 at
12:30pm. Call 822-5675.
In The Footsteps Of Alexander: Coinage
For An Empire. Dr. Martin J. Price.
Lasserre 107 from 3:30-5pm. Call 822-
5675.
UBC Reports is the faculty and
staff newspaper ofthe University
of British Columbia. It is published every second Thursday by
the UBC Community Relations
Office, 6328 Memorial Rd., Vancouver, B.C,V6T 1Z2-
Telephone 822-3131.
Advertising inquiries: 822-6163.
Managing Editor: Steve Crombie
Ass't Editor: Paula Martin
Contributors: Ron Burke, Connie
FffleoL Abe Hefter, Charles Ker,
and Gavin Wilson.
J%l     Please
4L£    recycle
CALENDAR DEADUNES
For events in the period October 20 to November 2, notices must be submitted by UBC faculty or staff on proper Calendar forms
no later than noon on Monday, October 7 to the Community Relations Office, Room 207,6328 Memorial Rd., Old Administration
Building. For more information call 822-3131. The next edition of UBC Reports wil be published October 17. Notices exceeding
35 words may be edited
SAT..!"
aMS'ai.is-; ■■twMHmam
3 DAY, OCT. 12
Music Concert
Hispanic/Italian Studies Lectures
Vida Extrema y la Poesia de Jorge Guillen.
Professor Francisco Diaz de Castro.
Buchanan A202 at 12:30pm. Call 822-
2268.
Largo Lamento de Pedro Salinas. Professor Francisco Diaz de Castro. Buchanan
B218 at 3:30pm. Call 822-2268
Fine Arts Lecture
Object Psyche And Interpretation. Jeanne
Randolph, U. of Toronto.
Lasserre 104 at 1:30pm.
Call 822-2757.
University Computing Services
Workshop
Using A Mouse With An IBM PC. Eldon
Wong. Register Computer Sciences 209.
Fee: $37.50, students $28. UCS Annex 2
from 1:30-3:30pm. Call 822-8938
TUESDAY, OCT. 8   1
Modern Chemistry Lecture
Molecules In Intense Fields—Theory vs.
Experiment. Dr. Andre Bandrauk, U. of
Sherbrooke, Que. Chem. B250 at 1pm.
Refreshments at 12:40pm. Call 822-3266.
Oceanography Seminar
Development Of An Isopycnal Ocean
General Circulation Model. BioSciences
1465 at 3:30pm. Call 822-2828.
Statistics Seminar
Efficient Estimation For Filtered Models.
Professor W. Wefelmeyer, Universitat
Koln. Angus 223 at 4pm. Call 822-4997/
2234.
Economics Seminar
A Comparative Analysis Of Unemployment In Canada And The United States.
Craig Ridell. Buchanan D225 from 4-
5:30pm. Call 822-2876.
Faculty Development Seminar
IPSIP^*15^! Teaching Assumptions.
"*      "      "j Gary Poole, Psychology,
j SFU.    Family/Nutritional
Sciences 60 from 3:30-
5pm.    Registration required. Call 822-9149.
University Computing Services
Workshop
Computer Keyboard Skills. Jim Stewart.
Register Computer Sciences 209. Fee:
$50, students $37.50. UCS Annex 2 from
1:30-2:30pm. Call 822-8938.
WEDNESDAY,
Forestry Seminar
Field Performance On A Reforestation
Site: An Ecophysiological Perspective.
Dr. Steven Grossnickle, BC Research
Corporation. MacMillan 166 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-3553.
1991 Computer Show
Computers Working For You: The Complete Solution. Sponsored by UBC Purchasing and AMS. SUB Ballroom from
10am-5pm Wed/Thurs.    Call 822-3456.
Cecil And Ida Green Lecture
Fuzzy Logic And Intelligent Systems.
Professor Lotfi Zadeh, College of Engineering, U. Calif., Berkeley. IRC #6 at
12:30pm. Call 822-5675.
Economics Seminar
Endogenous And Exogenous Restrictions
On Search For Employment. Avner Bar-
llan, Tel-Aviv U./UBC. Buchanan D225
from 4-5:30pm. Call 822-2876.
Orthopaedic Grand Rounds
j Blood Transfusion In Or-
| thopaedic Surgery.    Dr.
CI")    | Peter O'Brien.  Eye Care
-^ir'UJi Centre Auditorium, 910 W.
VWm 10th, 3rd fir., at 7:30am.
1 Call 875-4646.
Microbiology Seminar Series
Molecular Characterization Of The rfb
Operon Of Vibrio Cholera. Dr. Melissa
Brown, Microbiology. Wesbrook201 from
12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-6648.
Vancouver School of Theology
Lecture
Blowing Off The Dust: Biblical And Near
Eastern Studies In The 1990's. Dr. James
Lindenberger, Professor of Hebrew Bible. VST Boardroom at 7:30pm. Call
228-9031.
Wednesday Noon
Hour Concert
Theodore Arm, violin;
Barbara Hallam-Price, organ; UBC Chamber
Strings. Recital Hall at
12:30pm. $2 at the door. Call 822-5574.
BioTech Lab Seminar
< THURSDAY, OCT. IP1 <"
Centre for Health Services/
Policy Research Seminar
Cost-effectiveness Of Alternative Workup Strategies In Screening For Colorectal
Cancer. Kay Brown/Colin Burrows, Australian National Centre for Health Program Evaluation. Mather 253 from
11:30am-1 pm. Call 822-3130.
Policy Studies Seminar
The Politics Of Political Correctness: A
Forum On Democracy And Education.
Dr. John Willinsky, Dir., Curriculum/lnstr.
Ponderosa Annex H123 from 12-1pm.
Call 822-5361.
CICSR Distinguished Lecture
Series on Computer Graphics
Shared Workspaces: A Look At Supporting Distributed Workgroups. Dr. Sara Bly,
Xerox Palo Alto Research Centre. Scarfe
100 from 1-2:30pm. Refreshments at
12:30pm. Call 822-6894.
Insect Cell Culture Engineering: An Overview. Dr.
Theo Goosen, Queen's U.,
Kingston. Wesbrook 201
at 3:30pm. Refreshments
at 3:15pm. Call 822-5835.
Health Sciences Student Research Forum
Introductory Remarks: Dr. John Grace,
Dean of Graduate Studies. Keynote
speakers: Erin Brown, PhilipToleikis. IRC
Foyer from 5-8pm. Call 822-4305.
Pharmacology Seminar
The Cholesterol Myth. Dr. Morley
Sutter, Pharmacology/Therapeutics.
IRC#2from11:30am-12:30pm. Call
822-2575.
Cecil And Ida Green Seminar
Fuzzy Logic: Calculus Of Fuzzy If-Then
Rules. Professor Lotfi Zadeh. U. Calif.,
Berkeley. Civil/Mechanical Eng. 1204 at
11:30am. Call 822-5675.
Faculty Development Seminar
Science/Applied Science. Past/
present winners of university teaching prices comprise panel who will
address issues surrounding teaching/learning. Angus 104 from 3:30-
5pm.   Call 822-9149.
Jazz Chamber Ensembles
Recital Hall at 12:30pm. Call 822-5574.
Distinguished Artists Concert
|£iwm«nai| An Evening Of Chamber
* .." Music. Prelude lecture at
i| 7:15pm, concert at 8pm in
" the Recital Hall.   Adults
$12, seniors/students $7.
Call 822-5574.
FRIDAY, OCT. 11
Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand
Rounds
Management of Premature Rupture Of
Membranes And Intra-Amniotic Infection.
Dr. Ronald Gibbs, U. of Colorado. UBC
Hospital, Shaughnessy Site D308 at 8am.
Call 875-2171.
Chemical Engineering Seminar
Waste Processing In The USSR. Professor A.E. Gorshtein. Chem. Eng. 206 at
3:30pm. Call 822-3238.
Fluids/Thermal Bag Lunch
Lingzhe Kong, Research Assoc, Mechanical Engineering. Civil/Mech. Eng.
1212 from 12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-
5562.
Grand Rounds
Concepts In Medical Administration. Dr. David
Matheson, Vice-President
Medicine. G.F. Strong Auditorium at 9am. Call 875-
2118.
Music From The Heart. Bob Kindler And
Friends. Recital Hall at 7pm. Tickets at
SUB box office. $8, students $5. Call
228-1573.
Vancouver Institute Saturday
Night Lecture
Fuzzy Logic: Principles,
Applications And Perspectives. Professor Lotfi
Zadeh, U. of Calif.,
SSrf!flBerkeley. IRC #2 at
aBS":,a 8:15pm. Call 822-5675.
j~f U*:SDAY, OCT. 15  |
Medical Genetics Seminar
Zfy Genes In Mice And Men. Elizabeth
Simpson, PhD, Whitehead Inst., Cambridge, MASS. IRC#1 from4:30-5:30pm.
Refreshments at 4:15pm. Call 822-5312.
Statistics Seminars
Longitudinal Analysis For Binary And
Count Data. J. Graham; Over-Dispersion
In Poisson Regression. B. McNeney.
Statistics. Angus 223 at 4pm. Call 822-
4997/2234.
Oceanography Seminar
Mediterranean Heat And Buoyancy Flux.
Chris Garett, UVic. BioSciences 1465 at
3:30pm. Call 822-2828.
Biochemistry Seminar/Lecture
Glucocorticoid Receptor Phosphorylation.
Dr. Allan Munck, Physiology, Dartmouth
School, Harover, NH. IRC #4 at 3:30pm.
Call 875-2718.
University Computing Services
Workshop
Your Computer, Your Back, And Office
Ergonomics. Joan Hunting. Fee: $35.
Computer Science 460 from 12:30-
2:20pm. Register CSCI 209. Call 822-
8938.
ESDAY, OCT. 16l
Microbiology Seminar
Association Of A Photoactive Cancer
Therapeutic Agent (Benzoporphyrin Derivative) With Plasma Lipoproteins Improves Delivery And Therefore The Efficacy Of Photodynamic Therapy. Beth
Allison, Microbiology. Wesbrook201 from
12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-6648.
Applied Mathematics Colloquium
Multilevel Projection Methods. Professor
Steve McCormick, U. of Colorado, Denver.
Mathematics 104 at 3:45pm. Call 822-
4584.
Modern Chemistry Lecture
Structure/Function/Chemical Synthesis Of
Glycopeptides: Tomorrow's Information
Carriers? Dr. Klaus Bock, Carlsberg Laboratory, Denmark. Chem. 225 (central
wing) at 10:30am. Call 822-4511/2471.
Forestry Seminar
New Forestry: What Is It? Do We Need It?
Douglas Hopwood, Consulting Forester.
MacMillan 166 from 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-3553. UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE VICE-PRESIDENT,
ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
1990-91
The audited financial statements are
a public document. Copies of the University's audited financial statements
have been provided to each University
Department and the University Library.
For those interested in more information
than provided in these highlights, please
refer to the copy in your department.
Table 1 describes the activities in
each of five of the seven separate
funds involved in the financial reporting of UBC during the 1990-91
fiscal year. Excluded are the Student Loan Fund and Endowment
Principal Fund. The concept of fund
accounting organizes transactions
so that revenues and their related
expenses are accounted for in separate funds in accordance with objectives specified by donors, limitations and restrictions imposed by
sources outside the University, and
determinations made by the Board
of Governors.
GENERAL PURPOSE
OPERATING FUND
The revenue and expenses used
in the general operations of the
University are accounted for in this
fund. Operating income for 1990-
91 increased over 1989-90 by $19.3
million resulting primarily from increases in Provincial grants of $17.8
million and student fee revenue of
$1.5 million. Total expenses at
$308.4 million were up $28.5 million
with $25.1 million of the increase
attributable to salaries and benefits.
The University had an operating
deficit of $2.1 million for the year.
The deficit is non recurring and is
now eliminated as it was a first
charge against increased operating
income in 1991-92.
The Canadian Institute of Chartered Accountants made changes in
the generally accepted accounting
principles applicable to not-for-profit
organizations such as universities,
hospitals, municipalities and
schools. In our case, changes affect the accrual of costs for faculty
TABLE 1
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN UNAPPROPRIATED FUND BALANCES
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31
1991
(thousands ofdolL
rs)
Revenue ind other additions
General Purpose
Operating
Specific
Purposes
Sponsored
Research
Ancillary
Enterprises
Capital
Tola Is
1990
1991
Government grants and contracts
Government of Canada
$
S
3,569           $
81.128
S
_
S
400
$           85,097        J
57,297
Province of British Columbia
Base operating
232,404
-
434
-
-
232,838
215.056
Designated
4,640
12.844
13.646
-
53,791
84,921
74,910
Municipalities
-
5
168
-
-
173
37
Other governments
-
22
228
-
-
250
212
Foreign governments
-
894
1,321
-
-
2,215
2305
Student fees
58,974
435
-
1,293
-
60,702
58,757
Bequests, donations and non-government grants
-
4.462
26,307
-
7,634
38,403
31,443
Sales and services
1,043
176
312
70,612
-
72,143
72,163
Income from investments
5,211
13,035
-
1,032
5,563
24,841
21.376
Loans
-
-
-
-
-
-
999
534,555
302,272
35.442
123,544
72,937
67,388
601,583
Expenses and other deductions
Salaries - Academic
125,411
7,492
17,451
-
-
150,354
137,799
- Student services
8,333
3,180
11,153
-
-
22,666
20.138
-sun
90,701
5,414
22,234
17,833
920
137,102
118,876
224,445
16,086
50,838
17,833
920
310,122
276,813
Benefits
28.683
991
3,407
1,706
103
34,890
30,375
Travel, field trips, moving
6,032
1,957
6,600
770
75
15,434
13,750
Library acquisitions
6,528
345
438
-
-
7,311
6,897
Operational supplies and expenses
20,888
983
20,733
6.V»
2,279
51,489
49,330
Furniture and equipment
8,694
1,226
12,318
1,243
4,484
27,965
20,458
Utilities
9,731
206
827
1.431
682
12,877
12,032
Renovations and alterations
600
391
43
2.128
6,771
9.933
8,298
Scholarships, fellowships and bursaries
5,905
4,568
104
-
-
10,577
9,330
Professional fees
4,427
1,585
2,501
-
8,252
16,765
11,462
Grants to other agenies
-
-
16,702
-
-
16,702
1,134
Cost of goods sold
-
-
-
28,805
-
28,805
28.034
Debt servicing
-
-
-
8.027
21,824
29,851
26,770
Building contracts
-
-
-
-
11,635
11,635
14,199
Internal cost recoveries
(2.830)
191
1,591
1,048
-
-
_
External cost recoveries
(4,671)
-
-
-
-
(4,671)
(4,493)
308,432
28,529
116,102
69,597
57,025
579,685
504,389
Net change in the year
(6,160)
6,913
7,442
3,340
10,363
21,898
30,166
Transfers and appropriations
Expended from prior years' appropriations (State ment 2)
6,429
-
-
1,500
_
7,929
1,752
Interfund transfers (Note 2)
(465)
(5,004)
462
(1,418)
568
(5,857)
(4,581)
Appropriations for the year (Statement 2)
Net Increase (decrease) during the year
(3,117)
(3.313)
-
-
(3,754)
(332)
(10,693)
238
(17,564)
6.406
(21,684)
5,653
1,909
7,904
Unappropriated Fund balance, beginning of year
(4,867)
19.298
25,179
431
6,919
46,960
41,307
Unappropriated Fund balance, end of year
S          (8.180)
S
21,207           $
33,083
S
99
%
7,157
J          53,366       i
46,960
early retirement agreements and
vacation pay for staff. Previously,
these were recognized as expenses
when paid. Since 1985, the amount
of faculty early retirement agreement commitments have been disclosed in the notes to the financial
statements. Vacation pay expense
is now recognized as it is earned by
the staff. Early retirement expenses
are recognized when approved by
the Board of Governors. As at March
31,1991, the early retirement agreement liability was $4,331,000 (1990
- $3,444,000). The vacation pay
liability was estimated at
$1,749,000  (1990  -  $1,605,000).
These amounts totalling almost $6.1
million are shown as a deficit at
March 31, 1991 and approximately
this amount will show as a deficit
each year in the future, as long as
the early retirement program continues.
SPECIFIC PURPOSES
FUND
The revenues and expenditures for
projects stipulated by donors and income earned on the Endowment Principal Fund are included in this fund. Trust
fund revenue was $22.4 million and
Endowment Fund investment income
was $13.0 million for a total of $35.4
million. This is an increase in total
income of $4.5 million from 1989-90.
This increase is primarily the result of a
$3.4 million increase in grants from the
Province. Total expenses increased by
$3.0 million, with $2.3 million of the
increase attributable to salaries and
benefits.
SPONSORED RESEARCH
FUND
This fund includes amounts specifically identified for research grants
TABLE 2
SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING FUND
FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31,
1987 TO 1991
Source:
Province of B.C. - Grants
78.4
77.5
78.7
79.4
80.0
Student Fees - Credit
15.3
14.9
15.2
14.9
15.4
Student Fees - Non-credit
3.9
5.2
4.2
3.7
3.0
Other
2.4
J2A
_L2
_2J2
_L6
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Distribution by Function:
Academic and Associated Services
72.4
73.4
72.6
72.5
72.1
Library
7.3
7.1
7.2
7.3
7.5
Student Awards and Services
3.0
2.8
2.6
2.7
2.6
Administration
5.4
5.0
5.8
5.6
5.3
External Affairs
1.1
1.0
-
-
-
General
1.8
1.7
1.1
1.0
1.2
Plant
9.6
9.5
11.2
11.4
11.8
Overhead recovered
(_!L6.)
CJL5J
(_H5)
ULi)
(_<L5J
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
TABLE 3
SUMMARY COMPARISONS OF TOTAL GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING EXPENSES
1986-87 TO 1990-91
1990-91
1989-90
1988-89
1987-88
1986-87
%
%
%
%
%
Salaries and Benefits :
Academic
40.7
41.6
42.3
42.2
42.8
Student Services
2.7
2.5
2.4
2.4
2.5
Staff
29.3
28.3
28.4
29.2
28.5
72.7
72.4
73.1
73.8
73.8
Benefits
9.3
9.1
9.3
9.2
9.0
82.0
81.5
82.4
83.0
82.8
Travel &. Field Trips
2.0
1.8
1.7
1.6
1.4
Library Acquisitions
2.1
2.2
•2.3
2.3
2.4
Supplies & Expenses
7.7
8.5
8.0
7.9
7.9
Utilities
3.2
3.2
3.3
3.5
3.7
Furniture, Equipment & Alterations
3.0
2.8
2.3
1.7
1.8
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0 UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE VICE-PRESIDENT,
ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
1990-91
TABLE 4
TOTAL SPONSORED RESEARCH FUNDING
(thousands of dollars)
1990-91
1989-90
1988-89
1987-88
1986-87
Amount
$123,544*
86,432
80,147
71,511
65,280
Of the $123.5 million, the University distributed $ 16.7 million to other institutions. These funds
were distributed under agreements with the federal government, whereby the University is the
administrative head of a network of research and a portion ofthe research is undertaken at other
institutions and companies.
TABLE 5
SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH
FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31,1987 TO 1991
Source :
Government of Canada
Province of British Columbia
Other governments and agencies
Total governments
Individuals, business, foundations
Other
Distribution :
Salaries and Benefits
Travel and field trips
Operational supplies and expenses
Furniture and equipment
Grants to other Institutions
Other
62.1
12.0
76.2
23.7
Jli
100.0 100.0
65.7
11.4
1.4
78.5
21.3
1.2
64.1
11.0
77.6
22.2
_<L2
100.0
67.7
8.5
1.7
77.9
21.8
68.9
7.9
79.3
20.5
_<L2
100.0 100.0
46.7
54.6
56.0
55.6
58.2
5.7
6.9
6.7
6.5
6.3
17.9
21.8
21.6
21.6
20.4
10.6
10.0
9.4
11.3
10.1
14.4
1.3
-
-
-
4.7
^4
_kl
_5J2
_LQ
00.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
and contracts or related activities
as provided by government granting
agencies, research institutes and
other public and private agencies.
Revenue increased from $86.4 million in 1989-90 to $123.5 million this
year. The $37.1 million increase is
accounted for by the introduction of
the National Centres of Excellence
in the amount of $20.2 million as
well as increases in Natural Sciences and Engineering Research
Council grants of $5.0 million, Medical Research Council grants of $1.7
million, Health and Welfare Canada
grants of $3.4 million, Province of
British Columbia Health Care Research Foundation grants of $1.8
million, Business and Industry donations of $1.4 million and other
less significant variations both positive and negative. Of the $123.5
million, the University distributed
$16.7 million to other institutions.
These funds were distributed under
agreements with the federal government, whereby the University is
the administrative head of a network of research and a portion of
the research is undertaken at other
institutions and companies.
ANCILLARY
ENTERPRISES FUND
Ancillary enterprises provide goods
and services to the University community and are expected to operate on a
break-even basis. Total income for the
ancillary enterprises was $72.9 million,
an increase of 6.4% over 1989/90. Included are the Bookstore, Food Services, Student Housing and Conferences,
University Farm at Oyster River, Parking Services, Health Sciences Parkade,
Tennis Centre, Athletics and Sport Services, UBC Press, Media Services, the
Educational Measurement Research
Group and two new ancillaries, Telecommunications and Computer Maintenance.
CAPITAL FUND
The capital fund consists of gifts,
grants, interest and authorized capital borrowing received for the purpose of acquiring capital assets including those pertaining to ancillary
enterprises. Capital fund revenue
increased by $1.7 million. Building
contract expense decreased by $2.6
million. This expense is expected to
increase in the next five years as
major capital projects are initiated.
Many of these capital projects will
be funded through the proceeds of
the Major Fund Raising Campaign
currently underway.
COMBINED FUNDS
Table 1 shows the total revenue
and expenses of all five funds by
object of revenue and expenses.
Total revenue for all funds was
$601.6 million, up $67.0 million from
last year. Total salaries and benefits were $345.0 million, an increase of $37.8 million.
Table 2 shows the source and distribution of General Purpose Operating
funds over the past five years.
Table 3 shows a comparison of
the Total General Purpose Operating Expenses by object of expense
for the five years 1986-87 to 1990-
91.
Table 4 shows the change in total
Sponsored Research funding since
1986-87.
Table 5 shows the source and distribution of Sponsored Research funds.
GENERAL
The University's "A World of Opportunity" campaign which began in
January 1988 is progressing very
well. With the campaign expected
to be completed in 1992, more than
$200 million in cash and pledges
has been raised from individuals,
organizations, corporations and governments at all levels, including $87
million from the Provincial Government Matching Gifts Program. The
pledges will be collected over the
next five years with the matching
gifts from the  Provincial Govern-
TABLE 6
The University of British Columbia
SCHEDULE OF ENDOWMENT PRINCIPAL FUNDS
As at March 31
(thousands of dollars)
Areas
1985-86
1986-87
1987-88
1988-89
1989-90
1990-91
Scholarships
$   24,382
$   29,845
$   34,043
$
36,046         $
40,543
$   45,043
Agricultural Sciences
608
666
947
1,028
1,198
1,524
Applied Science
73
90
105
106
763
937
Arts
677
1,663
3.078
3,612
4,959
5,397
Commerce & Bus. Admin.
8,297
9,699
12,547
14,520
17,652
19,281
Dentistry
26
26
85
85
85
89
Education
138
151
490
531
533
1,538
Forestry
74
79
89
94
98
627
Graduate Studies
-
1
1
3
4
6,091
Law
100
100
123
138
312
401
Lectures
1,519
1,110
1,197
1,248
1,253
1,391
Library & Archival
1,365
1,365
1,453
1,735
1,883
2,062
Medicine
6,909
7,669
10,195
11,330
13,271
16,037
Pharmaceutical Sciences
-
-
165
191
244
341
Science
37
174
235
320
377
677
University Press
573
573
573
573
1,114
1,174
General
36,915
34,385
35,884
35,562
35,721
35,274
President's Fund
731
731
1.046
1.642
4.481
7.018
Sub-total
82,424
88,327
102,256
108,764
124,491
144,902
Vancouver Foundation
3.449
4.266
4.458
4.794
5.475
7.400
Total
$   85.873
$   92,593
$ 106.714
$
113,558        $
129.966
$ 152.302 u
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The University of British Columbia
Development Office Telephone
6253 NW Marine Drive 604 822.8900
Vancouver, Canada Facsimile
V6T 1Z1 604 822.8151
Opportunity
The UBC Campaign News
October 1991
First Campaign project nears completion
Excitement is building, as the David Lam
Management Research
Centre takes shape (right).
The new facility, which is
scheduled to open in
March 1992, will be the
first Campaign building to
be constructed. An artist's
rendering (below) shows
the Centre on completion.
Other World of
Opportunity Campaign
buildings slated for sod
turnings, cornerstone
ceremonies and openings in
the coming year include
CICSR (Centre for Integrated Computer Studies
and Research), First
Nations Longhouse,
Green College, the
Morris and Helen
Belkin Art Gallery,
and the Chan Shun
Performing Arts
Centre.
In all, nine
buildings will be
constructed
during the next
decade,
made
possible by
Campaign
funds.
Inside....
Retired Vancouver
broadcaster Bill
Bellman donates $1
million to the First
Nations Longhouse.
i UBC launches its first
annual Faculty and
Staff Campaign. Page 2
The UBC Campaign News
Sense of Community stressed
Campus campaign launched
The World of Opportunity Campaign has
come home through the launch of a Faculty and
Staff Development Campaign this fall.
To date, the campaign has raised more
than $200 million toward a projected goal of
$250 million. There is a wide range of prospective donors yet to be approached, including the campus community as well as international donors, alumni, and private and corporate donors who have indicated an interest in
contributing but have not yet done so.
"This will be a real hands-on campaign,"
said Law Professor Dennis Pavlich, volunteer
chair of the Faculty arid Staff Development
Campaign. "Donors will be able to contribute
to projects not yet fully funded, such as the
Institute of Asian Research, First Nations
Longhouse, Centre for Research in Women's
Studies and Gender Relations, the new Library
Centre, as well as chairs and professorships."
Pavlich said employees may also,
contribute to projects'created by various
campus units.
Campaign
projects
During the next year, faculty and staff
members, as well as people who have not yet
contributed to the Campaign, are invited to
contribute to projects which are partially or
nearly funded.
Campus Development
It is anticipated that UBC's current
campaign building projects will create 1,200
person years of work in the construction
industry. Buildings still requiring funding are
the following:
Creative Arts Facility to provide
studio space for students and faculty in fine
arts, music and theatre. A production area,
film theatre, costume design facilities, a studio
theatre and a scene shop will be constructed,
providing a multi-media environment where
creativity can flourish.
New Library Centre to address an
urgent need for more space to house the
expanding collection, for new storage systems
and technology so that users can obtain
information easily from the Library's worldwide networks. A new building will be
constructed as the first phase of the long-term
plan for the library system.
First Nations Longhouse to be the first
west coast longhouse constructed as an integral
part of a university campus, and the focus of
First Nations student activities at UBC.
Institute of Asian Research to include
regional centres to focus on Chinese Studies,
Japanese Studies, Korean Studies, South Asian
Studies and Southeast Asian Studies. In
addition, a Centre for Islamic Studies will be
established to begin exploring the impact of
this cultural force on world developments.
Research and Discovery
It is UBC's mission to enhance research
capabilities across all disciplines, supporting
the recruitment and development of leading
faculty to pioneer research and exchange
knowledge internationally. More than 100
academic endowments, chairs, scholarships
and multi-disciplinary centres have been
"In this event, donations might support projects
such as library acquisitions,
scholarships, research
projects and other initiatives.
This is an opportunity for the
entire campus to join together
in a real sense of community.
And, of course, each donation
will be matched dollar-for-
dollar by the provincial
government."
So far, President
David Strangway, the vice-
presidents, associate vice-
presidents and deans have
had a 100 per cent participation rate. They, along with other faculty and
staff members, have contributed almost
$500,000 to the Faculty and Staff Development
Campaign.
"The World of Opportunity Campaign
has been remarkably successful," said Pavlich.
Professor Dennis Pavlich is chairing the Faculty and Staff Campaign.
"The introduction of the campus campaign
provides us with another clear opportunity co
commit ourselves to the development of our
university, and to demonstrate this commitment
to the outside community which has supported
us so generously."
Faculty and staff donors
"I'm pleased to support the President's
Fund which will, in part, establish entrance
scholarships enabling the university to attract
the brightest students in B.C. and across
Canada."
Byron Hender
Executive Coordinator, Student &
Academic Services
"We've had a
tremendous response to
the A.D. Scott Fellowship
project, with contributions from colleagues and
former students across
campus, from all over
Canada and from several
other countries. Our
alumni were especially
attracted by the opportunity to honor one of
their mentors and provide for other students to
follow in their footsteps."
John Helliwell
Head, Department of Economics
"Faculty, staff, students, family and friends
have generously supported the Rick Sample
Klawe
Helliwell
Memorial Fund as a way
of honoring the memory
of Rick Sample, as well as
an opportunity to annually
provide an exceptional
undergraduate with a
research experience in
creating an innovative
computing environment,"
Maria Klawe
Professor and Head,
Computer Science Department
"It was a great honor to be awarded the
Killam Research Prize and Jacob Biely
Faculty Research Prize in 1989. With the
prize money and matching contributions from
the Faculty of Commerce and B.C. Government, it was possible to endow a fellowship
for PhD candidates. In this way, the inter-
generational transfer of learning from which I
benefitted can be continued."
William Stanbury
UPS Foundation Professor of Regulation and Competition Policy, Faculty
of Commerce and Business Administration
established through the World of Opportunity
Campaign, including the following which are
partially funded or nearly funded:
Chair in Aids
Chair in American Studies
Travelling Research Fellow in Art History
Chair in Audiology and Speech Sciences
Chair in Canadian Studies
Chair in Computer Engineering
Chair in Computer Integrated Design and
Construction
Chair in Conflict Resolution
Stephen Drance Chair in Ophthalmology
Netherlands Studies Endowment
Chair in Fisheries/Oceanography
Chair in Geriatric Dentistry
Professorship in Health Promotion
Chair or Professorship in International
Development
Judaic Studies Endowment
Hugh Keenleyside Chair in Canadian
Diplomacy
Gobind Khorana Chair in Biological
Chemistry
Chair in Landscape and Liveable Environments
Centre for Literacy and Technology
Elizabeth Kenny McCann Chair or
Professorship in Nursing
Chair in Pharmacy Administration
Chair in Plant Biotechnology
Chair in Spinal Cord Physiology
Warren Chair in Nuclear Physics
Chair in Women and Law
Disability Resource Center
MAGIC (Media and Graphics Interdisciplinary Centre)
Centre for Applied Ethics
Centre for Health Services and Policy
Research
Art Gallery Endowment
Food Quality and Management Centre
Centre for Research in Women's Studies
and Gender Relations
Major Donors to the
World of Opportunity
Campaign
As of September 30, 1991
The University of British Columbia is
pleased to recognize the following donors
to the World ol Opportunity campaign.
Recognition is also gratefully extended
to the Government of British
Columbia which has expressed its
commitment to higher education by
matching gifts to the Campaign, and to
the Vancouver Foundation for
matching gifts to the President's Fund
Opportunity   Endowment.
The lull value ol the donor gilts, plus
matching contributions, are gratefully
acknowledged below.
$10,000,000 or more
including matching funds
Chan Foundation of Canada
Cecil H. Green
Students of The University of British Columbia
Peter Wall
$2,000,000 to $9,999,999
including matching funds
Alcan Aluminium Limited
B.C. Lottery Fund
Jack Bell
The Morris and Helen Belkin Foundation
William E. Bellman
Estate of Hugh M. Brock
British Columbia Telephone Company
C.K. Choi & Family (Eason Enterprises
Ltd.)
Cominco Ltd. & Teck Corporation
Fletcher Challenge Canada Limited
Hongkong Bank of Canada
IBM Canada Limited"
Japanese Businessmen's Association
Walter C. Koerner-
L.O.M. Western Securities Ltd. & Peter
M. Brown
Estate of Gladys E. Laird
The Honourable David C. & Dorothy Lam
MacMillan Bloedel Limited
The Real Estate Foundation of British
Columbia
Ritsumeikan University
Department of the Secretary of State of
Canada
The Sauder Family
Mrs. Gordon T. Southam
UBC Alumni Campaign (continuing)
Vancouver Foundation
Workers' Compensation Board
W. Maurice Young
Anonymous
$1,000,000 to $1,999,999
including matching funds
Alias Research Inc.
The Arthritis Society
B.C. Hydro & Power Authority
Curragh Resources Inc.
The Hamber Foundation
Estate of Elsie May Harvey
Imperial Oil Ltd.
Edgar F. Kaiser, Jr.
Eugene W. King
Hewlett - Packard (Canada) Ltd.*
Maclean Hunter Limited
J.W. McConnell Family Foundation
Brenda & David McLean
Placer Dome Inc.
RHW Foundation
Robert C. Rodgers
CN.   Woodward
Anonymous
Anonymous
$500,000 to $999,999
including matching funds
B C. Friends of Schizophrenics
British Columbia Lung Association
Bank of Montreal
Bank of Nova Scotia
The Bentall Foundation
Estate of Winnifred E. Boyes
Canada Trust
Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce
Canfor Corporation
Joan Carlisle-Irving
Chan Tat Chee Memorial Fund
Mrs. Arnold B. Cliff
Finning Ltd.
Estate of Walter H. Gage
The Heart and Stroke Foundation of
British Columbia
Asa Johal
Energy. Mines and Petroleum and the
Ministry of the Environment
Multiculturalism and Citizenship Canada
RBC Dominion Securities Pemberton
Royal Bank of Canada
Shell Canada Limited
Stelco Inc.
Toronto-Dominion  Bank
TRIUMF
UBC Faculty & Staff Campaign
(continuing)
Weldwood of Canada Ltd.
Westcoast Energy Inc.
Weyerhaeuser Canada Ltd.
Anonymous
'Gift-in-kind, or partial gift-in-kind The UBC Campaign News
Page 3
$250,000 to $499,999
including matching funds
BC Gas Inc.
Canadian National
Chevron Canada Limited
Chris Spencer Foundation
Mr. & Mrs. Vicwood Chong Kee Ting
Mr, & Mrs. Ronald Laird Cliff
Dofasco Inc.
Mrs. Violet E. Eagles
Robin Endres
The B.I. Ghert Family Foundation
Yoshihisa Imajo
Imasco Limited
Janet W. Ketcham & West Fraser Timber Co.
Ltd.
Cy & Emerald Keyes Charitable Foundation
Kinsmen Club of Vancouver'
Michael M. Koerner*
Labatt Breweries of British Columbia
Geoffrey and Sandra Lau
Robert H. and Lily Lee
The Noranda Foundation & Noranda Forest
Inc.
Northern Telecom
Northwood Pulp & Timber Ltd.
Pacific Open Heart Society
Phillips Hager & North Ltd.
Royal Trustco Ltd.
Scott Paper Limited
Sun Life Assurance Company of Canada
Wavefront Canada Ltd.
Western Pulp Limited Partnership
Anonymous
$100,000 to $249,999
including matching funds
Mr. & Mrs. K. Alston
Andersen Consulting
BC Sugar
Canadian Pacific Forest Products
Central Capital Corporation
Estate of J.V. Clyne
Diachem Industries Ltd.
Du Pont Canada Inc.
Falconbridge Ltd.
Fisher Scientific Limited
Ford Motor Company of Canada, Limited
General Motors of Canada
Glenayre Electronics Ltd.
Hong Kong - Canada Business
Association
ICI Canada Inc.
Inco Limited
London Life Insurance Company
MacDonald Dettwiler & Associates
McLean Foundation
The Manufacturers Life Insurance
Company
Molson Family Foundation
Monsanto Canada Inc.
Nesbitt Thomson Inc.
Pacific Press Limited
Packard Bell Electronics Inc.
Petro-Canada Inc.
Pratt & Whitney Canada Inc.
Estate of Lyle Harvey Potts
Rayrock Yellowknife Resources Inc.
Rio Algom Limited
The Simons Foundation
Henry S. Skinner
George Chia Chi Tso
David & Alice Strangway
Valleydene Corporation Ltd.
James B. Wallace
Senta Wong
W. Robert Wyman
Xerox Canada Incorporated
Anonymous
Anonymous
Anonymous
$50,000 to $99,999
including matching funds
Air Canada
Peter J. G. Bentley
Dan & Arlene Birch
Joanne V. Brown
W. Thomas Brown
Bull Housser & Tupper
Grant D. Burnyeat
Canadian   Pacific Limited
Canada Life Assurance Company
Chinese Canadian Dental Society of B.C.
Confederation Life Insurance Company
David R. Crombie
Crown Life Insurance Company
Domtar Inc.
Audrey & Bruce Gellatly
David F. Hardwick
John Helliwell
Taichi Kameyama
Lafarge Canada Inc.
North American Life Assurance Co.
Princeton Mining Corp.
Rogers Communications Inc.
Russell & DuMoulin
Scotia McLeod Inc.
K.D. Srivastava
William T. Stanbury
Peter & Teresa Ufford & Family
UMA  Group
Western Forest Products Limited
Anonymous
Anonymous
Other Gifts
Generous support has also been
received from the community and alumni,
including the UBC Campaign Leadership
Committee and Advisory Council,
Campus Leadership, and The Wesbrook
Society.
$1 million gift gives Longhouse go-ahead
Construction on the First Nations
Longhouse has been given the green light
thanks to a $ 1 million gift from retired Vancouver broadcaster Bill Bellman.
Bellman, who in 1959 founded CHQM,
Vancouver's "good music" station, and CKVU
TV, contributed the second $1 million gift to
the longhouse. The first donor to the $4.6
million World of Opportunity Campaign
project was Jack Bell, a retired Vancouver
businessman and long-time friend of the
university.
The 106-metre-long structure, designed
by Larry McFarland Architects, will be a
representation of a Salish longhouse in western
red cedar with a copper-clad, shed-style roof,
upswept at its ends.
UBC native students and staff, their
children and elders participated in the design, and
describe it as evoking the image of a great eagle.
From one side of the longhouse will
emerge the Great Hall for cultural events and
public gatherings; on the other, a small Spirit
Lodge will accommodate about a dozen people
for meditation.
Verna Kirkness, director of the First
Nations House of Learning, said Bellman's gift
may now make it possible for the project to be
completed by next summer.
"The job's not quite finished but we're a
long way there," said Kirkness, who added that
the longhouse has been an objective of the First
Nations House of Learning since it was established at UBC in 1987.
Initially, in the early 1970s, UBC
focused on education because British Columbia
Top row: Bill Bellman, President David Strangway, Mrs. Bill Bellman.
Bottom row: First Nations elders Vince Stogan and Mini Croft, Alice Strangway, Verna Kirkness.
had fewer than two dozen certified native
teachers. That program now boasts about 140
certified First Nations teachers, and a graduate
program has been added.
Currently, First Nations student enrolment at UBC is estimated to be 250. About 40
students have enroled for graduate studies, 15
have earned their Masters degrees, and a year
ago, UBC graduated its first native student with
a doctorate. The university shares the commitment to increasing enrolment to a projected total
of 1,000 by the year 2000, enabling more First
Nations students to enter a wide range of
faculties and academic disciplines.
Kirkness is negotiating with several
potential donors for the remaining funds
required. She is confident that the federal
government will soon make a financial commitment to the project.
A fund-raising campaign is also planned
among some 200 native bands within the
province, this fall.
Campaign news briefs
Pictured L to R: The Right Honourable John Turner, Director, Curragh Resources Inc.; Curragh President
and Chief Executive Officer Clifford H. Frame; Leslie Peterson, Chancellor of UBC; The Honourable Jack
Weisgerber, B.C. Minister of Energy, Mines & Petroleum; UBC President David Strangway.
Hazelwood, President and CEO. "In our industry, we have a particular need for people with
education in the fields of chemical engineering,
forestry and environmental studies."
Northwood has supported post-secondary education for many years through
scholarships and donation programs. Many of
the company's scholarship programs have
been used by students to attend UBC.
Minister of Health Bruce Strachan
officiated at the opening of UBC's Centre
for Health Services and Policy Research —
a project of the World of Opportunity
Campaign. The centre will be a focal point
for reseach at UBC on health policy, population health, health human resource planning,
health services research, and health care
technology assessment.  It will complement
the educational and research activities of a
variety of UBC faculties and departments.
The University of British Columbia paid
tribute to Curragh Resources Inc. for its
$500,000 gift to establish the Clifford H.
Frame Chair in Mining and Mineral Process
Engineering.
The academic appointed to the chair will
work closely with other academics, industry
and government to develop innovative technology to ensure that Canada's mining industry
remains internationally competitive and
recovers mineral resources in a judicious
manner.
A $300,000 endowment fund established
through a contribution by Northwood Pulp
and Timber of Prince George and B. C.
Government matching funds will create ten
new scholarships.
The scholarships will be awarded to
students pursuing their studies in forestry,
engineering and commerce. Four additional
general scholarships will be awarded and for
all of the scholarships, preference will be given
to students who have attended a secondary or
post-secondary institution in northern British
Columbia.
"We have many employees who are UBC
alumni and we are delighted to support scholarships which will enable us to benefit from the
availability of university graduates," said C. T.
Minister of Health Bruce Strachan spoke at the
opening of the new Centre for Health Services and
Policy Research. Page 4
The UBC Campaign News
Arthritis chairs honor pioneers
The Arthritis Society, in
cooperation with UBC's World
of Opportunity Campaign, has
endowed two chairs and a
research endowment fund
totalling $2.5 million to further
research into arthritis — an
overall term used to describe
more than 100 different conditions that affect the joints and
connective tissue.
A recent Canada health
survey concluded that nearly 16
per cent of Canadians suffer
from some form of arthritis — a
number equivalent to the combined populations of Vancouver
and Toronto.
The endowed chairs have
been named to honor two British
Columbians who have pioneered
the crusade to recognize, treat
and ultimately cure arthritis.
The Mary Pack - Arthritis Society Chair in
Rheumatology will enable UBC
to recruit an expert in the most
up-to-date technology in the
laboratory to help unlock some
of the questions regarding the
cause of arthritis.
The Harold Robinson -
Arthritis Society Chair in
Arthritic Diseases is the first
endowed chair in Canada in
Rehabilitation Medicine.  It will
promote a coordinated approach
to researching questions related
to the treatment of arthritis with
an emphasis on the lifestyle
consequences of arthritis,
wellness, and how individuals
can be better encouraged to
participate in their own care.
Mary Pack - Founder of
the Canadian Arthritis
and Rheumatism Society
The success of Mary
Pack's efforts has benefitted
hundreds of thousands of people
with arthritis and made Canada a
world leader in research and
treatment of the disease.
A native of England,
Mary Pack emigrated to Canada
at the age of 18.  While teaching
physically disabled children in
Vancouver, Miss Pack became
Mary Pack and the Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society's first
ambulance, 1949.
Distinguished scholar
heads Women's Centre
Veronica Strong-Boag has
been appointed director of UBC's
newly created Centre for Research in Women's Studies and
Gender Relations. The centre is
a $2-million project of the World
of Opportunity Campaign.
The main goals of the
centre are interdisciplinary
research in Women's Studies and
Gender Relations, graduate
education and community
liaison.
"We are fortunate in being
able to recruit Professor Strong-
Boag as the centre's founding
director," said Dan Birch, vice-
president, academic and provost.
"Few, if any, Canadians could
offer as much potential for
intellectual leadership in the
field."
Strong-Boag joined UBC
July 1 from Simon Fraser University, where she held a joint
appointment in the Department
of History and the Women's
Studies Program.  Her current
research interests include women
in post-confederation Canada and
women, the family and suburban
development from post World
War II to 1960.
She is a member of
several distinguished organizations including Resources for
Feminist Research, the Canadian
Women's Studies Association
and the Canadian Research
Institute for the Study of Women.
In 1988, she received the
Sir John A. Macdonald Prize for
the best book in Canadian
history awarded by the Canadian
Historical Society.  A year
earlier, she was co-winner of the
Laura Jamieson Prize, presented
by the Canadian Research
Institute for the Advancement of
Women, for best feminist book
Dr. Harold Robinson (right) and another physician examine a patient's x-ray,
late 1950s.
concerned about the effects of
arthritis and the lack of facilities
for treatment of the disease.
Several of her pupils had arthritis and at the same time, her
mother was also developing a
form of the disease.
As a result of some
preliminary research, Miss Pack
found that few concerted and
detailed efforts were being made
to discover the cause or cure for
arthritis, even though thousands
of Canadians were afflicted.
Mary Pack spearheaded a
campaign which in 1948,
resulted in the formation of The
Canadian Arthritis and Rheumatism Society (CARS), the
original name by which The
Arthritis Society was known.
Today, The Arthritis Society has
offices in Toronto, as well as
divisions in all the provinces and
territories. The Society provides
help and assistance for people
affected by arthritis — one
person in seven, one family in
three.
Dr. Harold S. Robinson -
Developed team approach
to arthritis control
A recognized leader in
arthritis research in Canada, Dr.
Harold Robinson is widely
known for his role in developing
a team approach to arthritis
control.  In this approach, all
members of a treatment team —
physicians, nurses, social workers, physiotherapists and occupational therapists — could work
together more effectively in the
best interests of the patient.
To this day, Dr.
Robinson's team approach is the
basis by which arthritis treatment
is delivered by the B.C. and
Yukon division of The Arthritis
Society.
His father, Dr. Dean
Robinson, was one of the pioneers in the study of arthritis
care.
Sharing his father's
interest and dedication, Harold
Robinson became one of the first
five doctors to receive a one year
fellowship from CARS. In 1953,
he was appointed as Medical
Director, a position he maintained until his retirement, 30
years later.
Strong-Boag
by a Canadian author.
"UBC has many outstanding scholars working in Women's
Studies and Gender Relations."
Birch said.  "The coming year
will see them take a much higher
profile with the approval of a
Women's Studies major in the
BA degree, and the establishment
of the Centre for Research in
Women's Studies and Gender
Relations."
•pportunity
The UBC Campaign
News
UBC Development Office
Editor:
Debora Sweeney
Contributors:
Rosemary Ogilvie
Production/Design:
William Jamieson UNIVERSITY     OF    BRITISH     COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE VICE-PRESIDENT,
ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
1990-91
Faculties and Administrative Units as a Percent
of Total General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1986/87 to 1990/91
Percent
40
30
Faculties Plant Academic Services Continuing Education Other
|   1986/87    |~]   1987/88    fj   1988/89    ~Tj   1989/90    ~J   T^/91
Faculties includes ETA and retroactive salary increases.
Academic Service includes Computing Centre, Academic Services & Library.
Continuing Education comprises CCE and non-credit programs, which includes Commerce, Business Administration, Hearth Sciences, etc.
Other includes Student Aid, Student Services, Administration, General & Other.
Expenditures are net of carry-forward.
Object of expense calculations are taken as a percentage of net expenditures, which includes cost recoveries,
therefore the sum of the object of expense percentages wilt exceed 100.
UBC/Office of Budget and Planning
Total Academic Salaries* as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1985/86 to 1990/91
48
46
Percent               ^
" ! "^^<^^""""^--------
" r                         """■^.r.  l_^T~s^_
44
-   42
«-■            yy ./'                                  ^^
40    -          /
-    40
38    ;^_. .._  ,_     ;                      __,..._
38
1985/86                       1986/87                       1987/88                       1988/89                        1989/90
1990/S
1
UBC              Alta               Sask              Man              UWO              UTO
McGill
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers
* Comprises academic ranks and other instructional staff and student service appointments.
Object of expense calculations are taken as a percentage of net expenditures, which includes cost recoveries,
therefore the sum of the object of expense percentages will exceed 100.
UBC/Office of Budget and Planning
Total Salaries & Benefits as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1985/86 to 1990/91
Percent          j
86
- 86
- 84
84
82
80  -
"""■———.
. ~'~~:~-<;'--CL                 "~-C-'~	
-   82
80
78   -
^^                       ___
-   78
1985/86                       1986787                       1987/88                       1988/89                       1989/90
1990/91
UBC               Alta              Sask              Man              UWO              UTO             McGill
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers
Object of expense calculations are taken as a percentage of net expenditures, which includes cost recoveries.
therefore the sum of the object of expense percentages will exceed 100.
UBC/Office of Budget and Planning
ment collected in annual
installments of about $12 million over
a period of seven years from 1988-
89 to 1994-95 . The UBC Major
Campaign continues in order to
achieve its goal. The campaign
funds will provide the facilities,
scholarships, endowed chairs and
equipment described in the case
statement for the "World of Opportunity" campaign.
In 1990, the University initiated a
process to develop a comprehensive Master Plan for the Campus.
Here are four objectives of the Plan.
The Plan is required to accommodate new construction proposed over
the next ten years. This includes
eight facilities funded by the World
of Opportunity Campaign, approximately ten projects funded by the
provincial government, and approximately fifteen projects funded from
other sources. The Plan is designed
to take advantage of the current
building program in order to complete the academic campus, and,
concurrently, to solve existing major functional, orientation and circulation inadequacies. The Plan is
intended to provide a coherent
framework for the integration of
space, infrastructure and service
needs in a manner which maximizes
the funds available to the University. The Plan is intended to provide
comprehensive guidelines for ongoing development on the campus.
At the present time, an extensive
draft proposal for the main (Academic) campus has been tabled for
discussion. The projects sited in
this proposal include academic, research, housing, cultural, library,
recreational, parking and service
facilities. Some of these projects
are already completed, some are in
the design stage, others remain to
be planned. The Master Plan will
proceed this fall with an analysis
and proposals for future development guidelines for the central,
southern, and eastern portions of
the campus. First drafts of this
proposal will be presented in January 1992.
A comprehensive Campus Plan in
the final draft stage will be assembled in
1992. This will reflect the vision of the
Mission Statement and will result in the
first physical vision of the completed
campus in the University's history.
During the year new endowments
accounts were created for scholarships/awards as well as for specific
purposes within various departments
on campus. The endowment principal funds (scholarships) totalled $45
million at year end, up $4.5 million
in the year. Other endowment principal funds increased by about $16.0
million for a total of almost $100
million at year end. An amount of
$7.4 million is held and managed by
the Vancouver Foundation on our
behalf. Total endowment principal
funds, including those held at the
Vancouver Foundation, have grown
from $85.9 million to $152.3 million
since 1985-86. Table 6 displays the
changes over this time period. Much
of the large increase has been
funded by the World of Opportunity
Campaign. UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE VICE-PRESIDENT,
ADMINISTRATION AND FINANCE
1990-91
The University through the Staff
Pension Plan Investment Committee has undertaken a major review
of the Staff Pension Plan Investment Strategy. The review has focused on drafting an expanded investment charter, examining current
and alternative investment management structures and conducting a
money manager search based on
the revised structure proposed by
the charter. The purpose of the
review is to enhance long term investment performance of the pension fund. Both the faculty and the
staff pension plans are being studied by their respective boards to
accommodate changes in funding
and legislation.
The portion of the new Student
Information System which affects
the Student Records, the financial
accounting records and Award
processing was implemented in
March, 1991. Incorporated into the
new system is the new grading
policy. The first phase of the Integrated Human Resources Information System is targeted for implementation in late 1991. This phase
will include payroll processing, benefits administration, appointments
and human resources information
for faculty, staff and students. The
Purchasing department has implemented a new Material Management
System which includes a new purchasing system and a fixed assets
component. Plant Operations has
successfully implemented their new
Maintenance Management System
which replaces the old Work-in-
Process system. The FRS Review
Project has undertaken to improve
specific areas of the Financial
Records System (FRS), including
the monthly ledger sheet report format. An FRS User Advisory Committee has been formed to provide
advise on current and future improvements needed in the FRS.
During the past year, construction was completed on the Botanical
Garden - Greenhouse and workshop
project and on the University Apartment building development. Construction began on the David Lam
Management Research Centre, including a major Food Services Facility ($11.6 million), the Student
Services Centre (an addition to
Brock Hall), including a permanent
Disability Centre Facility ($9.5 million), the University Services Building ($12.1 million), Ritsumeikan/
UBC House ($8.1 million) and the
National Centres of Excellence addition to the Bookstore ($6.8 million). Construction will commence
shortly on the West Parkade ($10.1
million), the First Nations Longhouse
($4.4 million) and the Centre for
Integrated Computer Sciences Research/Computing Sciences Building ($18.1 million). Eight other major facilities with a total value of
approximately $110 million are in
various stages of planning or design.
Acadia House and Sopron House,
the 114 unit University Apartments
rental complex, was completed in the
summer of 1991. The project is part of
the University's endeavor to assist new
Non-Salary Expenditures as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1985/86 to 1990/91
Percent
30
28
32
J-   26
-   24
16    '— 1-
1985/86
1986/87
UBC Alta
-   18
'
1987/88
1988/89
1989/90
1990/91
Sask
Man
UWO
UTO              McGill
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers
Object of expense calculations are taken as a percentage of net expenditures, which includes cost recoveries.
therefore the sum of the object of expense percentages will exceed 100.
UBC/Office of Budget and Planning
Non-Academic Salaries as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1985/86 to 1990/91
34
34
Percent
32   -
30
28  -
26   -*-
24
30
1985/86
1986787
UBC Alta
1987/88
Sask
Man
1988/89
UWO
1989/90
UTO McGill
 h-    22
1990/91
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers
Object of expense calculations are taken as a percentage of net expenditures, which includes cost recoveries,
therefore the sum of the object of expense percentages will exceed 100.
UBC/Office of Budget and Planning
faculty and staff in dealing with the high
cost of housing in the Lower Mainland.
The official ribbon cutting ceremony to
celebrate the opening was September
3, 1991. The occupancy rate is 100%
and overall response to the project has
been very favourable.
A Faculty Housing Assistance
Program designed to help newly appointed faculty acquire a home in
the Lower Mainland was approved
at the September 6, 1990 Board of
Governors meeting. The Program
will be in place for a trial period of
three years to June 30, 1993 at
which time the Board of Governors
may elect to extend the Program.
Under the terms of the Program eligible faculty members may obtain
either a lump sum, non-repayable
amount of $10,000 or a $25,000
interest free loan to be repaid over 5
years. During the first seven months
of the Program, 16 faculty received
the lump sum payment and 15 received interest free loans. During
the first five months of fiscal 1991/
92, 43 faculty have participated in
the Program.
The UBC Real Estate Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of
the university, has substantially
completed the first phase of active
development of the Hampton Place
project. This first phase includes an
86 unit apartment/townhome development on campus land which will
be completed by the fall of 1991.
The second lot of the Hampton Place
project was successfully tendered
in the summer of 1991. Construction of this townhome development
is expected to commence in the fall
of 1991. The Company has also
undertaken a number of projects
related to the University's real es
tate holdings. The principal objective of the Corporation is to take
responsible and pragmatic steps to
make good use of the University's
land holdings, not required for academic needs in the foreseeable future, to improve UBC's long-term
capital and endowment programs.
UBC Research Enterprises Inc. was
incorporated as a wholly owned subsidiary of the University in April 1990.
The purpose of the Company is to
encourage and promote the creation,
testing, development, production and
commercialization of intellectual property owned by the University. The
Company will work to facilitate and
hasten the transfer of technology from
the University to the private sector. In
the past year the Company's efforts
focused on prototype development and
commercial assessment of selected research projects. UBCREPORTS 3.1991
S i
October 7 -
October 19
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
Reconstructive Surgery Of The Rheumatoid Forefoot. Dr. Richard J. Claridge.
Eye Care Centre, 910 W. 10th, 3rd fir., at
7:30am. Call 875-4646.
University Computing Services
Micro Lunch
Database Services. Frank Flyn. Computer Science 460 from 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-8938.
Carpool Matching
A service for faculty, staff and students.
Call Karen Pope, Dean's Office, Applied
Science at 822-3701 and find your area
match.
High Blood Pressure Clinic
Volunteers (over 18 years) needed,
treated or not, to participate in clinical
drug trials. Call Dr. J. Wright or Mrs.
Nancy Ruedy in Medicine at 822-7134.
Stress/Blood Pressure Study
Learn how your body responds to stress.
Call Dr. Wolfgang Linden in Psychology
at 822-3800.
Wednesday Noon Hour Concert       Political Science Lecture
iwr-■<£-vs?* v Jerry Domer, oboe; Jesse
| i ..*. : Read, bassoon; Martin
|.j. ■• :. ■:, Berinbaum, trumpet. Re-
j!:: v cital Hall at 12:30pm. $2
Ir ..      at the door. Call 822-5574.
Faculty Development Seminar
Teaching Effectiveness/Recent Research
On The Brain. Robert Aiken, Curric. Consultant, Vancouver City College. Angus
33 from 3:30-5pm. Call 822-9149.
Religious Studies Lecture/Demonstration
Dogen's Zen: His Philosophy And Practices. Zen Master Hosaka Takeo. Interpreter, Mrs. Hosaka. Asian Centre Auditorium from 7-9:30pm. Call 822-3357.
I
THURSDAY, OC1
Pharmacology Seminar
Myocardial Performance of Diabetic Hypertensive Rats. Dr. Soter Dai, Pharmaceutical Sciences. IRC#2from 11:30am-
12:30pm. Call 822-2575.
Experimental Medicine Lecture
Use Of Fluorine Techniques To Determine Intracellular Free Mg2+.
Dr. Long Jun Dai, Nephrology, Dept of Medicine. University Hospital, UBC Site ACU-
GF279from4:30-5:30pm. Call 822-7215.
School of Nursing Marion
Woodward Lecture
Wired For The Future: Can It Promote
Community Health? Professor Nancy
Milio, PhD, Health Policy, Nursing, U. of
N. Carolina, Chapel Hill. IRC #6 at 8pm.
Call 822-7417.
Chemistry Lecture
The Prediction Of Binding
Constants In Aqueous Solution For Biologically Important Molecules. Professor Dudley H. Williams,
Cambridge U. Chem. 124
(central wing) at 2:30pm. Call 822-4511/
6931.
%
m.
1st'-.
Co-operative Education Information Meeting
International Association For The Exchange Of Students For Technical Experience. Janet Land, IAESTE Representative/Chair. For students of engineering,
the sciences, and related fields who are
interested in working overseas. IRC #3
from 12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-6271.
Faculty Development Symposia
Professional Schools. Panel comprised
of past/present winners of university teaching prizes who will address issues surrounding teaching/learning. Angus 104
from 3:30-5pm. Call 822-9149.
President's Lectures On Classics
Roman Mosaics/Mosaicists. Professor
Katherine Dunbabin. McMaster U.
Lasserre 102 at 12:30pm. Call822-5675.
Canada's Constitutional Crisis: How Did
We Get Here? Dr. Alan Cairns, DPhil,
Political Science. Chair: Dean Lynn Smith,
Law. Curtis 101/102 from 12:30-2pm. Call
222-5238.
'   i j ii. i ■■■-i.iii-i' -.-i tri :   . ;v;,i(." ft, ;■':'
Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand
Rounds
rp
'r" Genes And Cancer.   Dr.
Tom Ehlen.    University
I   j',     ;Hospital, Shaughnessy
'•-»)..■»:"4-r;'*.}-> Site D308 at 8am.   Call
If*!' I >mA 875-2171.
d :.£■. ,.,i.:?!Hk:
Animal Science Seminar
Using Behaviour To Assess Welfare.
Dr. Ian Duncan, Acting Dir., Centre for
Animal Welfare, U. of Guelph.
MacMillan 158 from 1:30-2:30pm. Call
822-4593.
Chemical Engineering Seminar
Oxidative Coupling Of Methane.
Shanna Knights, grad student. Chemical Engineering 206 at 3:30pm. Call
822-3238.
Fluids/Thermal Bag Lunch
Informal Talk. Professor Ashok
Malhotra, Mechanical Engineering, India Inst, of Technology. Civil/Mechanical Eng. 1212 from 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-5562.
Economics Seminar
Real Business Cycle Methodology. Mark
Watson, Northwestern U. Buchanan D225
from 4-5:30pm. Call 822-2876.
University Computing Services
Workshop
MS-DOS Workshop. Charles Tremewen.
UCS Annex from 9:30am-12:30pm. Fee:
$50, students $37.50. Register CSI209.
Call 822-8938.
Vancouver Institute Saturday
Night Lecture
;■■;•-:-.ii;.< Insect Semiochemicals: A
j   ", ;..i.;;;;: ||Smelly Business.    Dr.
;.. !.!! •;'■■< i| Keith   Slessor,   Dept.
-     jChemistry/Biochem,
' '   -'.aSFU.  IRC #2 at 8:15pm.
'0311822-5675.
UBC Speakers Bureau
Would yourgroup like to know more about
topics ranging from fruit flies to computers
of the future? More than 400 topics to
choose from. Call 822-6167 (24-hr. ans.
machine).
Graduate Student Centre
Live entertainment every Friday in the
Fireside Lounge from 8-11 pm. No cover.
Call 822-3203.
Call For Former UBC Athletes
;, i   «»:'!..t| Athletics is updating its
•1       '*' 'Vs I mailing list of former ath-
*-    -z-'f $»-> != 'e,'c ,eam players: origina-
|   . ;;   <f   Z tors/contributors to pro-
'.':'      , | grams in place today.   If
you qualify or are knowledgeable in the location of any other past
player, call 822-8921 after 4:30pm.
Fine Arts Gallery
Open Tues.-Fri. from 10am-5pm. Saturdays 12pm-5pm on. Free admission.
Main Library. Call 822-2759.
Health Sciences Bookshop
Open Saturday
The Bookshop is open Mon.-Sat. from
9:30am-5pm in the Medical Student/
Alumni Centre at Heather and 12th Ave.
Call 879-8547.
Executive Programmes
Business seminars. Oct 7-11: Essential Management Skills, $1,375.
Oct. 15-16: Assertiveness for Managers, $495. Oct. 16-18: Logistics
Management, $950. Oct. 17-18:
Guidelines for the New Manager,
$495. E.D. MacPhee Executive Conference Centre.   Call 822-8400.
Centre for Continuing Education
Programs
Professional Development Series
Oct/Nov Workshops for Practising
Language Teachers: Teaching for
English in Japan, Videotaping in the
Language Class. Stimulating Student Talk/Public Speaking/Debating.
Tues. evenings from 7-9pm. Call
222-5208.
Reading, Writing/Study Skills
Centre
«.kt!-.-j--•*-<<( Non-credit  courses  in
rv%;   T'u p grammar, composition,
: study skills, reading for
■ speed/comprehension/
. business writing/reports/
proposals.
¥
Courses begin Oct. 1 and continue. Call
222-5245.
Language Programs/Services
Non-credit courses in beginner, intermediate or advanced levels of conversational French, Spanish, Japanese, Mandarin and Cantonese have
begun. 10-weeks, Tuesday/Thursday evenings and Saturday mornings.   Call 222-5227.
Statistical Consulting/Research
Laboratory
SCARL is operated by the Department of
Statistics to provide statistical advice to
faculty and graduate students working on
research problems. Forms for appointments available in Ponderosa Annex C-
210. Call 822-4037.
Muscle Soreness Study
If you primarily walk for exercise please
call Donna at Rehab Medicine. Volunteers 20-45 years required for research
study. Call 822-7571.
Seniors Hypertension Study
Volunteers aged 60-80 years with mild to
moderate hypertension, treated or not,
needed to participate in a high blood
pressure study. Call Dr. Wright or Nancy
Ruedy in Medicine at 822-7134.
Herpes Research Study
Participants needed for treatment studies of
shingles (herpes zoster) and first herpes
simplex infections, with new antiviral agents.
Also ongoing study for males 18-45 years
with recurrent herpes simplex. Dr. Stephen
Sacks, Medicine, sponsoring physician. Call
822-7565 or leave your name/number at
687-7711, pager 2887.
Heart/Lung Response Study
jst At rest and during exercise.
■■•■' Volunteers age 45-75 years,
j all fitness levels, required.
J No maximal testing. Sched-
)feffl uled at your convenience.
JMi Call Fiona Manning, School
of Rehab. Medicine, 822-7708.
IfTf
IMf
Lung Disease Study
Subjects with emphysema or fibrosis
needed to investigate means of improving lungfunctionwithoutdrugs. Call Fiona
Manning, School of Rehab Medicine, 822-
7708.
Bereavement Study
Participants needed for a study investigating the long-term effects of adolescent
bereavement. Must have lost either parent at least five years ago, and have been
between 13 and 17 years at the time of the
loss. Two one-hour interviews required.
Please call Ann McKintuck in Nursing at
224-3921/3999.
Retirement Study
Women concerned about retirement planning needed for an 8-week Retirement
Preparation seminar. Call Sara Cornish
Counselling Psychology at 931 -5052.
Personality Study
,.,!j||p: ;i-> . Volunteers aged 30 or
ii"!!*"'! : more needed to complete
'"" ; a personality question-
, ■ ■■' ,£.,(-! : i naire. Required, 2 visits,
■; ''JilllfH '■: about 3 hours total. Par-
i..! i »n.: ticipants receive a free personality assessment and a $20 stipend.
Call Janice in Dr. Livesley's office, Psychiatry, Detwiller 2N2, 822-7895.
PMS Research Study
Volunteers needed for a study of an
investigational medication to treat PMS.
Call Doug Keller, Psychiatry, University
Hospital, Shaughnessy site at 822-7318.
Hair Loss Research
Women aged 19-49 years experiencing
moderate hair loss, crown area only, are
needed for study. Must be able to attend
1-2 times weekly for 9 months. Honorarium paid. Call Sherry in Dermatology
at 874-8138.
Dermatology Acne Study
Volunteers between 14-35 years with
moderate facial acne needed for 4 visits
during a three month period. Honorarium
paid. Call Sherry at 874-8138.
Surplus Equipment Recycling
Facility
All surplus items. Every Wednesday, 12-
3pm. Task Force Bldg., 2352 Health
Sciences Mall. Call 822-2813.
Student Volunteers
'ii'. i";:«-:?' F'nd an interesting and
ji ' : ' #' -/j challenging volunteer job
i! [•• ''fffy- - witn Volunteer Connec-
f\ P^rrff'tH, tions, Student Counselling
and Resources Centre,
Brock 200. Call 822-3811.
Narcotics Anonymous Meetings
Every Tuesday (including holidays) from
12:30-2pm, University Hospital, UBC Site,
Room M311 (through Lab Medicine from
Main Entrance). Call 873-1018 (24-hour
Help Line).
Fitness Appraisal
Administered by Physical Education and
Recreation through the John M. Buchanan
Fitness and Research Centre. Students
$25, others $30. Call 822-4356.
Faculty/Staff Badminton Club
Fridays from 6:30-10pm in Gym A of the
Robert Osborne Centre. Cost is $15 plus
library card. Call Bernard at 822-6809 or
731-9966.
Botanical Garden
Open from 10am-5pm daily. Free admission on Wednesdays. Call 822-4208.
Nitobe Garden
asHBfw«: Open from 10am-5pm
'! •.!■-.»'.' daily. Free admission on
.!     Y;\       Wednesdays.    Call 822-
i      '■■'" 6038.
r     il
Advertise in
UBC Reports
Deadline for paid
advertisements for
the October 17
issue is noon,
October 7.
For information,
phone 822-3131
To place an ad,
phone 822-6163 6    UBC REPORTS October 3,1991
Students introduced to
university experience
By CHARLES KER
Back in 1910, a dozen towns vied
for the UBC campus.
Among them, Kamloops boasted a
clear, bracing sunny atmosphere and a
winter cold enough for ice hockey.
Nelson insisted it be the site because Kootenay Lake provided a great
rowing course and the British Empire
had been built on rowing, cricket and
football.
These were just a few historical tidbits
dished out to a small group of enquiring
first-year students participating in a new
undergraduate lecture series.
Following the lead of universities
in the U.S., UBC has launched the
First Year Experience Program, aimed
at helping new students adjust to university life.
"Coming into an academic community like ours, which is large and
unfamiliar, can cause some students
to develop a sense of alienation,"
said Ken Kush, director of UBC's
Student Counselling and Resources
Centre.
"This program is designed to provide them with a sense of
connectedness and give them a handle
on why they are here, what the university experience is all about and how to
succeed personally and academically."
During the first two months of
classes, 32 students from the Faculty of Arts gather each week with
a handful of faculty to discuss a
range of topical and practical issues. Following a one-hour presentation by a faculty member on a
specific topic, participants split
up into four groups to further analyse what they've learned.
Graeme Wynn, associate dean of
Arts, explained the history of univer
sities and UBC in the opening session.
His presentation ended with a name-
game in which students familiarized
themselves with the places of deans,
department heads, senior administrators, students and support staff in the
university.
"It helps give students a better understanding of where they fit into the
overall university structure and also
helps them make the most of their time
here," said Wynn.
Other lecture themes include: getting the most from lectures, maintaining a balanced lifestyle, interpersonal
style and stereotypes, the importance
of career planning and living in a
multicultural society.
First-year experience programs
have been operating in the U.S. for
more than 10 years with some schools
having up to 1,200 students enrolled
in "freshman experience" courses.
Kush added that results show the
courses boost students 'confidence and
overall academic achievement.
Among the Canadian universities
which have implemented similar programs are the universities of Calgary,
Western Ontario, Prince Edward Island, Victoria and Simon Fraser University.
Wynn hopes the UBC program, introduced as a pilot-project this year, will
grow in popularity, along with the university's mentoring programs. In the Faculty
of Arts, mentoring matches some 250
scholarship winners and residents of communities in the interior of B.C. with 45
faculty volunteers.
More than 130 mentors — graduate students, post-doctoral fellows
and faculty — have so far volunteered for the Faculty of Science
mentoring program.
Photo h> Cidvin Wilson
UBC Bookstore Director Debbie Harvie sees the bookstore as the "department store for campus."
Bookstore largest in Canada
By GAVIN WILSON
Move over, Duthie's.
With 80,000 titles on its database,
the UBC Bookstore is already one of
the largest bookstores in North
America.
Now, a survey shows that the bookstore is the seventh largest college or
university bookstore in North America
and the largest in Canada in terms of
sales volume.
According to figures released by
the National Association of College
Stores, UBC ranks higher than bookstores at much larger universities, such
as Penn State, with 59.000 students, or
Ohio State, with 55,000.
UBC is ranked 23rd overall in terms
Animal fat culprit in obesity
By ABE HEFTER
Animal fats versus plant fats. The
difference in the way the body burns
off the two could have tremendous
implications for people who are trying
to lose weight, according to UBC researcher Peter Jones.
Jones, an assistant professor in the
School of Family and Nutritional Sciences, has completed a study which
suggests that obese people tend to
store animal fats more readily than
non-obese people. The study, supported by the B.C. Medical Services
Foundation, was done in conjunction
with Dr. Laird Birmingham and Dr.
Terry PhangofSt. Paul's Hospital, but
not before Jones had thoroughly investigated the differences in the way
in which the body utilizes animal, or
saturated, fat and plant, or poly unsaturated, fat.
His first study, done in 1985, revealed that people tend to retain animal fatty acids, which are the building
blocks of fat, and burn off vegetable
fatty acids.
"That discovery, which looked only
at fatty acids, got the ball rolling," said
Jones. "In 1988, we decided to factor
entire meals into the equation."
Jones fed normal weight people
diets that differed only in the type of
fat they consumed: animal versus
plant, or, for the purpose of this experiment, lard and tallow versus corn
oil. What he discovered was that, after
a meal, people burned off plant fat
more quickly than animal fat — which
prompted him to take the entire experiment a step further.
"I wanted to determine whether
overweight people have a different
way of disposing of dietary fat," said
Jones, "and whether this difference
was perhaps due to a defect in the
body's regulatory mechanism."
The answer was yes.
"I repeated the second stage of the
experiment, but added a group of obese
"It's not how much these people eat, but what they eat."
individuals," said Jones. He discovered that although obese people burn
off plant fat at the same rate as non-
obese individuals, these overweight
people didn't rid their bodies of animal fats as efficiently as non-obese
people do.
"At this point, it's difficult to explain why there is a difference in obese
and non-obese people when it comes
to metabolizing animal fats," said
Jones. "I hope to be able to come to
grips with that in a further study."
At any rate, there certainly appears
to be a case for obese people who
claim they aren't big eaters.
"According tomy results, it'snotonly
how much these people eat, but what
they eat. And if they consume foods
high in animal fats, the resulting calories will tend to hang around their
bodies."
Jones said another study done has
shown that fish oils appear to be burned
off at an even higher rate than plant
oils — another significant step in the
study of obesity.
"There is still very little known
about the causes of obesity," said Jones.
"But the apparent metabolic problem
that prompts saturated fats to be stored
in the body sheds new and significant
light on the subject."
WestSide
■1
Graphic Design
Computer Graphics
Camera-Ready Art
Photography
"Serving UBC since 1986"
Call Bob Parker or Leza Macdonald
Phone 733-3739 Fax 7334725
of enrolment, but with total net sales
of $24.8 million, claims seventh place
in sales volume. That is up from ninth
place the previous year.
Topping the list is the Harvard-
MIT bookstore, with total net sales of
$62.7 million. The University of Toronto bookstore, UBC's closest rival
in Canada, is ranked 12th overall in
North America.
"We're sixth largest in terms of
general i nterest books and that' s something to be very proud of," said UBC
Bookstore Director Debbie Harvie.
"Bookstores are known by their general book listings."
Another reason for the high sales
volume at the UBC Bookstore is that
the campus is relatively remote from
the rest ofthe city, said Harvie.
"We're the department store for
campus," she said, pointing out that
the bookstore sells everything from
toothbrushes to computer work-stations.
Computer sales alone are worth $8
million each >ear and the bookstore
also has stationery, clothing, gifts and
souvenirs, a post office, and "one of
the best art departments in the Lower
Mainland." she said.
As well as serving the campus community, the bookstore attracts customers from throughout the Lower
Mainland and tourists who visit campus or attend conferences here.
UBC Reports Classifieds
Get your message across!
To place an ad, phone 822-6163
The Friends
of Chamber Music
I Musici De Montreal with Jon Kimura Parker, Piano
Shanghai Quartet and Peter Frankl, Piano
Tokyo Quartet
Shostakovich Quartet
Sine Nomine Quartet
Bartok Quartet
Beaux Arts Trio
Endcllion Quartet and Daniel McKelway, Clarinet
Peabody Trio
Colorado Quartet and Elisabeth Braden, Soprano
Complete Season - $135 (Includes GST) or
Mini Series of 5 - $85 (Students half price)
Pick up a brochure at the Magic Flute or Sikoras
or phone Doug Tailing 876-6474 or Eric Wilson 437-5716 UBC REPORTS October 3,1991
Giving is fun at United
Way Oktoberfest
United W^y
It promises to be the most mouthwatering deal in town.
Barbecued smokies, and all the
trimmings, will be served up by the
Plant Operations Department at its
annual Oktoberfest, Oct. 4, from
11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. at 2200
West Mall, in support of UBC's
United Way campaign.
Live musical entertainment
will be provided by the Plant
Operations Tradesmen, members
of the various trades in the department.
Cost of admission is a minimum donation to the campus
United Way campaign.
A mid-campaign reception
for volunteers on Oct. 10 will
feature an early bird draw for
UBC faculty and staff who have
already made their contributions. Prizes include a trip for
two to New Orleans, gift certificates, theatre tickets and books.
The festivities begin at 3:30 p.m.
in the ballroom ofthe Graduate
Student Centre.
UBC is hoping to raise
$280,000 of the $17.5-million
goal set by the United Way of
the Lower Mainland. The campus fundraiser continues through
the month of October.
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
• research design
• sampling
»data analysis
> forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D.
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508       Home: (604) 263-5394
Classified
Classified advertising can be purchased from Community Relations.
Phone 822-6163. Ads placed by faculty, staff and students cost $12.84
for 7 lines/issue ($.81 for each additional word). Off-campus advertisers
are charged$14.98 for 7 lines/issue ($.86 for each additional word). (All
prices include G. S. T.) Monday, October 7 at noon is the deadline for the
next issue of UBC Reports which appears on Thursday, October 17.
Deadline forthe following edition on October31 is noon Tuesday, October
22. All ads must be paid in advance in cash, by cheque or internal
requisition.
For Sale
OCTOBER SALE: of mailable (meaning lightweight) gifts at whsle. prices.
B.C. designs; on silk ties, composer
t's, kitchen linens, scarves and small
pottery pieces. Jewellery by
Edibaubles. FESTIVE FABRICS,
3210 Dunbar at 16th. 11-3 Tel. 736-
1016
CAR FOR SALE: '83 GM Celebrity,
6 cylinder, 143,000 km, $2,500
O.B.O. 986-9701
Services
NEW DAYCARE: UBC has a new
daycare centre opening October 1,
1991. If you need quality licenced
care for your child aged three to five
please come to 5590 Osoyoos Cres.
to apply or call 822-5343 for further
information.
Miscellaneous
DO IT RIGHT! Statistical and methodological consultation; data analysis; data base management; sampling techniques; questionnaire design, development, and administration. Over 15 years of research and
consulting experience in the social
sciences and related fields. 689-
7164.
PART TIME JOBS AVAILABLE:
$636.00 per month guaranteed working evenings & Saturdays or cash
paid weekly for commissioned day
work calling out of our office. No
experience necessary. Start immediately. Call 244-1871 between 10:00
AM & 8:00 PM.
Clinical competition highlight
of UBC Health Sciences Week
By CONNIE FILLETTI
Issues in health research and care,
including the future directions of nursing, will be explored during UBC's
fourth annual Health Sciences Week,
Oct. 6 to 12.
One ofthe highlights ofthe week's
events and activities is the Health Care
Team Clinical Competition, designed
to enhance students' knowledge about
other health professions and their roles
in the clinical arena.
"The original concept was to bring
all the health care disciplines together
and allow the students to interact,"
explained Dr. Ravindra Shah, a professor in the Faculty of Dentistry and
chair of the competition committee.
"The competition has evolved to
recognize that the objective of that
interaction has to be for the ultimate
benefit of the patient, to provide them
with total health care," he added.
Shah believes that the competition
was the most successful student event
on campus last year, attended by a
crowd of approximately 700.
Faculty attendance was also high
for the first time in the history of the
event.
Impressedby its educational value,
the Faculty of Medicine has made
attendance at this year's competition
mandatory for first year medical students as part of their curriculum.
The feasibility of other health sciences faculties and schools incorporating the Health Care Team Clinical
Competition into their first year programs is currently being explored.
"The health care needs ofthe population increasingly require a team approach and current approaches to prevention, and treatment of injury and
disease must involve the combined
expertise of many health care disciplines," said Dr. Paul Robertson, coordinator of Health Sciences.
"A team approach is essential to
the the needs of a patient including the
complex health problems of older
adults, severe and multiple traumatic
injuries, and patients whose host defence system has been compromised,"
he added.
The Health Sciences at UBC include medicine, dentistry, nursing,
pharmaceutical sciences, occupational
therapy, physiotherapy, social work,
audiology and speech sciences, clinical psychology, counselling psychology, family and nutritional sciences
and laboratory medical sciences.
Three teams of students will be
selected from the senior year of
each ofthe Health Sciences disciplines lo compete in the clinical
competition. The teams will be
presented with a hypothetical patient and asked questions about
the case. Their responses will be
assessed by a panel of judges.
The Health Care Team Clinical
Competition will be held before an
audience Oct. 10 between 12:30 p.m.
and 2:30 p.m. in IRC lecture theatre 2.
The public is invited to attend.
Call Sue Calthrop at 822-3737 for
more information.
Lecture series planned
to mark Science and
Technology Week
JS YOUR BABY
BETWEEN
2 & 22 MONTHS?
Join our research
on infant
development
at U.B.C! Just
one visit to our
infant play-room.
Please contact
Dr. Baldwin for
more information:
822-8231.
National Science and Technology Week, Oct. 18-27, will be
marked at UBC with a series of
lectures on the Networks of Centres of Excellence.
UBC is the headquarters for four of
the 15 national centres of excellence
and is associated with nine more. The
lectures will look at how the centres of
excellence were created and what fundamental questions they seek to answer.
Robert Miller, UBC vice-president
of research, will speak Monday, Oct.
21, on B.C.'s contribution to the national centres of excellence program;
Michael Hayden, director of the Genetic Diseases Network, talks Tuesday, Oct. 22; Michael Smith, director
of the Protein Engineering Network,
speaks Wed., Oct. 23; Robert Hancock,
director of the Bacterial Diseases Network, lectures on Thurs., Oct. 24; and
Paul Leblond, director of the Ocean
Production Enhancement Network,
speaks Fri., Oct. 25.
The lectures are offered by the UBC
Centre for Continuing Education and
will be held each night at 7:30 p.m. in
lecture theatre 1, Woodward IRC. Registration is $50. For more information,
call 222-5238.
Chefs Harvest Festival
October 1 to November 20,1991
Spend The Night and Dine On Us
Escape to a cozy mountain retreat for a mouth-watering night of fine dining and relaxation at the
Chateau Whistler Resort's Harvest Festival. Relax in this breathtaking setting while sampling fresh
locally-grown produce. Award-winning Chef Bernard Casavant has designed a bountiful harvest
menu in The Wildflower Restaurant. Treat your palate to such culinary creations as Sauteed Prawns
and Cilantro Ginger Noodlecakes. Tempt yourselfwith Apple Wood Smoked Duck Breast with Three-
Onion Confit. Delight your sweet tooth with Pecan Roasted Pumpkin Flan.
After dinner, retreat to the warmth ofthe fireplace in the Mallard Lounge. Relax in the hottubs, saunas
and steam rooms in the Chateau Health Club. Book a massage or go for a walk on the nearby trails.
Pamper yourself and experience the bounty ofthe harvest.
$99.00
per room/per night
Single or double occupancy
Sunday through Thursday
Includes:
* Premiere Room Accommodation
* Harvest Festival table d'hote menu in The Wildflower Restaurant
Call the Chateau Whistler Resort at (604) 938-8000.
Based on availability. Advance reservations required. Not applicable to groups.
Weekend rate available at $115.00 single or double occupancy.
Taxes and gratuities are not included 8    UBC REPORTS October 3.1991
Polish researcher gets helping hand at UBC
By GAVIN WILSON
Polish scientist Julitta Gajewska's
research was hampered by a lack of
facilities and equipment at the Agricultural University of Warsaw, where
she teaches.
But thanks to a program based in
UBC's Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, she is now working in the lab of
UBC soil scientist Shannon Berch and
has access to the anaerobic transfer
hood, other equipment for work with
anaerobic bacteria, and the electron
microscopes she needs to advance her
studies.
Gajewska said the opportunity for her
to come to UBC is "the best situation.
"I can compare strains I isolate
from soils here with these from Poland. For me, it is wonderful," she
said.
Gajewska is here as part of an
exchange program funded by the
Dr. And Mrs. A.S. Dekaban Foundation. Dr. Dekaban was born in
Poland and practiced medicine in
both Canada and the United States
before retiring.
The foundation was established in
1982 with the Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences to help the exchange of ideas
and new developments in agriculture
between UBC academics and Polish
agricultural universities.
Gajewska, who arrived in August
and will be here until the end of December, is an agricultural microbiologist whose research involves developing anaerobic strains of bacteria that
will quickly break down garbage into
usable compost.
She is one ofthe two junior Polish
agriculture faculty members who come
to UBC each year. A total of 16 Polish
academics have arrived here since the
program began in 1984.
The visiting academics have conducted research on soil science, horticulture, agricultural engineering, computer simulation modeling, food science and technology, the physiology
and management of livestock, and
problems related to environmental
pollution.
Most of the scholars have been
from the Agricultural University of
Warsaw, but others ha\e come From
agricultural universities in Poznan,
Krakow, Lublin and Wroclaw.
With the dramatic political changes
sweeping Eastern Europe, a new aspect ofthe Dekaban Foundation's work
is helping the Polish agricultural sector shift from a centralized to a free
market economy.
"People in Poland say they want to
learn more about economics," said
Victor Runeckles, chair ofthe Dekaban
Foundation Committee and professor
of Plant Science.
"They recognize they need to learn
a great deal very quickly. They know
virtually nothing of market economics. They rccogni/e that it will be a
hard grind to turn an entire economic
structure around."
To help meet this challenge,
the Dekaban Foundation sponsored UBC Agricultural Economics professors Tim Hazledine and
Richard Barichello, who held
workshops in two Polish centres
last summer.
Attended by academics and offi-
Photo by Chris Petty
AMS President Jason Brettpresents the 31st Great Trekker Award to Rosemary Brown atthe annual dinner
commemorating the Great Trek. The prominent activist and former politician graduated from UBC in the
mid-1960s.
dais from the Ministry of Agriculture
and Food I: onomy, the workshops
examine agiicultural economics,
market-, distribution and small farm
enterprise development.
"We < -bviously can't solve Poland's
problems alone, but we feel we have
something to offer them," said
Runeckles.
Holding more workshops, however,
may not be the best route, he added.
Getting things done in Poland
proved to be very difficult. Language
difficulties and periodic trouble with
communications links (for awhile it
was impossible to phone from one
campus of the University of Warsaw
to the other, across town) compounded
the organizational problems.
"Although the workshops were
unquestionably successful, we've had
second thoughts about whether this is
really the way to go. There are probably more cost-effective ways of contributing to Polish agricultural development, because we were only able to
reach a relatively small group," said
Runeckles.
One alternative approach the foundation is now looking into is producing
textbooks based on the UBC Access
course manual on introductory agricultural economics, translated into Polish.
The text "will not just be a translation," he said, but will also be put into
the Polish context.
The foundation also funds journal
subscriptions for libraries at five of
Poland's agricultural schools. Faced
with severe shortages of hard currencies, libraries find it extremely difficult to maintain journal collections.
Space station research subject of
international forum held at UBC
By GAVIN WILSON
Scientists from around the world
gathered at UBC this week to discuss
the proposed international space station.
The space station Freedom, a joint
project of NASA and the space agen
cies of Canada, Japan and Europe, will
be assembled in earth orbit beginning
in 1996.
The International Forum on the
Scientific Utilization of the Space
Station meets each year, bringing
together scientific advisory commit-
The President's Series on the Future of Canada
*cia
Keeping Canada Together?
It is possible that Canada is on the verge of breaking-up.
In this series of five free noon-hour lectures, UBC academics will explore
Canada's current constitutional crisis and consider possible futures.
The series will be chaired by Lynn Smith, Dean of Law.
■ October 17
How Did We Get Here?
ALAN CAIRNS, DPhil
Dept of Political Science
■ October 24
Renewed Federalism or Two
Nations?
ROBIN ELLIOT, LLM
Faculty of Law
■ October 31
The Process of Constitutional
Change
AVIGAILEISENBERG, PhD
Dept of Political Science
■ November 7
Public Opinion and
Constitutional Change
RICHARD JOHNSTON, PhD
Dept of Political Science
■ November 14
Alternative Futures
Panel:
KOGILA ADAM-MOODLEY, PhD
Dept of Social and Educational
Studies; Director, Multicultural Liaison
REJEAN BEAUDOIN, PhD
Dept of French
PHILIP RESNICK, PhD
Dept of Political Science
VERONICA STRONG-BOAG, PhD
Director, Centre for Research in
Women's Studies and Gender
Relations
5 Thursdays, Oct 17-Nov 14:
Lecture: 12:30-1:30 pm
Question period: 1:30-2 pm
Rm 101/102, George F. Curtis Bldg,
Faculty of Law, 1822 East Mall,
UBC campus. FREE.
Pre-registration not required.
Inquiries: UBC Centre for Continuing Education, 222-5238
tees from each of the four space station partners to recommend experiments most appropriate for the space
station. This was Canada's year to
host the forum.
"The symposium provided the
B.C. research community an opportunity to learn about some specific
areas of science being considered for
investigation on the space station."
said Dr. Donald Brooks, chair ofthe
Canadian advisory committee and
holder of a joint appointment in the
departments of Chemistry and Pathology at UBC.
Brooks added that the Canadian
Space Agency is expected to announce funding opportunities for
space station experimentation within
the next few years but that funds for
preliminary research are available
now.
Canada's contribution to the space
station is a Mobile Servicing System,
an advanced mobile robotic manipulator based on the Canadarm used on
the space shuttles. This investment
entitles Canada to a portion of space
station resources, including crew and
laboratory experiments.
During the forum, scientists from
each of the four space agencies presented seminars on contemporary research projects relevant toexperimen-
lation on the space station. Some of
the topics covered were materials and
fluid sciences in reduced gravity, observing and sensing sciences, such as
earth observation, and astronomy and
life sciences in space.
Constitutional change to be
discussed by faculty in public
lecture series
~\
A new constitutional package is
on the table leaving Canadians with
five months of public hearings.
What does it all mean?
Starting Oct. 17, UBC faculty
will be offering their views on the
government's current proposals for
constitutional change in a series of
five, free noon-hour lectures.
The President's Series on the
Future of Canada will be held at
UBC on consecutive Thursdays
and downtown at the Robson
Square Conference Centre on
Fridays. Lecture times are 12:30
p.m. to 1:30 p.m. at the Faculty
of Law's Curtis Building and
noon to 1 p.m. at the Judge
White Theatre in Robson
Square. Both campus and downtown lectures will be followed
by a question period.
Topics include:
-How did we get here? (Oct. 17,
18); Political Science Prof. Alan
Cairns will discuss the current
constitutional situation in the context of post-Meech Lake alienation of Quebec and the competing
constitutional demands of interest
groups.
- Renewed Federalism or
Two Nations'.' (Oct. 24. 25 i:
Robin Elliot, a professor in the
Faculty of Law, will examine
the strengths and weaknesses
of various solutions to the constitutional impasse.
- The Process of Constitutional
Change (Oct. 31, Nov. 1); political scientist Avigail Eisenberg
looks at the issue of political fairness as it relates to changing
present and future constitutional
arrangements.
- Public Opinion and Constitutional Change (Nov.7, 8);
Richard Johnston, also with
UBC's Political Science Department, will talk about opinion polls and his own research
on Canadians' constitutional
preferences.
- Alternative Futures (Nov. 14,
15); Panelists discussing possible
scenarios for Canada's future include: Kogila Adam-Moodley,
director, UBC Multicultural Liaison Office; Associate Prof. Rejean
Beaudoin, Department of French;
Political Science Prof. Philip
Resnick: and Veronica Strong-
Boag, director of UBC's Centre
for Women's Studies and Gender
Relations.
For more information regarding the s e i i e s, call E s t e 11 a
Overmver at 222-5238.

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