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UBC Reports May 16, 1991

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Array Women's Studies
Centre approved
By CONNIE FILLETTI
A Centre for Research in Women' s
Studies and Gender Relations has been
approved by Senate.
The recommendation to establish
the centre was made by the Provost's
Inter-Faculty Advisory Committee on
Women's Studies and Gender Relations.
The committee was formed simultaneously with UBC President David
Strangway convening a series of focus
groups with students and faculty as
part of the uni- ^^^^^^^^
versity's commitment to promoting gender
equality on
campus. ^_^__^^^_
"Both the
focus groups and the Provost's committee agreed that research and education are essential academic avenues
to gender equality," said vice-president, Academic and Provost Dan
Birch.
"UBC has impressive strengths in
feminist scholarship—from the study
of women in literature and history to
feminist legal studies and the transition from schooling to work," he
added. "A number of scholars share a
particular focus on violence against
women. We wanted to provide a catalyst for strengthening and increasing
the visibility of scholarship at UBC in
these areas."
The main goals of the centre
are research, graduate education
and community liaison, said Tannis
MacBeth Williams, director of
Women's Studies in the Faculty of
Arts and chair of the Provost's committee.
Specifically, scholars affiliated
with the centre will initiate and conduct interdisciplinary research in
Women's Studies and Gender Relations, facilitate the activities of UBC
researchers   in   related   areas and
"Once the centre is established,
master's and doctoral programs
will become a major goal."
develop and promote links with
international scholars, while developing links among UBC and the
local, national and international
communities.
Members of the centre also hope to
develop a strong interdisciplinary
program of graduate studies to complement the development of feminist
research within various disciplines.
Proposed programs of the centre
include a scholars in residence program, academic conferences, a seminar and lecture
series and an annual community
workshop.
"Once   the
^_^_^_^_        centre is established, master's
and doctoral programs will become a
major goal," said Williams. "Currently, no university in Western
Canada offers a doctorate in Women' s
Studies."
Williams added that the possibility
of developing a joint doctoral program with Simon Fraser University
will be explored.
In the meantime, an interdisciplinary graduate course in Women's
Studies is planned and the existing
individual interdisciplinary program
ofthe Faculty of Graduate Studies can
be used to accommodate master's and
doctoral students with interests in this
field, Williams explained.
Future plans of the centre also include an endowed Chair in Women's
Studies and Gender Relations and
summer institutes designed to enable
faculty at regional and community
colleges, who are teaching in Women's Studies, to enhance their qualifications.
The Centre for Research in Women's Studies and Gender Relations has
been designated a $2 million project
of UBC's A World of Opportunity
Campaign.
by Media Services
Soviet Victor Vikhrev, left, and American Jeff Mallet pit their chess-playing computers against one another
during the Micro-Computer World Chess Championship at UBC, May 1-9. The championship, which was
won by a Dutch entry called Gideon, was sponsored by the Computer Science department.
Power plant for campus studied
By GAVIN WILSON
The university has joined forces
with BC Hydro and BC Gas to fund an
engineering and economic feasibility
study for construction of a
cogeneration power plant on campus.
A cogeneration plant would provide all of UBC' s electrical needs and,
as a by-product, create steam that
would provide central heating for the
entire campus, said Marian Lis, an
engineer with Campus Planning and
Development.
The feasibility study will look at
several options for the actual construction and operation of the plant:
— UBC could fund construction
and ongoing operation of the plant,
with revenue accruing to the university
— funding of construction from a
third party with UBC operating the
plant
— a third party could build and
operate the plant, with UBC buying
power and steam at a lower rate
The study will also look into cost,
possible locations, size of the plant,
and which method would be used to
generate power.
The expected capacity ofthe plant
is in the range of 30 to 60 megawatts,
with a potential to expand to 100
megawatts, he said. Surplus electricity would be purchased by BC Hydro,
generating income for the university.
The plant could become operational
by January 1994, although no date has
been set for construction.
Inside § Pair of physicists win research prizes
DING BACK TO WORK: M K •/ K
GOING BACK TO WORK
Nursing Professor Wendy
Hall hasfound in a study that
balancing motherhood and
a full-time job requires re-
evaluatton of family roles.
Page 2
EflOjEZLf: HELPING WOMEN
REACH POTENTIAL: Pat
Thorn brought about a
break-through in attitudes
towards women and education. Pago 3    .-
WORKING STUDENTS:
Work Study Program offers
part-time work for full-time
students. Pagt 10
By GAVIN WILSON
A pair of Physics professors are the 1990 recipients of UBC's top faculty
research prizes. William
Unruh is the winner of the Jacob
Biely Research Prize and Gordon
Semenoff is the winner of the
Charles A. McDowell Award for
Excellence in Research.
Unruh was recognized for his
work in the field of theoretical cosmology, which has earned national
and international attention. He is
also recognized for his pioneering
work on quantum field theory applied to black holes.
Unruh is the LAC Minerals
fellow   in   and   director   of   the
cosmology program of the Canadian
Institute for Advanced Research
and has received
virtually every
major award
available to Canadian physicists,
including the
Steacie Prize,
Rutherford
Medal and
Herzberg Medal.
The Biely prize is named for Jacob
Biely, an internationally known poultry scientist, whose association with
UBC spanned half a century. The prize
was established in 1969 by his brother,
George Biely, a well-known figure in
Unruh
the B.C. construction industry.
Semenoff, a theoretical physicist,
is a leading expert in quantum field
theory and has worked on fundamental problems in gauge theories and
their applications to describing the
interactions of elementary particles
and phenomena in condensed matter
physics.
His work has led to the identification of mathematical structures important in such diverse areas of
study as the attempt to unify all
fundamental forces using
superstring theory, to theories of the
quantum Hall effect and high temperature superconductors. Semenoff
received the UBC Killam Research
Prize in 1989.
The Charles A. McDowell Award
is   made   to a
young re
searcher who
has demonstrated excellence in the pure
or applied sciences. The
award was established by
University Professor Charles
McDowell, who headed UBC's
chemistry department from 1955 to
1981.
The awards were presented by
President David Strangway at a ceremony held May 2.
Semenoff 2    UBC REPORTS May 16.1991
Safety and effectiveness high priorities
Study recommends site for new library centre
By ABE HEFTER
A site analysis report prepared by the
library planning committee has recommended that the area west ofthe Sedgewick
Library be adopted as the site of the Phase
One Library Centre development.
Early last winter, consensus about the
functions and activities forphase one development
emerged from a planning workshop involving
senior representatives from the library organization. It was generally agreed that the new
building would ideally be combined with the
Sedgewick Undergraduate Library, and that the
new integrated facility would result in a modern
humanities and social sciences library.
"This analysis represents a rigorous examination and testing of the many planning and
design criteria which must be considered in a
study of this kind," said Linda Moore, development manager, Campus Planning and
Development. "Not only are we addressing
the historic heart of the university, but the
Main Mall/Library Garden as well, which is
one of the most beautiful and memorable places
on campus."
The report analysed 10 possible sites for the
proposed library expansion and concluded there
may be no ideal site for phase one development.
Site option four, west ofthe Sedgewick Library,
rates better than all others in every category
considered, according to the report.
Release of the site analysis report coincides
with a motion put forward by the Senate Library
Committee at a meeting of Senate, April 24. The
motion, which was carried, resulted from an
assessment report on the status of the Main Library building. The report, prepared by architect
John Graham, was commissioned by the university administration in 1989-90 to report on the
state of the Main Library.
At Senate, Political Science Professor Phillip
Resnick, chair ofthe Senate Library Committee,
summarized some ofthe report's main findings.
Resnick pointed out the fire and seismic risks
associated with the Main Library and the building's poor functional and environmental conditions. He also said the safety ofthe Main Library
collection could be in jeopardy because of these
factors.
The Senate motion called for the immediate
tethering of book stacks in the Main Library as
well as other short-term safety measures. It also
called for Senate to recommend to the president
and board of governors that completion of the
planned phase one project be a matter of the
highest priority.
"The purpose of the report was to formulate a
statement of condition ofthe physical aspects of
the Main Library building," said Graham. "It's
an all-encompassing report which deals with the
building systems and environmental aspects of
the Main Library. This kind of inventory taking
is the initial step of the planning phase."
Tim Miner, director of Campus Planning
and Development, said the Main Library building is representative of similar problems UBC
is facing with respect to changing the face of
the campus.
"These changes are generated by functional,
environmental and safety issues," said Miner.
With the Main Library being the intellectual
heart ofthe university, there are strong emotions
associated with the building, he said. But the
university has to look at what is best for the
people who use the facility, and what's best for
the collections, Miner added.
"The environment of the Main Library is
detrimental to the preservation of collections,"
said Miner. "And the building itself is not
conducive to an effective library system. It has
a very limited efficiency of operation. However, it could serve other uses which would not
require the strict tolerances of a library."
We are looking at all of our buildings in a
health and safety sense, he explained.
"The Main Library represents an approach
that we will be taking as we work our way
through all facilities on campus."
Working mothers face
tough lifestyle changes
By CONNIE FILLETTI
As a registered nurse working with new mothers,
Wendy Hall was often
asked about the consequences of combining work outside
the home with motherhood.
While searching for information to
share with families,
Hall-found that although literature
existed to help
working mothers
with school-age
children, there was
nothing comparable
for mothers with
newborns.
Hall, a professor
in UBC's School of
Nursing, recognized
the value in studying
first-time parents,
particularly mothers
who had rejoined the
work force following the birth of their
babies.
Eight women
participated in a
study of women returning to work and
10 working men, whose partners had
returned to work, participated in a
second study. The women ranged from
25 to 35 years of age, while the men
were between 28 and 42 years old.
"Women felt overwhelmed and
guilty after returning to work," Hall
said. "They were more in tune with the
needs around the house than their partners and that made them take more
responsibility."
Hall found during the course ofthe
first study that women commonly perceived circumstances as being out of
control, while the men who were
studied found the same situations
difficult to manage.
"It was clear that women had to
change their expectations of themselves and learn to delegate," Hall
said. "It's important to share responsibility and know whose it is. The men
didn't personalize things the same way.
Their attitude was, if the house is a
mess, it's not a big problem."
Hall discovered that the expectations of family and friends placed on
the women were also high.
But working families were too
busy to seek help. Many found
themselves in the position of providing care to older parents. Others, because they lacked time to socialize,
Photo by Media Services
Wendy Hall studied new mothers returning to the workforce.
only shared their responsibilities
with each other.
"This proved hard on their relationships," Hall said. "Time for each
other and for themselves became a
low priority when it should have been
high on their list."
Hall's study indicated that couples
whose roles are interchangeable appear to cope better than couples with a
more traditional division of labor. A
factor impeding this type of balance
was the women's tendency to assume
the added responsibilities and workload that accompany being a new parent, while on their maternity leave.
Once they returned to their jobs, it was
difficult for them to give up what they
had taken on.
"They thought working all day
then returning home to clean, cook
and parent was the status quo they
had to maintain," Hall said. "The
women admitted they couldn't handle it but felt that they should be able
to handle it. The men indicated that
they felt excluded while their partners were on maternity leave, and
wanted a more active role in the
parenting of the child."
Rejoining the work force posed an
additional strain on the women Hall
interviewed. They reported that relatives, friends, co-workers and employers asked them
bow fhey' could
leave their babies.
While at home with
their infants, they
were asked if that
was all they did,
leaving them with a
double message
about parenting. The
women received
virtually no recognition of how difficult it is to be a parent.
"It's a hard lifestyle on people and
there is a perception
out there among
parents that there
isn't a lot of support
for it," Hall said.
"People are returning to work to meet
costs. They have mortgages to pay."
The women participating in Hall's
study felt they didn't have a choice
about returning to work, but the majority of them wouldn't go back full-
time if it was financially possible.
They would also reconsider full-time
employment when expecting a second
child.
Job sharing, on-site daycare, flexible work hours and paternity leave
are just a few of the services Hall
believes government and employers
should consider to help ease the heavy
burden new parents face. She feels
men and women also must develop
strategies to balance career demands
and parenting.
Hall is currently recruiting couples
with at least one child under 24 months
to test a questionnaire designed to
measure family and work roles for
parents following the birth of a child.
For more information, call 822-
7447.
Emergency plan
undertaken
By ABE HEFTER
Would you know what to do if a disaster or emergency situation suddenly
hit UBC?
The university's emergency planning committee wants to make sure the
answer is "yes," and is taking steps to develop a comprehensive campus-wide
emergency plan.
Pat Downey, an assistant fire chief at the University Endowment Lands Fire
Department and a member ofthe committee, said the university began taking
another look at emergency planning two years ago.
"At the time, President David Strangway wanted an update on emergency
planning on campus and what it would.take to plot an effective course of^
action,"' said Downey. "An emergency planning vSM^St^i^SmK^-
Occupational Health and Safety Director Wayne Greene, determined that the
format ofthe existing plan needed to be updated. A committee was then struck
to come up with recommendations designed to revitalize the university's
emergency plan."
Downey said the recommendations include the upgrading and updating of
the current emergency operations centre located at the U.E.L. fire hall; the
establishment of an emergency operations control group with representation
from across the campus; and the creation of the position of emergency
planning officer.
"The emergency operations control group would take responsibility and act
as the nerve centre in the event of a disaster," said Downey. "The emergency
planning officer would be in charge of maintaining the operations centre. The
idea is to facilitate actions and enhance efficiency in case of a disaster."
Downey said the other recommendations centre on the need to stage several
mock disasters to ensure swift response if and when the need arises, and the
need to educate faculty, staff, students and guests about emergency procedures.
"Faculty and staff may have a specific role to fill in the event of a disaster,
perhaps by aiding in evacuation. They have to know what's expected of them,"
said Downey.
"The recommendations brought forth by the emergency planning committee have been received favorably by deans and department heads," he added.
"The proposals have been presented to Bruce Gellatly, vice president, Administration and Finance."
Gellatly said the program proposal is well done. However, funding levels
will not support the addition of the new position of an emergency planning
officer in 1991 -92. Gallatly expects the plan will continue with direction from
a steering committee.
One way the university is currently alerting the campus community to
emergency planning is through a pamphlet entitled Are You Ready For An
Earthquake? The pamphlet, produced by and available at the Occupational
Health and Safety Office, offers advice on what to do if an earthquake strikes.
"The brochure is part of the education process," said Downey. "The
emergency planning committee helped put the pamphlet forward and represents the need for the campus community to be alert and aware when disaster
strikes."
Correction
In the May 2,1991 issue of UBC
Reports, an incorrect telephone
number was accidentally printed. The
story entitled "Human Resources
acquires new info system," on page
one, contained the error. The correct
telephone number for information
should have read 822-8964.
We apologize for any inconvenience this error may have caused. UBCREPORTS May 16,1991       3
JTioto by Media Services
Bio-Resource Engineering Professor Royann Petrell talks to some ofthe more than 200 Grade 10 and 11
female students who attended a one-day conference on careers in engineering earlier this month. The
conference was held by the Faculty of Applied Science to attract more women into engineering programs.
Collaborative projects planned
Forest research
centre opened
Computer service agreements signed
UBC has entered into two new
agreements with Sun Microsystems
of Canada Inc. to provide better services for UNIX workstations on campus.
One ofthe agreements, a hardware
servicing package with Network
Services of Information and Computers Systems, was hailed as the first of
its kind in Canada and a potential
model for agreements with other post-
secondary institutions.
"This exciting joint venture is a
first in Canada and we are very proud
to be part of it," said Bernard Sheehan,
associate vice-president, Information
and Computing Systems. "This fits
into our overall plan of trying to expand
the type of services we offer to our
clients."
The agreement provides for parts
and documentation so UBC can do its
own maintenance work. The goal is to
make the university entirely self-sufficient in maintaining Sun
workstations. As part of the agreement,
Sun will provide spare parts, support
and documentation so that UBC can
develop its own expertise.
The second agreement, for software maintenance, between Sun and
University Computing Services will
provide software maintenance for up
to 400 Sun workstations (there are
currently more than 300 on campus) at
low cost to individual owners of Sun
workstations, including OS operating
system software upgrades and upgrades to some new products.
A $30 million forest research centre at UBC was opened April 30 by
federal and provincial government
representatives and officials of
Forintek Canada Corp. and the Forest
Engineering Research Institute of
Canada (FERIC).
The site, built entirely out of wood,
includes a new office building for
FERIC and a larger Forintek complex.
Both organizations are private, nonprofit institutes, which provide research services to the forest industry.
Forintek was established to lead the
technological advancement of the
Canadian wood products industry
through innovative concepts, processes, products and education programs. FERIC specializes in harvesting and silvicultural operations
research.
The opening was attended by
Federal Forestry Minister Frank
Oberle, provincial Forests Minister
Claude Richmond, Forintek President
Tony French and FERIC President
Jean Berard.
"The new laboratories and offices,
situated close to the Faculty of Forestry
and the Pulp and Paper Research Institute of Canada, provide an excellent
opportunity for staff of the four agen
cies to collaborate on many projects,"
said Oberle.
Richmond said the new complex
will be the centre of excellence for
forest products and harvesting equipment research. "It will strengthen the
forest industry by improving its productivity and international competitiveness," said Richmond.
French said the all-wood building
has already paved the way for a lot of
architects, engineers and builders to
follow suit.
"We've achieved a considerable
saving from the wood construction of
the Forintek facility compared to the
cost of any other building material,"
said French. "And, we've met all
seismic, fire and durability requirements."
UBC Forestry Dean Clark Binkley
said the faculty is looking forward to
expanded cooperative research
projects with both Forintek and FERIC.
"We are currently developing a
major research project to anticipate
and manage the wood characteristics
of second-growth timber in B.C. The
project would involve, among others,
UBC, Forintek and FERIC," said
Binkley.
Thorn pioneered programs for women
Thorn
By CONNIE FILLETTI
Back in 1968, Pat Thorn
thought she was just doing her
job when she created a daytime
program of continuing education
courses which eventually paved
the way for new attitudes towards
women and women's studies at
UBC.
At 78, Thorn's fervent interest
in women's issues has not diminished. Although she retired
from her position as director of
the Centre for Continuing Education in 1978,
she continues to
work with various   women's
groups in Vancouver and Vic-    '**"*"****™"""*——
toria, where she
now resides. She also offers
women's workshops on career
planning.
"I wanted to let women in the
community know that they could
lead lives outside the home,"
Thorn said. 'The established do-
"I was on my own. There
was no one else in 1969."
mestic pattern was no longer
enough. It became clear that we
needed growth programs. Women
lacked in confidence, they had little sense of themselves."
Thorn was speaking from experience. Her role as a wife and the
mother of three children didn't satisfy all the expectations she had of
life. She decided to return to university and, at the age of 48, earned
a master's degree in psychology
from the University of Alberta.
After working for several years
as a researcher, teacher and
counsellor in her native Alberta,
Thorn and her family relocated to
B.C. in 1965. Three years later,
she was appointed program director of the newly created daytime
program in the Centre for Continuing Education.
In those early days, Thorn
worked closely with community
groups such as the Vancouver
Women's University Club, developing programs for adult women.
Installing a program that was
acceptable to the university administration, and which offered
something of substance to women,
sometimes posed a dilemma for
Thorn.
"Women
  didn't have society's permission
to be other than
mothers and
"-"—^~"—™" wives," Thorn
explained.
"When we offered a growth or self-
development program, titles had
to be acceptable to husbands,
friends and relatives so that the
woman was not seen to be becoming 'different'. We worked this way.
Ninety-nine point nine per cent of
our clientele were women paying
for the courses themselves. They
had less discretionary money back
then and more concern about the
acceptibility of developing themselves as independent persons."
Although Thorn was solely responsible for developing and im
plementing the daytime program,
she credits Gordon Selman and
Jack Blaney, Continuing Education's director and associate director respectively in 1969, for recognizing the need to develop a daytime program which met the interests and needs of women. Selman
was supportive of Thorn's efforts
at a time when, she said, the climate was generally unsympathetic
to women.
"After Gordon decided to start a
daytime program and hired me to
put it together, I was on my own,"
Thorn said. There was no one
else in 1969."
She saw the program as being
liberal arts oriented, with a mandate to provide public access to
the university.
It was a pioneering educational
program. Her background as a
psychologist and a former adult
student suited her for developing
personal programs to meet individual needs within the context of
adult continuing education. Some
of the first courses offered included
Developing Personal Potential,
Choosing and Finding Careers,
Return to Education and Effective
Study.
Thorn feels that many women
who enroled in the daytime program finally realized their potential. The experience broadened
their horizons and gave them new
ones. A large number of women
progressed from the non-credit
daytime courses to university
studies.
When the report of the Royal
Commission on the Status of
Women was released in December 1970, Thorn knew something
was going to happen.
"We were all fired up and ready
to go," Thorn recalls.
She decided
to organize a
conference to
help women
learn about and
understand the    	
commission's
176 recommendations which were
aimed at bringing major changes
to the lives of Canadian women.
In cooperation with the University Women's Club, the first Canadian conference on the report of
the Royal Commission on the Status of Women was held January
30,1971, just one month after the
report's release.
Three hundred women from
B.C. attended the conference. They
gathered in the basement of the
University Women's Club to hear
Florence Bird, chair of the commission, discuss her commission's
findings. The first ever status of
women group had been formed at
the conference.
"Nothing like this had ever been
done before," Thorn reminisced. "It
was an historic moment and a very
dramatic time. The climate was
"It was an historic moment
and a very dramatic time.
The climate was incredible."
incredible. Here we were, quiet
respectable women. I thought we
were going to march in the
streets."
Although the report had been
released, Thorn found that there
was little support available, financial or otherwise, to implement
the commission's recommendations.
But more conferences followed. Constant work eventually
supplied some funds, through the
federal government, and in cooperation with groups of local
women, Thorn organized the
Western Conference: Opportunities for
Women in
1973. This
conference
led   to   the
     creation  of
the Canadian
Congress of Women.
Two years later, the theme was
Integration of Women in the Labor
Force. And in 1978, Thorn and
her group spearheaded a national
conference in Ottawa, Beyond the
Status Report: The Next Step.
Over the years, Thorn developed many offshoots of the daytime program which have
emerged in support of women's
interests, concerns and aspirations. The Women's Resources
Centre, the Canadian Congress
on Learning Opportunities for
Women and the Vancouver Volunteer Centre are but a few.
When Thorn retired, her
daughters presented her with a
card to mark the occasion. Their
inscription read 'to our mentor.'
Her legacy to all women is truly
rich and varied. UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH TOXtJMBIA
UBC EMPLOYMENT EQUITY
Analysis of the Employment Equity
Census and Recommendations
UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Dear Colleague,
The following report was prepared for me by Sharon E.
Kahn, Director of Employment Equity, with the assistance
of the President's Advisory Committee on Employment
Equity and the Departments of Budget and Planning, Human Resources, and Information Systems Management.
The purpose of the report is to analyse responses to the
initial employment equity census, compare UBC's workforce
with external pools, and recommend hiring goals for the
University's employment equity program.
Please discuss the report with your colleagues and send
your comments to Dr. Kahn, c/o the President's Office.
Yours sincerely,
iris
David W. Strangway
Employment Group
Clerical/Secretarial  (Excluded)
TOTAL NUMBER OF
EMPLOYEES IN BASE
RESPONSE RATE
(PERCENTAGES)
Female
Male
Total
Female
Male
Total
19
88.9
100.0
89.5
CUPE 116
689
971
1662
58.3
50.5
53.7
CUPE 2278 (Non-Cred Sess Instruc)
36
7
43
66.7
42.9
62.8
CUPE 2950
1275
128
1405
75.2
61.0
73.8
Executive
5
5
100.0
100.0
Faculty
531
1781
2313
81.0
61.5
66.0
Farm Workers
13
66.7
50.0
53.9
IUOE 882
32
32
50.0
50.0
Management & Professional
489
442
932
82.3
70.0
76.3
Tech & Research Assts
317
232
550
61.9
61.3
61.5
TOTAL
3358
3609
6974
72.4
59.5
65.6
Table 1 - UBC Employment Groups by Women and Men (May 1990)
===    Secretarial (Excluded) and Executive.
Response to the
Employment Equity
Census and
Workforce Profile
Background of the Census
In February, 1990, the University of
British Columbia sent the employment equity
census, a self-identification questionnaire, to
6,974employees, including part-time, casual,
and temporary staff. (Census questionnaires
were not sent to those whose terms of employment were specifically determined by
their status as students or as postdoctoral
research fellows. For example, graduate
teaching and research assistants were not
asked to participate.) In March, 1990, a
follow-up mailing of the census went out to
those employees who had not responded to
the initial mailing.
The University now collects these data
from all newly hired employees. Thiscensus—
both the initial and ongoing—will enable the
University to monitor the progress of its employment equity program and thereby achieve
three significant goals. First, the census will
allow UBC to sketch a broad employment
picture of the four groups designated under
the Federal Contractors Program (FCP):
women, visible minorities, aboriginal people,
and persons with disabilities. This broad
picture is important because it will help identify areas where systemic discrimination may
exist. Second, by comparing the results of
the UBC census with figures derived from
sources of data such as the 1986 Federal
Census, the University will be able to compare
itself with external pools. Third, the employment equity census provides a base for an
on-going collection of data relevant to the
assessment and monitoring of employment
equity programs within the University. For
example, the census data can be used to
track patterns of hiring and promotion.
Databases
As the overall response rate
to UBC's initial employment equity
census was less than 100%, the
Employee Database, which reports
the number of women employed in
various capacities, was used to examine the situation of women within
the University. Since the University
had no previously collected data on
the other groups designated under
the FCP (aboriginals, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities),
the census data on these three
groups is drawn solely from the employment equity census.
Confidentiality
To ensure the confidentiality of individual responses to the employment equity
census, a blank space on the accompanying
tables replaces the return rate for groups of
employees fewer than five.
1. UBC Employment Group by
Women and Men [Table 1], Eight of the ten
employment groups at UBC contain both
women and men. Of these, the employment
groups with the highest response rates are
Clerical/Secretarial (Excluded) (89.5%,-19
persons) and Management & Professional
(76.3%, 932 persons). The lowest response
rate in these eight groups comes from CUPE
116 (53.7%, 1,662 persons). Men are represented in all ten employment groups, but in
seven of these groups, the response rate of
men is below 70 percent. The lowest response
rate for men is found in Farm Workers and
IUOE 882 (both 50%). The two highest
response rates by men come from groups
with either few men or all men:   Clerical/
In
contrast, women are represented in eight
employment groups, but in only four of these
groups, is the women's response under 70
percent. Excluding the groups that have no
women (Executive, IUOE 882), the lowest
response rates for women are found in CUPE
116 (58.3%, 689 women), Technicians &
Research Assistants (61.9%, 317 women)
and CUPE 2278 and Farm Workers (both
66.7%). The highest response rates for
women come from Clerical/Secretarial (Excluded) (88.9%), Management & Professional
(82.3%, 489 women), and Faculty (81 %, 531
women).
In addition to differences in response
rates of women and men in different employment groups, there are differences in
response rates between women and men
within the same employment group. The
greatest divergence between the response
rates of women and men is in CUPE 2278:
the women's response rate was higher than
the men's rate by 23.8 percentage points.
There is also a marked contrast in response
rates of Faculty, where 81% of women responded, but only 61.5% of men.
Employment Group
Clerical/Secretarial   (Excluded)
Total
Employees
Total
Response
Aboriginal
Person
Count
%
Visible
Minority
Count
%
Person with
Disability
Count
%
19
17
CUPE 116
1662
891
15
1.7
241
27.1
49
5.5
CUPE 2278 (Non-Cred Sess Instruc)
43
27
CUPE 2950
1405
1036
20
2.0
246
23.8
39
3.8
Executive
5
5
Faculty
2313
1525
15
1.0
141
9.3
65
4.3
Farm Workers
13
7
IUOE 882
32
16
Management & Professional
932
711
10
1.5
88
12.4
24
3.4
Tech & Research Assts
550
338
102
30.2
14
4.2
TOTAL
6974
4573
65
1.5
831
18.2
194
4.3
Table 2 - UBC Employment Groups by Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities, and
Persons with Disibilities (May 1990) 'Zlpz-^t^i&zgr.m^.!
mgasz-.r-Mytr'.-q,:-". ■^^mze.^z^'z-.-^ *\*'
^yZ^rr-
■--: ,i«tjri.f ■*#*=:*£
;yiy..j; i
UBC EMPLOYMENT EQUITY ^££2222*
Listed below are the Abella categories defined by the Federal Contractors Program and
examples of UBC positions that fall within each category:
Abella
UBC
01
Upper Level Managers
President, Vice-President
02    Middle and other Managers
Admin.
Officer, Coordina
Manager
Associate Vice-President, Dean, Head, Director,
Assist., Admin. Supervisor, Personnel
tor, Assist. Registrar, Food Service
03
Professionals
Accountant, Genetic Assist., Research Engineer, Pro
grammer/Analyst, Social Science Researcher, Gen
eral Librarian, Professor, Assoc. Professor, Assist.
Professor, Instructor, Lecturer, Research Associate,
Physician, Research Nurse, Counsellor
04
Semi-Professionals
& Technicians
Research Assist., Research Assist. Technician, Engi
neering Technician, Lab. Asst., Dental Assist., Medi
cal Artist, Editor, Information Officer, Coach
05
Supervisors
Secretary 5, Word Processing Coordinator, Adminis
trative Clerk, Section Head, Residence Life Coordina
tor, Executive Chef, Head Hostess
06
Foremen/Women
Assist. Head Service Worker, Head & Sub-Head Gar
dener, Head & Sub-Head Electrician, Head & Sub-
Head Carpenter, Area Supervisor, Custodial Supervi
sor
07
Clerical Workers
Secretary 1, 2, 3 & 4, Clinical Secretary 1 & 2, Clerk
Typist, Data Entry Operator, Computer Operator, Li
brary Assist. 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5, Communications Operator,
Clerk 1, 2 & 3, Clinical Office Assist. 1, 2 & 3, General
Clerk, Program Assist.
08
Sales Workers
Sales Clerk, Bookstore Assist.,Sr. Bookstore Assist.,
Computer Sales Assist.
09
Service Workers
Patrolperson, Cook, Assist. Cook, Kitchen Help, Bar
tender, Waiter/Waitress, General Worker (Heavy &
Light), Sales Attendant, Residence Attendant, Kiosk
Attendant
10
Skilled Crafts & Trades
Sheet Metal Worker, Electrician, Carpenter, Plumber,
Steamfitter, Maintenance Engineer 1 & 2, Locksmith
11
Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
Truck Driver, Apprentice, Clerk Driver, Farm Worker 2
& 3, Milker
12
Other Manual Workers
Service Worker 1 & 2, Sr. Service Worker, Gardener,
Service Worker-Ice Maker, Painter, Labourer
Table 5
Over 80 percent of all men employed
by the University are concentrated in the
following three areas: Faculty, CUPE 116,
and Management & Professional staff.
Women comprise 40 percent of CUPE 116
and over 50 percent of both the Management
& Professional employees and Technicians
& Research Assistants. The largest number
of women is found in CUPE 2950, which
contains more than one third of all women
employed by the University.
2. UBC Employment Group by
Aboriqinal People. Visible Minorities, and
Persons with Disabilities [Table 21.  The
census results reveal several employment
groups where no aboriginal person responded: Executive, Farm Workers, and
IUOE 882. Sixty-five persons (1.5% of the
census respondents) identified themselves
as aboriginal persons. The largest number of
aboriginal people are concentrated in CUPE
2950, twenty persons forming 2% of this
group. CUPE 2950 contains a little under one
third of all aboriginal persons responding to
the census. There are fifteen aboriginals
among Faculty (1 %) and fifteen in CUPE 116
(1.7%). Thus, approximately three quarters
of all aboriginal persons who responded to
the census are concentrated in CUPE 2950,
CUPE 116, and Faculty.
In contrast to women and aboriginal
people, members of visible minorities appear
in all employment groups. The 831 census
respondents who identified themselves as
belonging to a visible minority comprise 18.2%
of UBC's faculty and staff. The greatest
number of visible minorities is found in CUPE
2950, where 246 members of visible minori
ties work, and CUPE 116, where 241 members of visible minorities work.Taken together,
these two employment groups contain more
than half of the visible minority persons identified in the employment equity census. Another employment group with a high percentage of visible minorities is Technicians &
Research Assistants with 30.2% (102 persons). Lower percentages of visible minorities are found in the Faculty group (9.3%, 141
persons) and among Management & Professional staff (12.45%, 88 persons).
The Employment
Equity Act of 1986 defines
persons with disabilities as
those individuals who are
limited in the kind or amount
of work they can do. Ofthe
census respondents, 4.3%
(194 persons) identified
themselves as having disabilities that they think, or
believe someone else might
think, limit their work opportunities. As with aboriginal
persons, there are employment groups with no disabled persons; the Executive
group and CUPE 2278.
Persons with disabilities are
concentrated in two groups:
Faculty (4.3%, 65 persons)
and CUPE 116 (5.5%, 49
persons). More than half of
the disabled persons responding to the census are
found in these two groups.
3. UBC Faculty/
Administrative Unit by
Faculty/Administrative    Unit
Agricultural  Science
TOTAL NUMBER OF
RESPONSE RATE
EMPLOYEES IN BASE
(PERCENTAGES)
Female
Male
Total
Female
Male
Total
70
112
182
70.0
66.1
67.6
Applied Science
116
247
363
81.1
57.1
64.8
Arts
262
443
705
73.0
60.3
65.0
Commerce and Business Admin
94
94
188
69.2
64.9
67.1
Dentistry
58
50
108
75.9
64.0
70.4
Education
143
150
293
77.7
72.0
74.8
Forestry
31
67
98
83.9
68.7
73.5
Graduate Studies
34
28
62
79.5
67.9
74.2
Health Sciences
30
15
45
90.0
66.7
82.3
Law
28
45
73
78.6
60.0
67.2
Medicine
725
612
1340
71.5
56.7
64.6
Pharmaceutical  Science
49
38
87
85.8
71.1
79.4
President's Office
60
15
75
90.0
86.7
89.4
Science
196
498
694
73.5
59.9
63.7
VP Academic and Provost
129
30
160
74.5
73.4
73.8
VP Administration and Finance
720
856
1578
62.1
52.2
56.6
VP Research
62
35
97
74.2
82.9
77.4
VP Student and Academic Services
551
274
826
77.4
64.6
73.1
TOTAL
3358
3609
6974
72.4
59.5
65.6
Table 3 - UBC Faculty/Administrative Unit by Women and Men (May 1990)
Women and Men [Table 3]. The lowest
overall response rates come from departments reporting to the Vice-President, Administration and Finance, (56.6%, 1,578 persons), followed by departments reporting to
the Deans of Science (63.7%, 694 persons),
Medicine (64.6%, 1,340 persons), and Applied Science (64.8%, 363 persons). The low
response rate for Administration and Finance
is in part explained by the unit's high proportion of CUPE 116 members. The highest
response rates come from the President's
Office (89.4%, 75 persons) and from Health
Sciences (82.3%, 45 persons). The two
faculties with the greatest divergence in response rate between men and women are
Applied Science and Health Sciences. Men
in these units responded at rates of 57.1%
(247 men) and 66.7% (15 men) respectively;
whereas women in these units responded at
rates of 81.1% (116 women) and 90% (30
women) respectively.
Large numbers of men are concentrated in
Administration and Finance, Medicine, and
Science. Taken together, these three Faculty/Administrative units contain more than
half the population of men within the University. Women also are found in large numbers
in two of the same groups, VP Administration
and Finance, and Medicine, but the third
largest numerical population of women is in
VP Student and Academic Services. More
than half of the women employed by the
University are in these three groups.
4. UBC Faculty/Administrative Unit
by Aboriqinal People. Visible Minorities,
and Persons with Disabilities [Table 4]. In
Commerce and Business Administration,
Dentistry, and the President's Office, there
are no aboriginal respondents. Education
has a high percentage of aboriginals (5.5%)
as well as a high number (12). Although
Administration and Finance has a low percentage of aboriginal persons (1.7%), these
persons represent a high number (15). Taken
together, Education and Administration and
Finance, comprise more than one third of
aboriginal people at UBC.
Unlike the high percentage of aboriginal
people in Education compared with other
units, Education has a relatively low percentage of members of visible minorities—
7.4% (16 persons). The highest reported
percentages of visible minorities are found
in Administration and Finance, (25.5%,
227 persons), Student and Academic Services (25.1%, 151 persons), and Agricultural
Science (22.0%, 27 persons). The highest
numbers of visible minorities are in Administration and Finance (227) and Medicine
(147). Taken together, these two units contain just under half of the reported visible
minorities.
Looking at the figures of persons with
disabilities by Faculty/Administrative unit, the
highest percentage of persons with disabilities is found in Administration and Finance
Faculty/Administrative   Unit
Agricultural   Science
Total
Employees
Total
Response
Aboriginal
Person
Count
%
Visible
Minority
Count
%
Person  with
Disability
Count
%
182
123
27
22.0
5
4.1
Applied Science
363
235
46
19.6
8
3.5
Arts
705
458
43
9.4
19
4.2
Commerce and Business Admin
188
126
17
13.5
Dentistry
108
76
13
17.2
Education
293
219
12
5.5
16
7.4
5
2.3
Forestry
98
72
9
12.5
Graduate Studies
62
46
9
19.6
Health Sciences
45
37
Law
73
49
Medicine
1340
865
6
0.7
147
17.0
28
3.3
Pharmaceutical Science
87
69
12
17.4
President's Office
75
67
8
12.0
Science
694
442
76
17.2
14
3.2
VP Academic and Provost
160
118
16
13.6
VP Administration and Finance
1578
893
15
1.7
227
25.5
76
8.6
VP Research
97
75
9
12.0
VP Student and Academic Services
826
603
6
1.0
151
25.1
23
3.9
TOTAL
6974
4573
65
1.5
831
18.2
194
4.3
Table 4 - UBC Faculty/Administration Unit by Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities, and
Persons with Disabilities (May 1990) UBC EMPLOYMENT EQUITY SrSSSZSr*
(8.6%, 76 persons). More than one third of all
persons reporting work-related disabilities are
employed in this unit; no other units have any
numbers approaching that of Administration
and Finance.
Comparison of UBC's
Workforce with
External Pools
Response Bias
Of the total number of 6,974 employees who received the census, 65.6% responded—a response rate comparable to
that of other universities of similar size and
composition. Significantly, there was a notable difference in the response rates between
men and women. Although UBC's 3,358
women represent a little under half of UBC's
total employee population, 72.4% of these
women responded to the census; in contrast,
only 59.5% of UBC's men responded.
Abella Groupings [Table 5]
In order to compare UBC's workforce
profile with data on other employed
populations, ail faculty and staff positions at
UBC were categorized into Abella groupings.
Table 5 lists the twelve Abella Groups with
examples of UBC positions that fall within
each group. These Abella categories, derived from Employment and Immigration
Canada's Standard Occupational Coding,
classify jobs according to a variety of criteria,
such as responsibilities, education, training,
and experience.
1. Abella Group by Women and
Men [Table 6]. When we look at the numbers
of men and women in the various Abella
categories, we find the following: the majority
of men employed by the University are found
among Middle and Other Managers, Professionals, and Semi-Professionals and Technicians, with more than half the men among
Professionals. And although there are relatively high numbers of women in two of these
categories {Professionals, and Semi-professionals and Technicians), more than one third
of all women in the University are found
among Clerical Workers.
2. Abella Group by Aboriginal Peo
ple. Visible Minorities, and Persons with
Disabilities [Table 71. Leaving aside those
Abella categories where no aboriginal persons responded {Upper Level Managers,
Foremen/women, Skilled Crafts and Trades,
and Semi-skilled Manual Workers), the census indicates that the highest percentage of
aboriginal persons (4.3%, 9 persons) is found
in 09 {Service Workers). One of the Abella
groups reporting the lowest response rate for
aboriginal people is Professionals. Nonetheless, this group reports a high numerical
concentration of 17 aboriginal persons. An
even larger number of aboriginals is reported
among Clerical Workers—(2.3%) 23 persons, or just over one third of all the census
respondents who identified themselves as
aboriginal people.
Members of visible minorities appear
in all groups. Based on responses to the
employment equity census, the group with
the highest percentage of visible minorities is
Service Workers (36.2%, 77 persons), followed by Other Manual Workers (27.5%, 54
persons), and Semi-Professionals and
Technicians (25.4%, 167 persons). In terms
of numbers, more than one quarter of visible
minorities are concentrated among Clerical
Workers (248), closely followed by Professionals (205). Taken together, these Abella categories comprise more than
half of the people who reported themselves as
members of a visible minority.
The Abella category
with the highest reported
percentage of disabled persons is Skilled Crafts and
Trades with 11.3% (7 persons), followed by Other
Manual Workers with 8.7%
(17 persons). Although the
percentages are lower
among Professionals and
Clerical Workers (3.9%, 66
persons; 3.8%, 39 persons),
more than half of all people
who reported work-related
disabilities (105 persons)
are found in these two
groups.
Abella Category
01    Upper Level Managers
Total Employees
Number of Women
% Women
5
0
0.0
02   Middle and Other Managers
569
285
50.1
03    Professionals
2626
731
27.8
04    Semi-Professionals & Technicians
1049
507
48.3
05   Supervisors
137
110
80.3
06    Foremen/women
42
3
7.1
07   Clerical Workers
1388
1235
89.0
08   Sales Workers
89
47
52.8
09   Service Workers
508
289
56.9
10   Skilled Crafts and Trades
148
4
2.7
11    Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
40
5
12.5
12   Other Manual Workers
373
142
38.1
TOTAL
6974
3358
48.2
Faculty
2313
531
23.0
Table 6 - Women Employed at UBC (May 1990)
relevant information from outside the University. For example, we do not know how many
aboriginal people, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities received advanced
graduate degrees in recent years or how
many of these persons earned doctoral degrees in the academicdisciplines represented
dure for accurately disaggregating UBC data
on employment status. Accordingly, it is not
possible to determine whether designated-
group members work fewer hours than other
employees. Likewise, we have not completed yet an analysis of the salary ranges of
women, aboriginal people, visible minorities,
Number of
%
Number of
%
Number of
%
Total
Total
Aboriginal
Aboriginal
Visible
Visible
Persons with
Persons with
Abella Category
Employees
Response
People
People
Minorities
Minorities
Disabilities
Disabilities
01    Upper Level Managers
5
5
0
0.0
1
20.0
0
0.0
02   Middle and Other Managers
569
473
9
2.0
22
4.7
21
4.5
03    Professionals
2626
1714
17
1.0
205
12.0
66
3.9
04    Semi-Professionals & Technicians
1049
659
3
0.5
167
25.4
22
3.4
05   Supervisors
137
103
1
1.0
22
21.4
5
4.9
06   Foremen/women
42
33
0
0.0
3
9.1
1
3.1
07    Clerical Workers
1388
1028
23
2.3
248
24.2
..  39
9.8
08   Sales Workers
89
70
0
0.0
23
32.9
1
1.5
09   Service Workers
508
213
9
4.3
77
36.2
14
6.6
10   Skilled Crafts and Trades
148
62
0
0.0
8
13.0
7
11.3
11    Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
40
16
0
0.0
1
6.3
1
6.3
12   Other Manual Workers
373
197
3
1.6
54
27.5
17
8.7
TOTAL
Faculty
6974
4573
65
1.5
831
18.2
194
4.3
2313
1525
15
1.0
141
9.3
65
4.3
Limits of the Analysis
Presently, there are two obstacles
that stand in the way of formulating a completely satisfactory workforce analysis. One
of these obstacles is the unavailability of
Table 7 - Aboriginal People, Visible Minorities, and Persons with Disabilities
= Responding to the UBC Census (May 1990)
Abella Category
01 Upper Level Managers
02 Middle and Other Managers
03 Professionals
04 Semi-Professionals & Technicians
05 Supervisors
06 Foremen/women
07 Clerical Workers
08 Sales Workers
09 Service Workers
10 Skilled Crafts and Trades
11 Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
12 Other Manual Workers
Faculty
%
%
%
%
Women
Aboriainal People
Visible   Minorities
Persons  with   Disabilities
50.6
3.0
6.3
7.3
50.6
3.0
6.3
7.3
50.6
3.0
6.3
7.3
50.8
2.6
16.9
6.8
50.8
2.6
16.9
6.8
50.8
2.6
16.9
6:8
50.8
2.6
16.9
6.8
50.8
2.6
16.9
6.8
50.8
2.6
16.9
6.8
50.8
2.6
16.9
6.8
50.8
2.6
16.9
6.8
50.8
2.6
16.9
6.8
50.8
3.0
6.3
7.3
Table 8 - All Designated Groups in 1986 Population (Canadian population used for
Abella categories 01-03 and Faculty; Vancouver area population used for Abella
categories 04-12)
at UBC. This information is particularly relevant to an analysis of faculty.
A second obstacle is the present unavailability of certain kinds of data from within
the University. An accurate workforce profile
requires complete workforce data. Unfortunately, this workforce analysis is
based on the May, 1990, overall response rate of 65.6%. Moreover, the
UBC's Employee Database gives a
precise count of women employees,
but lacks information on the other
three groups. The current employment equity census may give an incomplete picture of the UBC population of aboriginal people, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities. The University's workforce
changes frequently, and this change
results in another internal limit to the
analysis. Each month, some 150
faculty and staff move into and out of
positions and must be added to or
removed from the census. The
present analysis does not adequately
capture the fluidity of UBC's
workforce.
Furthermore, this analysis
unavoidably aggregates all UBC employees, including part-time, casual,
and temporary staff because we have
not been able yet to develop a proce-
and persons with disabilities compared with
other employees. And until a salary analysis
is complete, we will be unable to determine if
designated group members are segregated
in lower-paid positions within Abella categories.
Comparison of the UBC
Workforce with External
Pools [Tables 8-13]
The objectives of UBC's Policy on
Employment Equity are to regard individual
merit as the prime criterion for employment
and to build a workforce representative of the
pool of potential candidates with appropriate
qualifications, including women aboriginal
people, visible minorities, and persons with
disabilities. Unfortunately, much of the data
provided by Statistics Canada and Employment and Immigration Canada refer to how
many designated-group members were employed rather than how many were qualified
for particular positions. Therefore, the
President's Advisory Committee on Employment Equity decided to compare the proportions of designated-group members employed
by UBC with women, aboriginal people, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities
in two external pools: 1. the population who
were employed in 1986, as well as 2. the total UBC EMPLOYMENT EQUITY ttZSSXSS*
Abella Category
01 Upper Level Managers
02 Middle and Other Managers
03 Professionals
04 Semi-Professionals & Technicians
05 Supervisors
06 Foremen/women
07 Clerical Workers
08 Sales Workers
12
Service Workers
Skilled Crafts and Trades
Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
Other Manual Workers
Faculty +
Women
Aboriqinal  People
Visible   Minorities
Persons  with   Disabilities
15.2
1.1
4.3
1.6
35.2
1.5
3.7
3.4
34.1
0.9
9.1
1.6
30.0
0.3
17.3
2.3
67.0
1.1
12.3
6.4
13.1
0.6
13.4
4.4
89.7
1.8
12.0
3.3
53.0
1.6
14.0
5.0
56.5
2.4
24.6
7.7
5.0
1.6
10.2
9.1
15.5
2.6
11.2
8.0
30.9
2.6
21.7
7.8
28.4
0.8
9.0
1.6
Canadian population used for Abella categories 01-03 and Faculty
Vancouver area population used for Abella categories 04-12
Percent Canadian college and university teachers
Table 9 - All Designated Groups in 1986 Labour Force (Percentages Adjusted for
Positions at UBC)
Canadian population.
The first comparison—UBC's
workforce with the labour force—reflects both
current employment patterns and discrimination in Canadian society. Also, a comparison
of UBC's workforce with those employed in
1986 cannot reveal how many qualified
women, aboriginal people, visible minorities,
and persons with disabilities were unemployed at that time. Thus, comparing UBC's
workforce with the external labour force may
under-represent the numbers of qualified
designated-group members available to work
and reflect the very discrimination that the
University's employment equity program
seeks to remedy. The second comparison—
UBC with the total Canadian population—
goes beyond UBC's current Policy on Employment Equity. We provide both comparisons in order to suggest a range of possibility
for UBC's on-going employment equity program.
Some Abella categories within the University's workforce are compared with national
(Canadian) figures, and some are compared
with local (Vancouver) figures. Three Abella
groupings—Upper level Management, Middle Management, and Professionals—are
compared with the national, rather than local
figures because hiring for these groups is
generally conducted on a national scale. The
other nine Abella groups are compared with
local figures.
Table 8 shows the percentage of employees in each of the four designated groups we
would expect to observe among UBC's faculty and staff using the appropriate national or
local figures if the distribution of UBC employ
ees reflected the distribution of women, aboriginal people, visible minorities, and persons
with disabilities in the Canadian population.
(We adjusted upward the percentage of aboriginal people in the Canadian and Vancouver population to
reflect the appro x i m at e I y
45,000 aboriginal
people living on
reserves who
were not included
in the 1986 census.)
Other Managers and Professionals—
contain members of faculty and staff
in one grouping. (The Upper Level
Managers group also contains members of faculty and staff, but this Abella
group is equivalent to the UBC employment group Executive. Middle
and Other Managers and Profes-
s/ona/s overlap two UBC employment
groups—Faculty and Management
and Professional.) The Abella group
of Middle and Other Managers is
composed of both faculty, such as
deans and heads of academic departments and staff, such as directors and coordinators of non-academic units. Similarly, the Abella
group of Professionals is composed
of both faculty and other professionals, such as analysts, programmers,
and engineers. UBC recruits the
majority of its faculty, especially tenure-track faculty, from a pool of individuals who have earned doctorates.
Because the recruitment pool for UBC
faculty differs from that of non-faculty
managers and professionals, in the accompanying tables, we include the UBC employment group Faculty when comparing UBC's
workforce with external pools. We use Faculty to refer to all faculty members, including
2. compared to the labour force after
adjusting for the distribution of jobs at UBC.
When we examine Tables 6-10, we see
that in some Abella groups, the percentage of
UBC women, aboriginal people, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities falls
short of percentages in the population as well
as in the adjusted external labour force.
For example, Table 6 shows that in
AbellaGroup 10—Skilled Crafts and Trades—
UBC employed four women in May, 1990,
whereas the comparable figure for the adjusted labour force in Table 10 is seven
women. Accordingly, if occupations in Skilled
Crafts and Trades in the labour force matched
the distribution of these jobs at UBC. the
University would employ three additional
women in SkilledCrafts andTrades positions.
On the other hand, in some Abella groups.
UBC appears to exceed the number of designated-group members compared with
their expected numbers in the adjusted external labour force. For example. Table 7
shows that in Abella Group 03—Professionals—UBC employed sixty-six disabled per
sons who reported they were limited in the
kind or amount of work they did. This com
pares with the expected number of professional persons with disabilities—42—shown
in Table 10.
Abella Category
01 Upper Level Managers
02 Middle and Other Managers
03 Professionals
04 Semi-Professionals & Tech
05 Supervisors
06 Foremen/women
07 Clerical Workers
08 Sales Workers
09 Service Workers
10 Skilled Crafts and Trades
11 Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
12 Other Manual Workers
Faculty
Table 10
Next, to increase the accuracy of a comparison between UBC
data and Statistics
Canada data, an
adjustment had to
be made to accommodate the
fact that the distribution of jobs at
UBC is not the
same as that found
in Canada overall. For example, the proportion of women in Canada employed as
schoolteachers and nurses far exceeds the
proportion of women employed by UBC as
schoolteachers and nurses. Therefore, a
figure was calculated to indicate the percentage of employees in each of the four designated groups we would expect to observe in
the external labour pools if the distribution of
occupations across Canada was the same as
the distribution of jobs in UBC's workforce
(Table 9).
Two Abella categories-^/W/ddfe and
Women
Aboriqinal People
Visible Minorities
Persons   with   Disabilities
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
2.5
0.8
0.2
0.1
0.3
0.2
0.4
0.1
287.9
200.3
17.1
8.5
35.8
21.1
41.5
19.3
1328.8
895.5
78.8
23.6
165.4
239.0
191.7
42.0
532.9
314.7
27.3
3.1
177.3
181.5
71.3
24.1
69.6
91.8
3.6
1.5
23.2
16.9
9.3
8.8
21.3
5.5
1.1
0.3
7.1
5.6
2.9
1.8
705.1
1245.0
36.1
25.0
234.6
166.6
94.4
45.8
45.2
47.2
2.3
1.4
15.0
12.5
6.1
4.5
258.1
287.0
13.2
12.2
85.9
125.0
34.5
39.1
75.2
7.4
3.8
2.4
25.0
15.1
10.1
13.5
20.3
6.2
1.0
1.0
6.8
4.5
2.7
3.2
189.5
115.3
9.7
9.7
63.0
80.9
25.4
29.1
1175.0
656.9
69.4
18.5
145.7
208.2
168.8
Expected Numbers for All Designated Groups - UBC Compared with Population
and Adjusted Labour Force
instructors, sessionals, research associates,
and librarians. We compare this group with
Canadian college and university teachers.
Table #10 shows the numbers of designated-group employees UBC would expect
to employ in each Abella
group using the appropriate national or local
figures in two ways:
1. compared to the
Canadian population,
and
Table 11 summarizes the under- and over-
representation of the four designated employment-equity groups in all Abella categories using Canadian population and labour
force data. This analysis is based on raw
data; that is, we assume all designated-group
Abella Category
01    Upper Level Managers
Women
Aboriqinal People
Visible Minorities
Persons  with   Disabilities
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
2.5
0.8
0.2
0.1
-0.7
-0.8
0.4
0.1
02   Middle and Other Managers
2.9
-84.7
6.6
-1.9
10.3
-4.5
17.1
-5.1
03    Professionals
597.8
164.5
57.2
2.0
-95.4
-21.8
107.7
-42.0
04    Semi-Professionals 8 Tech
25.9
-192.3
22.7
-1.5
-80.0
-75.8
37.4
-9.8
05    Supervisors
-40.4
-18.2
2.3
0.2
-5.0
-11.3
2.9
2.4
06   Foremen/women
18.3
2.5
1.1
0.3
4.1
2.6
1.9
0.8
07   Clerical Workers
-529.9
10.0
5.7
-5.4
-92.6
-160.6
42.9
-5.6
08   Sales Workers
-1.8
0.2
2.3
1.4
-12.0
-14.5
4.9
3.3
09   Service Workers
-30.9
-2.0
-6.6
-7.6
-83.8
-44.6
3.7
8.3
10   Skilled Crafts and Trades
71.2
3.4
3.8
2.4
9.0
-0.9
-3.9
-0.5
11    Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
15.3
1.2
1.0
1.0
4.3
2.0
0.2
0.7
12   Other Manual Workers
Faculty
47.5
-26.7
4.5
4.5
-30.4
-12.5
-4.0
-0.3
644.0
125.9
50.9
0.0
28.4
34.1
88 6
-43.2
Table 11 - Under and Over-representation for All Designated Groups - UBC Compared with Population and Adjusted Labour Force (A negative number indicates an over-representation with the
external pool)
Explanatory Note 1 (Table 11)
Calculation of inferred shortfall for total UBC
population
Inferred shortfall
where Expected number =
Total number of UBC census
respondents for Abella category
Actual number
Expected number - Actual number
Response rate
Participation rate of designated group in labour force
for Abella category (adjusted
for UBC positions)
Number of UBC census respondents in designated group for Abella
category
Response rate =
Total number of women respondents for Abella category
Total number of women in Abella category i*^^»:f5«S8i)i5*--
?:M$mPZ:^'-Zx^Z??*?tf%''! Z
i°\yP'\ jn^L^t^ ~*
"^.W^*JsSW*»J>>
7.^'^1r?lZ*?;;™   ■:'*■     . '«*:^>^■;^tf5»fM^~:*^■~,: ^ 1'.?. ™<?Kfo3mffi~^&."^* ^V*^..
^^^W"^«"K»
UBC EMPLOYMENT EQUITY
Analysis of the Employment Equity
Census and Recommendations
members responded to the census. In some
Abella categories, for example, Semi-Skilled
Manual Workers, UBC, compared with either
population or labour force data, shows a
shortfall in all four groups. In other categories, for example, Middle and Other Managers, and Semi-Professionals and Technicians, UBC appears to fall short of the proportion of women in the Canadian population
and exceed the proportion of women in the
current employment pools.
Because we have complete data on the
numbers of women faculty and staff at UBC,
we know the actual response rate for women.
But we cannot know how many of the census
non-respondents are aboriginal people, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities.
Assuming the response rates for the three
minority groups to be similar to that for women,
we accordingly adjusted the numbers for
aboriginal people, visible minorities, and persons with disabilities (See Explanatory Note
1.) Table 12 reveals where the number of
women, and the estimated numbers of aboriginal people, members of visible minorities,
and persons with disabilities employed by
UBC fall short of population and adjusted
national and local labour pools.
The shortfall of 165 women in the Professional group reflects the large number of
faculty in this Abella category. When we
compare UBC faculty—full-time and part-
time—with Canadian university and college
teachers, there is a shortfall of 126 women.
Table 13 compares the number of
UBC's tenured and tenure-track women
faculty to recent hiring of women faculty and
doctoral degrees granted to women. Two
points stand out:
1. There is a
large range between fields where
no women earned
doctorates in 1988
(Architecture and
Dentistry, 0) and
that in which 231
women earned
doctorates that
year (Education,
51%). In Arts and in
Science, 756 and
624 women received doctoral degrees, yet these
high figures represent 41.3 and 19.4
percent respectively of the total
doctorates awarded
in 1988.
2. Except in the
case of Pharmaceutical Sciences,
the percentage of
women hired into tenure-track positions in
recent years at UBC is higher than the percentage of women in the faculty. In the three
largest faculties (Arts, Medicine, and Science), the percentage of women hired in
recent years far exceeds the current proportion of women to men in tenured and tenure-
track positions, 22-35%, 18-35%, and 8-16%,
respectively.
The shortfall between the current representation of women in the professoriate varies by discipline, but the number of women
in the qualified applicant pools is bound to
increase as more and more women pursue the graduate degrees that qualify them
for academic careers.
Abella Category
01    Upper Level Managers
Women
Aboriginal People*
Visible Minorities*
*
Persons  with   Disabilities
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
Population
Labour Force
2.5
0.8
0.2
0.1
0.4
0.1
02   Middle and Other Managers
2.9
6.6
10.3
17.1
03   Professionals
597.8
164.5
57.2
2.0
107.7
04   Semi-Professionals & Tech
25.9
22.7
37.4
05   Supervisors
2.3
0.2
2.9
2.4
06   Foremen/women
18.3
2.5
1.1
0.3
4.1
2.6
1.9
0.8
07   Clerical Workers
10.0
5.7
42.9
08   Sales Workers
0.2
2.3
1.4
4.9
3.3
09   Service Workers
3.7
8.3
10   Skilled Crafts and Trades
71.2
3.4
3.8
2.4
9.0
11    Semi-Skilled Manual Workers
15.3
1.2
1.0
1.0
4.3
2.0
0.2
0.7
12  Other Manual Workers
47.5
4.5
4.5
TOTAL
781.4
182.6
107.4
11.8
27.6
4.6
219.2
15.5
Faculty
644.0
125.9
50.9
28.4
34.1
88.6
'Estimate based on census response rate of women.
Table 12 - UBC Shortfall Calculation for Designated Groups - UBC Compared with Population and
Adjusted Labour Force
In summary, the University shows
shortfalls from the Canadian population in
many Abella categories. In addition, UBC
shows shortfalls from current national and
local employment pools in every Abella category with two exceptions: Middle and Other
Managers, and Semi-Professionals and
Technicians. (The shortfall of ten women
among Clerical Workers reflects, no doubt,
the large number of men (151) UBC employs
in this traditionally female-dominated group.)
There is one category in which shortfalls from
local labour pools appear for all four designated groups: Semi-Skilled Manual Workers. For tenured and tenure-track faculty,
the University shows a shortfall from the
current number of women earning doctoral
degrees.
Recommendations
Consistent with UBC's Policy on Employment Equity, which states that
individual achievement and merit are the fundamental criteria for employment
decisions, the President's Advisory Committee on Employment Equity recommends the following:
A. To ensure that UBC reflects the percentage of women in the applicant
pool of doctoral degree recipients in Canada, UBC should hire women to fill at
least 35% of vacant tenure-track faculty positions. (This is an overall figure and
must be adjusted for individual faculties and departments according to their
respective applicant pools.) As universities across Canada seek to increase
the number of women in their faculties, competition for the women in this pool
will increase. Therefore, UBC should devise means to attract and retain the
best-qualified women.
B. In order to reflect the numbers of women, aboriginal people, members
of visible minorities, and persons with disabilities currently employed in
external labour pools, UBC should add the following qualified individuals to its
staff with all reasonable dispatch:
Abella Category
(Current # of employees,
Upper Level Managers (5)
Professionals (2626)
Supervisors (137)
Foremen/women (42)
Sales Workers (89)
Service Workers (508)
Skilled Crafts & Trades (148)
Semi-Skilled Manual Workers (40)
Other Manual Workers (373)
Hiring Goal to Eliminate
Current Shortfall
1 woman
39 women
2 aboriginal people
2 persons with disabilities
3 women
3 members of visible minorities
1 person with disability
1 aboriginal person
3 persons with disabilities
8 persons with disabilities
3 women
2 aboriginal people
1 woman
1 aboriginal person
2 members of visible minorities
1 person with disability
5 aboriginal people
C. UBC should review its goals for hiring members of designated employment-equity groups annually keeping in view the long-term objective of a
workforce that reflects the distribution of potential candidates with appropriate
qualifications, including women, aboriginal people, visible minorities, and
persons with disabilities.
FACULTY
AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE
F/T FACULTY 1989/90
FACULTY HIRING 198490
DOCTOFIAL DEGREES GRANTED
Total
% Women
Total
% Women
Total
% Women
55
9.1
11
18.2
84
32.1
APPUED SCIENCE
Architecture
13
0.0
0
0.0
2
0.0
Engineering
'""•'   117
2.6
32
3.1
338
8.3
Nursing
39
97.5
6
100.0
ARTS
496
21.8
98
34.7
756
41.3
COMMERCE & BUSWESS
95
11.6
29
24.1
37
27.0
DENTISTRY
35
17.1
13
30.8
4
0.0
EDUCATION
181
30.9
24
45.8
231
51.1
FORESTRY
41
2.4
20
10.0
12
16.7
GRADUATE STUDIES
19
5.3
1
100.0
-
LAW
41
14.6
16
31.3
N/A
N/A
MEDICINE
385
18.4
116
34.5
243
36.6
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCE
33
27.3
9
11.1
15
13.3
SCIENCE
307
8.1
49
16.3
624
19.4
ALL FACULTIES
1859
18.3
424
26.4
2353
30.2
•Tenured/tenure-track fa
;ulty include assistant, asso
ciate, and full
professors; s
nd instrucH
>rs
Source:  UBC Office of Budget and Planning
Table 13 - UBC Tenured/tenure-track Women Faculty Compared with Doctoral
Degrees Granted Nationally to Women (Tenured/tenure-track faculty include
assistant, asociate, and full professors; and instructors - Source: UBC Office
of Budget and Planning)
Append
ixA
President's
Advisory Committee on Employment Equity
Alannah Anderson
CUPE 2950
Jessica McFarlane
CUPE 2278
Caroline Bruce
Manager/Supervisory
Technician, Pharmacol
George McLaughlin
President, CUPE 116
ogy & Therapeutics -
M. Wayne Greene
Acting Director, Human
Axel Meisen
Dean, Faculty of Ap
.
Resources
plied Science
Samuel P.S. Ho
Professor, Economics
Wendy Merlo
Assistant Treasurer, Financial Services
George Hoberg
Assistant Professor, Po
litical Science
Judith H. Myers
Associate Dean for the
Promotion of Women in
Bill Kadey
International Representative, IUOE
Science
Mary Russell
Faculty Association
Sharon E. Kahn
Director, Employment
Equity
Judith C. Thiele
Reference and Collection Librarian, Charles
Verna Kirkness
Director, First Nations
House
Crane Memorial Library
William A. WeDber
Associate Vice-Presi
A.J. McClean (Chair)
Associate Vice-President,
Academic
dent, Academic
•—-*■' 9    UBC REPORTS May 16,1991
May 19 -
June 1
SUNDAY, MAY 19
Botanical Gardens Sale
"■""■■■"■I First Annual Perennial
j/jQ|| Plant Sale. Free admis-
/ufll* sion with plant purchase.
■^* Reception/Education
^ Centre from 10am-4pm.
Call Judy Newton 822-
4372.
TUESDAY, MAY 21   j
Medical Genetics Seminar
Hemopoietic Stem Cells In Mouse. Mr.
Chris Fraser, Ph.D. student, Terry Fox
Lab. IRC #1 at 8:30am. Call 822-5311.
Neuroscience Discussion Group
Extracellular Monamines In Response To
Psychostimulants. Dr. R. Kuczenski,
Psychiatry, U. of California. University
Hospital, UBC Site G279, at 4pm. Call
822-2330.
International Relations Institute
Lecture
Relations After The Cold
War. Brian Fall, C.M.G.,
British High Commissioner
to Canada. Buchanan
Penthouse at 4pm. Call
822-5480.
AAPS Forum
Michael Guillemette, AAPS Pension
Consultant, will be speaking about the
staff pension plan. Grad Centre Banquet
Rm. from 12:30-1:15pm. Call 822-4310.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 221
Microbiology Seminar Series
Biodegradation Of Halogentated Aliphatic
Compounds By Pure And Mixed Cultures
Of Bacteria. Dr. Christine Egli, Microbiology, UBC. 201 Wesbrook from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-6648.
THURSDAY, MAY 23 {
Geophysics/Astronomy Seminar
Some Posers To The Big
Bang Cosmology. Prof
J.V. Narlikar, Inter-University Centre for Astronomy/Astrophysics,
Pune, India. Geophysics/Astronomy 260
at 4pm. Coffee available from 3:30pm.
Call 822-4134.
UBC Reports is the facility and
staff newspaper of the University
of British Columbia. It is published every second Thursday by
the UBC Conuimaity Relations
Office, 6328 Memorial Rd., Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z2.
Telephone 822-3131.
Advertising inquiries: 822-6149.
Managing Editor: Steve Crombie
Ass't Editor: Paula Martin
Contributors: Ron Burke, Connie
FOIettL Abe Hefter, Charles Ker,
and Gavin Wilson.
J\     Please
Cp*#.   recycle
CALENDAR DEADLINES
For events in the period June 2 to June 15, notices must be submitted by UBC faculty or staff on proper Calendar forms no later
than noon on Thursday, May 16 to the Community Relations Office, 6328 Memorial Rd., Room 207, Old Administration
Building. For more information call 822-3131. The next edition of UBC Reports wil be published May 28. Notices exceeding
35 words may be edited.
FRIDAY, MAY 24     |
Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand
Rounds <
Intra-uterine Insemination. Dr. Patrick
Taylor, UBC. University Hospital,
Shaughnessy Site D308 at 8am. Call
875-2171.
Paediatrics Grand Rounds
Low Level Lead Toxicity-
Implications For The Paediatrician, The Patient And
The Taxpayer. Dr. G.
Lockitch, Pathology, UBC
Children's Hospital.  G.F.
Strong Rehab Centre Auditorium at 9am.
Call 875-2118.
|    MONDAY, MAY 27   |
Biochemistry Discussion Group
Protein Processing And Secretion In
Yeast. Dr. Howard Bussey, Biology, McGill
U. IRC #3 at 3:45pm. Call 822-5925.
Paediatrics Research Seminar
Recurrent Chickenpox In Immune Competent Children. Dr. Anne Junker, Immunology Div., Paediatrics, Children's Hospital. University Hospital, Shaughnessy
Site D308 at 12pm. Refreshments from
11:45am. Call 875-2492.
Pulp/Paper Centre Dow Lecture
Directions In New Zealand Mechanical
Pulping Research. Dr. Stuart Corson,
Dow Distinguished Lecturer, PAPRO,
Forest Research Inst., Rotorua, New
Zealand. Pulp/PaperCentre 101 at 11 am.
Call 822-8560.
Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand
Rounds
Methodology And Logistics Of A Multi-
Centre Canadian Randomized Clinical
Trial. Dr. Jean-Marie Moutquin. University Hospital, Shaughnessy Site D308 at
8am. Call 875-2171.
L~
NOTICES
TUESDAY, MAY 28   |
Medical Genetics Seminar
Retrovirus-Like Promoters In The Human
Genome. Ms. Anita Feuchter, Ph.D. candidate, Terry Fox Lab. IRC#1 at 8:30am.
Coffee at 8:15am. Call 822-5311.
Campus Tours
Enjoy a free walking tour
of UBC's gardens, galler-
ii fjiMM ies, recreational facilities
- "-" and more. Drop-in tours
leave the Tours and Information desk in the Student
Union Building at 10am and 1pm weekdays. To book specialized tours including
those for seniors, children, ESL groups
and the physically challenged, call 822-
3777.
Census Day June 4
Next Statistics Canada Census. Complete your questionnaire and mail it back
according to the instructions on the package. For information, call 666-2041 or
666-7299.
English Language Institute
Homestay
English-speaking families needed to host
international students participating in UBC
programs, for periods of two to six weeks.
Remuneration is $19/night. Call 222-
5208.
International House Reach Out
Program
Local students correspond with international students accepted to UBC. Act as
contact and provide useful information to
incoming students while making global
friends. All students (Canadian or Internationals) welcome. Call 822-5021.
Museum of Anthropology
[■?}K""™"1 Exhibition extended to
#55 tv.    June 29:   Portraits of BC
@JJ   Nativeleaders,chiefs,chief
H(F^       counsellors and elders by
mmJ^^   Kwaguitl photographer
David Neel. Now open in
the new West Wing: The Koerner Ceramics Gallery.  Closed Monday. Call 822-
Microbiology Seminar Series
Replication And Transcription Of Parvoviruses.
Dr. Caroline Astell, Biochemistry, UBC.
Wesbrook 201 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-6648.
THURSDAY, TVIAY 30 \
Biochemistry Seminar
Structure And Function Of A Catalytic
RNA. Dr. Sidney Altman, Biology, Yale U.
IRC #4 at 12:30pm. Call 822-5925.
FRIDAY, MAY 31     \
Paediatrics Grand Rounds
Paediatric Endocrinology Relevant To
Mainstream Paediatrics? No One Can
Ignore Growth Factors Any Longer. Dr.
Judson Van Wyk, U. North Carolina at
Chapel Hill,. G.F. Strong Rehab Centre
Auditorium at 9am. Call 875-2118.
5087.
Executive Programs
One/two-day business seminars. May
21-22, Financial Management For Non-
Financial Managers, $550. May 27-31,
Marketing Challenge For Senior Managers, $1,950. May 28-29, Leading Creative And Professional Staff, $750. E.D.
McPhee Executive Conference Centre,
Henry Angus Bldg. For more information
call 822-8400.
Infant Hearing Study
Infants aged 1 -3 mos. needed for hearing
study. Remuneration for participation.
Interested parents please contact
Catherine (for Ellen Levi) at the School of
Audiology, 822-2288.
Psychology Step-Families Study
Married couples who have at least one
child from a previous union living with
them, are invited to participate in a study
of stress and coping in step-families. Call
Jennifer Campbell at 822-3805.
Counselling Psychology Retirement Study
Women concerned about
planning their retirement
needed for an 8-week retirement preparation seminar. Call Sara Cornish at
822-5345.
Adult Child Separation/Divorce
Study
Volunteers needed for study exploring
how mothers cope with their adult child's
separation/divorce. Participants will be
required to anonymously complete a
mailed questionnaire. Call Allison Krause,
Counselling Psychology, at 946-7803.
Psychiatry Depression Study
Participants needed for research study
using new antidepressant medication.
Depression sufferers, 18-65 years. Call
Doug Keller at 822-7318.
Diabetic Clinical Study
Diabetics who have painful neuropathy
affecting the legs needed to volunteer for
14-week trial of an investigational /new
drug. Call Dr. Donald Studney, University
Hospital, UBC Site at 822-7142.
Daily Rhythms Study
Volunteers needed to keep a daily journal
(average 5 min. daily) for 4 months, noting
patterns in physical/social experiences.
Call Jessica McFarlane at 822-5121.
Psychiatry PMS Study
University Hospital, Shaughnessy site.
Volunteers needed for a study of an
investigational medication to treat Pre
Menstrual Syndrome. Call Doug Keller at
822-7318.
Study on Exercise and the Menstrual Cycle
Volunteers needed age 18-35 having normal menstrual cycles-not currently on oral
contraceptives. Dr. Connie Lebrun, Family
Practice, Sports Medicine. Will get
V02max and other physiological testing
done. 822-4045.
Hypertension in Pregnancy
Study
Pregnant women concerned about their
blood pressure, are invited to participate.
The study compares relaxation training
with standard medical treatment (own
physician). Call Dr. Wolfgang Linden,
822-4145.
Exercise In Asthma Study
Volunteers with exercise-induced asthma
needed for 2-part study (30 min. each).
No medications or injections. Call Dr. Phil
Robinson, Pulmonary Research laboratory, St. Paul's Hospital at 682-2344, extension 2259.
Memory For Places
Study on memory for
places (shopping mall) requires volunteers age 65
years and older for 1.5
hours. Please call Bob Uttl,
Psychology, UBC at 822-
2140.
Herpes Research Study
Participants needed for treatment studies
of shingles (herpes zoster) and first herpes simplex infections with new antiviral
agents. Also ongoing study for males 18-
45 years with recurrent herpes simplex.
Dr. Stephen Sacks, sponsoring physician.
Call the Herpes clinic at 822-7565 or leave
your name/number at 687-7711, pager
2887.
Gastrointestinal Study
Volunteers required for pre-clinical trials
of a new gastrointestinal ultrasound contrast agent. Volunteers (18-30 years) in
good health with no history of ulcers or
other gastrointestinal ailments. Call Dr.
Colin Tilcock, Radiology, University Hospital, UBC Site at 822-3717.
Female Hair Loss Study
Females age 19-49. Moderate hair loss,
crown area only. Must be able to attend
1-2 times weekly for 9 months. Honorarium paid for participation. Call Sherry
at 874-8138.
Statistical Consulting and Research Laboratory
SCARL is operated by the Department of
Statistics to provide statistical advice to
faculty and graduate students working on
research problems. Forms for appointments available in 210. Ponderosa Annex
C-210. Call 822-4037.
Surplus Equipment Recycling
Facility
All surplus items. Every
Wednesday, 12-3pm.
Task Force Bldg., 2352
Health Sciences Mall. Call
822-2813.
Sexual Harassment Office
Two advisors are available to discuss
questions and concerns on the subject.
They are prepared to help any member of
the UBC community who is being sexually
harassed to find a satisfactory resolution.
Call Margaretha Hoek or Jon Shapiro at
822-6353.
Volunteering
To find an interesting and challenging
volunteer job, get in touch with Volunteer
Connections, Student Counselling and
Resources Centre, Brock 200. Call 822-
3811.
Narcotics Anonymous Meetings
Every Tuesday (including holidays) from
12:30-2pm, University Hospital, UBC Site,
Room 311 (through Lab Medicine from
Main Entrance). Call 873-1018 (24-hour
Help Line).
Duplicate Bridge
Informal game. All welcome. Admission
$2, includes coffee/snacks. Faculty Club
every Wednesday at 7pm. Call 822-
4865.
Fitness Appraisal
Physical Education and
Recreation through the
John M. Buchanan Fitness
and Research Centre, administers a physical fitness
assessment program.
Students$25, others$30. Call822-4356.
Adult Hockey Camps
Cool off on the ice this summer. Whether
you're just starting out or an experienced
player, these camps offer quality skill development instruction for both men and
women. For further information call Community Sport Services at 822-3688.
Adult Golf Lessons
Perfect your golf game this year in a basic
or intermediate programs. Learn quality
fundamentals of grip, posture, stance,
alignment and accuracy. Class size limited to 6. Call Community Sport Services
at 822-3688.
Neville Scarfe Children's Garden
Located west of the Education Building.
Freeadmission. Open year round. Families interested in planting, weeding or
watering the garden, call Gary Pennington
at 822-6386 or Jo-Anne Naslund at 434-
1081.
Botanical Garden
F"BB,,,,"™1 10am-6pm daily. Freead-
I j0fjffl mission on Wednesdays.
I MJmP      Call 822-4208. 10    UBC REPORTS May 16,1991
Work Study Program helps
students pay their way
Arts student
employed on
By GAVIN WILSON
They move pianos, sharpen skates,
program computers,
shelve library books,
test seismic equipment
and assist researchers.
From agriculture to
zoology, students
needing financial assistance are employed
across campus in
UBC's Work Study
Program.
"I wouldn't have
been able to stretch my
finances to the end of
the school year without
it," said Michele
Hebein, a second-year
Arts student who performed clerical dudes
in the psychology department office from
September to May.
A recent survey shows that the UBC
program—the biggest in the province
— is meeting the expectations of both
students and their campus employers,
said program administrator Evelyn
Buriak.
"We were pleasantly surprised," she
said of the study results, gathered in
February and March of this year. "We
pointedly asked for comments on what
participants saw as the biggest problems."
The program offers part-time jobs
for full-time students with demonstrated
financial need. Funded by the provincial government and the university, it is
administered by Awards and Financial
Aid, with support from other university departments.
This past year, 770 students were
employed in 450 to 500 campus
projects. The program received
$790,000 in funding for B.C. students
from the provincial government and
$50,000 from the university for stu?
dents from other provinces.
Despite its success, Buriak said
many people do not know about the
program, or that it could work well for
them.
For students, the principal criteria
is demonstrated financial need, as
assessed by B.C. Student Assistance
Program policy. The work study program also tries to give them some career or study-related experience. A
full 50 per cent of the jobs created
under the program are research-related.
"We found that it is usually a pretty
good match in that respect," Buriak
said. "It's doing what we had hoped it
would."
Even when the perfect match is not
found, the program can open up oppor-
Ptioto by Media Services
Michele Hebeinis one of 770 UBC students
campus in the Work Study Program.
tunities. Buriak has heard of students
getting so-involved in their work study
projects that they revise their career
plans.
If there is a complaint about" the
program from the students' point of
view, she said, it is that
they wanted more of it:
more, hours, more
money and greater
flexibility of hours.
Currently, students
can earn a maximum
amount of $2,500 annually (hourly pay
ranges from $8.25 to
$14) and are restricted
to a maximum of 10
hours a week. In many
cases hours are restricted because of
campus union contracts,
but it is also government philosophy that
jobs should not detract
from study, said Buriak.
Project proposals for
the creation of work
study jobs can be submitted by full-
time faculty, administrative and professional staff members. Deadline for
project proposals is August 1.
Two UBC professors
named to TRIUMF
advisory board
Education Minister Stan Hagen
has named two UBC professors to
the newly created advisory board
for the TRIUMF-KAON Ventures
Office.
The office was established last June
to actively pursue opportunities to
commercialize new technologies created by TRIUMF and the proposed
kaon factory project.
The board will oversee the transfer of technology from the TRIUMF
laboratory to the private sector. ■
Named to the board are Microbiology professor Julia Levy, who is
vice-president of Quadra Logic
Technologies, and Dr. David
Hardwick, associate dean of research
and planning in the Faculty of Medicine and director of laboratories,
Children's Hospital.
The advisory board will be chaired
by Haig Farris, chairman and president
of the Fractal Capital Corp. Other
board members include Robin
Armstrong, president of the University of New Brunswick, Normand
Morin, vice-president of Lavalin, and
Marian Vaisey-Genser, associate
vice-president, University of Manitoba.
The new board will provide the
leadership to propel TRIUMF's scientific innovations into the national
and international marketplace, Hagen
said.
In the past year, the office has
identified more than 50 new commercial technologies at the TRIUMF
facility, ranging from medical technologies through microelectronics
and computer software.
The office played an active role in
assisting the first foreign sale of a
compact, commercial cyclotron by
Ebco Industries of Richmond.
UBC hosts Canada-wide Science Fair
By GAVIN WILSON
More than 450 students from across
Canada and several Pacific Rim countries were expected to arrive at UBC to
takepart in the week-long 1991 Canada-
Wide Science Fair, May 12-19.
The university is a co-sponsor ofthe
event.
The students, aged 11 to 18 years,
are winners of nearly 100 regional fairs
held earlier across the country. Their
projects, in four categories (engineering, life science, physical science and
computer science), were to be displayed
in the War Memorial Gym.
More than 200 judges were invited
to award $100,000 in trips, scholarships, cash awards and summer jobs, as
well as medals and numerous special
awards.
In all, more than 1,000 people, from
as far away as Japan, Thailand, the
Philippines, Sweden and Australia,
came to participate as guests, delegates
or competitors.
The annual Science Fair is held to
encourage scientific interest among
young men and women, help students
develop experimental skills and assist
them in pursuing careers in science.
The theme of this year's fair is the
Pacific Rim.
As well as science, students will be
treated to a week of social and cultural
activities, workshops and seminars.
They will also tour campus, Vancouver and Victoria.
The Science Fair movement has
grown quickly in B.C., from just one
regional event a few year ago, to 11
regional fairs right across the province.
B.C. students have earned top awards
each year at the Canada-Wide Science
During the science fair, UBC Registrar Richard Spencer was director of
judging and Reg Wild, math and science education, was director of exhibition facilities. Other organizing committee members from UBC were Bob
David Dolphin, chemistry,and Michael
Crooks, physics.
U of Texas vets SlA-v/dlUon facility
Cecil Green's philanthropy goes on
Philanthropist and long-time benefactor of UBC Cecil Green has endowed the University ofTexas at Dallas
with a centre designed to explore the
relationships between science and issues of social policy.
The Cecil and Ida Green Centre for
the Study of Science and Social Policy
is the latest project to receive a part of
an estimated $150 million Green has
donated to educational and research
institutions worldwide.
Construction of the $2.4-million
centre will be funded by Green's donation, University of Texas endowment funds and other donors.
Green attended a ceremony in Dallas to dedicate the centre on May 2.
Completion of the 16,500-square-foot
facility is expected by
September, 1992.
In 1990, Green donated more than $7 million to UBC's fundraising
campaign, A World of
Opportunity, for construction of a residential
graduate college to be
named in his honor.
British-born Green,
91, was raised in Vancouver and studied at
UBC before transferring
to the Massachusetts Institute of
Technology. After earning degrees in
electrical engineering, he went on to
become a pioneer in the field of exploration geophysics and a co-founder
ofTexas Instruments, the
Dallas-based electronics
firm.
Green will be knighted
by Her Royal Highness,
Queen Elizabeth IL at a
ceremony to be held this
spring, in Dallas, which
has been Green's home
since 1930.
It is the latest in along
list of honors bestowed on
Green Greenwhosephflanthropy
has earned him, as well as
his late wife Ida, much esteem over the
years. Their names grace dozens of
fellowships, parks, colleges, professorships, lecture series and research
facilities throughout North America.
Light therapy may help bulimia patients
By CONNIE FTLLETTI
Light therapy, successfully used in
the treatment of winter depression or
Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD),
may offer new hope for bulimia patients.
"Our preliminary studies indicate
that 46 per cent of the bulimic patients
we examined exhibited seasonal mood
symptoms as severe as persons afflicted
with winter depression," said clinical
psychiatrist Dr. Raymond Lam, direc-
torof UBC's Seasonal Mood Disorders
Clinic at the University Hospital, UBC
site.
Bulimia is a common eating disor
der affecting up to 30,000 women in
B.C. Bulimic patients binge on large
quantities of food over short periods of
time, often several times aday. Binging
is followed by purging, usually by self-
induced vomiting through laxative and
diuretic abuse.
Physical complications of bulimia
range from dental problems and
chemical imbalances, leading to dizziness and fainting, to cardiac rhythm
problems and even death. The psychological consequences include distorted
body image, guilt, poor self-esteem,
lack of concentration and suicidal
thoughts.
Lam observed that many bulimic
patients worsened during the winter
and improved in the summer, the same
pattern noted in patients suffering from
winter depression. Symptoms of both
syndromes improved when treated with
light therapy.
"We don't know why people become bulimic or suffer from severe
winter depression, but a common biological problem may be responsible for
both syndromes," Lam said. "For example, we know that abnormalities in
brain chemicals such as serotonin are
found in both bulimia and SAD. However, there also may be alternate ex
planations which need further investigation."
Currently, bulimia is treated with a
combination of psychotherapy, focusing on distorted thinking patterns, self-
esteem issues and assertiveness and
anti-depressant medications.
"These are time-intensive, expensive treatments," said Lam. "The effects are variable and don't work for
everyone. We hope that light therapy
will be an addition to currently available methods of treatment, or help patients to improve their response to these
existing protocols."
Lam and colleagues Dr. Elliot
Goldner, director of the Eating Disorders Clinic at St. Paul's Hospital, and
UBC psychiatrist, Dr. Leslie Solyom,
are now involved in a larger study to
assess the value of light therapy in the
treatment of bulimia, and to determine
what type of light is the most effective.
Persons enrolled in the out-patient
study are required to spend approximately two hours each morning (over a
two week period for each type of light
being tested) in front of a light box
emitting high intensity light.
The study is being funded by the
B.C. Health Research Foundation. For
more information, call 822-7325.
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AuMiHll UBC REPORTS May 16.1991       11
Whole Language: learning that's familiar and fun
By CHARLES KER
The principal of Sunnybank School
was clearly flustered.
"You say children were making
noise in class," the defence lawyer repeated. "What kind of noise, exactly?"
After an awkward pause, Basil Ford
sheepishly admitted that the "disruptive" clamor coining from a Grade 1
classroom had, in fact, been children
talking about their studies.
"Yes... well... they were talking
about their work," Ford stuttered. "But
they should have been doing it."
Ford's admission was a turning point
in Whole Language on Trial, a skit
written by a group of nine UBC language education professors.
Presented three years ago at a national conference of English teachers,
the informal production highlighted the
pros and cons of whole language, a
non-traditional approach to language
instruction. But while it may be deemed
non-traditional, whole language supporters stress that it is very much a
research-based methodology.
"The process has evolved over many
years," said Victor Froese, head of
UBC's Department of Language Education. "It is not something that just
landed on us."
Froese and his colleagues have since
rewritten ideas presented in the original skit and published them in book
form in 1990. Whole Language, Practice and Theory is currently being used
as a textbook by universities across
Canada. The first 4,000 copies of the
book quickly sold out and an American
edition was released earlier this year.
Froese credits the book's popularity
to its teacher-based approach. Each
chapter offers practical suggestions on
how a teacher might implement a whole
language program in a classroom.
Rather than have children sitting in
rows taking notes from standardized
texts (Ford's notion of "doing it"),
whole language promotes active communication among students. In a whole
language system, students might be
asked to observe an activity outside,
perform a skit or watch a news program. They would then be asked to talk
and write about what they witnessed.
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Classified
Classified advertising can be purchased from Community Relations.
Phone 822-6149. Ads placed by faculty, staff and students cost $12.84
for 7 lines/issue ($. 81 for each additional word). Off-campus advertisers
are charged$14.98 for 7lines/issue ($.86 for each additional word). (All
prices include G.S. T.) Tuesday, May 16 at noon is the deadline for the
next issue of UBC Reports which appears on Thursday, May 28. Deadline
for the following edition on June 13is4p.m Tuesday, June 4. All ads must
be paid in advance in cash, by cheque or internal requisition.
House Rentals
WANTED TO RENT: by two doctors
while interning. 2 bdrms in house or
apartment, bright, clean, quiet. Kits/Kerr/
Shaugh. perfered. Commencing June
1 st. Approx. $750. Please phone Sandy
at 264-1499.
WATERFRONT RETREAT: near
Chemaimus, Vancouver Island. Very
quiet and picturesque location. Fully
furnished home with decks, 2 bdrm, 2
bthrm, dining rm, lofts, etc. For rent
weekly or longer. Phone 224-0143.
SERVICES
HOUSESITTING: Are you looking for a
family to take good care of your home
while you are away on sabbatical/leave?
We are coming to UBC from out of
province/faculty and student/require 3
bdrms. Excellent references. Phone
689-2597 a.m. only.
HOUSE-SITTING: Mature n/s, n/d,
male respiratory therapy student in
clinical year, looking to house-sit from
June '91-May'92. Previous experience, excellent references, experienced landscapes Call collect 828-
9571, dr message (403)455-0126.
Ask for John.
DOG WALKING/HOUSE & PET SITTING: Kitsilano and Point Grey area.
Recent university graduate (and animal
lover!) in need of extra income. Good
rates. Excellent references. Call 224-
4722 evenings and weekends.
Miscellaneous
LAWN BOWLING: West Point Grey
Lawn Bowling Club (West 6th & Trimble)
welcomes new and experienced lawn
bowlers. Call Jean Elder 224-4407 or
John Flint 689-8125.
EMPLOYMENT WANTED: What
can I do for you? Former UBC Program Assistant available for part-
time, on- call relief office duties. 822-
8254.
BLACK & WHITE ENLARGEMENTS: from your negatives, individually hand exposed, cropped,
dodged and shaded to your exact
specifications. High quality papers in
matte or high gloss finish. We can
get the best from your sub-standard
negative. Great prices, an 8x10 custom enlargement just $5.70! Call
Media Services Photography at 822-
4775. (3rd floor LPC, 2206 East
Mall).
Whereas the traditional method of
teaching language depended on a series of books isolating different skills,
whole language brings these skills together in a real-life context making
"They get hooked on learning
and they don't even know it."
language more familiar. Froese emphasizes that it is a literature-based
approach which encourages students
to read as much as possible.
"With whole language, kids are
reading, writing, speaking and listening all the time," said Froese. "They
get hooked on learning and they don't
even know it."
UBC has recently been the site for
Canada's largest study of pre-school
language development. Based at UBC's
Child Study Centre, university researchers followed the oral language
development of 60 three and four-year-
olds for three years. Forty-three of the
children were then followed for another two years into Grades 1, 2 or 3.
The study's findings clearly linked
children's early language development
to success in their learning to read and
write.
In Froese's 1988 skit, a Grade 1
teacher at Sunnybank school is charged
with hampering childrens' reading
achievement, skill development and
spelling ability by using a whole language approach.
However, in his role as an expert
witness, Froese told the judge that results have shown children in whole
language programs read more, show
more initiative and have a wider vocabulary. He added that traditional
readers, spellers and composition books
are often a hindrance to learning because their skill lessons are separated
and discourage children from reading
ahead.
Whole language enthusiasts also
point to the positive spin-offs for
teachers. Rather than simply administering a set of pre-approved materials,
which many students already know,
whole language forces teachers to be
more creative.
Froese argues that it is wrong for
standardized texts to decide beforehand on a prescribed sequence for
teaching language. He said research
can't give any clear answer on a "correct method" of language instruction.
"Traditional textbooks have goals
built into them which put form before
function," said Froese. "Whole language has the teacher deciding the goals
based on what the kids are able to do in
the classroom."      '
In Canada, virtually every province
has adopted an integrated curriculum
where reading, writing, speaking and
listening are taught together. But Froese
and his colleagues are working hard to
see that whole language is adopted
further by gradually shifting the responsibility for learning to the children
themselves.
"If you believe that language is a
social process, then you have to arrange
for the process to happen in class," said
Froese. "That may require a different
view of school."
Stepfamilies subject of study
By CHARLES KER
A UBC study is now underway examining ways in which stepfamilies
cope with problems particular to them.
According to Statistics Canada,
close to six per cent of all British
Columbians have raised stepchildren,
almost double the national average.
The province also leads the country
in terms of both its percentage of
married people who have been divorced
and those who have remarried.
Anita DeLongis, a UBC psychology
professor, plans to interview 200
stepfamilies in the Vancouver area and
follow their progress over a two-year
period.
"We want to find out what makes
some families able to function and
others not," said DeLongis.
Delongis said that while previous
studies have looked at stepfamilies from
a dysfunctional point of vie w, her study
will compare well-adjusted stepfamilies
with families that are coping poorly.
The study is also the first of its kind to
be conducted over a period of time.
The main problems isolated so far in
the study involve parents' dealings with
ex-spouses, conflicting parenting styles
which mothers and fathers bring to new
marriages and children's treatment of
step-parents.
For instance, a wife may feel her
husband's son doesn't treat her with
respect which the husband may not
consider to be an issue. Tensions also
arise when the natural parent feels the
step-parent isn' t treating his or her child
right.
For the last decade, DeLongis's research has focused on how people cope
with stress. She hopes this study will
isolate the sources of stress among
stepfamilies and find out what effect
this stress has both in terms of family
adjustment and physical health.
"Too often clinicians and social
workers make assumptions that aren't
necessarily based on evidence," said
DeLongis. "Hopefully, this will provide
some proof of what coping methods
work and what don't."
The study will involve interviewing
the wife and husband in stepfamilies
that have at least one child from a
previous marriage living at home.
Interviews will be done separately
over the phone with different interviewers for each partner. Participants
will then be sent questionnaires and a
structured diary. The diary is to be
filled out three times a day for two
weeks detailing moods shifts and levels of tension. At the end of each day,
each parent is also asked to document
the most significant family problem
that came up each day and how it was
handled.
Participants will be contacted six
months later for a followup inquiry.
For more information call 822-3805.
Fisheries Centre Planned
IS YOUR BABY
BETWEEN
2 & 24 MONTHS?
Join our research on
language development
at U.B.C! Just one
visit to our infant
play-room. Please
contact Dr. Baldwin
for more information:
228-6908
By ABE HEFTER
Plans are under way for UBC to
establish a Fisheries Centre within the
Faculty of Graduate Studies.
The centre would provide the academic focus for studies in the scientific
and social aspects of living aquatic
resources in marine and freshwater
environments.
"Aquatic resource systems play a
major role in the B.C. economy," said
Paul Leblond, head of the Oceanography Department. "Fishes and other
living aquatic resources, in the sea as
well as in rivers and lakes, contribute
several billion dollars annually to the
B.C. economy through commercial and
recreational fisheries, water-based recreation, tourism and aquaculture."
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The proposal to establish a Fisheries Centre at UBC was written by
Leblond and Geoffrey Scudder, head
of the Zoology Department.
Scudder said aquatic ecosystems are
vulnerable to disruption through environmental abuse, urban and industrial
expansion, exploitation and global
climatic change.
"Understanding and managing the
problems associated with living aquatic
resources can't be approached within a
single disciplinary framework,"
Scudder added. "What is clearly needed
is a multidisciplinary academic center
which will bring together natural, social
and applied scientists who are specialized in the various levels and aspects of
the problem."
The centre, which would be the first
fully integrated unit of its kind in
Canada, will maintain a research team
devoted to the study of living aquatic
resources and to issues related to fisheries. Leblond said the centre will
focus on concerns ranging from fish
and their habitat to fish processing and
food preparation.
The centre will encourage the participation of faculty with expertise in
other areas of science and applied science as well as from areas representing social, commercial, industrial, international and regulatory concerns
of fisheries. 12    UBC REPORTS May 16,1991
Health of
seniors
studied
By CONNIE FILLETTI
UBC's Faculty of Medicine is participating in a nationwide study, the
first of its kind in Canada, aimed at
exploring the health of seniors.
The multidisciplinary team of researchers, representing the Department
of Medicine, Division of Geriatric
Medicine and the Departments of
Health Care and Epidemiology, Psychiatry and Medical Genetics at UBC,
will examine a wide variety of topics,
from seniors' present health status and
ability to manage daily tasks, to work
history and family history of disease.
"The study is funded by the National
Health and Research Development
Program and underscores a real need to
understand how the senior population
is aging," said Dr. Jo Ann Miller,
mainland coordinator of the study.
She added that researchers will be
investigating both the physical and
psychological health of seniors, as well
as what support services they need to
receive or maintain quality health care.
The fastest growing segment of the
population at the present time is people
80 and over. According to Statistics
Canada, more than three million Canadians, or 11.5 per cent of the country's
population, were 65 years of age or
older in 1990.
"By looking at randomly selected
people over the age of 65, we will be
better able to understand the current
health status of individuals who are
likely to access health care services,"
said Dr. Lynn Beattie, head of tbe Division of Geriatric Medicine and chair
ofthe B.C. portion ofthe study.
"The study will provide a valuable
database; we survey how individuals
are doing now, with the potential to
delineate changes as time goes on," she
said.
The project, known as The Canadian
Study of Health and Aging, is part of a
World Health Organization study being
conducted simultaneously in several
countries.
More than 10,000 seniors will be
surveyed for the Canadian component
ofthe study, which involves 18 research
institutes and universities. The British
Columbia steering committee comprises representatives from UBC, as
well as the University of Victoria,
Simon Fraser University and the B.C.
Ministry of Health.
In B.C., about 2,000 individuals, 65
years of age or over, will be invited to
participate in the study.
Advertise in
UBC Reports
Deadline for paid
advertisements for
the May 28 Issue Is
4 p.m. May 16.
For information,
phone 822-3131
To place an ad,
phone 822-6149
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Big Bang
History Professor Peter Moogk, left, and retired officers Major Vic Stevenson and Captain
Keith Brown, helped unveil a plaque last month, inset, commemorating the military history of
Point Grey. Located to the northeast ofthe Museum of Anthropology, the plaque sits atop the
I former site of a six-inch calibre gun, above, used to defend Point Grey Fort in the early 1940 's.
Fraser River Basin examined in new book
By GAVIN WILSON
Sustainable development in the
Fraser River Basin is the topic of a new
book published by UBC's Westwater
Research Centre.
Perspectives on Sustainable Development in Water Management: Towards Agreement in the Fraser River
Basin, is the first of a two-volume set
on the environment of B.C.'s largest
river and its watershed, which encompasses one quarter of the province's
entire land area.
The book was edited by Anthony
Dorcey, assistant director ofthe centre,
which conducts interdisciplinary research on the management of water and
associated resources.
"The book does not aim to provide
any final answers, but it does offer
preliminary analyses designed to
stimulate discussion," he said. "This is
the first phase of a larger, more ambitious, research project that addresses
immensely complex, wide-ranging and
k '"|" • U]tmfr]
nolo by David Gray
Anthony Dorcey hopes new book will stimulate discussion on the
complex issues involving future development ofthe Fraser watershed.
challenging issues."
The book brings together natural
and social scientists, and academics
and professionals from outside the uni
versity. Among the 24 authors are lawyers, economists, zoologists, foresters,
engineers and graduate students.
Some of the topics they cover in
clude fisheries, forestry, water pollution, habitat degradation, flooding,
erosion and resource use by Native
Indians. As well, the book examines
the framework of policies and institutional agreements that guide management of resources in the region.
Dorcey draws on the different
views expressed in the book to provide an analysis and propose strategies that could help build consensus
in contentious resource management
issues.
The recendy announced Fraser River
Basin Action Plan, part of the federal
government's Green Plan, provides "an
unexpected and excellent opportunity"
to take further steps in the process, he
said.
The second Westwater book on the
Fraser will focus on the environmental
state ofthe Fraser River watershed and
how innovations in resource management can be implemented. Publication
is expected in July.
Model looks at shrinking timber supply
By ABE HEFTER
Two UBC forestry professors have
developed a prototype timber supply
analysis model which will enable the
province to take a more comprehensive
approach to the planning of resource
management on forest lands.
. When the province decided it needed
to develop an advanced strategic
analysis system for timber supply
planning, it turned to Andrew Howard
and John Nelson. The two Forest
Harvesting professors presented a
prototype which will simulate forest
growth over the next 250 years to determine what is considered a sustainable
allowable cut
"In the last three or four years, the
province has been looking at ways to
change our present system to make it
more responsive to the issues that affect
resource management," said Dave
Waddell, a systems forester with the
Integrated Resources Branch of the
Ministry of Forests. "At the time,
Howard and Nelson were already doing related work and demonstrated they
could help us address our needs."
Those needs, according to Howard,
centre on spatial constraints used to
limit the size of clearcuts and the length
of time before stands of trees adjacent
to openings can be harvested. These
constraints ensure not only a long-term
timber supply, but also the protection
of non-timber resources.
"The ministry has the task of determining how much timber can be cut
annually at a sustainable level," said
Howard. "In the past, there was plenty
oftimber to go around. But things have
changed radically and, with the prototype we've developed, the government
will be able to incorporate these constraints, which have anemormous impact on the annual cut. The scientific
input is our contribution."
The UBC prototype includes computer graphics which look something
like a chess board. Each square represents an area of land which is eligible
for treatment such as cutting, planting
or spacing. The timing of treatments
for each land unit depends on biological, environmental and economic goals.
Nelson said wildlife habitat concerns
and landscape esthetics are just two of
the areas that have been included in the
methodology encoded in the prototype
model. The economics of timber supply have also been added — the tracking of value of different stands, where
they are grown, and whether or not it's
economically feasible to harvest them.
"The methodology on which the
model is based provides, for the first
time, the opportunity to incorporate
non-timber resources into the planning
process," said Howard. "Although the
current version i$ principally timber
driven, the next step will be for wildlife
and other non-timber resources to become equal partners with timber in the
planning of forest management. Our
ongoing research is.directed towards
this objective."
Waddell said the province will review the implications of the prototype
over the next three to six months. Future development of a working timber
supply model may be open to the forestry consulting community, he added.
"It' s nice to know we can go to UBC
to get the job done," said Waddell.
"This project has proven to be good
value for the government. When there
are academic research questions that
must be answered—that's where UBC
DONT GIVE UP
YOUR DAY
JOB.
Now is the time to
find out about UBC Winter
Session '91-'92
Evening Credit
Courses
Deadline for new
applicants is June 30.
for Information, contact;
Extra-Sessional Studies
6323 Cecil Green Park Road
Vancouver. B.C. V6T1Z1
Telephone 822-2657

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