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UBC Reports Feb 3, 1982

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Array Volume 28, Number 5
February 3,1982
Board hikes tuition,
puts $921,000 more
into aid for students
Increases in student tuition fees
averaging 32.8 per cent were approved
Jan. 26 by the UBC Board of
Governors.
The higher fees will bring in an
additional $5.1 million to the
University in 1982-83, of which almost
$1 million will be spent on increased
financial aid to needy students. More
than 1,200 additional bursaries of
$750 will be available, representing an
Appointments
approved
by Board
UBC's Board of Governors has
approved the appointment of a new
head for the medical school's
Department of Biochemistry and the
reappointment of Prof. Warren Kitts
as dean of the Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences for a second term of office.
The new head of biochemistry is Dr.
Dennis E. Vance, who joined the UBC
faculty in 1973 and who is currently
on leave of absence from the
University to undertake research in the
Division of Metabolic Diseases of the    '
University of California at San Diego.
Dr. Vance, who will take up his
appointment on July 1, currently holds
research grants from the B.C. Heart
Foundation, the Medical Research
Council of Canada and the U.S.
National Institutes of Health for
research on serum lipids, fatty
substances found in the bloodstream.
Deari Kitts, who has been a member
of the UBC faculty since 1953, was
first appointed dean of agricultural
sciences in 1976 after heading the
faculty's animal science department
for nine years. His second term as
dean runs from July 1 this year to June
30, 1988.
A native of North Vancouver and a
UBC graduate, Dean Kitts has been
honored on a number of occasions by
professional organizations for his work
on animal nutrition and physiology.
He is currently chairman of the panel
which advises Canada's Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research
Council on the award of strategic
grants for food and agriculture
research.
Deari Joseph Gardner, head of
UBC's Faculty of Forestry since 1965,
has submitted his resignation as dean,
effective June 30, 1983. He will
continue as a forestry professor for one
year beyond his resignation date, when
he reaches retirement age.
increase in student aid of 46.1 per
cent.
"Our objective is that no student
who is academically qualified should
be prevented from attending this
University because he or she can't
afford to come," Board chairman
Leslie Peterson, QC, said following the
Jan. 26 Board meeting,
UBC president Douglas Kenny said
he does not expect enrolment to fall
next September because of the higher
tuition fees.
"Even with this increase, tuition fees
at UBC will still be comparatively
low," Dr. Kenny said, noting that the
1981-82 fees at the University of
Toronto are higher than UBC's
1982-83 fees.
And the UBC president once again
called upon the provincial government
to consult with the universities and
establish some long range objectives
for the university system in B.C.,
saying that fiscal and academic
planning on a year-to-year basis "is
like living in an Alice in Wonderland
world."
Dr. Kenny noted that the
University's next fiscal year begins .on
April 1, "and yet we will be lucky if
we know by then what our operating
grant will be for the.year."
Although the average increase at
UBC is 32.8 per cent, the tuition fee
for the first year of the Bachelor of
Arts, Bachelor of Education and
Bachelor of Science programs goes up
only 29 per cent, to $840 a year from.
$650. Medical students will pay the
highest fees at UBC, $1,450. They pay
$1,050 this year.
Expressed as a percentage of the
University's net operating budget, next
year's revenue from tuition fees will be
approximately 9.5 per cent of a
budget expected to be about $220
million. Tuition fee revenue this year
represents only 8.7 per cent of the
operating budget. Ten years ago,
tuition fees accounted for more than
15 per cent of UBC's budget.
The tuition fee schedule approved
by the Board of Governors was
originally proposed on Jan. 13 by an
advisory committee on retrenchment
that was appointed last September by
President Kenny. The increase of 32.8
per cent was subsequently endorsed
unanimously by the Senate Budget
'Committee.
To meet a continuing shortfall of
$7.48 million for 1982-83 and beyond,
the retrenchment committee
Please turn to page 2
See FEES
Prof Stephen Calvert, head of UBC's Department of Oceanography, holds a
manganese nodule estimated to be some 20 million years old. He's. analysing
nodules, dredged upfront the North Pacific seabed, for their nickel and copper
content in a $275,000 x-ray emission spectrometer. He's one of 21 UBC faculty
members who have been awarded more than $2 million by Canada's Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research Council for projects of national concern. For
more on the grants, see story on page 4.
Inflation outstripped earnings
UBC students earned more money
last summer than in the summer of
1980, but the increase in income was
well below the increase in the cost of
living.
A report issued by the UBC Student
Counselling and Resources Centre
shows that the median income for
undergraduate men in 1981 was .
$3,678, an increase of only $127 over
the 1980 median summer earnings.
Undergraduate women earned a
median amount of $2,551, an increase
over 1980 of $82.
Some other points from the report:
• Some 83 per cent of students
registering at UBC for the 1981-82
winter session reported that they had
sought employment in the summer of
1981.
• 99 per cent of those seeking
employment obtained it.
• The median number of weeks
worked was 13.3 (men — 13.6, women
- 13).
• . Male students in forestry
($5,125), applied science ($4,591),
architecture ($4,416) and agriculture
($4,375) reported the highest median
earnings. Among female students, the
highest summer earnings were
reported by those in applied science
($4,033) and forestry ($4,000).
• Male undergraduates reported
mean savings of $2,489, an increase of
$214 from 1980. The mean savings of
female undergraduates was $2,106, an
increase of $132 from the 1980 mean.
Both men and women reported saving
62 per cent of their earnings.
• Few independent students (only
19 per cent of the men and 7.5 per
cent of the women) earned enough to
finance their education from summer
earnings.
• 31.4 per cent of the students
(35.1 per cent of the women and 28.1
per cent of the men) reported that
they had a part-time job for the
1981-82 session. !'JBC Reports February 3, 1982
continued from page 1
recommended cuts in faculty and non-
faculty budgets and an increase in
tuition fees. With the new fee
schedule, the student share of the
:   shortfall will be $2.27 million. Cuts in
faculty budgets will account for $1.93
million, and non-faculty budgets will
be trimmed $3.28 million.
The increase of 32.8 per cent will
also be applied to spring and summer
session courses at UBC, and to
correspondence and special courses.
The fee for a 3-unit correspondence or
spring or summer course rises to $210
from $156.
Total tuition fee revenue for
1982-83 at UBC is estimated at $20.88
million, an increase of $5.16 million
over 1981-82. Of this additional
income, $921,000 wil be spent on
v increased student aid, $1.96 million
will go to offset inflation (estimated at
12.5 per cent) and the remaining
$2.27 million will help with the
University's shortfall of $7.48 million.
President Kenny's advisory
committee on retrenchment put
forward two proposals on tuition fees,
alternative one calling for an increase
of 29.5 per cent and alternative two
suggesting 32.8.
The committee noted that if the
Board opted for 32.8 per cent, then
additional funds of $435,100 would be
available to help with the $7.48
million shortfall. It recommended that
this be used to lower the proposed
assessments against the Library,
Computing Centre and Research
Committee grants. Original proposed
cuts in those areas were $564,000,
$290,00 and $1 million, respectively.
UBC TUITION FEES
Fulltime Winter Session
Present 1982-83
(Not including AMS or other
student-levied fees)
Agricultural Sciences
B.Sc. (Agriculture)
1st year $ 695
2nd and 4th years 725
3rd year (including field trip) 865
B.L.A.
1st year 695
other years 725
Applied Science
Architecture 850
Engineering 850
Nursing - 1st year 650
other years 695
Arts
B.A., B.F.A.
1st year 650
other years 670
B.H.E.
1st year 650
other years 670
Diploma Programs 670
Librarianship (M.L.S. and M.A.S.) 770
Music 850
Social Work
3rd and 4th years 670
5th year (concentrated) 700
Commerce and Business Administration
- -    1st year 695
other years (B.Com.) 820
Licentiate in Accounting 820
Dentistry
D.M.D. 1050
Dental Hygiene 820
Diploma Programs 1060
Education
B.Ed. - 1st year 650
other years 670
Diploma and Teacher Training 670
Industrial Education (sponsored program) 25
B.P.E. - 1st year 677
other years 695
B.R.E. - 1st year 677
other years 695
Forestry
1st, 2nd and 4th years 820
3rd year (including field trip) 1095
Law 820
$ 985
1050
1250
985
1050
1150
1150
885
950
840
875
840
875
875
1050
1200
900
985
950
1100
1100
1450
1075
1465
840
875
875
35
900
925
900
925
1050
1350
1100
Medicine
M.D.
Residents and Interns
Rehabilitation Medicine
2nd and 3rd years
4th year
B.M.L.Sc.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
1st year
other years
Science - 1st year
other years
Graduate Studies
Doctoral Degrees
1st year
2nd year
3rd year
each subsequent registration
Master's Degrees
1st year
2nd year
each subsequent registration
12 month fee
18 month fee
Candidate paying on a unit basis - per
unit.
Master's Degree and Diploma in Dentistry
Each year (3 years)
Each subsequent registration
-Clinical Studies**
-Thesis
**Refund $172.50 if work completed in first term.
Part-time students (except Graduates Studies) Winter Session.
1050
1450
75
100
695
975
705
985
820
1100
695
935
820
1100
650
840
670
875
935
1280
700
958
470
643
100
140
935
1280
470
643
100
140
935
1280
1170
1602
95
130
1060
1465
250
345
100
140
per unit
Essay only
Spring and Summer Sessions
3 unit course
2 unit course
1V6 unit course
1 unit course
14 unit course
Change of course
Special course fees
Biology 323
Biology 444
Chinese 180
Chinese 280
Japanese 180
Japanese 280
Music Education 400
Music 164
Guided Independent Study
3 unit course
Refunds     (i) within 30 days
(ii) within 60 days
(iii) within 90 days
(iv) after 90 days
48
75
156
104
78
52
26
7
185
69 per unit
470
470
•470
470
85
156
156
133
94
57
■ 0
64
100
210
140
105
70
35
7
250
93
632
632
632
632
114
210
210
178
126
73
0
Deadline near for awards
The deadline for submission of
nomination forms for the UBC Alumni
Associations' Alumni Award of
Distinction and the Honorary Life
Membership award is 4 p.m. on
Feb. 12.
To be eligible for the Alumni
Award of Distinction, a candidate
must have a degree from UBC, must
have achieved distinction in his or her
chosen field, and must have made a .
contribution to that field of such
significance that it will reflect upon
the University.
Candidates for the Honorary Life
Membership must have a degree from
UBC, honorary or otherwise, must be
a Canadian working in Canada, and
should have at least 15 to 20 years
experience in his or her field. The
recipient must have a national or
international reputation.
For more information about these
awards, contact the UBC Alumni
Association at 228-3313. UBC Reports February 3, 19*
'GRANT-
DCADLINCS
Faculty members wishing more
information about the following
research grants should consult the
Research Administration Grant
Deadlines circular which is available in
departmental and faculty offices. If
further information is required, call
228-3652 (external grants) or 228-5583
(internal grants).
March 1
• American Chemical Society:
PRF - Research Type AC.
• AUCC: International Relations —
Poland/Unesco Copernicus
Fellowships.
• AUCC: International Relations —
Poland/Unesco Fellowships in
Slavonic Studies.
• B.C. Health Care Research
Foundation — Development and
Training Fellowship.
• B.C. Health Care Research
Foundation — Research Grant.
• B.C. Health Care Research
Foundation — Research-Scholar
Award.
• Banting Research Foundation —
Research Grant.
• Canada Council: Explorations
Program — Explorations Grant.
• Canada Israel Foundation for
Academic Exchanges — Canadian
Studies Program at Hebrew
University.
• Canada Mortgage and Housing
Corporation — Research Contract
Type B (over $2,500).
• Donner Canadian Foundation —
Research Grant.
• Huntington's Chorea Foundation
(U.S.) — Research Grant.
• International Development Research
.Centre — Education Research
Awards Program.,
• Juvenile Diabetes Foundation (U.S.)
— Research Grant.
• March of Dimes Birth Defects
Foundation (U.S.) — Intensive
Course in Maternal Nutrition.*
• Scottish Rite Schizophrenia
Program — Research Grant
(application).
• SSHRC: International Relations
Division — Bilateral Exchange:
China.
• SSHRC: International Relations
Division — Travel to Int'l Scholarly
Conferences.
• SSHRC: Strategic Grants Division
— Canadian Studies: Research
Tools.
• U.S. Department of Health,
Education and Welfare — NIH
Grants to Foreign Institutions.
• Von Humboldt Foundation
(W. Germany) — Research
Fellowship.
• Woodward's Foundation (Mr. and
Mrs. P.A.) — Foundation Grants.
March 6
• University of British Columbia —
UBC: Biely Faculty Research Prize.
March 12
• National Cancer Institute of Canada
— Terry Fox Special Initiatives
Program.
March 13
• University of Cambridge — Smuts
Visiting Fellowship in
Commonwealth Studies.
March 15
• Agriculture Canada — Extramural
Research Grant.
• Bronfman Foundation — Seagram
Business Faculty Award.
• Canadian Diabetes Association —
Charles H. Best Fund.
• Health and Welfare Canada:
NHRDP - NHRDP Research
(Priority Themes).
• International Atlantic Salmon
Foundation — Fellowship.
• Koerner, Leon and Thea
Foundation — Foundation Grants.
• NSERC: International Relations
Division - CIDA/NSERC Research
Associates: LDC's.
• NSERC: International Relations
Division — Exchange: France,
Brazil, Czech, Japan, Bulgaria.
• NSERC: International Relations
Division — International
■   Collaborative Research.
• NSERC: International Relations
Division — International Scientific
Exchange Awards.
• Royal Geographical Society —
Society Bursaries.
• Royal Society — The Royal Society
Commonwealth Bursaries Scheme.
March 20
• Department of Education, Dublin,
Ireland — Research Fellowship in
Science and Engineering.
March 25
• National Institute of Education
(U.S.) - NIE Research Grants.
March 26
• NSERC: Strategic Grants
Division — Strategic — Open
Areas.
March 31
• Arctic Institute of North America
— Northern Studies Fellowship.
• North Atlantic Treaty Organization
— International Collaborative
Research.
• Science Council of B.C. — B.C.
Science and Engineering Awards.
• SSHRC: Strategic Grants Division
— Library: Strengthening of
Specialized Collections.
*new grant
Note: All external agency grant
application forms must be signed by
the Head, Dean, and Dr. R.D.
Spratley. Applicant is responsible for
sending form to agency.
Job seminar
on Feb. 4
If hunting for a job is looming
ahead of you this spring, plan to
attend the Employment Seminar being
held on Feb. 4 by the student affairs
committee of the UBC Alumni
Association and Cariada Employment.
The seminar, intended for
graduating students, runs from 5:30 to
8 p.m. and will feature discussions,
films and workshops on such topics as
how to conduct a job search, how to
contact employers and how to be
successful in a job interview.
The seminar is free and takes place
at Cecil Green Park. Space may be
limited, so if you're planning to attend
you should register early by phoning
Florence Shaw at 228-3313.
Coffee and tea will be provided but
bring your own 'brown bag' supper.
UBC attracts senior
researcher from U.S.
A senior researcher from a major
medical research centre in the U.S.
has come to Vancouver to lead a
research team into diseases involving
Ron Krause (top), a second-year
medical student and fourth-year
commerce student Dave Dale were
elected to serve a one-year term as
student representatives on the UBC
Board of Governors. They succeed
Anthony Dickinson and Chris
Niwinski.
New contract
ratified
The Teaching Assistants' Union and
University negotiators reached
agreement on a new contract Jan. 20,
averting a 24-hour strike that had
been scheduled to start the next night.
The contract has since been ratified .
by the UBC Board of Governors and
by the union membership (Local 2278
of the Canadian Union of Public
Employees).
It gives'the approximately 1070
teaching assistants a wage increase of
15 per cent, retroactive to Sept. 1,
198L The contract expires Aug. 31,
1982.
Hourly rates for the teaching
assistants now range from just over $7
an hour for undergraduates to just
over $15 an hour for graduate TAs..
Membership in the union remains
voluntary.
the central nervous system.
Dr. Donald Brian Calne has been
Chief of the Experimental
Therapeutics Branch as well as
Clinical Director of the National.
Institute of Neurological and
Communicative Disorders,and Strokes.
The Institute is one of many
medical research groups organized
under the umbrella of the National
Institutes of Health at Bethesda,
Maryland.
Dr. Calne will join the Division of
Neurology in UBC's Department of
Medicine which has received a grant
of $160,000 a year for five years from
the Dystonia Medical Research
Foundation.
Under the grant Dr. Calne will head"
a team investigating dystonia,
Parkinson's disease, Huntington's
chorea and other brain disorders in
which patients lose control over
posture and body movement.
The Dystonia Foundation was
formed four years ago and is
extensively sponsored and supported
by the Belzberg family of Vancouver.
The Foundation has offices both in
Vancouver and in Beverly Hills,
California, and chapters throughout
North America.
Main objectives of the foundation
are to disseminate information about
dystonia to patients and physicians,
and to find a successful cure and
treatment for it through research. This
new grant by the Dystonia Foundation
indicates its recognition of the
importance of a multifaceted research
program into all types of movement
disorders, since a discovery in one area
frequently has an impact on another.
A major attraction for Dr. Calne at
UBC is the Positron Emission
Tomography (PET) program now
being developed at UBC with the
collaboration of the TRIUMF
cyclotron on UBC's south campus.
PET is one of the newest research
devices available to neuroscientists. It
provides a scan that shows what is
happening in the brain in three
dimensions, without operating on the
brain and while the patient is fully
conscious.
The only other PET in Canada is at
the Montreal Neurological Institute.
Installing one is usually enormously
expensive because it requires a
cyclotron as a source of short-lived
isotopes used to trace the brain's
activity. The PET project at UBC will
take advantage of the existing
TRIUMF cyclotron.
Dr. Calne received five degrees
including his medical degree from
Oxford University, England.
His neurological residency was done
at the National Hospitals for Nervous
Diseases in London where he was also
house physician. For three years
beginning in 1966 Dr. Calne was
honorary senior registrar in neurology
at University College Hospital in
London.
Then followed four years as
consultant neurologist at
Hammersmith Hospital and the Royal
Postgraduate Medical School in
London before joining the National
Institute of Neurological and
Communicative Disorders and Stroke
in Maryland. BC Reports February 3, 1982
Engineering controls approved by Board
Proposals to control enrolment in
engineering programs in the Faculty of
Applied Science were approved last
week when they were submitted to
UBC's Board of Governors for a
second time.
The proposals, which were first
recommended by Senate to the Board
last October, were rejected by the
Board and sent back for
reconsideration. Senate, in turn,
referred the proposals back to the
applied science faculty, which re-
endorsed them and again had them
approved by Senate at its December
meeting.
The enrolment controls approved by
the Board will limit overall enrolment
in engineering prograrns to about .
1,800 students (current enrolment is
1,725).
The faculty, in its rationale for the
enrolment limitation, said its proposals
were "a reflection of the faculty's
ability to provide a quality engineering
education."
The present available resources of
the faculty are only adequate for a
total of 1,400 students, the faculty
said, and the proposed enrolment
controls "will perpetuate the existing
crisis experienced by the engineering
departments."
The enrolment proposals are also
designed to stream students into each
of the nine engineering degree
programs offered in applied science.
This will be done by limiting second-
year enrolment, with allocations into
programs made according to student
preferences and academic
qualifications.
NSERC grants exceed $2 million
Twenty-one1 members of the UBC
•faculty have received first-time
strategic research grants worth more
than $911,000 from the Natural
Sciences and Engineering Council of
Canada (NSERC).
In addition, NSERC has renewed
grants worth $1.4 million for some 50
faculty members to enable them^to
continue research begun up to two
years ago.
Strategic grants are awarded for
projects in the areas of
communications, energy,
environmental toxicology, food and
agriculture and oceans. Grants are
awarded to projects judged to be of
"national concern."
Of the 21 receiving awards for the
first time, the largest single grant has
been made to Dr. Ronald M. Clowes,
a UBC geophysicist who will use a
total of $138,437 for the purchase of
seismic equipment to enable him to
study ocean sediments off the west
coast of Vancouver Island and the
Queen Charlotte Islands and in the
Strait of Georgia.
His research is relevant to offshore
petroleum exploration and had the
support of Petro-Canada and Chevron
Canada.
Dr. S.E.. Calvert, the head of UBC's
Department of Oceanography, has
received a first-time grant of $48,820
plus a second installment of $100,000
for the purchase of a $275,000 x-ray
emission spectrometer which will be
used to analyse ferromanganese
nodules dredged up from a depth of
five kilometres in the North Pacific
Ocean.
.Dr. Calvert says the North Pacific
Ocean floor is littered with "thousands
of millions of tons" of the nodules. He
will use the new spectrometer to
- analyse the nodules, some of them 20
million years old, for their nickel and
copper content.
Dr. A.G. Fowler, the director of
UBC's Computing Centre, has been
awarded a first-time grant of $70,000
to work on development of an
electronic mail system that will allow
letters to be transmitted via computer.
He says the viability of such a
system is increasing, largely as a result
of escalating postage costs.
Development of the system would
enable home computers to transmit
and receive letters.
Some other UBC faculty members
who received first-time NSERC
strategic grants and their projects are
as follows:
Prof. J. Keith Brimacombe of
Metallurgy gets $47,300 for a study
on rotary kiln -firing using pulverized
coal or oil.
Prof. James Kutney, Chemistry,
and Prof. C.E. Townsley, Food
Science, were awarded $60,000 for
development of plant tissue and cell
culture fermentations to produce
pharmaceutical^ important products.
Prof. Beryl March of poultry science
gets $45,000 for studies of stress and
efficiency of protein utilization in
growing chickens.
Dr. Jochen Meyer and two
Colleagues in the Department of
Physics have been awarded $61,750
for laser research.
Prof. R.D. Russell and Dr. Tomiya
Watanabe, both of Geophysics, receive
$52,344 for geophysical
instrumentation.
Dr. M.A. Tung of Food Science gets
$39,950 for research on a thermal
processing system.
Make higher education your priority.
Amnesty UBC seeks funds
Amnesty UBC, a campus branch of
the world-wide human rights
organization Amnesty International,
has launched a major fundraising
campaign.
Faculty members will receive a letter
describing AI's work and asking for
donations. Amnesty UBC President
Horacio de la Cueva explained that in
order to remain politically
independent, the volunteer
organization is forced to raise money
in this way, rather than by appealing
to governments or major corporations.
Fifty per cent of the money raised
will go to Amnesty International's
Ottawa and London offices for
continuing research so vital to the
organization's work on behalf of
"prisoners of conscience." The other
half will support the activities of
Amnesty UBC on campus, helping to
pay for information campaigns such as
the Week for the Disappeared in
February, postage and duplicating
costs for the 30 to 40 form letters
signed each Friday at the Amnesty
information table in SUB, and
improvements to an already extensive
library of human rights literature.
Included with the letter is a
membership form for any who are
interested in getting more involved.
"In the past," de la Cueva said,
"faculty members may have felt
unwelcome because the group is
• affiliated with the AMS and its
members are mostly students, but
we'd like to change that. Human rights
is an issue that touches the whole
University community and faculty
participation would certainly add to
our effectiveness," he said.
The Amnesty UBC office and library
(SUB 230d) are open weekdays at
noon.
Associate dean of applied science
Dr. Axel Meisen told the Board last
week that some engineering degree
programs were characterized by low
enrolments and high demand for
graduates.
He said the faculty would be doing
a service to the province by steering
students into low-enrolment areas
where there was a high demand for
graduates.
CAMPUS
P€OPI£'
Dr. Roy Taylor, director of the UBC
Botanical Garden, was elected
Secretary of the International
Association of Botanical Gardens
when the association met recently in
Canberra, Australia. Dr. Taylor will
serve as secretary for the next four
years.
Prof. Indrajit Desai of the human
nutrition division of UBC's School of
Home Economics was the recipient of
the 1981 Pediatric Research Award of
the Brazilian Pediatric Society for his
research publication entitled "Vitamin
E in Placental Intervillous Blood and
its Interrelationship to Maternal and
Newborn Levels of Vitamin E." Prof.
Desai has been conducting
collaborative research for the past four
years at the University of Sao Paulo
Medical School in Brazil under the
auspices of the International Scientific
Exchange Program of the Natural
Sciences and Engineering Research
Council of Canada and the National
Research Council of Brazil.
Recent appointments at UBC
include those of Janet Land as
assistant co-ordinator of the Office of
Co-operative Education and
Internships, and Mary Flores as acting
director of the Department of Student
Housing and Conferences. Ms. Lund
comes to UBC after ten years in
private industry and with the provincial
and federal governments. Ms. Flores is
the residence administrator in the
student housing department, and will
continue in that role in addition to
taking on her new duties.
Dr. Peter Oberlander, director of
the Centre for Human Settlements at
UBC and a professor of planning,
spent part of the Christmas recess in
Nigeria on work for the government of
Nigeria.
Nigeria has decided to build a new
national capital in Abuja, in the
interior of the country, and sought
independent help and advice on site
development and housing policy. The
United Nations called upon Dr.
Oberlander, who subsequently
reported to the UN Centre for Human
Settlements in Nairobi and to the
Nigerian government.
Abuja, the geographic centre of
Nigeria, is expected to have a
population of 1.5 million people by
the end of the century. UBC Reports February S, 1982
Facing TV cameras and newspaper reporters last week in the Council Chamber
of the Student Union Building were Captain Richard Truly, left, and Colonel
Joe Engle, the pilot and commander respectively of the space shuttle Columbia,
which flew its second mission in space in November, 1981. The astronauts spent
an hour on the campus Jan. 25 to show film of last year's flight and answer
questions from an enthusiastic student audience, mostly engineers. A feature of
the second Columbia mission was the testing of the Canadarm, the shuttle's $100
million manipulator arm developed by Canada's National Research Council.
Engineering Undergraduate Society president Lance Balcom presented the
astronauts with red Engineer's jackets during their UBC visit.
Bank of Montreal sets up
new chair in Commerce
The Senate of the University of B.C.
has approved establishment of the
Bank of Montreal Chair in
International Finance associated with
the University's Faculty of Commerce
and Business Administration.
The dean of the faculty, Dr. Peter
A. Lusztig, said the bank's gift will
provide research support for a
professor who is to be appointed to the
chair later this year. He-also noted
that for the past several years studies
and research in the area of
international business, including
international finance, have received
priority within the faculty.
The first of two contributions was
officially turned over to the University
on Jan. 21 by Stan Davison, vice-
chairman of the bank and its senior
executive officer in Western Canada.
The cheque was received on behalf of
UBC by President Douglas T. Kenny.
B.C. directors, senior officials of the
bank and UBC faculty were in
attendance.
"No one appreciates more than a
university president that it is extremely
difficult for Canadian universities to
attract and hold distinguished scholars
in business administration, as well as
other professional fields, without
offering research support over and
above salary," Dr. Kenny said. "This
type of support is seldom possible
today from university budgets and can
only be provided through the vehicle
of.endowed chairs.
"The University of British Columbia
is grateful to the officers and directors
of the Bank of Montreal for their
recognition of UBC's Faculty of
Commerce and Business
Administration in this very concrete
way."
William D. Mulholland, chairman
and" chief executive officer of the Bank
of Montreal, said in a statement that
the bank "is particularly pleased to be
able to assist UBC with support for
education in the field of international
finance.
"Canada is more dependent upon
international trade than many other
countries," he noted. "We hope the
Bank of Montreal Chair in
International Finance will help to
encourage young pedple to take a
greater interest in the prospects for
interesting and rewarding careers in
international business."
Dean Lusztig noted the significance
of national organizations increasingly
coming to recognize UBC's Faculty of
Commerce and Business
Administration as a national resource.
Chairs in the Faculty of Commerce,
involve endowments of between
$100,000 and $900,000, the larger
ones covering faculty salaries as well as
providing support for research.
The Bank of Montreal Chair in
International Finance is' the seventh
endowed chair in Commerce at UBC
in the past three years, and is the
eighth in the faculty overall.
Max Bell Foundation
backs UBC projects
The Max Bell Foundation of
Toronto has approved three grants
totalling $628,500 to support projects
in the Faculty of Law, the Institute of
Asian Research and the Westwater
Research Centre at UBC.
The funds will support development
of Japanese legal studies, finance a
two-year research project on "Canada
and the Changing Economy of the
Pacific Basin" in Asian research, and
enable Westwater to complete studies
for a book on managing the resources
of Canada's Pacific coast.
The foundation was established
under the will of the late Max Bell,
Canadian businessman-and publisher.
The foundation approves funding for
projects in the areas of Canada and   .
the Asian Pacific, health services, the
media, oceans and inland waters,
physical fitness and sport and
veterinary medicine.
The $300,000 grant to UBC's
Institute of Asian Research will support
seven studies focussing on major
.components of Canada's economic
relationships with the countries of the
Pacific and Asia.
Research topics include the flow of
investment capital among Pacific Rim
countries as seen in real estate
investment in Vancouver, Hong Kong
and Singapore, the effect of economic
growth in the Pacific basin on potential
growth in B.C. and Alberta, the
implications for Canada of cooperation agreements and joint
venture contracts in China, the
economic contribution of East Indians
to B.C., and an analysis of Japan-
Western Canada economic relations in
relation to potential impact on regional
development.
Nine UBC faculty members from
economics, commerce, community
and regional planning as well as the
Institute of Asian Research will be
involved in the research studies. A
member of the geography department
of Simon Fraser University is also a
participant in the project.
A grant of $275,000 to the Faculty
of Law will foster the development of
Japanese legal studies over a three-
year period.
The grant has enabled the
appointment of Prof. Malcolm Smith
to the law faculty as director of
Japanese legal studies and provides
for research projects by ten members
of the law faculty comparing selected
areas of Canadian and Japanese law
and legal institutions, with special
emphasis on the legal aspects of
Canadian and Japanese business and
economic relations.
Prof. Smith, who formerly headed
the Japanese law program at Monash
University in Australia, is currently a
visiting professor of law. His
permanent appointment to the UBC
faculty is effective July 1, 1982.
The research projects include a
study of the Japanese approach to law
and legal concepts, comparative
studies of Japanese and Canadian law
in such areas as the environment,
labor, commerce, securities regulation,
the rights of indigenous people and
condominiums and housing.
Dean of Law Kenneth Lysyk said
the foundation grant will enable UBC
to "develop a program that is not only
without parallel in Canada, but one
which has the potential for making
UBC a major North American centre
for Japanese legal studies."
The $53,500 grant to the Westwater
Research Centre will provide it with
the "invaluable opportunity to
synthesize results from a coastal
resource management project carried
out over the past five years and define
priorities for completing the program
over the next three years," according
to the centre's assistant director,
Anthony Dorcey.
Over the next six months,
foundation funding will be used to
produce a book tentatively titled
"Governing Canada's Pacific Coastal
Resources: Opportunity and Peril,"
which will draw on a number of
studies already completed by centre
personnel.
These include case studies on Fraser
River estuary management, salmon
protection and the B.C. forest industry
and offshore oil and gas exploration
and development.
Fight against
crime moves
into SUB
RCMP personnel and the five
student members of the Crime
Prevention Project, a group
established last summer, will be
manning information booths and
putting on demonstrations in the
Student Union Building next week as
part of Crime Prevention Week (Feb.
8-12).
Slide presentations and displays will
be set up in SUB from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. each day, and RCMP personnel
will be on hand for engraving of
valuables.
Lunchtime activities planned for the
week (in the SUB lobby) are radar
demonstrations (Monday and
Thursday), breathalyzer
demonstrations (Tuesday and Friday),
and on Wednesday in SUB 212 there
will be a debate "Be it resolved that
the police be authorized to pay
informers for information leading to
the detection and prevention of
crime."
A talk on "Prohibited Weapons and
Soft Body Armour" will take place in
Place Vanier residence (Monday at
7:30 p.m. in the Shrum Lounge) and
Totem Park residence (Tuesday at 7
p.m. in the north ballroom).
If you'd like more information
about Crime Prevention Week, contact
Sergeant Hardy, RCMP, at 224-1322.
Museum volunteer
Joan Goodall dies
Joan Goodall, a founding member
of the UBC Museum of Anthropology's
Volunteer Associates, died suddenly on
Jan. 18, at the age of 65.
Miss Goodall devoted much time
and energy to the formation and
growth of the volunteer associates, a
group which works closely with staff in
all departments of the museum. She
brought to the museum extensive
knowledge gained from working and
travelling in many areas of the world
and contributed significant pieces to
the museum's Northwest Coast Indian
and Asian collections. UBC Reports February 3, 1982
New
AWARDS
The following student awards were
approved at the January meeting of
the UBC Senate. For more
information on these and other
scholarships and bursaries, contact
Awards and Financial Aid in the
General Services Administration
Building, Room 50.
Maury L. Boilert Bursary Fund —
To honor the memory of the late Mary
L. Bollert, first Dean of Women at the
University of British Columbia, women
graduates of the University and
members of Miss Bollert's family have
established a fund to assist women
students. Bursaries to a total-of
approximately $400 per annum will be
awarded in consultation with the
Women Students' Office. (Please note
that this award will be made available
in the 1982/83 winter session.)
Brissenden Prize in Art Education
— A prize of $250 will be awarded to
the student in Education 425 or
Education 404 who' produces the best
project designed for the teaching of
some aspect of the art of B.C. This
award will be made in October of
each year on the recommendation of
the department.-
Brissenden Scholarship in Art
Education — A scholarship of $500
will be awarded to a student enrolled
in ARTE 441 (Art Education Theory
and Research) who submits the best
proposal for a project designed to
develop for pupils a further
understanding of art in B.C. This
award will be made in April of each
year on the recommendation of the
department. (Please note that this
award will be available in the 1981/82
winter session.)
Chevron Fellowships in
Oceanography — A fellowship in the
amount of $8,000 has been made
available by Chevron Canada Limited,
Vancouver, and Chevron Standard
Limited, Calgary, to a graduate
student in the Department of
Oceanography. The award will be
made on the recommendation of the
Department of Oceanography to a
student entering the first year of the  .
program-. Two additional fellowships
of $1,000 each are available for
students to help defray costs during
the early part of the graduate
program. (Please note that these
fellowships will be made available for
the 1981/82 winter session.)
Coopers & Lybrand — Donald
McLean Anderson Memorial
Scholarship — A scholarship of $750
has been established in memory of
Donald McLean Anderson. This
scholarship will be awarded annually
to a student who has completed, with
high academic standing, his or her
third year of study in the Faculty of
Commerce* and Business
Administration, and is entering the
final year of the Accounting and MIS
option. The successful applicant will
be one who, in the opinion of the
faculty, most clearly shows consistent
general academic achievement
throughout his or her three years, but
with special emphasis in accounting.
(Please note that this award will be
made available for the 1982/83 winter
session.)
Coopers & Lybrand Service
Scholarships — Two scholarships of
$1,000 each will be given annually by
Coopers & Lybrand, Chartered'
Accountants, to students who have
completed three years of study in the
Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration and are planning to
proceed to the fourth year of the
Accounting and MIS option. The
successful candidates will have shown a
consistently high record of academic
achievement and will possess the well-
rounded personality and aptitude
which, in the opinion of the faculty
and Coopers & Lybrand, denote the
potential to be a successful chartered
accountant. Coopers & Lybrand will
provide summer employment between
the students' third and fourth year.
Further information may be obtained
from the offices of the Dean of
Commerce and Business
Administration. (Please note this
award will be available in the 1982/83
winter session.)
Digital Equipment of Canada Ltd.
Award of Merit — An award of a
medal and' $100 will be made annually
to a student completing a B.Sc. degree
in Computer Science or a B.Com.
degree with an option in Computer
Science) The award will be made on
the recommendation of the
Department of Computer Science on
the basis of academic standing. (Please
note that this award will be made
available in the 1981/82 winter
session.)
Fisons Corporation Limited Prize —
A prize in the amount of $100 and a
bronze medallion have been made
available by Fisons Corporation
Limited to the graduating student in
the Faculty of Medicine demonstrating
excellence in allergy and immunology.
The award will be made on the
recommendation of the faculty.
(Please note that this award will be
made available in the 1981/82 winter
session.)
Fisons Corporation Limited
Scholarship — A scholarship in the
amount of $500 has been made
available by Fisons Corporation
Limited. The award will be made to a
student in the Faculty of Medicine,
demonstrating excellence in allergy
and immunology. The award will be
made on the recommendation of the
faculty. (Please note that this award
will be available in the 1981/82 winter
session.)
Harper, Grey, Easton Prize in
Insurance Law — A prize in the
amount of $200 has been made
available by Harper, Grey, Easton and
Associates. The award will be made to
the student achieving the highest
standard in the subject of insurance.
(Please be advised that this award will
be made available for the 1981/82
winter session.)
Harper, Grey, Easton Scholarship —
A scholarship in the amount of $800
has been made available by Harper,
Grey, Easton and Associates. The
award will be made to a student who
has achieved high standing and is
entering the second or third year in
the Faculty of Law. (Please note that
this award is available in the 1982/83
winter session.)
Steve House Memorial Scholarship
— A scholarship in the amount of
$150 has been made available in
memory of Steve House who passed
away in the fall of 1981 while in the
final stages of completing the
requirements to be a chartered
accountant. His ability to remain
steadfast in his educational and
employment commitments, his sense of
humor in addressing the world around
him and those in it against great odds,
and his courage in facing the disease
that disabled him but never
handicapped him are the qualities that
are to be immortalized in this award.
The award will be made to a student   -
in the Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration with
preference given to a student who is
disabled or has made a concerted
effort in his/her schooling while
having to deal with some physical,
mental, emotional, or social obstacle.
The award will be made on the .
recommendation of the faculty.
Ann McCullough Memorial Bursary
— A bursary in the amount of $250
has been established by friends of Ann
McCullough, B.A. 1930, who worked
for the University in the Registrar's
Office and the Faculty of Agricultural
Sciences for more than 30 years. The
bursary will be awarded to a student
in the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
who requires financial assistance to
complete his/her studies. In making
the award, preference will be given to
a Canadian citizen from a rural or
farm background. (Please be advised
that this award will be made available
in the 1982/83 winter session.)
Dr. John L. Oulton Memorial Prize
in Anaesthesiology — An annual
prize in the amount of $200 has been
established in memory of Dr. John L.
Oulton, by his friends and associates.
Dr. Oulton was a Clinical Associate
Professor in Anaesthesiology .and
Assistant Director of Anaesthesiology
at the Vancouver General Hospital.
He was director of the Departmental
Medical Technology Laboratory at the
time of his sudden passing in 1981. He
is remembered for his clinical and
scientific expertise in the area of
medical technology development in
Anaesthesiology. The prize will be
awarded to the undergraduate
proceeding to the fourth year
considered by the department as
demonstrating general proficiency in
the understanding of clinical
anaesthesiology. (Please be advised
that this award will be made available
in the 1981/82 winter session.)
Rehabilitation Medicine Alumni
Bursary — A bursary in the amount
of $500 has been made available by
the School of Rehabilitation Medicine
— Class of '82. The award will be
made to students enrolled in the third
or fourth year and will be based on
financial need, academic standing,
and participation in school activities.
The recommendation will be made by
a joint faculty-student committee.
(Please be advised that this award will
be available for the 1982/83 winter
session.)
Vancouver General Hospital
Psychiatry Prize — This prize in the
amount of $200 is awarded to a
student in the second year of Medicine
who, in the opinion of the Department
of Psychiatry, has demonstrated
particular competence in psychiatry
during the second year. (Please be
advised that this award is available in
the 1981/82 winter session.)
UBC Izaak Walton Killam
Memorial Postdoctoral
Fellowships
These awards are provided
annually from "The Izaak Walton
Killam Memorial Fund for
Advanced Studies", established
through a bequest from the late
Dorothy J. Killam. Available in
general for any field of study or
research (other than the "arts" as
presently defined in the Canada
Council Act and not limited to the
"humanities and social sciences"
defined in that Act). The basis of
award will be special distinction of
intellect, with due regard for sound
character and personal qualities.
They are open to suitable
candidates from any country, but
those who are not Canadian
Citizens may use their awards only
for study and research in Canada.
Izaak Walton Killam Memorial
Postdoctoral Fellowships are
awarded for two years, subject to
review at the end of the first year.
• These awards, each in the range
of up to $19,000 (subject to change)
are open to:
(i) students who have recently
obtained a doctorate at the
University of B.C., have shown
superior ability in research
and wish to pursue further
study and research at the
University of B.C. or elsewhere;
and
(ii) students who have recently
obtained a doctorate at
another university, have shown
superior ability in research,
and wish to pursue further
study and research at the
University of B.C.
(iii) consideration will also be given
to candidates who, although
they do not possess a
doctorate, are deemed by
virtue of their achievements
and ability to have similar
qualifications.
Preference will be given to
Canadian Citizens.
Application Procedure:
Application forms may be obtained
from the Awards Office or from the
Office of The Dean of Graduate
Studies and may be submitted
through the appropriate
department or institute of UBC in
which the applicant has been or
will be engaged in research or
study, or directly to the Office of
The Dean of Graduate Studies. The
application should contain a
precise account of the study and
research to be undertaken during
the period of the fellowship.
Three supporting letters of
recommendation are required. One
letter should be from the head of
the department at UBC in which
the candidate has been or will be
engaged in research and study. The
other letters should be from people
familiar with the work of the
candidate.
Transcripts of academic record
should also accompany the letter of
application.
Applications must be received at
the Office of The Dean of Graduate
Studies, General Services
(Administration) Building, by Feb.
15, 1982. UBC Reports February 3, 1982
Economic Council defends universities
The Economic Council of Canada,
an advisory body appointed by the
federal government, has corrie to the
defense of higher education by urging
Ottawa to abandon plans to cut $5.7
billion from aid to provinces for health
care and post-secondary education.
In a report entitled "Financing
Confederation: Today and
Tomorrow," the council says the
federal government's plan to cut
grants under the Established Programs'
Financing scheme will only shift the
burden to provincial governments,
which will be forced to raise taxes,
reduce services or increase user charges
for medical care and tuition fees for
students..
The report adds: "Better education,
improved skills and more intensive
research contribute to Canada's
economic growth, enable the
Canadian economy to be more
competitive in international markets,
and improve the mobility and
productivity of the Canadian labor
force. In these ways, federal funding
of post-secondary education helps to
achieve national goals."
In addition to recommending that
Ottawa "define and clarify its interests
in, and potential influence on, post-
secondary education " the
council urges that the federal
government "... through its EPF
transfer to the provinces, continue to
provide strong support to post-
secondary education."
The council also recommends that
the federal and provincial governments
"establish a formal and continuing
dialogue for the purpose of improving •
federal-provincial co-operation on
matters relating to post-secondary
education policies."
The council also feels that issues of
national concern in the area of higher
education should be .debated in
parliament and recommends that the
secretary of state table an annual
report "on the effectiveness of federal
programs relating to post-secondary
education."
This is the second federal body
which has been critical of Ottawa's
plans to reduce payments to provinces
under the EPF scheme.
A parliamentary i^ask force which
held hearings in all parts of Canada
last summer reached the conclusion
that programs supported by EPF "are
serving vital social needs and merit
undiminished support."
The report of the task force, chaired
by Liberal MP Herb Breau, said that
for the most part, there is "no fat left
in the system       no fat in post-
secondary education, no fat in the
health system, no excess spending in
social assistance, little redundancy in
social services."
The task force also urged more
consultation between the two levels of
government and an improved student
aid program.
Art materials can be health hazards
Art may be dangerous to your
health! So warns the UBC Museum of
Anthropology and the UBC Fine Arts
Gallery, who are co-sponsoring a
seminar which will bring together
artists, art teachers and museum
professionals from around the province
to discuss the health hazards of art
and museum materials.
On Friday, March 5, and Saturday,
March 6, North American experts
from many specialties will come to
UBC to present information on these
health hazards and on organizations
willing to provide further information.
The seminar will focus on sound
UDC
CalcndaR
Calendar Deadlines
For events in the weeks of Feb. 21 and Feb. 28,
material must be submitted not later than
4 p.m. on Feb. 11.
Send notices to Information Services, 6328
Memorial Rd. (Old Administration Building).
For further information, call 228-3131.
The Vancouver Institute.
Saturday, Feb. 6
An Anglophone in
Quebec. Dr. Maurice
McGregor, Medicine,
McGill University.
Saturday, Feb. 13
Quebec After
Patriation. Mme.
Solange Chaput-
Rolland, Q.C., writer
and political
commentator, Quebec.
Both lectures in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre at 8:15 p.m.
MONDAY, FEB. 8
Cancer Research Seminar.
Fiber Counting and Analysis of Asbestos-Related
Diseases. Dr. A. Churg, Pathology, UBC.
Lecture Theatre, B.C. Cancer Research Centre,
601W. 10th Ave. 12 noon.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
Some Thoughts on Airfoils and Wind Tunnels.
Prof. G.V. Parkinson. Room 1215, Civil and
Mechanical Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Axially Loaded Rigid Pile Embedded In a
Sloping Half-Space. Prof. Tian-quan Yun,
Mathematics and Mechanics, visiting professor
from the Huazhong Institute of Technology,
Wuhan, China. Room 104, Mathematics
Building. 3:45 p.m.
Zoology "Physiology Group"
Seminar.
Avian Aerodynamics — How Birds Fly. Dr.
Philip Withers, Biology, Portland State
University, Room 2449, Biological Sciences
Building. 4:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEB. 9
Fine Arts Lecture.
Archeology and Contemporary Affairs. The
Case of Iran. Dr. Hanna Kassis. Room 102,
Lasserre Building. 12:30 p.m.
Hillel House.
Rabbi Daniel Siegel, director of B'Nai B'rith
Hillel Foundation, will be the guest. For
information, call 224-4748. Hillel House.
12:30 p.m.
Freesee Film Series.
The Arsenal, the fifth in this series with the
general title America — A Personal History of
the United States. Auditorium, Student Union
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Forestry Seminar.
The Shawnigan Lake Study: an Investigation of
Tree Response to Thinning and Fertilizing. Dr.
Holga Brix, Canadian Forestry Service, Room
166, MacMillan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Botany Seminar.
An Illustrated Talk on the Bamfield Marine
Station. Dr. R.E. Foreman, UBC and Bamfield
Marine Station. Room 3219, Biological Sciences
Building. 12:30 p.m.
■Oceanography Seminar.
Ecology of the Benthos of a British Columbia
Fjord. Dr. Verenz Tunnicliffe, Institute of
Ocean Sciences, Sidney, B.C. Room 1465,
Biological Sciences. Building. 3:30 p.m.
English Colloquium.
Detecting False Imprints: Hamlet Ql and Pierce
Penilcsse Q5. J.A. Lavin. Room 212, Buchanan
Building. 3:45 p.m.
Biomembranes Discussion Group
Seminar.
The Na + /H + Antiporter of the Proximal
Tubule. Dr. D.D. Warnock, Medicine,
University of California, San Francisco. Lecture
Hall 5, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. 4 p.m.
Chemistry Seminar.
Some Novel Problems in the Magnetism of
Iron(III)bjs(dialkyldithiocarbamates). Dr. Mollis
Wickman, Chemistry, Oregon State University.
Room 126, Chemistry Building. 4:30 p.m.
Gerontology Seminar.
Home, Community and Institutional Care. Prof.
Mary Hill, Social Work, UBC. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
7 p.m.
Hillel House.
L'chaim — a documentary on European Jewry.
Hillel House. 7:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 10
Pharmacology Seminar.
Modulation of the Interactions of Drugs with the
ACh-activated End-Plate Channel: Effects of
Temperature and Divalent Cations. Dr. James
McLarnon, Pharmacology, UBC. Room 114,
Block C, Medical Sciences Building. 12 noon.
Hillel House.
Lunch sponsored by Hillel mothers. For
information, call 224-4748. Hillel House.
12 noon.
working practices, and anyone working
with art, display and museum
materials is invited to attend. For
information and registration forms,
please call Miriam Clavir,
Conservator, UBC Museum of
Anthropology, at 228-5087.
At some point in their lives, almost
everyone in Canada works with art
materials — in school, with children's
projects, as hobbyists, or even when
refinishing a chair or dyeing clothes at
home. For years, manufacturers have
been required to label acutely toxic
substances (although this was not
uniformly followed with materials,
such as art materials, that were sold in
small quantities). It is only recently,
however, that the possible long term
effects of many substances commonly
found in art materials are being
researched and recognized.
There are reasonably safe ways to
work with many of these materials,
and alternative materials are being
developed. This seminar is designed to
begin a dialogue and create an
information network among those
people who work with these art
materials and who bring these
materials to children and families
throughout the province.
Interview Techniques.
This program, sponsored by the Women
Students' Office, will help to prepare you for
that important job interview and to present
yourself well to a prospective employer. For
information, call 228-2415. Rooms 106 A, B
and C, Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Wednesday Noon-Hour Concert.
Music of J.S. Bach and Marais. John Sawyer,
viola da gamba; and Doreen Oke, harpsichord.
Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Simulation and Modelling in
Science.
An Econometric Model of Electricity Demand in
Zimbabwe. Dr. Rabab Ward, Electrical
Engineering, UBC. Room 103, Mathematics
Building. 12:30 p.m.
World University Services of
Canada.
Growing Dollars, part of a film series on Third
World development. Room 205, Buchanan
Building. 12:'30 p.m.
English Lecture.
Sean O'Casey and the Abbey Theatre, Dublin.
Prof. Ronald Ayling, English, University of
Alberta, Edmonton. Sponsored by the
Committee on Lectures. Room 204, Buchanan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Statistics Workshop.
Prof. Don Andrews, University of California,
Berkeley. Room 239, Geography Building.
3:30 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology Seminar.
The Resin d'etre of a Plant Secondary
Chemical: Interactions Between EZuphydryas
Butterflies and Their Larval Food Plants. Room
2449, Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Comparative Literature Lecture.
From Mallarme to Derrida. Dominique
Baudouin, French, UBC. Penthouse, Buchanan
Building. 4:30 p.m.
Classics Seminar.
Mythos and Logos: Longus' Lesbian Pastorals.
Prof. Brian P. Reardon, Classics, University of
California, Irvine. Sponsored by the Committee
on Lectures. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
8 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEB. 11
Women and the New Energy
Environment.
Using the Political Process to Effect Change in
the Environment. Doreen Lawson, Alderman,
Municipal Council of Burnaby. First in a series
sponsored by the Women's Resourced Centre
entitled Living Differently: Women and the New
Energy Environment. For more information, call
685-3934. Women's Resources Centre, 1144
Robson St. 12:10 p.m.
UBC Symphony Orchestra.
Music of Tchaikovsky, Rossini and Boccherini.
Douglas Talney, director; and Charles Inkman,
cello soloist. Old Auditorium. 12:30 p.m.
Dentistry Seminar.
Estimation of Caries Producing Potential of
Foods. Prof. James H. Shaw, MRC Visiting
Professor, Nutrition, Harvard School of Dental '
Medicine, Boston. Lecture Hall 6, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Hillel House.
Zionist Seminar. For more information, call
224-4748. Hillel House. 12:30 p.m.
Classics Lecture.
How the Greeks Wrote Novels. Prof. Brian P.
Reardon, Classics, University of California,
Irvine. Sponsored by the Committee on
Lectures. Room 205, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
Raman Scattering From Metal/Amorphous
Silicon Interfaces. Robert Nemanich, Xerox
Palo Alto Research Center. Room 318,
Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
Civil Engineering Seminar.
Nonlinear Behavior and Ultimate Strength of
Multi-Cell Reinforced Concrete Box Girder
Bridges. Dr. Frieder Seible, University of
California, Berkeley. Room 1212, Civil'and
Mechanical Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
Physics Colloquium.
Free-Electron Lasers. Prof. Marian O. Scully,
director. Institute for Modern"Optics, University
of New Mexico. Room 201, Hennings Building.
4 p.m
Psychology Colloquium.
Rape Proclivity Among Males. Dr. Neil
Malamuth, Psychology, University of Manitoba.
Room 209, Scarfe Building. 4 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEB. 12
Dentistry Lecture.
Nutrition and Oral Health. Prof. James H.
Shaw, Nutrition, Harvard School of Dental
Medicine, Boston. Lecture Hall 4, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 10:30 a.m.
Developmental Medicine Seminar.
Release of GI Hormones in vitro. Dr. Ray
Pederson, Physiology, UBC. First Floor Seminar
Room, Willow Pavilion, VGH. 12:30 p.m.
The Immune System — Medical
Genetics Rounds.
Polymorphisms of la Antigens and Their
Relationship to Immune Response Genes. Dr. R.
McMaster, Biochemistry, UBC. Fourth Floor
Conference Room, Health Centre for Children,
VGH. 1 p.m.
Continued on page 8 UK
FcbnuryS, IMS
Calendar
continued from page 7
Linguistics Colloquium.
Modalization and Its Effect on the Japanese
Language. Matsuo Soga, Asian Studies, UBC.
Room 2230, Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
Chemical Engineering Seminar.
Sprayability of Concentrated Black Liquor Fibre
Morphology and Paper Strength. Room 206,
Chemical Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m..
Humanities and Sciences Lecture.
An Evening with Marilyn Ferguson: The
Aquarian Conspiracy is Alive and Well.
Sponsored by the Centre for Continuing
Education. Admission is $10; $7 for students.
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre. 7:30 p.m.
UBC Public Affairs.
Canada, Reagan and the Western Alliance. Dr.
Douglas Ross, Institute of International
Relations, UBC, with host Gerald Savory, UBC
Centre for Continuing Education. Program will
be repeated on Friday, Feb. 19 at 7:30 p.m.
Channel 10, Vancouver Cablevision. 7:30 p.m.
International'House.
Land of The Morning Calm? A Look at
Working Conditions in South Korea. Joanne
Fisher. Upper Lounge, International House.
7:30 p.m.
Hockey.
UBC vs. the University of Calgary. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre. 8 p.m.
UBC Symphony Orchestra.
Music of Tchaikovsky, Rossini and Boccherini.
Douglas Talney, director; and Charles Inkman,
cello soloist. Old Auditorium. 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, FEB. 13
Hockey.
UBC vs. the University of Calgary. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre. 8 p.m.
SUNDAY, FEB. 14
Music Recital.
Graduate student Catherine Fitch, soprano, will
perform works by Strauss, Berlioz,
Rachmaninoff and Rorem. Terence Dawson,
piano. Recital  Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
MONDAY, FEB. 15
Cancer Research Seminar.
Oxidation Effects on the Biological Activity of
Phenolics. Ann F. Hanham, graduate student,
Environmental Carcinogenesis Unit, B.C.
Cancer Research Centre. Lecture Theatre, B.C.
Cancer Research Centre, 601 W. 10th Ave.
12 noon.
Asian Centre Inaugural Event.
Music of the Chinese Flute. Cheng Cheng hua,
Shanghai National Orchestra. Co-sponsored by
the UBC Department of Music. Recital Hall,
Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
.Asian Studies Lecture.
Pilgrimage and Allegory in the Hsi-yu chi. Prof.
Anthony C. Yu, University of Chicago. Room
604, Asian Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Classics Lecture.
The Roman Theatre and its City. Prof.
Elizabeth R. Gebhard, Classics, University of
Illinois. Sponsored by the Committee on
Lectures. Room 102, Lasserre Building.
12:30 p.m.
Pacific West Coast Inorganic
Lecture.
Metal to Carbon Multiple Bonds. Prof. W.
Roper, University of Auckland, New Zealand.
Sponsored by UBC's Department of Chemistry.
Room 225, Chemistry Building. 2:30 p.m.
Asian Studies Seminar.
, The Journey to the West: Joys and Frustrations
of Translation. Prof. Anthony C. Yu, University
of Chicago. Room 604, Asian Centre. 3:30 p.m.
Joint Applied Mathematics and
Optimization Seminar.
Generalized Subgradients and the Interpretation
of Lagrange Multipliers as Marginal Values.
Prof. R.T. Rockafellar, Mathematics, University
of Washington. Room 104, Mathematics   ■
Building. 3:45 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
Do Galaxies Merge? Dr. Sidney van den Bergh,
Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria.
Room 318, Hennings Building. 4 p.m.
Archaeological Institute of America
Meeting.
The Theatre and the Late Roman City of Stobi,
Yugoslavia. Prof. Elizabeth R. Gebhard,
Classics, University of Illinois. Sponsored by the
Committee on Lectures. Lecture Theatre,
Museum of Anthropology. 8 p.m.
Geography Lecture.
Future Canadian Climate: Threat or Resource?
Prof. F. Kenneth Hare, Geography, University
of Toronto. Room 100, Geography Building.
8 p.m.
TUESDAY, FEtf. 16
Fine Arts Lecture.
Art in the Roman Boonies. Dr. James Russell.
Room 102, Lasserre Building. 12:30 p.m.
Botany Lecture.
New Data and Speculations on the Floristic and
Environmental History of the Queen Charlotte
Islands. Rolf Matthews, SFU. Room 3219,
Biological Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Freesee Film Series.
The First Impact, the twelfth in this series with
the general title A Personal History of the
United States. Auditorium, Student Union
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Forestry Seminar.
The Intensive Forest Management Program of
Tahsis Company. Sven Rassmussen, Tahsis
Company. Room 166, MacMillan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Institute of Asian Research
Presentation.
Prehistory of Southeast Asia: The Evolution of
Early Man. Richard Shutler Jr, Archaeology,
SFU. Room 604, Asian Centre. 12:30 p.m.
_ Geological Sciences Lecture.
Metamorphism of Rodingites. Dr. J.M. Rice.
Room SSOA, Geological Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Effects of Olisthodiscus luteus on Oyster Larval
Survival. Rose Ann Cattalico, Botany, University
of Washington. Room 1465, Biological Sciences
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Library Lecture.
The New York Public Library. David H. Stam,
Director of the Research Libraries, New York
Public Library. Room 100, Buchanan Building.
3:30 p.m.
Biomembranes Discussion Group
Seminar.
New Horizons in Membrane Structure and
Function. Dr. C.P.S. Tilcock, Biochemistry,
UBC. Lecture Hall 5, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre. 4 p.m.
■Chemistry Seminar.
Biomimetic Synthesis-or Doing What Comes
Naturally. Dr. James White, Chemistry, Oregon
State University. Room 126, Chemistry Building.
4:30 p.m.
Gerontology Seminar.
Transportation and Community Access —
Social Welfare Policy. Dr. Dennis Guest, Social
Work, UBC. Lecture Hall 3, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
7 p.m.
Botanical Garden Lecture.
UBC Friends of the Botanical Garden present
Allen P. Paterson, director of the Royal
Botanical Gardens, Hamilton, Ont., on The
History of Garden Design. Speaker is the former
director of the Chelsea Physic Garden, London,
England. Admission by advance ticket purchase
only ($4, includes reception after lecture). Call
228-3928. Lecture Hall 6, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 8 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 17
Wednesday Noon-Hour Concert.
Music of Britten, Schutz, Corigliano, Keeble,
Washburn, Raminsh, Brahms, Schafer and
Bernstein. Vancouver Chamber Choir,
conducted by Jon Washburn. Recital Hall,
Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Anatomy Seminar.
Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Morphological,
Behavioral, and Pituitary-Adrenal Effects. Dr. J.
Weinberg, Anatomy, UBC. Room 37, Anatomy
Building. 12:30 p.m..
Hillel House.
Poetry Reading by Larry Geller. For
information, call 224-4748. Hillel House.
12:30 p.m.
Simulation and Modelling in
Science.
Continuous Linear Programming. Dr. James V.
Whittaker, Mathematics, UBC. Room 103,
Mathematics Building. 12:30 p.m.
Statistics Workshop.
Effective Dimension of a Vector Space with
Implications for Linear Modelling. W. Oldford,
Statistics, University of Toronto. Room 239,
Geography Building. 3:30 p.m.
Geography Colloquium.
The Environmental Myth Re-Examined. Prof.
F. Kenneth Hare, Geography, University of
Toronto. Room 201, Geography Building.
3:30 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology Seminar.
Social Behaviour in the Acorn Woodpecker:
Cooperative or Uncooperative Breeding. Dr.
Walter D. Koenig, Moore Laboratory of
Zoology, Occidental College, Los Angeles. Room
2449, Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, FEB. 18
Mid-term break.
Women and the New Energy
Environment.
Food as Technology. Anne Jones Hall, associate
director, ENTROPHY. Second in a series
sponsored by the Women's Resources Centre
entitled Living Differently: Women and the New
Energy Environment. For information, call
685-3934. Women's Resources Centre, 1144
Robson St. 12:10 p.m.
World University Services of
Canada.
Elements of Survival: Food, part of a film series
on Third World development. Room 205,
Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, FEB. 19
Mid-term break.
Developmental Medicine Seminar.
The Effects of Undernutrition and Over-
nutrition on Cholesterol Synthesis in Intestinal
and Adipose Tissues of Newborn Rats. First
Floor Seminar Room, Willow Pavilion, VGH.
12:30 p.m.
The Immune System — Medical
Genetics Rounds.
Multiple Sclerosis. Dr. D. Paty, Neurology,
UBC. Fourth Floor Conference Room, Health
Centre for Children, VGH. 1 p.m.
SATURDAY, FEB. 20
Early Music Concert.
The Toronto Consort, co-sponsored by the
Vancouver Society for Early Music and the UBC
Department of Music. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 8:30 p.m.
Annual report
available
The annual report of President
Douglas Kenny to UBC's Board of
Governors and Senate has now been
published and is available to interested
members of the University community.
The 56-page document reviews the
academic, research, financial and
public service aspects of University
activities in the 1980-81 academic
year, which ended Aug. 31, 1981.
Copies of the report are available from
Information Services, 228-3131.
Notices..
Understanding Business through
Best Sellers
The Centre for Continuing Education is offering
an evening series on "Understanding Business
through the Best Seller List" on Thursday
evenings from Feb. 25 to April 1. The full series
is $55, single lectures are $10. The lectures take
place in Seminar Room G65/66 of the
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre from
7:30 to 9:30 p.m. For more information, call
228-2181, local 240.
Faculty and Staff Tennis Club
. Faculty members who wish to join a Faculty and
Staff Tennis Club should contact Russell Uhler
at 228-3836.
Special Collections Display
Down But Not Out — the Cycle of Financial
Crises at the University of British Columbia,
1914 to 1982. Top floor, south wing, Main
Library.
Graduation Cards
Students expecting to receive their academic
degrees at UBC's spring congregation must fill
in their application-for-graduation cards and
return them to the Registrar's Office by Feb. 12.
Application cards have been mailed to students
graduating in the following degree programs:
BA, BFA, BMus, BCom, LicAcct, BEd
(elementary, secondary and special ed.), BPE,
BRE and BSc.
Art Exhibit
Prof. Geoffrey Smedley of UBC's fine arts
department has an exhibit of his works on
display at the Vancouver Art Gallery. The
exhibit ends Feb. 7.
Museum of Anthropology
Exhibitions: The Legacy: Continuing
Traditions of Canadian Northwest Coast Indian
Art, until August, 1982.
Guided Gallery Walks: Gallery guides will,
introduce museum gallery to visitors —
2:30 p.m. on Tuesdays and Thursdays.
Imagination Market: The museum is putting
together packages of old materials that can be
used for arts and crafts to sell for a nominal fee
at Open House this year. Anyone on campus
who has materials that can be recycled for this
use are asked to contact Hindy Ratner at
228-4606.
Museum hours are noon to 9 p.m. on
Tuesdays, noon to 5 pfe. Wednesdays through
Sundays and the museum is closed Mondays.
For information on museum activities, call
228-5087.
Faculty/Staff Tennis Instruction
Instruction for beginners is being given in three
sessions: Feb. 1 to 17; Feb. 22 to March 10;
and March 15 to March 31. Lessons take place
on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays from
11:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Fee is $10. Register
in Room 203 of the War Memorial Gymnasium
from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. (closed from. 11:30
a.m. to 12:30 p.m.).
Faculty/Staff Exercise Class
Faculty and staff exercise classes for men and
women take place Mondays, Wednesdays and
Thursdays from 12:30 to 1:05 p.m. Instructor is
S.R. Brown. Fee is $15 — payable in Room 203
of the War Memorial Gymnasium. For more
information, call 228-3996.
Functional Fitness Appraisal
The John M. Buchanan Fitness and Research
Centre is administering, a physical assessment
program available to students, faculty, staff and
the public. $20 for students: $25 for others. For'
more information, call 228-3996 or contact
Recreation UBC, Room 203, War Memorial
Gymnasium.
UBC RtporU is published every second
Wednesday by Information Services,
UBC. 65SS Memorial Road.
Vancouver, B.C., V6T IW5.
Telephone Z28-S13I. Al Hunter,
editor. Lorie Chortrk, calendar editor.
Jim Banham, contributing editor.

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