UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Reports May 2, 1991

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcreports-1.0118165.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcreports-1.0118165.json
JSON-LD: ubcreports-1.0118165-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcreports-1.0118165-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcreports-1.0118165-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcreports-1.0118165-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcreports-1.0118165-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcreports-1.0118165-source.json
Full Text
ubcreports-1.0118165-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcreports-1.0118165.ris

Full Text

 I
Waste incinerator to be built on campus
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC has applied for a permit from
the provincial Waste Management
Branch to begin construction of a new
chemical waste processing facility on
south campus.
The facility will include an incinerator and other methods of disposing
of waste solvents and biological
wastes, said Dr. William Webber, associate vice-president, academic.
The new facility is part of the university's ongoing efforts to be responsible for waste products generated
on campus, efforts which also involve
new studies into recycling and reuse
Human
Resources
acquires new
info system
In April 1988, UBC started a
prqjectto tmptementtf new Integrated
Human ResourcesInformation System
(IHRIS). This project is part of an
overall strategic systems plan to improve the university's administrative
support.
The principal objectives of IHRIS
are to implement a single, integrated,
accurate source of human resources
data; to ensure accurate and timely
pay for all faculty and staff; and to
provide tools and facilities to support
financial planning and the administration of human resources policies
and procedures.
The major benefits of IHRIS include a reduction in the duplication of
effort; a reduction in human resource
processing backlogs; a reduction in
the number of processing errors; and
an increased ability of faculties and
departments to respond to human resources inquiries.
In July of 1990, following an in-
depth investigation and evaluation,
•mmm
WBXXMs^J* volunteer program atkrtwiilluiiaJ House
fcwjpa foreign iimidsnts upon
wrtwltoUBC.«w©2
QES: A
f
JiM>4jMfflHis4MM0r record-
Page3
MEASURUte SUCCESS:
Professor
overcame
linstsd
fJsfdtoacMswftsuccessful
of waste materials.
"UBC ought to be responsible for
its own waste and handle it in as safe
a manner as possible," said Webber.
"To accomplish this, we are placing a
new emphasis on recycling and
streaming of other waste products."
The incinerators will be used to
dispose of waste solvents and biological wastes. Some waste solvents
and used motor oil will be recycled,
where practical. Solvents from Simon
Fraser University and the University
of Victoria will also be disposed of at
the UBC facility.
"We are the major user of solvents
due to our size and the amount of
research conducted on campus," said
Webber. "It is the sensible thing to
bring these materials to UBC rather
than building three incinerators."
The $5-million facility, funded
UBC engineering students built this 15-seat bicycle for the Manulife
Ride for Heart, held April 28 to raise funds for heart research.
UBC acquired a human resources
management system software package from PeopleSoft Inc. This package meets a major portion of UBC's
needs and comes with sophisticated
tools to tailor the system to address
unique requirements.
The implementation will involve
three projects over the course of several years. Project one includes Human
Resources and payroll processing and
is targeted for the fall of 1991. Project
two will implement position manage
ment and budget management. The
third project addresses applicant
tracking and recruiting.
An advisory committee has been
established for representatives of faculties and administrative departments
to review the design and provide
suggestions and feedback. Regular
project updates are being published in
the monthly newsletter INFONOTES,
issued by Human Resources. Forfurther information please call the IHRIS
project office at 822-9864.
jointly by the three universities, along
with provincial government grants,
will have a 10-year life expectancy,
due to the rapidly changing technologies of waste disposal.
The existing waste solvent incinerator no longer meets current standards, which were strengthened at the
beginning of 1990, and is not operating. Since that time, waste solvents
have been stored and then shipped to
licensed facilities in the United States
as part of an alternative fuel program.
Overseeing the project is a President's Advisory Committee, chaired
by Webber, which includes repre
sentatives of faculty users, the GVRD,
the Vancouver Health Department,
UBC's Department of Occupational
Health and Safety, and the University
Endowment Land Ratepayers Association.
Design consultants on the project
are the Vancouver branch of CH2M
Hill, specialists in waste disposal.
Plans for the new incinerator will
be on view at an open house on
Wednesday, May 8, from 4 to 8 p.m at
the UBC Botanical Garden reception
hall. Representatives ofthe designers
and the university will be on hand to
answer questions.
Dental hygiene
degree approved
By CONNIE FILLETTI
Senate has approved the creation
of a dental hygiene diploma degree
program leading to a Bachelor of
Dental Science degree.
The program will be the first of its
kind at a western Canadian university.
"The degree completion program
is designed to prepare future academic and clinical leaders in dental
hygiene," said Dr. Paul Robertson,
dean of the Faculty of Dentistry.
"The program is also designed to
produce graduates who will have a
broadened scientific education,
combined with the depth and proficiency in dental hygiene skills."
He added that there is a great need
for advanced training in dental hygiene to prepare clinicians for careers in professional education and
community health.
Robertson said recent surveys of
dental hygienists in B.C. demonstrate
a strong interest in a post-diploma
degree program in dental hygiene.
Results of two separate surveys
conducted by the B.C. Dental Hygienists' Association and by the College of Dental Surgeons of B.C. indicated that 50 per cent of the respond
ents would be interested in the program, should one become available.
The establishment of a dental hygiene completion program within a
western Canadian university was first
recommended by the Federal Government Working Group on the
Practice of
Dental Hygiene in 1986.
The University of
Montreal and
the University
of Toronto
currently are
the only other
universities to Robertson
offer degree completion programs
for dental hygienists in Canada.
Completion of the degree will require a minimum of 60 credits of
course work, of which approximately
34 to 38 credits will be core material.
The remaining course work will allow students to focus on community
dental health care, advanced clinical
practice or allied dental education
and research.
Application forms may be obtained from the dean' s office, Faculty
of Dentistry.
Campus loses Canada Employment Centre
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC's Canada Employment Centre will close its doors this September
as the federal government eliminates
funding for job placement services at
university and college campuses.
Gordon Fox, manager of the UBC
employment centre, said about 100
campus centres, half of them in Quebec, are being closed because of the
changing mandate of Employment
Canada. It now stresses a more universal approach to service delivery,
instead of serving a specialized clientele.
"Canada Employment wants to be
able to apply more resources to less
advantaged clientele," said Fox.
The closures also follow govern
ment spending restraints introduced
in the most recent federal budget, he
said. Many of the larger universities,
especially in Ontario, were already
providing their own placement services without government assistance.
K.D. Srivastava, vice-president,
student and academic services, said
his office is urgently looking into the
possibility of establishing an equivalent placement service on campus.
Some interim external financial grants
may be available to continue a placement service for a year or so.
"This will enable our office to develop a long-term strategy for offering
this important service to UBC students," he said.
The UBC centre, which first opened
its doors in 1977, is currently staffed
by four full-time employees, making
it one of the largest campus Canada
Employment Centres in the country.
The centre regularly places about
2,500 UBC students in permanent,
summer and part-time jobs each year,
Fox said. A majority ofthe permanent
placements are in engineering, commerce, forestry, education and computer science.
"We believe we have provided a
valuable service," Fox said. "We're
disappointed. The staff have enjoyed
serving students and employers."
Also closing will be Canada Employment Centres at Simon Fraser
University, the University of Victoria
and the B.C. Institute of Technology.
After September, the nearest Canada
Employment Centre to UBC will be
an office on West Broadway near
Burrard St., where a full range of services will be available to students.
Before the Canada Employment
Centre was established on campus, a
placement service was offered by the
Student Counselling and Resource
Centre. That centre currently offers a
career counselling service to all registered students at UBC.
Srivastava said that all authorizations for foreign workers at UBC will
be handled by the Canada Employment
Centre at Sinclair Centre when the
campus employment centre staff are
gone. 2    UBC REPORTS May 2,1991
Letters to the Editor
April 19,1991
The Editor
UBC Reports
Dear Sir:
I feel obliged to respond to the April 9th letter to you from the West Point
Grey Residents' Association as it contains numerous factual errors and
inconsistencies about Hampton Place and the University. The trees were
removed from the site in the fall of 1989, not "six months ago" as claimed. The
first development, Thames Court, is in the south-west corner, not the "southeast". The Thames Court townhouses and condominium homes will be
available for sale this year, not "in 12 -18 month's time".
Ofthe so-called "24 left over acres" approximately 6 acres are in existing
landscaping and roads and a further four acres are reserved for three high rise
sites for rental housing by UBC Real Estate Corporation. This leaves six sites
for leasehold sale of which one or two will be offered by public tender this year.
These sites have not "been put on hold". Since Hampton Place was conceived,
land prices have not "fallen drastically". Hampton Place was originally
conceived in the early 1980's and started detailed design in 1986-87. Land
prices rose steadily during this time, climbed to an exceptional peak in 1989-
90, dropped to more normal levels and have since been steady.
We are achieving our projected revenues and have retired all debt against
Hampton Place, and more, from just the first land lease sale to Thames Court.
The purpose of Hampton Place is firstly to make money for the University to
spend on capital and endowment projects and, secondly, to increase the supply
of housing, both condominium and rental. This is and was the plan for
Hampton Place and we have always stated that it would take at least five years
to see Hampton Place substantially built.
With regard to "European" versus "West Coast" landscaping this is
obviously a matter of taste but recent surveys of the pros and cons of the
Campus have shown that the older areas of the Campus, such as the original
Library, the Chemistry Building and the grand boulevard ofthe Main Mall are
considered amongst the most attractive. These areas have definite European
origins.
UBC Real Estate Corporation is currently building 115 units of housing for
junior faculty members. These rental units should be available for September
of this year and will include a Day Care. By combining the public and private
resources ofthe University and the Real Estate Corporation, these rental units
are being built on a full cost recovery basis and with below market rents.
We have spent the last year working with representatives of the Faculty
Association, the University Endowment Lands, the Greater Vancouver Regional
District, the Alma Mater Society, student representatives to the Board of
Govrenors, the School of Planning and the Economics Department on an
advisory committee on Hampton Place. I believe that the views of these
groups have been well represented and will be the subject of an upcoming
committee report. The West Point Grey Residents Association will be more
than welcome to a copy of this report when it is finished as it should represent
the views of those who live and work on the Campus.
Mark Betteridge
President
UBC Real Estate Corporation
April 22,1991
Editor
UBC Reports
Dear Sir:
Your article on "University set to provide childcare" on April 4
contains some interesting distortions and omissions. The article doesn't
mention that there are many people associated with daycare at UBC who are
extremely unhappy with the University administration's proposed takeover.
The article talks about "existing parent advisory committees". The parents are
not advisors. The daycares are parent co-ops which means that parents are
directly involved and responsible. They have existed on this campus for
almost twenty years. The notion that the University can automatically provide
better care or even comparable care in an institutional setting is only a notion.
In fact meetings between University officials and parents have made it
abundantly clear that the University has spent much more time thinking about
its legal position than it has spent thinking about child care. An apt quote on
the situation is perhaps that of Senator Lowell Murray from the Globe and Mail
on April 20: "What you can achieve from the bottom up is perhaps more
enduring and more acceptable than what you can achieve from the top down".
J. Carolan
Physics Department
Welcoming hand extended
to international students
By CHARLES KER
Gertjan Hofman was more
than a little relieved to see
the International House
sign when he stepped off
the plane two years ago at Vancouver
Airport.
The 21 -year-old Dutch student had
chosen UBC to study for his master's
degree in physics and was understandably apprehensive about what
awaited him.
"It is a bit daunting going 15,000
miles to a place you have never been
before, but the reception was really
quite amazing," said Hofman. "International House received me before
Canada Customs did."
A "host" family was also on hand
to greet Gertjan and take him back to
their house where he would stay for a
few days until he found permanent
lodging.
Starting in July, Gertjan plans to
be among 130 volunteers offering
some home hospitality to UBC's new
international arrivals. About 200
students took advantage of International House's reception program
last year with Gertjan himself hosting three students in three consecutive weeks.
"It's a positive start and a good
introduction to Canada," said Carol
Shepstone, past coordinator of the 10-
year-old program. "It's optional but
those who sign on have a sense of
reassurance before leaving their home
Engineers
seek more
women
students
By GAVIN WILSON
More than 200 young
women from Lower
Mainland high schools
who are interested in careers in engineering have been invited to a daylong conference hosted by the Faculty
of Applied Science.
The conference is part of the facul-
ty's commitment to increasing the
number of women studying engineering at the university, said Sidney
Mindess, professor of Civil Engineering and a conference organizer.
"We would like women to see engineering as a viable career option, not
as a profession that is blocked off to
them," he said. "We want to give them
the message that if this is what they
want to do, then yes, they can actually
do it."
Female faculty members such as
Rabab Ward (electrical engineering)
and Royann Petrell (bio-resource engineering) will speak to the students,
as will as practicing engineers who are
women. Students will also get the
chance to speak informally with these
women about opportunities in the field.
The conference, on Wednesday,
May 8, at the Graduate Student Centre, is being held for the second year.
Last year, about 175 young women
country."
Prior to the arrivals in July and
August, International House sends off
about 800 information packages on
the university to potential international
students. The months of May and June
are spent recruiting hosts, drivers and
volunteers for the International House
kiosk at the airport.
With half the volunteer list
made up of international
students, Morrison hopes
more Canadian volunteers
come forward to share in
the experience.
In addition, International House
launches a separate letter-writing
campaign which last year included
80 volunteers writing some 800 letters
to students from abroad. Randy
Morrison is coordinating this year's
effort and is looking for 100 volunteer
scribes.
"We provide some guidelines about
basic information to include about the
city and climate but the rest is up to the
individual," said Morrison. "Generally, it helps incoming students adjust
to new surroundings and gives them
more of a soft-landing."
With half the volunteer list made
up of international students, Morrison
hopes more Canadian volunteers come
forward to share in the experience. He
has had good success this year with
more than 15 first-time volunteers from
the Rotary Clubs of Vancouver and
Vancouver South. The aim is for students to start up a correspondence
before they actually meet. Morrison
added that volunteers can expect two
or three responses from 10 letters sent.
Close to 1,600 international students registered at UBC in 1990 with
roughly two-thirds of those entering
graduate programs.
Volunteers can call International
House at 822-5021 for more information.
New office looks at
health technologies
UBC's recently created Centre
for Health Services and Policy Research has established a B.C. Office
of Health Technology
Assessment (OHTA).
The Ministry of
Health is providing
$250,000 in start-up
funds for the office,
which is located in the
Purdy Pavilion of University Hospital, UBC
site.
"The establishment
of the OHTA will better position British
Columbia in efforts to
assess and evaluate the
effectiveness of new and existing
health care technologies," said provincial Health Minister John Jansen.
"The office will also allow us to
gain greater access to the network of
shared information and research."
The province's OHTA will be
active in several areas, including
the selection of technologies to be
examined and identifying technologies that have insufficient scientific
study.
Consultation and advice will be
available to investigators develop-
Kazanjian
ing research proposals for funding
studies that address research gaps.
Associates of the office will review and analyze all
scientific literature to
prepare summary reports on specific
technologies. These
summaries will be
highlighted in a quarterly newsletter to be
published by the
OHTA.
"Promoting and
encouraging the use
of assessment research in policy, acquisition and utilization decisions at the clinical, operations and government levels entails
understanding what other factors influence these decisions," said
Arminee Kazanjian, chair of the
OHTA steering committee.
"The office will be responsible
for developing such research."
In addition to its health technology assessment activities, the centre
is a focal point for research at UBC
on health policy, population health,
health human resources and health
services research.
attended.
Currently, about 11 per cent of
Applied Science undergraduate students are women. While this number
is typical of North American universities, it is unacceptably low, Mindess
said.
Women represent the largest untapped pool of potential talent for the
engineering profession, which is projected to suffer a shortage of recruits
in the next 15 years, he said.
In October, the faculty's annual
workshop for high school science
teachers also highlighted opportunities for women in engineering. Teachers who attended said there are an
increasing number of women students
in Grades 11 and 12 science classes.
UBC Reports is the faculty and
staff newspaper ofthe University
of British Columbia. It is published every second Thursday by
the UBC Community Relations
Office, 6328 Memorial Rd7, Vancouver, B.C., V6T 1Z2.
Telephone 822-3131.
Advertising inquiries: 822-6149.
Managing Editor: Steve Crombie
Ass't Editor: Paula Martin
Contributors: Ron Burke, Connie
Filletti, Abe Hefter, Charles Ker,
and Gavin Wilson.
i%     Please
^«b>    recycle UBC REPORTS May 2.1991       3
Compulsive behavior studied
BY CHARLES KER
It's not known what causes some
people to compulsively clean and
check, but their actions can be debilitating.
Clinical cases have included a 38-
year-old woman who, obsessed by a
fear of contamination, opened and
closed all doors with her feet in order
to avoid dirtying her hands; or the case
of a 19-year-old man who spent four
hours each night checking electrical
appliances, doors and taps after other
members of his family had gone to
bed.
"These people often think they are
going crazy, but they simply have an
anxiety problem," said Cindy Lopatka,
a UBC PhD candidate who is conducting research into compulsive
checkers and cleaners.
Lopatka said that while much is
known about the behavioral aspects of
the problem, her research will focus
on the emotional aspects ofthe disorder.
"We already know what they do,"
said Lopatka. "I want to find out what
these people think about and how they
feel while they check and clean."
Lopatka's study will involve individual interviews with 40 compulsive cleaners and checkers between
the ages of 19 and 65. Participants
will first be asked about their individual patterns of checking and
cleaning. They will then be exposed
to four situations in which they
would normally check and clean and
be asked questions about their expe
riences.
Lopatka said that between 20,000
and 30,000 people in Greater Vancouver suffer from an obsessive-compulsive disorder, with cleaning and
checking being the two main kinds of
compulsions. The longterm "goal of
Lopatka's research is to develop a
more effective treatment program than
is currently available.
Other anxiety disorders include
panic with agoraphobia (a fear of imminent threat, often in a public place),
social phobia (fear of negative evaluation by others) and simple phobias
such as fear of enclosed spaces, flying
or heights.
Anyone interested in participating
in the study should call Cindy Lopatka
at 822-9028.
Computers clash
in chess wars
By GAVIN WILSON
An international field of chess-
playing computers will be competing
in the Micro-Computer World Chess
Championship at UBC. The contest,
which began May 1, runs until May 9.
About 15 teams from the Soviet
Union, France, Great Britain, the
United States, Holland and Germany
are entered. It is only the second time
that the championship has been held in
Canada.
During the competition, human
beings play only a supporting role,
moving chess pieces according to the
decisions made by computers with
names such as Mephisto, the defending champion.
But the computers are only as good
as the people who program them, says
tournament organizer Nathan
Divinsky, a mathematics professor and
Canada's representative to the World
Chess Federation.
"All the machines are very fast. It's
the programming, with which the
computers evaluate their positions, that
makes the difference," he said. "That's
where knowledge and experience in
chess comes in."
The championship is co-sponsored
by the Computer Science Department
and the chess federations of B.C. and
Canada. It will be held at International House, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
each day.
Advertise in
UBC Reports
Deadline for paid
advertisements for
the May 16 issue is
noon, May 7.
For information,
phone 822-3131
To place an ad,
phone 822-6149
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DRAFT POLICY STATEMENT
Number Original Issue Date Revision Date
1 December/86 as April 16,1991
Policy Ac-5
SUBJECT: SMOKING
RESPONSIBLE VICE PRESIDENT: Administration & Finance
WORKING CONTACT: Libby Nason, Provost's Ass't, 822-2909
PURPOSE: To establish a general prohibition on smoking
POLICY: Smoking is prohibited in all University buildings subject to
exceptions listed in the procedures following.
PROCEDURE SUMMARY:
Effective July 1, 1991, smoking will be prohibited in all University
buildings.
The principal entrances to all buildings or parts of buildings will have
a sign informing users that smoking is prohibited. The absence of such
a sign at any one, or more, or all of the entrances to any particular
building or part of a building does not affect the general prohibition
against smoking.
Two exceptions to the policy are:
• Any establishment on campus whose primary function is the
serving of alcohol may designate up to a maximum of 25% as
smoking areas, but these areas must be away from access to the
servery and have ventilation to prevent smoke from drifting to pollute
the non-smoking area. It is understood that the ultimate goal is to ban
smoking in these areas as well.
• Smoking will be permitted in the Residences as governed by the
University of British Columbia Residence contract.
DETAILED PROCEDURES:
Smoking cessation clinics will be offered free of charge for students,
faculty and staff by the University through Student Health Services
through October 31,1991.
NOTES: This is an adaptation of the second draft proposed by the
University Health and Safety Committee. In January, all departments at
UBC were asked for their comments on the first draft. The comments
were provided in summary form to the University Health and Safety
Committee and were considered in the re-draft, which has been
reviewed by Deans, Heads, Directors and Service Unit Directors.
Subject to approval by the Board of Governors, the anticipated date for
implementation is July 1,1991.
Languages live on in professor's work
By CHARLES KER
'Ma 'yanxuxwa 'nalax?
Translation: What day of the
week is today?
It's Wednesday and Jay Powell
is methodically loading a coffee-
maker while his guest squints to
read some Kwak'wala.
An illustrated alphabet of the
Kwakiutl language hangs on the
wall behind Powell's desk along
with alphabets from nine other
B.C. Native bands.
"Linguists from around the
world come here to listen to these
languages because they are some
of the most explosive sounds
people can make," said Powell, a
native-language specialist in
UBC's Department of Anthropology and Sociology. "When we
record them, it is like catching a
rare bird as it flies off to extinction."
Powell has spent his academic
career documenting some of
B.C.'s 25 Native languages. During the last 16 years, he has written
60 language books in 10 different
languages for Native school students.
Together with photographer
Vickie Jensen (his wife), a curriculum designer and an illustrator, Powell has produced student
readers, exercise books and
teacher training manuals for the
Nitinat, Nuuchahnulth,
Musqueam, Shuswap, Quileute,
Kwakiutl, East and West Gitksan
and Lillooet languages. He has
also compiled two Native dictionaries and is at work on a third.
"It's a wonderful feeling to have
Native communities phone and ask
for your help," said Powell. "What
Native people want is to have their
language available to their kids
and to have it documented completely so it can be used and appreciated for
years to come."
Spending up
to four months a
year on reserves,
Powell describes
what he does as,
"making sense of
sounds."
While complex ideas in English
are formed by stringing words together, Native languages add affixes to the roots of words with
unique results. For instance, single words can often span the width
of a page.
Powell's approach to developing language programs for Native
communities has been to involve
the people themselves in the process.
The first step is to set up a
committee of elders which determines how the language is to be
written. Once a system is chosen,
an alphabet sheet is drawn up outlining significant sounds with illustrated examples of a word that
starts with a particular sound or
has that sound in it. The alphabet
sheet is then circulated to homes
and businesses throughout the
community.
In the last six years, Powell has
developed a series of language
readers with accompanying audio
tapes of elders speaking their
ancestoral language for hands-on
community use. Tape topics range
from carving and
basket-making to
rituals and grandparents. Powell is
even at work on a
Native language
video game in
which an English
word is typed into a computer and
a cartoon picture of an elder appears on the screen to say the
word in their language.
The object is to make the language fun and accessible," said
Powell. "The tapes can be used
while listening to your Walkman or
driving in the family pickup."
But committing the languages
to a practical writing system has
been Powell's main concern.
From the beginning, the professor's goal was to provide language
materials that were attractive, easy
to read and affordable. By doing all
the writing, editing and layout himself, Powell was able to deliver 400
copies of his first book, Quileute
Language, in a single summer for
Photo by Media Services
Jay Powell has spent his career documenting Native languages.
only $1,800. He points out that a
professional publisher would have
taken much longer, cost considerably more and left the community
with little control over content.
'The English-language school
texts that Native kids use are professionally bound and packaged,"
said Powell. "If Native children learn
their language from a set of dogeared, mimeographed handouts,
they get a sense their language
and culture isn't as respectable.
We want to create something they
can be proud of."
While helping individual bands
establish school programs to teach
their own languages, Powell has
been quietly compiling a dictionary
and set of lessons which he hopes
will some day be used by Native
groups who have lost their mother
tongue.
Powell explains that his dictionary of Chinook Jargon is based
on a trade language that began
when white settlers first made
contact with Natives at the beginning of the 19th century. A combination of Chinook, French, English and Nuuchahnulth, Powell
said Chinook Jargon has a vocabulary of about 500 words and
is easy to learn.
Linguists grimly forecast that
90 per cent of the world's 6,000
languages will die out within the
next century. However, Powell
can take solace in knowing that
his work will be around long after
many of these languages have
disappeared. 	 4    UBC REPORTS May 2.1991
May 5-
May 18
MONDAY, MAY 6    j
BC Cancer Research Seminar
Childhood Leukemia And Electromagnetic
Fields. Ms. Mary McBride, Epidemiology,
Biometry/Occupational Onconology.
BCCRC Lecture Theatre from 12-1pm.
Call 877-6010.
Biochemistry 530 Seminar
Cellular Targets For Transformation By
Adenovirus E1A Protein. Dr. Peter Whyte,
McMaster U. IRC #3 at 3:45pm. Call 822-
5925.
Laboratory
Biotechnology
Seminar
■^h Cellular Components Me-
^^gft   dlating Protein
iltfjK Translocation Across The
WaM Membrane Of The
^^^ Endoplasmic Reticulum.
mmm™™ Dr. David I. Mayer, Biological Chemistry, UCLA. IRC#1 at 4pm.
Call Dr. Wilt Jefferies at 822-6961.
TUESDAY, MAY 7   j
Medical Genetics Seminar
Inbreeding And Heterozygous Effects In
Long-Term Selected Poultry Populations
And Genetic Susceptibility To Marek's
Disease In Poultry. Dr. Hossien Ameli,
Postdoctoral Fellow, Animal Research
Centre,Ottawa. IRC#1 at8:30am. Coffee
from 8:15am. Call 822-5311.
Neuroscience Discussion Group
The Role Of Insulin, Acting In The Brain,
On The Control Of Food Intake And Body
Weight. Dr. Stephen Woods, Psychology,
U. ol Washington. University Hospital,
UBC Site G279 at 4pm. Call 822-7948.
WEDNESDAY, MAY 81
Illustrated Lecture
Monuments Of Medieval Armenia. Dr.
Arpag Mekheterian, Executive Secretary,
Queen Elizabeth Egyptological Foundation, Brussels, Belgium. Sponsored by
UBC Department of Religious Studies
And The Archaeological Society Of BC.
Vancouver Centennial Museum Lecture
Hall at 8pm. Call 822-6523.
Microbiology Seminar Series
Ribosomal Protein Genes In The
Archaebacteria. Dr. Celia Ramirez,
Microbiology, UBC. Wesbrook 201 from
12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-6648.
Rehabilitation Medicine Visiting
Lecturer
Introduction To Rasch
Measurement: Test-Free,
Rater-Free And Sample-
Free Measurement. Dr.
Anne Fisher, U. of Illinois,
Chicago. University Hospital, UBC Site's Koerner Pavilion Lab 8
from 12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-7392.
THURSDAY, MAY 9 |
Rehabilitation Medicine Visiting
Lecturer
Assessment Of Motor And Process Skills
(AMPS): Simultaneous Evaluation Of
Functional Performance In Activities Of
Daily Living, Motor And Cognitive-Process
Skills. Dr. Anne Fisher, U. of Illinois,
Chicago. Regent College 100 from 9am-
1:30pm. $25 fee includes lunch. Call
822-7416.
Social Work Research Paper
Presentations
5th Symposium of Social Work Research:
In The Contemporary Context. Students
$10, General, $20. Graham House,
School of Social Work from 9am-4:30pm.
Call 822-2255.
CALENDAR DEADLINES
For events in the period May 19 to June I, notices must be submitted by UBC faculty or staff on proper Calendar forms no later
than noon on Tuesday, May 7 to the Community Relations Office, 6328 Memorial Rd., Room 207, Old Administration Building.
For more information call 822-3131. The next edition of UBC Reports wil be published May 16. Notices exceeding 35 words
may be edited.
FRIDAY, MAY 10    )     j      FRIDAY, MAY 17     t
Paediatrics Resident Case Management Seminar
Neonatal Pneumonia. David Critchley/
Gail Annich, Residents. G.F. Strong
Rehab. Centre at 9am. Call A.C. Ferguson
at 875-2118.
Rehabilitation Medicine Visiting
Lecturer
Development Of A Neonatal Assessment
Scale. Dr. SuzannCampbell.U. of Illinois,
Chicago. University Hospital, UBC Site's
Koerner Pavilion from 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-7392.
Plant Sale
Call 822-3283.
Bedding plants, Geraniums, Tropicals at wholesale prices. Cash sales
only. Plant Science
Greenhouse, West Mall at
Stores Rd. from 9am-5pm.
SUNDAY, MAY 12  1
Mothers Day Tea At Cecil Green
Presented by Food Services. Live classical music. Tickets, $12.50 (+GST). Visa/
Master Card accepted. For reservations
call 822-2018.
TUESDAY,
Medical Genetics Seminar
Human Genome Projects: Scientific
Prerogative Or Ethical Imperative? Mr.
Richard Benson, CM, American College,
Leuven, Belgium. IRC #1 at 8:30am.
Coffee from 8:15am. Call 822-5311.
WEDNESDAY. MAY 151
Microbiology Seminar Series
Topic To Be Announced. Dr. Joan
McPherson, Plant Science, UBC.
Wesbrook 201 from 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-6648.
Oceanography Seminar
International Decade For Natural Disasters Reduction (IDNDR): A Challenge
For Canadian Meteorologists And Oceanographers. Dr. Mohammed El-Sabh,
Oceanography, U. of Quebec, Rimouski,
PQ. All welcome. Geography 201 at
2pm. Call 822-2317.
French In Action
^ml^m^— Come and meet Pierre
^P^^ Capretz, author of French
A^k In Action. No host bar. All
Hkj^X welcome.    Faculty Club
^>   " from 6-8pm.    Call 222-
™^"« 5227.
THURSDAY, MAY 16
Biotechnology Laboratory
Seminar
Functional Implications Of HLA Class II
Antigen Transport. Dr. Peter Cresswell,
Duke U. Medical Centre, Durham, NC.
IRC #1 at 4pm. Call Dr. Wilf Jefferies at
822-6961.
Paediatrics Grand Rounds
Recent Advances In Systemic Lupus
Erythematosus In Childhood. Dr. D.E.
Magilavy, Associate Professor, Paediatrics; Head, Paediatric Rheumatology, U.
of Chicago. G.F. Strong Rehab. Centre
Auditorium at 9am. Call 875-2118.
L_
NOTICES
Campus Tours
Enjoy a free walking tour of UBC's gardens, galleries, recreational facilities and more.
Drop-in tours leave the
Tours and Information
desk in the Student Union
Building at 10am and 1 pm
weekdays. To book specialized tours
including those for seniors, children, ESL
groups and the physically challenged, call
822-6410 (after May 6, 822-3777).
CMEA Biennial Conference
Pacific Sounds'91. May 8-11. Canada
and the Pacific Rim-The 21st Century:
forums, research papers, workshops, daily
and evening concerts. Canadian guest
speakers include His Honour the Honourable David C. Lam, Lt.-Gov. province
BC and Kogila Adam-Moodley, Director,
UBC Multicultural Liaison Office. Call
822-5367.
Laboratory Chemical Safety
Course
Safe Handling, Storage And Disposal Of
Chemicals; Laboratory
Inspections; Emergency
Response; Spill Clean-Up.
Various speakers. Two
mornings: Mon. May 13
and Tues. May 14 from
8:30am-12:30pm.    UBC
employees free, General $200. Call 822-
2029/5909.
Census Day June 4
Next Statistics Canada Census. Complete
your questionnaire and mail it back according to the instructions on the package.
For information, call 666-2041 or 666-
7299.
English Language Institute
Homestay
English-speaking families required to host
international students participating in UBC
programs, for periods of two to six weeks.
Remuneration is $19/night. Call 222-
5208.
International House Reach Out
Program
Local students correspond with international students accepted to UBC. Act as
contact and provide useful information to
incoming students while making global
friends. All students (Canadians or Internationals) welcome. Call 822-5021.
Museum of Anthropology
■"I Exhibition extended: Portraits of BC Native leaders,
chiefs, chief counsellors
and elders by Kwaguitl
photographer David Neel.
Now open in the new West
Wing: The Koerner Ceramics Gallery.
Closed Monday. Call 822-5087.
Executive Programs
One/two-day business seminars. May 6-
7: Effective Sales/Marketing for the Forest Industry, $550. May 9-10: Managing
Upward, $495. E.D. MacPhee Executive
Conference Centre (Henry Angus). For
more information call 822-8400.
Language Programs/Services
Enjoy an exciting weekend in conversational Japanese or Chinese at Silver Star
Resort in the Okanagan, May 18-20.
Classes offered at all levels. Fee of $300
covers tuition and meals. Call 822-5227.
Reading, Writing/Study Skills
Centre
Four spring courses. Reading for Speed/
Comprehension, Study Skills begin May
7. Grammar/Composition, Writing Improvement begin May 9. Call 222-5245.
Psychology Step-Families Study
Married couples who have at least one
child from a previous union living with
them, are invited to participate in a study
of stress and coping in step-families. Call
Jennifer Campbell at 822-3805.
Adult Child Separation/Divorce
Study
Volunteers needed.   The
study will explore how
J dA mo,ners C0Pe wi'n ttleir
adult child's separation/divorce. Participants will be
required to anonymously
complete a mailed questionnaire. Call
Allison Krause, Counselling Psychology,
at 946-7803.
Sports Medicine Study
Volunteers, female, age 18-35 needed to
participate in study on Exercise and the
Menstrual Cycle. Fit, healthy, having
normal menstrual cycles and not currently on oral contraceptives. Physiological testing provided. Allan McGavin
Sports Med. Centre, John Owen Pavilion,
UBC. Call Dr. Connie Lebrun 822-4045
or 980-6355.
Psychiatry Depression Study
Participants needed for research study
using new antidepressant medication.
Depression sufferers, 18-65 years. Call
Doug Keller at 822-7318.
Diabetic Clinical Study
Diabetics who have painful neuropathy
affecting the legs needed to volunteer for
14-week trial of an investigational new
drug. Call Dr. Donald Studney, Medicine,
University Hospital, UBC Site at 822-7142.
Daily Rhythms Study
Volunteers needed to keep a daily journal
(average 5 min. daily) for 4 months, noting
patterns in physical/social experiences.
Call Jessica McFarlane at 822-5121.
Psychiatry PMS Study
University Hospital,
Shaughnessy site. Volunteers needed for a study of
an investigational medication to treat Pre Menstrual
Syndrome. Call Doug
Keller at 822-7318.
Hypertension in Pregnancy
Study
Pregnant women, concerned about their
blood pressure, are invited to participate.
The study compares relaxation training
with standard medical treatment (own
physician). Call Dr. Wolfgang Linden at
822-4156.
Exercise In Asthma Study
Volunteers with exercise-induced asthma
needed for 2-part study (30 min. each).
No medications or injections. Call Dr. Phil
Robinson at Pulmonary Research laboratory, St. Paul's Hospital at 682-2344,
extension 2259.
Memory For Places
Study on memory for places (shopping
mall) requires volunteers age 65 years
and older for 1.5 hour. Please call Bob
Uttl, Psychology, UBC at 822-2140.
Study on Memory
Old wine;
-       _ _._ -, old memories.
£^^l To study whether some
ML/^^ memories improve with
^■^r age (like some wine) we
^^^_L need volunteers 60 years
of age and older for 1.5
hours.  Please call Paul Schmidt/Gloria
Lam at 822-2140.
Gastrointestinal Study
Volunteers required for pre-clinical trials
of a new gastrointestinal ultrasound contrast agent. Volunteers (18-30 years) in
good health with no history of ulcers or
other gastrointestinal ailments. Call Dr.
Colin Tilcock, Radiology, University Hospital, UBC Site at 822-3717.
Acne Study
Volunteers 14-35 years of age, moderate
facial acne. Four visits over 3 month
period. Honorarium paid for participation.
Call 874-8138.
Female Hair Loss Study
Females age 19-49. Moderate hair loss.
Crown area only. Must be able to attend
1 -2 times weekly for 9 months. Honorarium paid for participation. Call Sherry
at 874-8138.
Statistical Consulting and Research Laboratory
SCARL is operated by the Department ot
Statistics to provide statistical advice to
faculty and graduate students working on
research problems. Forms for appointments available in 210. Ponderosa Annex C-210. Call 822-4037.
Surplus Equipment Recycling
Facility
All surplus items.   Every
Wednesday,    12-3pm.
// fUMM Task Force Bldg., 2352
" -i«" Health Sciences Mall. Call
822-2813.
Sexual Harassment Office
Two advisors are available to discuss
questions and concerns on the subject.
They are prepared to help any member of
the UBC community who is being sexually harassed to find a satisfactory resolution. Call Margaretha Hoek or Jon
Shapiro at 822-6353.
Volunteering
To find an interesting and challenging
volunteer job, get in touch with Volunteer
Connections, Student Counselling and
Resources Centre, Brock 200. Call 822-
3811.
Narcotics Anonymous Meetings
Every Tuesday (including holidays) from
12:30-2pm, University Hospital, UBC Site,
Room 311 (through Lab Medicine from
Main Entrance). Call 873-1018 (24-hour
Help Line).
Adult Hockey Camps
Cool off on the ice this
summer. Whether you're
just starting out or an experienced player, these
camps offer quality skill
development instruction for
both men and women. For further information call Community Sport Sen/ices at
822-3688.
Adult Golf Lessons
Get into the swing of things! Perfect your
golf game this year in one of our basic or
intermediate programs. Learn quality
fundamentals of grip, pasture, stance,
alignment and accuracy. Class size limited to 6. For further information call
Community Sport Services at 822-3688. UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
UBC LIBRARY: PHASE I
Site Analysis Report
(April 1991)
It is proposed that this information be presented to
the Board of Governors on May 23,1991. Written
comments or requests for further information
should be submitted to Linda Moore, Development
Manager, Campus Planning and Development.
A NOTE FROM THE
DEVELOPMENT
MANAGER
The following information
presents an analysis of ten
possible sites for the proposed UBC Library Phase I,
and recommends the approval of a preferred site. The
recommendation of a site
within this area of campus is
a very important consideration. Not only are we addressing the historic heart of
the University, but the Main
Mall/Library Garden area is
also one ofthe most beautiful
and memorable places on
campus.
This analysis represents a
rigorous examination and
testing of the many planning
and design criteria which
must be considered in a study
of this kind. It should also be
noted that in order to ensure
the appropriateness of the
recommended site, we went
beyond the analysis and information presented herein.
To this end, our consultants
also ran a preliminary testing
ofthe preferred site to confirm
integration with Sedgewick,
optimum site capacity, and
the ease of accommodating
future phases of the UBC
Library. This work was integral to the overall analysis.
As the Development Manager for the proposed UBC
Library Phase I, I am confident that the recommended
site represents the outcome
of a highly professional effort
which, in the final analysis,
balances planning and design criteria with a very strong
appreciation of the beauty
and historic importance of this
location.
Linda Moore
April 26, 1991
INTRODUCTION
Planning for the Phase I development of the Library Centre has been undertaken during most of 1990. During the
past year, the Library Planning
Committee has considered
concepts around a site which
was expected to be contiguous
to the existing Main Library
building... honouring a commitment to enhance the "heart of
the UBC Campus."
Early last winter, consensus
about the functions and activities for Phase I development
emerged from a planning workshop, involving senior representatives from the library organization, in which itwasgen-
C_
J    t
EAST     MALL
3    C
&
■Option 9? T= Option 3 =1 j
I
I
H 211   OLD J   I
l^p J | AUDITORIUM •
I KEY:
Ssao  Underground Structure
— •— — — Above Ground Structure
erally agreed that the new
building would (ideally) be
combined with the Sedgewick
Undergraduate Library, and
that the new integrated entity
would result in a modern Humanities and Social Sciences
library. In so doing, the stratification of library services would
cease: all students, graduates
and undergraduates, together
with UBC faculty and staff, and
outside users would use a
common facility. Implicit within
this decision was the commitment by the University Librarian that the nature of library
services would change to provide an integrated "first stop"
venue.
These decisions provided a
different thrust to the planning
process. In addition to meeting
the terms of reference for the
Phase I development, as provided to the Committee by the
University, the Committee then
embraced the concept that the
development would create not
only about 100,000 sq. ft. of
new library space, but also the
notion of a new library entity on
the UBC campus. In fact, the
scope ofthe project shifted dra-
Figure 1 - Sites
matically, without any budget
adjustment. Rather than a
building of 100,000 sq. ft. or so
(gross area) worth $24M, the
thinking had evolved to a $24M
investment in an integrated
development that would create
a total 210,000 sq. ft. development, which would incorporate
the approximately 110,000 sq.
ft. of the Sedgewick Library.
With this decision and realization, several new factors entered into the planning.
The integrated facility
would create a critical mass
large enough to become a new
centre for the library organization.
• As such, the integrated
facility should present a new
"front door" to the library - a
convenient, contemporary, efficient and appropriately staffed
enterprise, worthy of the magnitude of UBC's activities.
• The service model for the
Phase I library would meet the
challenge of the integrated
functions.
Considered
• The original notion of
Phase I as a building had been
expanded to become part of a
greater whole.
• The original site considerations had become irrelevant
because the new thrust was
directed toward an integrated
Sedgewick (rather than Main
Library associated) solution.
The factors which affect the
site selection for this project
are many and varied. Inserting
a major development into the
already crowded vicinity of the
heart of the campus means that
social, historic, cultural, institutional considerations must also
be weighed with functional and
financial aspects. For these
reasons, a numerical evaluation was adopted. Criteria have
been given numerical values,
based upon the opinion and
observation of the planning
consultant. Although the numbers provide only a general
guide, they offer a means
whereby the merits of the site
options may be considered
without the need for (and perhaps the bias of) schematic,
graphic renditions. Raw scores
for each of the criteria have
been weighted, to provide a
weighted total score for each
option. These have been used
as a basis for discussion, conclusions and recommendations. The scores, therefore,
constitute a quantitative guide,
and are open to interpretation.
ANALYSIS
METHODOLOGY
This assessment of site alternatives is intended to provide the Phase I Planning
Committee, the Library Long
Range Planning Committee,
and the University Administration with a straightforward
statement of how the recommendation for a preferred site
was formulated.
The planning consultants are
aware that additional factors
may be introduced into the
evaluation process and that
opinions will vary about the
scores awarded to different alternatives. The information
presented within this document
is an attempt not to "prove a
winner" but rather to offer a
defendable recommendation in UBC LIBRARY: PHASE I
SITE ANALYSIS
REPORT
light of pertinent project criteria, and based upon reasoned
conclusions.
CRITERIA FOR
CONSIDERATION
The following criteria
have been organized under
general topics so that they may
be readily referred to specific
project objectives. These topics include:
Relationship with the
Sedgewick Library
Relationship with elements of the Campus Plan
• A miscellany of functional, emotional/nostalgic, financial and potential donor
considerations
By topic, the criteria are as
follows:
Relationship with the
Sedgewick Library
Proximity to the existing
structure.
Prospective configurations with existing structure.
Enhancement to/detraction from existing plan.
Functional integration
with the existing structure.
Analysis of floor plates,
relative to anticipated functions.
Relationship with
major elements of
the Campus Plan
Respect of pedestrian
thoroughfares.
Respect of views.
Respect of vehicular
routes.
Respect of the "Heart of
the Campus."
Respect of the axes
(Main Mall and Main Library)
Miscellaneous
Relationship to user
populations.
Respect of landscapi ng,
including the Library Garden.
Aspects of physical
presence, including:
Creation of a new "Main
Library."
Creation of a new main
entrance to the library.
Phase II (and possibly)
Phase III expansion potential.
Capital cost premiums/
savings, including existing/
proposed utilities.
Donor appeal.
ASSUMPTIONS
Since the evaluation inevitably includes subjective opinion,
the following assumptions are
provided, so that the reader
may be aware of the planning
consultants' rationale.
About the relationship with Sedgewick
Library
Sedgewick Library is an architectural understatement on
the UBC campus. Widely acclaimed as a well planned undergraduate facility, it is deceptively buried in a central cam
pus location. Since the Phase I
development is required to
function with the Sedgewick Library building, the proximity to
and configuration with the
Sedgewick structure in fundamentally important. Generally,
"end on" and tenuous links with
the existing building have been
ranked lower than those options which more fully interface
with the existing building.
Each of the alternative sites
has an impact on the Sedgewick
Library design. Some create
natural affinities to, and enhancement of the original
building, whereas others are
unrelated, even detracting to
the existing building.
Functional integration with
the existing building is essential. Generally, higher scores
have been given to arrangements which logically expand
the ways in which current
Sedgewick spaces may be utilized. Also, preference has been
given to alternatives which enhance the floor plates of the
existing building, and provide
improved movement within and
around the present structure.
About the Campus
Plan
Nearing completion, the
Campus Plan proposes a
framework within which future
planning on the UBC campus
should occur. Siting alternatives
have been evaluated against
salient criteria from the Campus Plan.
Key in the plan is the intent to
maintain the Library Garden as
a "memorable" space, and to
create a "presence" opposite to
and axial with the Main Library
Building. Although not an absolute, the plan is accepted as
an equivalent to a municipal
zoning by-law, and recognized
as a guiding document. As
such, siting options which obstruct or conflict in some way
with the intent and purpose of
the Master Plan are rated lower
than those which do not.
Site options which interfere
with pedestrian thoroughfares
and vehicular routes as shown
in the Campus plan score lower.
Important, views within and
across the "heart of the campus" are taken into account:
solutions which encroach or
obstruct these views and adversely affect the definition of
space around the heart are
scored lower.
Since much has been said
about the importance of axes
(Main Mall and Main Library
included) within the campus
plan, those site options which
either detract or do nothing to
reinforce the axes score lower.
About other factors
Since strategic and functional decisions have been
made about the activities of the
Phase l/Sedgewick integrated
entity, proximity to users has
been taken into account. Given
that the main stacks will house
most, if not all of the Humanities/Social Sciences collection,
the further away from the
SEDGEWICK       J
CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERATION
CAMPUS PLAN          l                       OTHERS                               j
>
Y                             Y                                     Y                                                      *i
'
SITE OPTION
i UJ
£8
PROSPECTIVE
CONFIGURATIONS WITH
SEDGFWICK
is
CC Q-
z<2
zz
uj O
FUNCTIONAL INTEGRATION
WITH EXISTING
STRUCTURE
z
<
cr
t-
<o
S23
Li. IX
OX
a|
&o
ax
CC 1-
co
>
Li.
o
h-
O
UJ
§5
LXJ
DC
LX
<
_j
o
X
UJ
>
Li.
o
OCO
UJ UJ
Ss5
£-8
LL
o
(—
LX
<
UJ
X
U.CO
°1
OS
So
co uj
rxf
z
<
s
coec
UJ <
< m
si
co -J
uj S
CO
or
UJ
CO
z>
O
co
ex
X
CO
z
O
-J
LU
cr
RESPECT OF
LANDSCAPING INCLUDING
LIRRARY GARDEN
z
<
2
§
z
LL
o
Ss.
LU LX
CC £33
O D
z
<
2
5
LU
z
<
LL
o
UJ K
LXZ
O UJ
<
X
o-z
•a o
= CO
LU Z
a. lu
a
5
2
UJ
L?
1—
co
o
o
_|CO
<e>
1- z
< <
O CO
<
UJ
0.
0.
<
cr
O
z
s
TOTALS
1.   SEDGEWICK NE
3
3
3
3
1
0
5
0
1
5
0
1
2
1
3
3
34
2.   SEDGEWICK SE
3
3
2
3
0
0
5
0
1
4
0
1
2
1
3
3
31
3.   NW SEDGEWICK
3
3
2
3
1
5
5
3
4
4
5
2
3
3
0
3
49
4.   SEDGEWICK WEST
5
5
4
4
5
4
5
5
5
4
4
5
5
3
4
3
70
5.   SEDGEWICK SW
3
3
3
3
1
2
5
3
3
3
5
2
2
3
0
3
44
6.   BUCHANAN SOUTH
2
1
5
2
5
5
0
5
5
5
4
0
1
3
0
44
7.   SEDGEWICK EAST
5
5
4
4
4
3
5
1
1
4
1
4
5
2
0
49
8.   NORTH MAIN MALL
4
3
4
4
4
5
0
4
5
5
2
0
1
2
0
44
9.   LASSERRE SOUTH
2
1
5
2
5
5
0
5
5
4
4
0
2
3
0
44
10. SOUTH MAIN MALL
4
3
4
4
4
5
0
4
5
3
2
0
1
1
0
40
0 = UNACCEPTABLE               5 = EXCELLENT
Figure 2 - Site Evaluations - Raw Scores
Buchanan Building, the lower
the site is scored.
Recognizing the emotional/
historical significance and attachment that the Library Garden commands on the UBC
campus, site options which do
not interfere with this resource
score higher.
Most important to the University Librarian and the library
organization is that need to create a sense of physical presence of the library on the campus. Solutions which do not
enhance the Library's presence
are rated lower. Related to this
is the further consideration that
underground buildings are not
inherently attractive for donors,
since little or no visible physical
structure results from the investment. Low profile or completely underground structures
have been given a lower score.
As an extension of the Library's need for presence, once
additional feature - the Main
Entrance - has been given special consideration.
Site options which do not
lead to natural solutions for a
prominent main entrance have
been given a lower score too.
Although not part ofthe $24M
commitment, the need exists to
assess ways in which each site
alternative relates to potential
phases of expansion. Sites
which offer logical and integrated expansion options are
given a higher score.
Finally, capital costs have
been taken into account. Characteristics of each site have
been assessed relative to each
other, ie. sites which present
neither premiums nor savings
have been rated as average,
those sites with inherent premiums have been rated lower
than average, and site alternatives with potential savings have
been rated higher.
The schematic plan on the
preceding page (figure 1) illustrates the ten prospective sites
which have been evaluated. As
can be observed, they represent a selection of locations
which, in one configuration or
another, may be functionally
and structurally associated with
the Sedgewick Library. Other
sites, or combinations of sites
were also considered, but
eliminated from this process
because they represented only
variations on the options which
have been explored.
OBSERVATIONS
Raw Scores
Total raw scores {figure 2,)
are the sum of 16 scores applied to each criterion for each
site option. Scores are rated on
a scale of 0-5, where 0 is unacceptable, and 5 is excellent. UBC LIBRARY: PHASE I
SITE ANALYSIS
REPORT
The site scores fall into three
general groupings:
• 31-34, for two sites to
the east of the Sedgewick Library, occupying the treed areas of the Library Garden.
• 41-49, for a variety of
sites to the north, northwest,
south and east of the
Sedgewick Library.
• 70 for the site which occupies the excavated area to
the west of the Sedgewick Library.
All but the highest scoring
option, score zero (unacceptable) in one or more categories. The two lowest scoring
options are rated as unacceptable on the topics of respect of
views, respect of the "Heart of
the Campus" and respect of the
landscaping. In addition, Site
Option 2 (the lowest scoring of
all) is rated as unacceptable
with respect to pedestrian thoroughfares.
Options 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 all
score zero in the final category
- donor appeal. All of these
solutions are subterranean, and
considered unattractive not only
to a potential benefactor, but
(with the exception of Option 7)
quite unable to create a new
Main Library - a strong entity,
presence, and manifestation of
the Library organization on the
campus.
Only two options (4 and 7)
are considered to have an excellent relationship with the existing Sedgewick Library. Although several solutions will
increase the overall area of the
existing Sedgewick Library
floors, all but two do so in tenuous, inefficient and potentially
dysfunctional ways. Options 4
and 7 would combine with the
Sedgewick Library on the "long
side", allowing existing floor
plates to be enlarged, without
"bottleneck" connections, thus
enabling good functional relationships, natural growth and
straightforward process flow.
Unfortunately, Option 7 would
occupy the library garden, and
adversely change the character of the area.
The Library Phase I project
isfixedat$24M. Two options (3
and 5) are rated as unacceptable in this category due to
premiums and time delays associated with the demolition of
existing structures and the additional cost of finding new accommodation for present occupants. Option 3 requires the
demolition of the Old Administration Building, whereas Option 5 would necessitate the
demolition of the Math Annex
Building. Four of the options
are considered cost neutral -
creating neitheracost premium
nor a saving. Three options (7,
8, 9 and 10) are estimated to
incur premiums due to either
relocation of existing services
or underground construction on
a restricted site. Only one option (4) is considered to offer a
potential saving, because the
+
SEDGEWICK
+
CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERATION
CAMPUS PLAN i OTHERS
+
0
I
co
z
Ulg
si!
£8a
ai
fTO.
Co
z«2
UJ X
2LU
UJ -s
o*
x"-
LuO
E
F
cr
O
UJ
K
?(5
3f£
t-UJO
Ox3
zFtr
U.SCO
z
<
cr
co
Sffi
ll u.
OX
if
uj ±
cr F
co
>
Lt_
o
H
o
8!
LU
a.
cr
<
_j
3
O
X
UJ
>
u.
O
O CO
ifF1
ui O
tree
u.
o
LT
<
LU
I
u. CO
°l
a§
WW
UI X
z
<
co cr
UJ <
< CO
°i
as
CO
cr
UJ
CO
3
O
co
a.
X
CO
z
O
UJ
cr
a
z
o
3
u£l
oo i
uicog
COQS
UI < cc
tr2 =
z
<
2 '
I
o
05-
<1
Lu CC
CE CQ
OD
z
<
2
5
LU
z
<
LL
z-
sd
UIK
cr z
O LU
<
X
Q-z
<o
— CO
UI z
32
IX
a lu
ft
2
3
2
LU
tr
a.
H
CO
o
o
_|CO
<o
1- z
< <
O CO
_j
<
UI
a.
a.
<
cr
O
z
8
TOTALS
Weighting Factor
2
1
2
2
1
1
1
2
1
2
2
3
3
3
2
3
1.   SEDGEWICK NE
6
3
6
6
1
0
5
0
1
10
0
3
6
3
6
9
70
2.   SEDGEWICK SE
6
3
4
6
0
0
5
0
1
8
0
3
6
3
6
9
60
3.   NW SEDGEWICK
6
3
4
6
1
5
5
6
4
8
10
6
9
9
0
9
91
4.   SEDGEWICK WEST
10
5
8
8
5
4      5
10
5      8
8
15
15
9
8
9
132
5.   SEDGEWICK SW
6
3
6
6
1
2
5
6
3
6
10
6
6
9
0    j  9
1
84
6.    BUCHANAN SOUTH
4
1
10
4
5
5
0
10
5
10
8
0
3
3
6
0
74
7.   SEDGEWICK EAST
10
5
8
8
4
3
5
2
1
8
2       12
15
3
4
0
90
8.   NORTH MAIN MALL
8
3
8
8
4
5
0
8
5
10
4
0
3
3
4
0
73
9.    LASSERRE SOUTH
4
1
10
4
5
5
0
10
5
8
8
0
6
3
6
0
75
10. SOUTH MAIN MALL
8
3
8
8
4
5
0
8
5
6
4'
0
3
3
2
0
67
Figure 3 - Site Evaluation - Weighted Scores
site is already largely excavated
- the West Garden (or "Pit" as
it is also referred to)	
Although funding for subsequent phases of development
has not been approved, it is
nevertheless considered essential that whichever option is
selected, there must be a natural, obvious and functional direction for additional growth.
Here, only three options (3, 4
and 5) rated better than poor.
Because so many of the site
options are tenuous with the
existing Sedgewick Library
structure, their additional expansion only serves to heighten
the less-than-ideal relationship.
In turn, these lead to strange
configurations, linear
(unsquare) proportions, and the
need for additional major entrances in the future which result in decreased security, dilution of the concept of the "main
entrance" and the notion of a
"first stop" service centre for
the Library. None of the site
options are considered ideal
for expansion, mainly due to
the congestion of prospective
adjacent building sites around
the core of the campus. Nevertheless, the sites of the Old
Administration Building, the
Mathematics Building and the
Mathematics Annex have been
considered as acceptable
growth options, given the anticipated several year lag before subsequent phases will be
funded, and the aspiration
within the Campus Plan to replace the old buildings in this
part of the campus.
Weighted Scores
The second score sheet
{figure 3) displays weighted
scores for the site options. Each
of the criteria have been assessed a relative degree of importance. Of the 16, five (perhaps the least important) have
not been given added weight.
These are:
• prospective configurations with Sedgewick Library
respect of pedestrian
thoroughfares
• respect of vehicular
routes
• respect of views, and
respect of the Main Mall
and Main Library axes.
Seven criteria have been
weighted x 2. These are:
proximity to the
Sedgewick Library
• enhancement of/detraction from the Sedgewick Library
respect of the "Heart of
the Campus"
relationship to the users
(recognizing that in its initial development, the major collection
in Phase I will be Humanities/
Social Sciences)
respect of the landscaping and the Library Garden
capital cost premiums/
savings.
Four criteria are considered
most important, and have been
weighted x 3, as follows:
• the creation of a new
"Main Library"
• the creation of a new
main entrance to the Library
system
Phase II and Phase III
expansion capability
• donor appeal
The weighted scores provide
evidence of the real disparity
between the site options, and a
means of recognizing their
relative strengths and weaknesses. Scores range from a
low of 60 for Site Option 2, to a
high of 132 for Site Option 4.
Three sites (options 3,4 and
7) emerge ahead of the majority. Site Option 3, paradoxically,
is considered unacceptable for
reasons mentioned earlier (the
site of the Old Administration
Building). Of these three, Site
Option 4 scores a relatively exceptional 132.
CONCLUSIONS
There is no ideal site for
Phase I development.
There are many mediocre
alternatives that militate against
good functional relationships,
against a strong physical presence of a modern library and
against a civic statement worthy of the academic core of the
UBC campus.
Only Site Option 4 rates better than unacceptable in every
category.
The weighted scores serve
further to demonstrate the inherent strengths of Site Option
4.
The option with the second
highest score (Option 3) is unacceptable because the site is
not currently available. This
provides further credibility to
Site Option 4, because it could
naturally consume this site in a
few years hence, as a subsequent phase of development.
The option with the third
highest score (Option 7) has
little or no donor appeal, has
little respect of the Library Garden and has no natural, obvious, and functional patterns of
expansion.
Option 4 (the highest scoring) provides a good functional
link to the Sedgewick Library,
several directions for expansion into subsequent Phases
(to the north, west and south). It
provides a natural boundary to
the west side of the heart of the
campus (without encroaching
into it), relating strongly to Main
Mall and to the existing Main
Library Building. Existing
Sedgewick Library floors (each
about 55,000 sq. ft.) can be
expanded to approximately
75,000 sq. ft. whilst maintaining generally square proportions. A main entrance to Option 4 naturally occurs at Main
Mall level, on axis with the existing Main Library Building,
providing a roughly central point
of entry into the the expanded
footprint of the integrated facility at a middle floor (level three
of a five storey structure which
would appear three storeys
above the ground). Such a central entrance fits comfortably
with the need to create a clearly
defined service point for the
new Library.
RECOMMENDATION
That Site Option 4, west of
the Sedgewick Library, be
adopted as the site of the
Phase I Library Centre development. 8    UBC REPORTS May 2.1991
People
Mackworth wins ITAC/NSERC award
Mackworth
Computer Science Professor Alan
Mackworth has won the
$50,000 ITAC/NSERC
award for his leadership in
the field of information
technology research in
Canada.
The award is presented
by the Information Technology Association of
Canada, a consortium of
major information technology companies, and the
Natural Sciences and Engineering Research
Council.
Half of the award is to supplement salary and
is funded by IT AC. The other $25,000 is funded
by NSERC and must be used for research.
Mackworth and his colleagues have established the new Laboratory for Computational
Intelligence at UBC. He is the Shell Canada
Fellow in the Canadian Institute for Advanced
Research's artificial intelligence and robotics
program. As well, he is a project leader in the
national Network of Centres of Excellence Institute for Robotics and Intelligent Systems.
Mackworth was one of two recipients of the
award; the other is Howard Card of the University of Manitoba. The award was presented at a
ceremony held at the Museum of Civilization in
Hull, Quebec, on April 23.
Robert Silverman has been appointed as the
new director of UBC's School of Music.
Silverman will assume the directorship on
July 1, 1991, replacing William Benjamin who
has been in the position since 1984. Benjamin
will return to full-time
teaching and research at the
school.
Silverman came to UBC
in 1973, having taught
previously at the universities of California at Santa
Barbara and Wisconsin in
Milwaukee. A distinguished pianist, he has
performed throughout
North America, Europe, the
Far East, the Soviet Union and Australia.
Professor Silverman plans to continue his
concert career and has scheduled appearances
with Music Toronto and the Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra.
Dr. Patricia Baird, professor of Medical
Genetics, is being awarded two honorary degrees.
Baird will receive an honorary Doctor of
Science degree from McMaster University in
Hamilton, Ont. during convocation ceremonies
Silverman
Baird
for the Faculty of Health
Sciences on May 10.
The University of Ottawa will confer a Doctor of
the University degree on
Baird during convocation
ceremonies taking place at
the National Arts Centre on
June 10.
Currently, Baird is
chairing the Royal Commission on New Reproductive Technologies and was recently appointed a
vice-president of the Canadian Institute of Advanced Research. She is also co-chair ofthe 1991
National Forum of Science and Technology
Councils.
She has been a member of UBC's Faculty of
Elaine Carty, a professor in the School of
Nursing, has been appointed to B.C.'s Caesarean
Section Task Force.
The task force was convened by the provincial Ministry of Health in response to a significant increase in the number of caesarean sections
being performed in the province, and throughout
Canada, over the past decade.
A prime objective of the task force will be to
identify why the number of caesarean deliveries is on the rise in B.C. and in selected
centres nationwide. It is also charged with
recommending ways in which women can
have choices between different approaches
to safe delivery.
Carty, who is a registered nurse and
midwife, is one of 11 members appointed to
the task force. The project will be administered by the B.C. Reproductive Care Program.
Pharmaceutical Sciences Professor Sid
Katz has been appointed Executive Director of Science World British Columbia.
A non-profit, self-supporting institution,
Science World seeks to increase public
awareness, understanding and appreciation
of science and technology, provincewide,
through a program of informal educational
activities, live demonstrations and exhibits.
In his capacity as a consultant to Science
World over the past few years, Katz has
planned exhibits for the main gallery and
organized several lecture series.
He assumes his new position June 1, and
will continue his research activies within
the Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences.
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
• research design
• sampling
• data analysis
»forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D.
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508       Home: (604) 263-5394
Classified
Classified advertising can be purchased from Community Relations.
Phone 822-6149. Ads placed by faculty, staff and students cost $12 for
7lines/issue ($. 75 for each additional word). Off-campus advertisers are
charged $14 for 7 lines/issue ($.80 for each additional word). Tuesday,
May 7 at noon is the deadline for the next issue of UBC Reports which
appears on Thursday, May 16. Deadline for the following edition on May
28 is 4 p.m Thursday, May 16. All ads must be paid in advance in cash,
by cheque or internal requisition.
Services
PHOTOGRAPHS: Provocative and
beautiful framed color prints to enhance home and office - and for
that perfect gift! "Confessions of a
Cloudwatcher" series plus others,
celebrating Vancouver as heaven on
earth. Call Neall Calvert. 222-8276.
EDITING/PROOFREADING: Help
with your writing. 10 years' experience.
"Accuracy, Brevity, Clarity." Clients
range from monthly magazines to MA
students. Located close to UBC. Student rates. ABC World of Publishing.
Cal Neall Calvert, BA 222-8276.
WORDPERFECT: Master the basics In
six hours. Call Stephen Gauer. 681-
4243.
Miscellaneous
EMPLOYMENT WANTED: What
can I do for you? Former UBC Program Assistant available for part-
time, on- call relief office duties. 822-
8254.
HOUSE-SITTING: Mature n/s, n/d,
male respiratory therapy student in
clinical year, looking to house-sit from
June '91-May'92. Previous experience, excellent references, experienced landscaper. Call collect 828-
9571, or message (403)455-0126.
Ask for John.
CAT-LOVERS: As of June 1st, 1991
for 3 weeks, possibly 4,2 bedroom &
den furnished house in Dunbar/
Kerrisdale area. Rent negotiable.
Care of 2 cats required. Phone 266-
7216
Economist defeats odds
By ABE HEFTER
What do you want to be when you
grow up?
When that question was asked of
young women in Australia in the late
1960s, they were pretty well limited to
three career choices: secretary, nurse
or teacher.
That wasn't enough for Barbara
Spencer — she was determined to
become an economist.
Almost 30 years after entering
Australian National University in
Canberra, where she was the only
woman in a class of 70 economics
students, Spencer has emerged as one
ofthe leading scholars in international
trade theory and policy. The UBC
Commerce and Business Administration professor is a pioneer in the development of strategic trade policy
based on techniques drawn from the
IS YOUR BABY
fr***^
i              BETWEEN
/ 2 & 24 MONTHS?
Join our research on
-x    language development
1Q (• •
ni^v at U.B.C! Just one
Pl^
/T^Jjr   visit to our infant
Y^   play-room. Please
\«oTj
[        contact Dr. Baldwin
for more information:
>             228-6908
industrial organization area. Her work
has opened up a new branch of the
literature concerned with understanding the implications of
government trade and
industrial policy. Last
year she was awarded a
UBC Killam Research
Prize for excellence in
her field of research.
While growing up in
Australia, Spencer was
determined to succeed
academically in a country that legislated
women out of the public sector work force
when they married, a practice that
remained in effect until 1970. It's not
that Spencer considered herself a
crusader for women's rights — she
just wanted a job that she enjoyed
doing. That didn't include teaching,
nursing or secretarial work.
"Initially, I wanted to be a chemist,"
said Spencer. "But after getting into
statistics at the university level, I set
my sights on being an economist. Not
very many women became economists
in Australia in those days and my
father, although very supportive, tried
to discourage me from pursuing a career in economics because he felt I
would simply have a difficult time
getting a job."
After graduating, Spencer became
Spencer
Your New International Newspaper
& Magazine Store with a
24 hours Automated Video Rental Outlet
IS NOW OPEN at
4453 W.f 0th Ave. Vancouver 222-8333
VIDEO CUBE OFFERS:
• over 3000 Videos (VHS & Bela)
•over 800 titles of International
Newspapers & Magazines
a full-time tutor in the Faculty of Economics and Politics at Monash (iniversity in Melbourne. She came to
Canada in 1970 and
joined the University of
Manitoba, where she remained until joining
Boston College in 1980
as an associate professor. After five years in
Boston, Spencer came to
UBC as an associate
professor. She was promoted to professor July
1, 1988.
Spencer considers her
research into strategic
trade policy her most significant academic contribution to date. A dozen
of Spencer's publications in the area
of industrial organization were co-
authored by her husband, James
Brander, who is also a UBC Commerce and Business Administration
professor.
One of Spencer's current projects
involves determining the attitude of
unions towards technological change.
"I believe technological change is
fundemental to competitiveness and
general economic growth. I had done
research into unions in the past, but
had not addressed the issue of technological change."
Spencer said this is just one area
that she is currently researching. As
someone who thinks about her research
just about every waking moment of
the day, Spencer said there are no
shortages of research topics to tackle
— it's a question of finding the time.
"At this stage in my career, I have
a tremendous load of outside requirements in terms of teaching and administrative work in general. I am as
busy now as I have every been — and
then I have my five-year-old daughter
as well. My biggest challenge these
days is juggling my academic career
with my home life."

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
http://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcreports.1-0118165/manifest

Comment

Related Items