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UBC Reports Oct 6, 1994

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 THE  UNIVERSITY  OF BRITISH  COLUMBIA
UBCREPORTS
Catch the magic:
Homecoming '94
by Abe Hefter	
Staff writer
Do you believe in magic? Chemistry
Prof. Robert Thompson does.
Since 1982, Thompson and his department colleagues have been dazzling
audiences with the wonders of oxygen,
nitrogen dioxide and ethanol in the Chemistry Magic Show. The event is one ofthe
stops along the Path of Learning on Oct.
15 during Homecoming '94, which runs
from Oct. 13-16, at UBC.
The 50-minute show combines chemical reactions with audience participation
and the antics of a 'mad scientist' to give
the public a feel for what chemistry is and
what chemicals are. But don't let format
fool you. Thompson and his colleagues
take this approach to education seriously.
"Many of the demonstrations we put
on at the Chemistry Magic Show are part
of the first-year chemistry curriculum,"
said Thompson. "We're not making fun of
science. We try to make learning fun."
You won't get an argument from the
crowds that have been mesmerized by
the show's snappy pace and assault on
the senses. The show, which has been
held in various forms across the prov-
©wancoutwSuri
ince, has been a particular favourite of
young and old at Homecoming, Open
House and as an exhibit during National
Science and Technology Week at Science
World.
"Most people are naturally curious,"
said Thompson. 'The show gives the
audience a chance to experience something they don't get watching television or
reading the newspaper."
With the help of exploding hammers,
spontaneous combustion, and chocolate
brownies, Thompson and other faculty
members and graduate students try to
get across the idea that chemicals are all
around us.
Although the theme has remained fairly
consistent through the years, the Homecoming '94 version will leave you scratching your head and chuckling with delight.
If you'd like to be part ofthe chemistry
at this year's Chemistry Magic Show, visit
UBC, October 15, during Homecoming
'94. Show times at the Chemistry Building are at 11:30 a.m. and 1:45 p.m.
See HOMECOMING, Page 2
See Page 8 for the
Homecoming '94 schedule
of events.
®
AIR   CANADA
Great Trekker Award
Former AMS president
set ball rolling for SUB
by Abe Hefter
Stq/jTuJriter
Chuck Connaghan will return to the
site of one of his greatest campus achievements when he is presented with this
year's Great Trekker Award.
Connaghan (BA'59,
MA'60), president of the
Alma Mater Society (AMS)
in 1958-59, commissioned a pre-feasibility
study which led to the
establishment ofthe Student Union Building. It is
there that he will be honoured by the AMS at the
Great Trekker Award ceremony, Oct. 13, during
Homecoming '94 festivities.
The Great Trekker
Award is given annually
by the students of UBC to
a   graduate   who   has
Chuck Connaghan
achieved eminence in his or her field.
Past recipients ofthe award include writer
and lecturer Rosemary Brown, author
and broadcaster Pierre Berton, and former
Prime Minister John Turner.
"I feel deeply honoured to receive the
Great Trekker Award," said Connaghan.
"My wife and I met on campus and our
three children received their undergraduate degrees at UBC. I have had a very long
and gratifying association with the university."
Connaghan, UBC vice-president. Administrative Services from 1975-1980,
was a member of Senate from 1970-1975
and the Board of Governors from 1972-1975. He
was active in the AMS on
a number of levels and
was a member of the
Alumni Association's
Board of Management
from 1960-1961.
After graduation, he
maintained his strong ties
to the university as an
alumni event organizer in
Ontario and Quebec before moving back to Vancouver in 1970.
Currently the chief
commissioner ofthe B.C.
Treaty Commission,
Connaghan is involved in facilitating negotiations between the federal and provincial governments and the First Nations, on the issues of land and governance.
For more information on the Great
Trekker Award Ceremony, phone Leah
Costello at the AMS at 822-2050.
Gavin Wilson photo
Member of the rollerblade stunt team Zero Gravity takes to the air during
a recent performance at SUB Plaza. The event was sponsored by campus
fraternity Beta Theta Pi as part of rush week.
Faculty, grad students urged
to participate in PoliSci enquiry
Vancouver lawyer Joan McEwen, who
Is conducting an enquiry Into allegations
of sexism and racism in the Political
Science Dept, will be interviewing faculty
and graduate students who wish to participate in the enquiry through to December.
An independent review was unanimously endorsed and requested by faculty members in August following allegations by a group of graduate students
against some faculty members.
"As part ofthe enquiry, I would like to
interview any (Political Science faculty
and graduate students) who may possess
relevant Information," McEwen said.
Individuals who wish to participate in
the enquiry should contact McEwen by
mail at 300-1275 W. 6th Ave., Vancouver, V6H 1A6, or by voice mail at 737-
0448. Voice mail messages can be as long
as necessary and callers are asked to
leave a phone number and time at which
they can be contacted.
McEwen will interview between 9:30
a.m. and 5:00 p.m. In room 246 of the
School of Family and Nutritional Sciences.
Inside
Apple Fest
The UBC Botanical Garden offers an apple for every taste, and then some
Digit 3
Offbeat: A Classics prof unearths secrets on the Greek island of Lesbos
Rose Garden 6
Fulfilling a promise: the Rose Garden will return, bigger and better
Desktop Dumpster 8
A teeny-weeny trash can helps cut waste and increase recycling 2 UBC Reports ■ October 6,1994
Smith lecture to kick off
Health Sciences Week
by Connie Filletti
Staff writer
Nobel laureate Michael Smith,
director of UBC's Biotechnology
Laboratory, will deliver the keynote address during Health Sciences Week on campus, Oct. 9 to
15.
Smith, the recipient of the
1993 Nobel Prize in Chemistry,
will discuss the excitement of
health science research on Oct.
13 beginning at 5:00 p.m. in
lecture hall 6 of the Instructional Resources Centre (IRC).
His address will be followed
by presentations from graduate
students Rosalie Starzomski of
the School of Nursing and
Brendan Bell ofthe Dept. of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology-
Starzomski will discuss the
attitudes, beliefs and values of
the public and health care providers regarding solid organ
transplantation.
Bell will present research find-
Homecoming
Continued from Page 1
While you're at it, make sure
you check out the other stops on
the Path of Learning tour. Venues include Cecil Green Park,
the Museum of Anthropology,
Botanical Garden, the UBC
Bookstore and Thunderbird Stadium for the Homecoming football game between the
Thunderbirds and the Alberta
Golden Bears.
The Path of Learning passport makes you eligible to win
prizes, including a chance to win
a trip for two with Air Canada's
Executive First Class to Europe.
The event is co-sponsored by Air
Canada and the Vancouver Sun.
For more information, call the
Homecoming Hotline at 822-
8967.
News Digest
New long distance dialing procedures are in effect at UBC.
The procedures were recently
introduced by telephone companies in North America to increase
the number of area codes available, explained Jim Tom, director of UBC'sTelecommunications
Services.
All direct long distance calls
from UBC telephones now require the caller to dial 8 + 1 +
area code + 7 digit telephone
number.
"There has been some confusion about why we are dialing 8
and not 9 to initiate the direct
long distance calls," Tom said.
"We opted for 8 because it is
too easy to slip and dial 9-1 -1 by
mistake. We were concerned that
this might generate spurious
emergency calls."
For operator-assisted calls,
dial 9 + 0 + area code + 7 digit
telephone number. A BC TEL
calling card number must be
provided for billing. BC TEL will
not accept charges to a UBC
local.
Corporate BC TEL calling
cards for UBC are available. Call
Telecommunications Services at
822-2555 for more information
on calling cards and other services.
tags on a new protein which may
be responsible for activating HIV,
the virus which causes AIDS.
Ignorance, mistakes and uncertainty ta the health sciences
will be explored ta this year's
John F. McCreary Lecture by
Prof. Arthur Schafer, director of
the Centre for Professional and
Applied Ethics at the University
of Manitoba.
The lecture, named after the
first Health Sciences coordinator at UBC, will be held on
Oct. 12 from 12:30 p.m. to 1:30
p.m. in IRC lecture hall 1.
The McCreary Prize, established this year to recognize and
promote inter-professional team
work in the health professions,
will be presented before the lecture. The first recipient of the
cash award is the AIDS care
team at St. Paul's Hospital.
A highlight of the seventh
annual event will again be the
Health Care Team Clinical Competition Oct. 13 between 12:30
p.m. and 2:00 p.m. in IRC lecture hall 2.
The public is invited to attend
the competition which is designed to enhance students'
knowledge about other health
professions and their roles in
clinical care.
Call Maureen Dunn at 822-
3737 for more information.
Meeting The Need
Charles Ker photo
United Way volunteers (l-r) Mahara Jacksen, Barb Bruce,
campaign chair Doug Napier, Louise Shaw and Mary
Prodanovic, stormed the campus Sept. 26 for the official
UBC campaign kickoff. Those wishing to contribute should
hand in their pledge cards by Oct. 10 to become eligible for
the early-bird prize draw. The draw will be held at the annual
Pancake Breakfast on Oct. 12 in the IRC foyer from 7:30 a.m.
to 10 a.m. Call 822-0913 for more campaign information.
Technical Support
tor Social Science Projects
^ Course & Instructor Evaluations
& Scannable Forms (multiple-choice)
^ Data Collection
i
^ Statistical Analysis j
^Custom Reports/Graphics
^ Questionnaire/Survey/Test Design
Educational Measurement Research Group
University of British Columbia
Room 1311 Scarfe Building
2125 Main Mall
Dr. Michael Marshall
\_      V Executive Director
y       Tel: 822-4145  Fax: 822-9144
DISCOVER the
COMPETITION!
Attention
Foreign
Students!
Are You Considering
Canadian Permanent
Residence?
Do You Need Help With
Student/Work
Extensions?
Van Reekum Veress
Immigration Consulting
1-800-565-5236
For All Immigration
Concerns
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
• research design  . • data analysis
• sampling • forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508 Home: (604) 263-5394
si
DIVORCE
& FAMILY LAW
CHILD CUSTODY
William R. Storey
Barrister & Solicitor
731-5676
LOCATED AT 4th AND ALMA
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
Storey, Easton & Thomson
3683 West 4th Avenue, Vancouver, V6R IP2
UBC REPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December, June. July and August) for the entire
university community by the UBC Community
Relations Office, 207-6328 Memorial Rd., Vancouver
B.CV6T1Z2.
Managing Editor: Steve Crombie
Editor: Paula Martin
Production: Stephen Forgacs
Contributors: Connie Filletti, Abe Hefter, Charles Ker,
Gavin Wilson
Editorial and advertising enquiries: (604) 822-3131
(phone), (604) 822-2684 (fax).
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in
UBC Reports do not necessarily reflect official
university policy.
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. UBC Reports ■ October 6,1994 3
Equity Office advisor
tackles diverse issues
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
UBC's Equity Office has hired a new
advisor, Dave Sangha, to enhance its
efforts to create a harassment-free climate on campus.
Sangha's duties include training, policy
development, complaint resolution and
helping to establish initiatives across
campus in areas
such as harassment prevention,
employment equity
and educational
equity.
"I see my role
and the role of the
office as an enabling one—providing people with the
tools they need to
create an equitable
environment for
work and study,"
Sangha said.
A UBC graduate
with a bachelor's
degree in history
and a master's degree in social work,
Sangha brings 15
years of experience
to his position at
UBC, having
worked with universities, police forces,
municipal and provincial governments
and school boards.
He previously worked as a regional
consultant for the Race Relations Directorate of Ontario's Ministry of Citizenship. As part of that job, he was a member
of the principal's advisory committee on
race relations at Queen's University.
Sangha also worked at the Ontario
Human Rights Commission, where he
was involved in an investigation of services for students with disabilities at Trent
University.
He also served as a senior policy analyst with the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training to develop anti-racism
policies and procedures.
Sangha said that one of his first tasks
at UBC will be to identify issues on campus by opening a continuing dialogue
with representatives of the lesbian and
gay communities, visible minorities, aboriginal peoples, women and people with
disabilities.
"We need to provide access to the
Dave
voices of marginalized groups who have
not always been heard," Sangha said.
Sangha's appointment comes as the
Equity Office expands its responsibilities
to move beyond sexual harassment and
employment equity to issues such as
discrimination on the basis of race, disability and sexual orientation.
The Equity Office was formed last April
with the consolidation of the offices of
Employment Equity,
Multicultural Liaison
and Women and Gender Relations.
Sharon E. Kahn,
associate vice-president, Equity, said
that as part of this
consolidation process, her office will
help each campus
department to review
its educational and
employment procedures.
For example, departments should
enlarge candidate
pools to include under-represented
groups and inform
students, staff and
faculty of harass-
Gavin wiison photo ment p0iiCies. In ad-
Sangha dition, departments
should use gender neutral language in
internal memos and documents.
Kahn acknowledges that there are conflicting views about harassment and discrimination issues on campus, particularly as they are perceived to affect academic freedom and traditional teaching
practices.
"The university's commitment to equity includes a legal obligation to provide
a work and study place free of harassment," she said. "It is the responsibility of
my office to find ways to do so."
Recent Supreme Court decisions have
clearly shown that the university has
special legal obligations because it is not
just an employer, but also the provider of
a public service, she said.
A pull-out supplement containing the fourth draft of
the policy on discrimination
and harassment is in this issue of UBC Reports.
Offbeat
by staff writers
Did you ever dream of living the life of an archeologist, digging for
clues and unearthing signs of lost civilizations?
If so, you won't want to miss an opportunity to join Classics Prof.
Hector Williams for the excavation of a sacred sanctuary on the Greek
island of Lesbos.
For the last 10 years, Williams has spent his summers in a sanctuary of
the fertility goddesses Demeter and Kore, at Mytilene, on Lesbos. There he
and his wife Caroline have co-directed an excavation that has revealed a
previously unknown aspect of the religion of the ancient Greeks of Lesbos.
Last June they were joined by a camera crew. And their most recent
findings, unearthed by UBC archeology students and volunteers from
across Canada, will be revealed Oct. 17 as part ofthe "Archeology" series
on the Learning Channel.
"Viewers will have an opportunity to see the remains of daily life on the
island in the age of Alexander the Great, and the remnants of sacrificial
rites and other offerings made by the women of Lesbos," says Williams.
"They will also leam about Sappho, Lesbos' most famous poet, whose
impassioned love lyrics to her female companions have made her famous
and notorious."
The finds include curse tablets, which are strips of lead with the names
of people etched upon them, along with accompanying curses. The excavation crew also dug up figures of men, women and children, coins, lamps,
hairpins, loom weights, and 12 tonnes of pottery - the remains of pots used
at mealtime.
Funding for the project came from the Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council, UBC and private donors.
No Bad Apples
Gavin Wiison photo
Murray Kereluk, a UBC Botanical Garden curator, tends to one of the 50
different varieties of apples grown in the garden as preparations are made
for the Apple Festival, Oct. 15 and 16.
Festival offers more
than an apple a day
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
Ever since Eve tempted Adam, apples have had a special meaning to
Western cultures.
But for most of us, they're just good
eating, and that's the focus ofthe fourth
annual Apple Festival, to be held at the
UBC Botanical Garden on Saturday,
Oct. 15 and Sunday, Oct. 16 from 11
a.m to 4 p.m.
Thousands of apple-lovers have attended past festivals, said Anne
Gartshore, a member of the volunteer
group Friends of the Garden, which is
organizing the weekend event.
To those whose knowledge of the
apple is limited to the half dozen varieties available in most supermarkets,
the true extent of the apple family can
be a revelation, she said.
King of Tomkin's County, Lord
Lambourne, Cox's Orange Pippin, Belle
de Boskoop, Glockenapfel and Winter
Banana are just some of apples with
colourful names and even more colourful histories that will be featured at the
festival.
Gartshore said there is a growing
grassroots dissatisfaction with the limited choice of apples available. The
public's increasing taste for more exotic flavours has resulted in growers
planting new varieties, many never
before available in B.C.
"People have begun to realize what a
limited choice there is available to them
at the supermarket. Why should we be
so restricted to such a few samples of
nature's bounty?" she said.
The reason growers concentrated on
fewer and fewer varieties is a simple
matter of economics. Many ofthe now-
exotic varieties fell out of favour because they did not bring as big a return
as more prolific, disease-resistant varieties.
"But these apples, often from the old
world, are superior in flavour," said
Gartshore.
Festival-goers will be able to judge
that for themselves. There will be 60
different apple varieties for tasting and
40 varieties will be available for buying.
There will also be homemade baking
with apples, hot and cold cider, and
information booths staffed by apple
growers who will answer questions on
the cultivation of apple trees.
Festival-goers will also get free admission to the UBC Botanical Garden,
where 50 different varieties of apples
grow. Some of the garden's trees are
freestanding, but others are trained to
grow along fences or lattices in the
shape of goblets and even spelling out
the initials U-B-C.
British Columbians have good reason to be interested in apples, Gartshore
said. Several varieties now grown all
over the world — Spartan, Spencer and
Shamrock among them — were developed at the Agriculture Canada research station in Summeriand.
For more information, call the Botanical Garden at 822-4529. 4 UBC Reports • October 6, 1994
Calendar
October 9 through October 22
Monday, Oct. 10
Green College Lecture
Aboriginal Self-Government.
Wendy Grant, Vice-chief, B.C. Region Assembly of First Nations.
Green College recreation lounge
at 8pm.  Call 822-8660.
Tuesday, Oct. 11
Creative Writing Annual
Book Sale
Also Oct. 12. Proceeds to United
Way. Rummage/Bake/Book Sale
and 5-Minute Shoulder Massages. Buchanan E-462 from
12-1:30pm both days. Call 822-
0699.
Animal Science Seminar
Series
Do Salmon Like Sweets? C.
Perelra, PhD candidate, Zoology,
U. of Trondheim, Norway.
MacMillan 260 at 12:30pm. Refreshments.  Call 822-4593.
Botany Seminar
The Systematlcs Of Rocky Mountain Maple (Acer glabrum Torrey).
BioSciences 2000 from 12:30-
1:30pm.  Call 822-2133.
Lectures in Modern
Chemistry
Discrimination Among Trivalent
Metal Ions By Multidentate Phenol Ligands. Prof. Chris Orvig,
Chemistry. Chemistry 250, south
wing at lpm.  Call 822-3266.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Clinical Div. Seminar
Evidence Against Direct
Proarrhythmia Associated With
Cocaine. Dr. James Tisdale,
Pharmacy Practice, College of
Pharmacy, Wayne State U., MI.
UBC hosp. G-279 from 4-5pm.
Call 822-4645.
Green College Lecture
Cultural Astronomies: Old Universe For New. Dr. David Vogt,
director of Science, Science
World, B.C. Green College recreation lounge at 5:30pm. Call
822-8660.
Archaeological Institute
Classics Lecture
The Collapse Of Mayan Civilization. Prof. T. Patrick Culbert, U.
of Arizona. MOA theatre gallery
at 8pm.  Call 822-2889.
Ethnic Studies Lecture
Multicultural Critical Theory: The
Ethnicity Of Race. SnejaGunew,
professor of English. Green College recreation lounge at 8pm.
Call 822-5129.
Wednesday, Oct. 12
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
Sports: The Interior Cruciate
Ligament As A Sensory Organ.
Speakers: Drs. J.P. McConkey,
L. Mrkonjic. Vancouver Hosp.
Eye Care Centre auditorium at
7am. Call 875-4272.
Wednesday Noon Hour
Concerts
Baroque Chamber Music. Ingrid
Matthews, violin; Olga van
Kranendonk, cello; Byron
Schenkman, harplschord. Music Recital Hall at 12:30pm. Admission $2.50.  Call 822- 5574.
Microbiology/Immunology
Seminar
Human Cytomegalovirus: The
Immunological Pirate.     Brad
Spiller, Pathology. Wesbrook 201
from 12-1:30pm. Call 822-3308.
Forest Sciences
Departmental Seminar
Some Differences In Plant Competition Experienced By Conifer Seedlings: Implications To Vegetation
Management And Land Stewardship. Phil Burton, assistant professor, Forest Sciences. MacMillan
166 at 12:30pm.  Call 822-6019.
Centre for Southeast Asian
Research Seminar
Food Consumption Patterns And
Culture In Thailand: A Discussion
Of Research Methodologies And
Findings. Marilyn Walker, adjunct
prof., U. Vic/Research Coordinator, B.C. Consortium For Health
Promotion Research. Asian Centre Music Room from 12:30-
1:30pm.  Call 822-4688.
Interdisciplinary Activities
in the Health Sciences
Lecture
Ignorance, Mistakes And Uncertainty In The Health Sciences. Dr.
Arthur Schafer, Centre for Professional and Applied Ethics, U. of
Manitoba. IRC #1 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-5898.
Centre for Japanese
Research Seminar
Japan's Search For New International Identity. Dr.TsuncoAkaha,
Inst, of International Studies,
Monterey, CA. Asian Centre 604
from 12:30-2pm.   Call 822-4688.
Geography Colloquium
The Japanese Electronics Industry. Dr. Mark Fruin, UBC Institute
of Asian Research. Geography
201 at 3:30pm. Refreshments.
Call 822-4929.
Geophysics Seminar
Upper Ocean Processes. David
Farmer. Geophysics/Astronomy
260 at 4pm. Refreshments fat
3:45pm.   Call 822-2082/2267.
Centre for Biodiversity
Research
What The Science Of Ecology Tells
Us About The Risk Of Genetic
Engineering: Models And Experiments. Dr. Peter Kareiva, Zoology,
U. ofWashington. Family/Nutritional Sciences 60 at 4:30pm. Call
822-4239.
Continuing Studies Lecture/
Seminars.
Also Oct. 19. The Play's The Thing
by Richard Sutherland, MA. Carr
Hall conference room from 7:30-
9pm. Call 222-5203.
Thursday, Oct. 13
Fisheries Centre Workshop
Continues on Oct. 14. Bycatches
In Fisheries: Their Impact On The
Ecosystem. Chair: Dr. Peter Larkin
and invited guest panel. Ralf
Yorque Room, Fisheries Centre,
Hut B-8 from 8:30am-5pm. Registration.  Call 822-2731.
Students for Forestry
Awareness Lecture Series
B.C.'s Tenure System. Hugh
Sutcliffe; VP, chief forester, Pacific
Forest Products. MacMillan 166
from 12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-
2727.
Centre for South Asian
Research Seminar
Self And Non-self In Early Buddhism. Dr. Johannes Bronkhorst,
Universite de Lausanne, Switzerland. Asian Centre 604 from 12:30-
2pm.  Call 822-4688.
Students of Health Sciences
Lecture
Health Care Team Clinical Competition: Case Studies. IRC #2
from 12:30-2pm.  Call 822-5571.
Faculty Development
Seminar
Using Case Studies For Classroom
Inquiry. Selma Wasserman, Education, SFU. Faculty Development
seminar room, bsmt. of David Lam
Research Centre from 3-5pm. Call
822-9149.
CICSR Distinguished Lecture
Series
Groupwork And Groupware: How
The Process And Product Of Realtime Group Work Changes With
Shared Workspaces And Long-distance Connectivity. Dr. Judith
Olson, U. of Michigan. CICSR/CS
208 at 4pm.  Call 822-6894.
Physics Colloquium
Evidence ForTheTop Quark. Melissa
Franklln.HarvardU. Hennings 201
at 4pm. Call 822-3853.
Centre for Applied Ethics
Colloquium
Privacy: Some Reflections. Dr.
Arthur Schafer, director, Centre
for Professional and Applied Ethics, U. of Manitoba. Angus 413
from4-6pm.  Call 822-5139.
Biochemistry Seminar
The N-end Rule: Ubiquitin And
Protein Degradation. Alexander
Varshavsky, Calif. Institute of
Technology. IRC #1 at 4:30pm.
Call 822-9871.
Green College Law and
Society Lecture
Contemporary Issues In Law And
Society: The Legal Profession.
Joan Brockman, Criminology,
SFU; Fiona Kay, UBC Sociology.
Green College recreation lounge at
5:30pm.  Call 822-8660.
Frederic Wood Theatre
Also Oct. 14. Film Night At The
Theatre: The Best OfThe Best. A
retrospective of the best UBC student/alumni films at 8pm. Admission $6; $5 for FWT season
ticket holders.  Call 822-2678.
Friday, Oct. 14
Health Care/Epidemiology
Rounds
Quantitative Measures Of HIV
Specific Antibodies As Predictors
Of Progression To AIDS. Steffanie
Strathdee, research associate.
Health Care/Epidemiology And
Project Manager, Vancouver
Lymphadenopathy Study, St.
Paul's Hosp. Mather 253 from
9-10am. Free parking in B-lot.
Call 822-2772.
Music Concert
Faculty Recital. Michael Strutt,
guitar. Music Recital Hall at
12:30pm.  Call 822-5574.
Occupational Hygiene
Programme
Mevinphos Poisoning In Washington Apple Orchards. Victoria
Skeers, RN, MN, Head, Pesticide
Section, Dept. of Health, WA.
CEME 1202 from 12:30-l:30pm.
Call 822- 9595.
Institute for Asian Research/
Centre for Japanese
Research Seminar
Breaking The Japanese Negotiating Code: How To Win With Integrity. Julian Gresser, international
attorney. Green College recreation lounge from 12:30-2pm. Call
822- 4688.
Astronomy Seminar
Radio Continuum Observations Of
The Large Magellanic Cloud.
Raymond Haynes, CSIRO Division
ofRadiophysics, Sydney, AU. Geophysics/Astronomy 260 at 3pm.
Coffee at 2:30pm. Call 822-2696/
2267.
Mathematics Colloquium
Almost Periodicity Of Solutions To
The Periodic Kadomcev-
Petviashvilli Equation. Prof. Joel
Feldman, Mathematics. Math 104
at 3:30pm. Refreshments at
3:15pm.  Call 822-6430.
Theoretical Chemistry
Seminars
The Differential Capacitance Of
The Metal-Electrolyte Solution Interface. D. Berard, Chemistry.
Chemistry 402, central wing at
4pm.  Call 822-3997.
Economics Seminar
Nonparametric Cointegration
Analysis. Herman Bierens, Southern Methodist U., Texas.
Buchanan D-225 from 4-5:30pm.
Call 822-8216.
Law Faculty Sr^Ninar
ANew Theory OfCX25Xrf Justice.
Prof. mchard^V^^f: Faculty of
Law and Py^cfe*0? Green College. Cu"<.toK<!(w Bldg., Faculty
Confere\VS<m., 12:30-1:30pm.
Saturday, Oct. 15
Vancouver Institute Lecture
The Future OfThe Canadian Intelligence Services In The Post Cold
War World. President Geoffrey
Weiler, UNBC, Prince George. IRC
#2 at 8:15pm. Free admission.
Call 822-3131.
Sunday, Oct. 16
Theatre Performance
Shadows And Voice Against Racism. Indo-Canadian Community
Youth Theatre. Museum of Anthropology theatre gallery at
2:30pm.  Call 822-4604.
Monday, Oct. 17
Biochemistry Seminar
The Colony Stimulating Factors:
Laboratory To Clinical Medicine.
Dr. Donald Metcalf, Cancer Research Unit ofthe Eliza and Walter
Hall Medical Research Institute.
IRC #4 at 3:45pm. Refreshments
at 3:30pm.  Call 822-9871.
Mechanical Engineering
Seminar
Knowledge Based Hierarchical
Control      System. Nali
Wickramachchi, PhD student.
CEME 1202 from 3:30-4:30pm.
Refreshments. Call 822-6671.
Astronomy Seminar
The Lithoprobe Project. Ron
Clowes, Geophysics and Astronomy. Geophysics/Astronomy
260 at 4pm. Refreshments at
3:30pm. Call 822-2696/2267.
Zoology Comparative
Physiology Seminars
Protein Expression In Fish Gills:
Importance For Salinity And Temperature Tolerances. Dr. D. Kultz,
Oregon State U., Corvallis.
BioSciences 2449 at 4:30pm. Call
822-5709.
Green College Science and
Society Panel Discussion
Sustainable Development. Joe
Stott, GVRD Senior Planner for
Regional Economic Development.
Green College Great Hall at 8pm.
References/readings available in
advance.  Call 822-6563/8660.
Continuing Studies
Lecture/Seminars
Art Through History: Rembrandt
To Rothko. Rebecca Fairbairn,
MA. Lasserre 105 from 7:30-
9pm.  Call 222-5203.
Tuesday, Oct. 18
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Clinical Div. Seminar
Beta Blockers For Esophageal
Varices - Is It AGood Idea? Donna
Buna, PhD student, Clinical
Pharmacy. UBC Hosp. G-279
from 4-5pm.  Call 822-4645.
Fine Arts Illustrated
Lecture
Posing And Performance: Glamour/Desire In Interwar
Homoerotic Photography And
Film, Thomas Wavgh, Concordia.
Lasserre 104 at 12:30pm. Call
822-2759
Animal Science Seminar
Series
Steroidogenic Characteristics Of
hCG-induced CL. Dr. P.C.
Sianangama, Animal Science.
MacMillan 260 at 12:30pm. Refreshments.  Call 822-4593.
Plant Science Seminar
Floriculture: Denmark, 1994.
Christia Roberts, Plant Science.
MacMillan 318-D at 12:30pm.
Call 822-9646.
Centre for Chinese
Research Seminar
The Canada And Hong Kong
Project. Diana Lary, History.
Asian Centre 604 from 12:30-
2pm.  Call 822-4688.
Lectures in Modern
Chemistry
Nano-Crystals And Nano-Optics.
1994/95 McDowell Lecture in
Chemical Physics. Dr. Louis
Brus, Bell Labs., Murray Hill,
NJ. Chemistry 250, south wing
at lpm. Refreshments at
12:40pm.  Call 822-3266.
Faculty Development
Seminar
A User-Friendly Guide To Promotion And Tenure. Bob Kubicek,
UBC REPORTS
at
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85
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to
Calendar items must be so
>le from the UBC Cornmunit
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lbrnisslons for the Calendar's
nited due to space. Deadline
UBC Reports — which covei
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omitted on forms avrafi-
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5 Notices section may be
for the October 20 issue
■s the period October 23
ber 11. THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
b&4
UrLi*J,
— •"■■»!iis5jislj^y* *^.'
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Draft Policy on Discrimination and Harassment
Please review and provide your suggestions to
Libby Nason, Vice-Provost
Supplement to UBC Reports 2 Supplement • October 6,1994
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Draft Policy on Discrimination and Harassment
Letter from the President - October 6,1994
Dear Colleagues:
Development of a UBC Policy on Discrimination and Harassment
Once again, I am asking you to participate in the on-going discussion of UBC policies to prevent discrimination and
harassment. Over the past several years, many faculty, staff, and students have offered advice on this policy
development. Not surprisingly, much ofthe advice reflects concerns about the promotion and protection of academic
freedom, civil liberties, and human rights. The Vice Presidents and I remain committed to a process of policy
development that includes wide-ranging consultation on and discussion of relevant issues.
Background Chronology
UBC's Board of Governors approved the current Sexual Harassment Policy in 1988, and shortly thereafter, the
University established the Sexual Harassment Policy Office. In 1990, I decided that UBC needed a policy to address
issues of racial harassment and discrimination, and to that end, I asked Kogila Adam-Moodley to chair a committee
to develop such a policy. The committee drafted a human rights policy prohibiting discrimination and harassment on
the grounds covered by the B. C. Human Rights Code. This policy, which adopted the complaint procedures in the
existing Sexual Harassment Policy, was distributed for campus comment in the summer of 1992. Hearing strong
objections, we concluded in the fall of 1992 that more discussion was required on the development of a human rights
policy and on the relationship of UBC's Sexual Harassment Policy to other types of discrimination and harassment.
To facilitate discussion of these issues, my office undertook several initiatives. In December 1992, members ofthe
several advisory committees on equity-related issues were invited to a presentation on B. C. Tel's discrimination and
harassment policy, which assigns full responsibility for the protection of employees' human rights to department heads.
In another initiative to promote discussion, Daniel R. Birch, Vice-president Academic and Provost, invited representatives from UBC's equity-related departments, including Employment Equity, Multicultural Liaison, and Sexual
Harassment, to explore common concerns and future directions at a two-day retreat. Following this retreat, Libby
Nason, Vice Provost, held meetings with a large variety of campus groups, including unions, employee associations,
and student societies, to discuss policy development on discrimination and harassment issues.
In the spring of 1993, Ms. Nason redrafted the human rights policy and procedures based on the extensive feedback
received since the 1992 draft. Prior to publishing the new draft in June 1993, Ms. Nason vetted it with many members
ofthe campus community, including those individuals whom the Vice-President Research had identified as experts on
issues of equity and human rights. In addition, the 1993 draft was discussed with the Deans and Vice Presidents, the
Faculty Association, representatives ofthe CUPE unions, the Board ofGovernors, and as well, with some members of
the 1991/92 drafting committee.
The large response to the June 1993 draft from members of the UBC community included excellent suggestions for the
subsequent draft in September 1993—Draft 2. In the same period, Ms. Nason convened a small working group to
recommend revisions to the Sexual Harassment Policy, an unfulfilled commitment of the President's Permanent
Advisory Committee on Sexual Harassment since the previous December. In December 1993, this working group
decided to revise the Sexual Harassment Policy independently of the President's Office.
By March 1994, we concluded that after four years, UBC ought to have a draft human rights policy for consideration
by the Board ofGovernors. Thus, Libby Nason was asked to prepare Draft 3 of a human rights policy and to undertake
wide consultation. I did so somewhat reluctantly, since I had not yet heard from the group that was reviewing the Sexual
Harassment Policy. Again, I received advice both to move directly and speedily toward Board approval as well as to wait
until the fall term to proceed with further discussion.
Meanwhile, in April 1994, Sharon E. Kahn was appointed Associate Vice-President Equity. Dr. Kahn's responsibility
is to coordinate equity and human rights functions, many of which heretofore were carried out by the offices of
Employment Equity, Multicultural Liaison, Sexual Harassment, and the Advisor on Women and Gender Relations.
Over the summer 1994, the group reviewing the Sexual Harassment Policy produced a draft revision, and now, Dr. Kahn
and Ms. Nason have integrated these revisions and the proposed human rights policy into one Discrimination and
Harassment Policy, which as Draft 4 is attached to this letter.
Issues for Consideration
Discrimination and Harassment Policy (Draft 4)
There are a number of critical issues that now must be resolved for UBC to
finalize its policies on discrimination and harassment. Below, I summarize the
arguments for and against the ways Draft 4 resolves these issues:
1. Approval of a Policy by the End of January 1995 with a Commitment for
a Two-year Review. The earliest date for the approval of Draft 4 is the end of
January 1995. A two-year review could be conducted in 1997.
FOR
• At this time, the UBC community is not able to achieve consensus on all the
critical issues addressed in discrimination and harassment policies; therefore,
approving Draft 4 with a commitment for review after two years of implementation can be an acceptable compromise.
AGAINST
• Further consultation is required until such time as consensus on discrimination and harassment policies is reached. The absence of a policy on human
rights is preferable to an imperfect policy.  Persons who suffer discrimination
and harassment, other than sexual harassment, can grieve through their
union or employee association, or can seek redress through external agencies.
2. A Single. Integrated Policy.  Draft 4 integrates the existing Sexual Harassment Policy and the proposed human rights policy into one policy on discrimination and harassment.  Relying heavily on the language and detail proposed for the
revision to the Sexual Harassment Policy, Draft 4 retains sexual harassment as a
separate category of harassment.
FOR
• Conceptually, acts of discrimination and harassment, including sexual
harassment, share common dynamics.  For example, these acts are defined
by their impact on those affected, rather than the motivation of alleged
perpetrators. A single, integrated policy on discrimination and harassment
will strengthen UBC's commitment to providing a work and study environment free from all types of discrimination and harassment.
• Many complaints of discrimination and harassment involve overlapping
human rights. For example, sexual harassment can be accompanied by
racial harassment or discrimination. An effective discrimination and harassment policy must be able to deal with cases involving more than one kind of
discrimination or harassment.
• Providing the same complaint process for all individuals who experience any
type of discrimination or harassment ensures that similar attention to due
process is given to all complainants.
• Pragmatically, the Equity Office can operate more effectively with a single,
integrated policy than with different policies and procedures for different
types of complaints.
• The Equity Office can more effectively provide campus-wide education and
training on issues of discrimination and harassment with a single, integrated
policy.
• A single policy requires fewer advisory committees than would multiple
policies and thereby reflects the integrated organizational structure of the
Equity Office.  Groups such as lesbians and gays that previously were
excluded from formal equity programs and initiatives can be included more
effectively in a coordinated effort to eliminate discrimination and harassment
under one policy.
AGAINST
• Sexual harassment is so different from other types of discrimination and
harassment that it warrants a separate policy and its own advisory committee.  Similarly, other types of discrimination and harassment, for example
racial harassment, also may require their own policy and advisory committees.
• Integration of UBC's Sexual Harassment Policy into a policy on discrimination
and harassment can weaken the gains already achieved by those who have
worked hard to promote sexual harassment prevention at UBC.
3. Active Role of Administrative Heads of Unit in Informal Complaint
Resolution.  Draft 4 ensures that administrative heads of unit participate actively
in the prevention and remediation of discrimination and harassment in UBC's Supplement • October 6, 1994 3
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT
work and study environment. In the first instance, complainants may direct their
concerns about discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, to
administrative heads of unit. At the same time, the Equity Office continues to be
available to complainants who prefer not to discuss concerns with their administrative heads of unit.
FOR
• Administrative heads of unit are responsible for the work and study environment within their departments. This responsibility includes creating an
environment where every faculty, staff, and student member of the department is expected to respect the rights of others, and where those who raise
issues of discrimination and harassment feel confident that their concerns
will be treated seriously, fairly, and professionally.
• Administrative heads of unit often are in the position to facilitate effective
resolution of discrimination and harassment complaints in their department.
• As both an employer and an institution serving the public, UBC is obligated
under the B. C. Human Rights Act to prevent discrimination and harassment.
Without full participation from administrative heads of unit in meeting UBC's
legal obligations, it will be impossible for a small, centrally-administered
Equity Office to ensure that acts discrimination and harassment are
addressed satisfactorily.
• From their positions throughout the campus, administrative heads of unit
can influence the behaviours of a larger number of faculty, staff, and students
than can the centrally-administered Equity Office. The Equity Office can
more effectively provide education and training, consultation, or advice to
administrative heads of unit when these administrators are actively communicating information on the elimination of discrimination and harassment to
faculty, staff, and students.
AGAINST
• Administrative heads of unit vary in their interest and capacity to take on the
responsibility for prevention of discrimination and harassment in their
department. As well, administrative heads of unit already are burdened with
a wide-range of responsibilities. Therefore, some administrative heads of unit
may not seek support from the Equity Office and may inadequately perform
the duties required to maintain the best possible work and study environment
in their department.
4. Accountability of Administrative Heads of Unit for Discipline and Remedy.  In Draft 4, the stages of complaint investigation and adjudication conclude
with recommendations made to the administrative head of unit who has authority
to impose discipline on and establish remedies for the complainant and the
respondent. The decision of the administrative head of unit, unless appealed, is
final. Thus, decisions about an individual's employment or student status remain
within the authority of the University's management.  Moreover, to maintain
consistency in decision making and to prevent prejudicial attitudes or impulsive,
ad-hoc behaviours from adversely affecting these decisions, the administrative
head of unit is required to consult with both her or his vice-president and the
Associate Vice-president Equity prior to deciding on discipline and remedy.
Under these internal complaint procedures, administrative heads of unit are
accountable for making considered and proper decisions.  Complainants and
respondents who disagree with such decisions have avenues of appeal:  Staff
collective agreements provide for grievance and arbitration procedures; the
Faculty Framework Agreement provides appeal procedures under Section 22; the
Senate Committee on Student Appeals on Academic Discipline hears student
appeals.  Moreover, if a complainant is unwilling to proceed with a complaint
through the authority of UBC's management, he or she need not consult with an
administrative head of unit or an equity advisor prior to accessing grievance
procedures provided by a union, employee association, or external agencies, such
as the B. C. Human Rights Council or the B. C. Ombuds Office.
FOR
• Decisions about employment and student status are made by UBC administrators rather than by an adjudicative body outside the authority of UBC.
• Students and the majority of employees have access to formal avenues of
appeal, which conclude in final and binding decisions.  For those employee
groups such as Management & Professional, non-union technician, and nonunion secretarial/clerical that currently do not have appeal procedures, UBC
will need to establish formal appeal procedures.
• When unions and employee associations do not agree with the decisions of
UBC's management, the appeal process provides these groups with an
important, formal role to play in the prevention and remediation of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, at UBC.
AGAINST
• Currently, some employee groups such as Management & Professional, nonunion technician, and non-union secretarial/clerical do not have formal
appeal procedures.
• Some faculty, staff, and students place more trust in the final and binding
decisions made by an adjudicative body outside the authority of UBC's
management than in those made by UBC administrators.
5. Initiation of ComplflJTtty "y Administrative Heads of Unit.  Draft 4 permits
not only persons directly affected by discrimination and harassment, but also
administrative heads of unit who observe an incident or receive a report of
discrimination to initiate complaints. Thus, administrative heads of unit may
become complainants in cases where the victim is unable or unwilling to initiate
the complaint.
FOR
• Under the B. C. Human Rights Act, UBC must take appropriate action when
it becomes aware of conduct violating the Act, even in the absence of an
individual complaint.
AGAINST
• Persons unwilling to become complainants will not always be able to stop
complaint proceedings once they have discussed their experience with their
administrative head of unit.
6. Similar Complaint Procedures for Faculty. Staff, and Students.  In Draft 4,
the complaint procedures for all complainants and respondents, regardless of
employee or student status, are the same. Thus, in cases where a student is a
respondent, these adjudication procedures replace those of the President's
Permanent Advisory Committee on Student Discipline.
FOR
• One set of procedures for all complainants and respondents will increase the
likelihood that disciplinary actions and remedies are consistent.
AGAINST
• For students, allegations of discrimination and harassment should remain '
with the President's Permanent Advisory Committee on Student Discipline.
7. Test of a Reasonable Person of Similar Background to the Complainant.
In Canadian human rights law, discrimination and harassment are measured in
terms of their effect on the complainant. The "reasonable person" standard has
been used to measure this effect.  In Draft 4, the "reasonable person" test is
further elaborated by defining the "reasonable person" as someone of similar
background to the complainant.
FOR
• Studies have shown that different groups of people may experience the same
behaviour in different ways.  For example, studies have found that men and
women generally have different perspectives on sexual behaviour in the
workplace.  Many persons argue that the "reasonable person" standard
cannot be a fair test of the impact of discriminatory and harassing conduct as
long as the "reasonable person" is defined solely as one who shares the
attitudes and beliefs of white males.
AGAINST
• Controversy exists over the extent to which the "reasonable person" test
includes women and members of minority groups.
8. Exceptions to Confidentiality of Files.  Draft 4 defines the bounds of file
confidentiality.  Confidential case files may be reviewed when (a) there are repeated allegations by the same individual or repeated complaints about the same
individual, (b) the safety or security of persons may be at risk, or (c) UBC is legally
bound to provide information about a case as, for example, in response to a
subpoena.
FOR
• Previous allegations of discrimination or harassment can affect recommendations for discipline and remedy.
• The safety and security of faculty, staff, and students can require the communication of information to authorities outside the Equity Office.
AGAINST
• Persons who have lodged complaints previously will hesitate to do so again.
• Persons about whom complaints have been lodged in the past will feel vulnerable to future complaints.
9. Limited Access to Complaint Procedures. While UBC campus visitors,
including invited speakers, suppliers, and contractors, can expect to find an
environment free from discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment. Draft 4 guarantees access to the internal procedures of formal complaint
resolution only to students, and members of faculty and staff. Visitors who have
complaints are encouraged to express their concerns to the Equity Office, which
may or may not choose to intervene.
FOR
• Limiting access to UBC's formal complaint procedures to its employees and
students will ensure more efficient and effective service to those members of
the UBC community who experience discrimination and harassment.
• Offering access to UBC's formal complaint procedures to those who are not its
employees and students will confer rights to individuals over whom UBC has
no authority.
• Agencies external to UBC—for example, the B. C. Ombuds Office and the B.C.
Human Rights Council—are available to persons who do not have access to
UBC's formal complaint procedures.
AGAINST
• All individuals who experience discrimination and harassment at UBC should
be able to access internal complaint procedures.
I would appreciate your sending comments on these issues and the attached
Discrimination and Harassment Policy (Draft 4) at your earliest convenience to
Libby Nason. Thank you for your continued interest and patience.
Yours sincerely,
David W. Strangway        \\ V
President 4 Supplement • October 6,1994
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT - Draft Policy
SUBJECT
Discrimination and Harassment
RESPONSD3LE VICE PRESIDENT
Vice President Academic and Provost
Vice President Administration and Finance
Vice President External Affairs
Vice President Research
Vice President Student and Academic Affairs
INTRODUCTION
(1) The University of British Columbia is committed to providing its employees
and students with the best possible environment for working and learning.
The University therefore does not condone discrimination and harassment,
including sexual harassment, of any kind. Indeed, the University regards
discrimination and harassment as serious offenses that are subject to a wide
range of disciplinary measures, including dismissal or expulsion from the
University.
(2) The fundamental objectives of this University policy are to prevent discrimination and harassment from occurring, and to provide procedures for
handling complaints and imposing discipline when they do occur. These
objectives are to be achieved in a number of ways. The University provides
programs that raise campus awareness of the nature of and problems
associated with discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment,
and educates administrators in the objectives and implementation of the
policy. The University also provides support and counselling for those
affected by discrimination and harassment and establishes procedures for
handling complaints.
(3) In addition, the University has the obligation to ensure that its policy and
procedures are fair and are applied fairly. It is therefore necessary to provide
an environment in which victims of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, feel free to bring complaints forward. It is equally
important that those against whom allegations are made have a full and fair
opportunity to meet those allegations.
(4) In this policy, the word discrimination refers to intentional or unintentional
distinctions in treatment for which there are no bona fide and reasonable
justification. Such discrimination imposes burdens, obligations, or disadvantages on specific individuals or groups as defined by the British Columbia
Human Rights Act (1984, amended 1992.) The grounds protected against
discrimination by the British Columbia Human Rights Act include age, race,
colour, ancestry, place of origin, political belief, religion, marital status,
family status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, and
unrelated criminal convictions. The Act contains a number of exemptions
and defenses.  For example, the University's Employment Equity Policy,
which has as its object the amelioration of conditions of disadvantage, is
exempt from a complaint of discrimination under the Act. Similarly, the
Supreme Court of Canada upheld the University's policy on mandatory
retirement, and therefore, it also is exempt under the Act. See Appendix for
examples.
(5) In this policy, harassment refers to physical, visual, or verbal behaviour that
a reasonable person would consider to affect adversely a positive study and
work environment at the University. Physical harassment includes, but is
not limited to, physical acts of aggression and unwanted familiarity. Visual
harassment includes, but is not limited to, offensive posters, pictures, and
graffiti, including derogatory images on electronic media. Verbal harassment
includes, but is not limited to, spoken or written threats, intimidation, jokes,
and other comments.  See Appendix for examples.
(6) In this policy, sexual harassment refers to comment or conduct of a sexual
nature, when any one or more of the following conditions are satisfied:
• the conduct is engaged in or the comment is made by a person who knows
or ought reasonably to know that the conduct or comment is unwanted or
unwelcome;
• the conduct or comment is accompanied by a reward, or the expressed or
implied promise of a reward, for compliance;
• the conduct or comment is accompanied by reprisal, or an expressed or
implied threat of reprisal, for refusal to comply;
• the conduct or comment is accompanied by the actual denial of opportunity, or the expressed or implied threat of the denial of opportunity, for
failure to comply;
• the conduct or comment is intended to, or has the effect of, creating an
intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment.
Such comment or conduct may include sexual advances; requests for sexual
favours; suggestive and/or offensive comments or gestures emphasizing sex,
sexual identity, or sexual orientation; or physical contact. See Appendix for
examples.
(7) Harassment, including sexual harassment, can occur between individuals of
the same or different status, and both men and women can be the subject of
harassment by members of either gender. Harassment, including sexual
harassment, can involve individuals or groups; can occur during one incident, or over a series of incidents including single incidents, which, in
isolation, would not necessarily constitute harassment; and can occur on
campus or off, during working hours or not.
(8) Neither this policy in general, nor its definitions in particular, are to be
applied in such a way as to detract from the right of faculty, staff, and
students to engage in the frank discussion of potentially controversial
matters, such as age, race, politics, religion, sex, sexual identity, and sexuality.
These are legitimate topics and no University policy should have the effect of
limiting discussion of them provided that such discussion is conducted in a
mutually respectful and non-coercive manner.
(9) The impact of behaviour on the complainant defines the comment or conduct
as discrimination and harassment, subject to the test of a reasonable person
of a similar background to the complainant.
PURPOSE
(10) To provide and maintain a study and work environment free from discrimina
tion and harassment, including sexual harassment.
POLICY
(11) Every student and member of faculty and staff" at the University of British
Columbia has the right to study and work in an environment free from
discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment. The University and all members of the University community are responsible for ensuring
that the work and study environment at UBC is free from discrimination and
harassment.  Specifically, Administrative Heads of Unit bear the primary
responsibility for maintaining a study and work environment free from
discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment; Administrative
Heads of Unit are free to act, and should act, on this responsibility, whether
or not they are in receipt of individual complaints; and the knowledge and
experience of the Equity Office are available to all members of the University
community.
ACCESS TO COMPLAINT PROCEDURES
(12) A complaint of discrimination or harassment pertaining to University work,
studies, or participation in campus life may be lodged by any member(s) of
the University community against other member(s) of the University community and/or the University.
(13) A complaint may be lodged even when there has been apparent compliance of
the complainant in the conduct or comment in question.
(14) Contractors, their employees and agents, and visitors to the University also
are expected to conduct themselves in any University-related activity in a
manner consistent with this policy. Allegations of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, against such persons will be dealt with
by the University as potential breaches of contract, and/or may result in
suspension of University privileges, such as access to the campus.
(15) Although contractors, their employees and agents, and visitors to the University who suffer discrimination or harassment do not have access to these
complaint procedures, such individuals are encouraged to consult with an
Equity Advisor or express their concerns directly to the Associate Vice
President Equity.
COMPLAINT PROCEDURES
(16) Complaints of discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment,
can be resolved by employing any or all of the following procedures: (A)
informal resolution, (B) mediation, (C) adjudication.
A. Informal Resolution
(17) Informal resolution is a resolution to which the complainant consents,
and is arrived at with the assistance of an Administrative Head of Unit
and/or an Equity Advisor, but without the use of either mediation or
adjudication. The possible means of achieving informal resolution are
numerous. Examples include advice to the complainant, referral for
counselling, investigation by the Administrative Head of Unit, letter to
the respondent, relocation of the complainant and/or the respondent,
disciplining the respondent, or any other appropriate and just measures. Informal resolution can occur without knowledge to anyone other
than the complainant and the Administrative Head of Unit, or the
Equity Advisor who receives the complaint.
(18) No informal resolution of a complaint that adversely affects the academic, employment, professional, or other interests of the respondent
shall be enacted without the consent of the respondent.
(19) The Equity Advisor or the Administrative Head of Unit assists the
complainant in clarifying the allegations, and their related consequences, and in considering the applicability of various options, such
as an apology from the respondent or reassignment of duties.  See
Appendix for additional options for informal resolution.
(20) Written records of informal resolutions are kept in confidential files of
the Equity Office.
B. Mediation
(21) At any time after a complaint has been received, the parties can attempt
to resolve the complaint through a process of mediation, provided that
both parties consent to such a process.  Mediators are drawn from the
Equity Resource Group and are selected by the Associate Vice President
Equity. They are trained in alternate dispute resolution techniques that
relate to the issues covered by this policy. Appointed mediators and the
format of the mediation process must be acceptable to both the complainant and the respondent.
(22) A mediated settlement arrived at between the complainant and the
respondent is written out, signed by the complainant and the respondent, and counter-signed by the mediators.  If a potential settlement
entails action to be taken by the University, the University becomes a
third party to the mediation and also must agree for there to be a
settlement.
(23) A copy of any agreement reached during mediation is provided to each
of the signatories and to the Equity Office, and remains confidential.
(24) No person involved in a mediation proceeding shall give evidence or Supplement • October 6,1994 5
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT - Draft Policy
introduce documents from that proceeding during any other subsequent University proceeding where that evidence or those documents
would disclose that any person had agreed or refused to agree to
mediation or, if mediation occurred, what took place during the
mediation.
C. Adjudication
Request for Adjudication
(25) At any time after the complaint has been made, if the complainant
wishes to have the complaint adjudicated, the complainant has the
right to file a written request for adjudication with the Equity Office.
Requests include detailed accounts of the conduct or comment on the
part of the respondent that forms the basis of the complaint.
(26) Within five working days, the Equity Office delivers a copy of a request
for adjudication to the respondent.
(27) The respondent has the right to respond to the request for adjudication
in writing, provided such right is exercised within ten working days
from receipt of that request. The respondent may acknowledge or deny
the validity of the complaint in whole or in part, provide new information, or propose a resolution of the complaint.
(28) Within five working days from receipt of the respondent's written reply
to a request for adjudication, the Equity Office delivers a copy of that
reply to the complainant.
(29) On receipt of the respondent's written reply, the complainant may
accept the reply as full resolution of the complaint, or on the basis of
the respondent's written reply, the complainant may choose to pursue
either informal resolution or mediation, in which case an Equity Advisor
puts into effect the appropriate procedures.
Investigation
(30) When informal resolution or mediation has failed to resolve a complaint,
the Equity Office informs the respondent's Administrative Head of Unit,
and the Associate Vice President Equity assigns a member of the Equity
Resource Group to investigate.
(31) The investigator interviews the complainant, the respondent, and such
other persons as she or he considers may have information pertaining
to the complaint. The investigator re-interviews or seeks additional
witnesses in order to confirm evidence or explore discrepancies.  He or
she examines any written material considered relevant, including
previous decisions, records, and informal resolutions involving the
respondent, and any decisions of bad faith made against the complainant. The investigator prepares a written recommendation indicating
whether or not the complaint is valid under this policy.
(32) Interviews are private and held away from the work areas of those
involved.
(33) The investigator submits and discusses the report with an Adjudication
Panel comprised of three people (one of whom is external to UBC)
appointed for 2-year terms by the Associate Vice President Equity. This
panel meets with the complainant and respondent to discuss the
contents of the report. The Adjudication Panel may request supplementary reports from the investigator.
(34) The Adjudication Panel decides on the following:
• whether the policy applies in the circumstances;
• whether on the balance of probabilities, and with the onus of proof
being on the complainant, there has been a violation of the policy;
• whether discipline or remedies are appropriate.
(35) If the Adjudication Panel concludes that other University policies or
procedures bear on the complaint, the Panel identifies them and refers
the relevant parties to the University office with responsibility therefor.
(36) In the event that the Panel recommends that the complaint be upheld,
it may recommend both a form of discipline for the respondent and a
remedy for the complainant.  It also may recommend any other measures it considers appropriate in the circumstances.  Such recommendations are made in writing and supported by reasons.
(37) In the event that the Panel recommends the complaint be dismissed, it
may recommend counselling, support, education, and such other
measures as it considers appropriate for the complainant or the respondent. It also may recommend such measures as it considers
appropriate to restore the complainant's or respondent's unit to effective functioning.  Such recommendations are made in writing and
supported by reasons.
(38) In the event that the Panel recommends not only dismissal of the
complaint but contemplates finding the complaint to have been made in
bad faith, it shall meet with the complainant and provide an opportunity for the complainant to respond prior to making its recommendation.
It may recommend both a form of discipline for the complainant and a
remedy for the respondent. The Panel also may recommend any other
measures it considers appropriate in the circumstances.  Such recommendations are made in writing and supported by reasons.
(39) The Adjudication Panel distributes its recommendations and reasons to
the Associate Vice President Equity, the complainant, the respondent,
and their Administrative Heads of Unit.
(40) For students, the Administrative Head of Unit with authority to receive
the Panel's recommendations is the President; for members of staff, it is
the Director or Head of Department; for faculty, the authority may be
either the President or the Dean/Head, depending on the nature of the
discipline contemplated. The Agreement on Conditions of Appointment
states that only the President may discipline a faculty member by
dismissal or suspension without pay. The individual receiving the
Panel's recommendations meets with the complainant and respondent,
confers with the Associate Vice President Equity and his or her own
Vice President, and considers the Panel's recommendations.
(41) The individual receiving the Panel's recommendations may take such
disciplinary and remedial measures as he or she considers appropriate.
A written report of measures taken with supporting reasons is distributed to the Associate Vice President Equity, the complainant, the
respondent, their Administrative Heads of Unit, the investigator, and
the Panel.
(42) A student who denies that a violation of the policy took place or who
disagrees with an imposed penalty has recourse through the Senate
Committee on Appeals on Academic Discipline. A member of staff or
faculty has recourse through the provisions of the collective agreement
or terms and conditions of employment. As well, the complainant and
respondent may have recourse to extra-University processes.
INITIATION OF COMPLAINT PROCEDURES
(43) While it is possible for anyone to seek anonymously the advice and assistance of an Equity Advisor, only those complaints in which the complainant's
identity is disclosed are processed in accordance with these procedures.
(44) Only those complaints lodged within one calendar year of an event, or in the
case of a series of events, the last event in a series are processed. The
Associate Vice President Equity may grant extensions beyond this one-year
limit.
(45) The procedures in this policy can be initiated by persons directly affected (by
the conduct or comment that forms the basis of the complaint) or by Administrative Heads of Unit.
A.  Initiation of Procedures by Persons Directly Affected
(46) Persons directly affected by the conduct or comment that forms the
basis of the complaint may lodge the complaint with either an Adrninistrative Head of Unit or with an Equity Advisor.
(47) At any time, complainants may choose to withdraw from these complaint proceedings.  Nevertheless, the University's legal responsibility to
provide an environment free from discrimination and harassment,
including sexual harassment, may obligate the University to proceed in
the absence of a complaint from the persons directly affected. In such
cases, the Administrative Head of Unit and the Equity Advisor decide
whether to proceed, taking into account the need for protection against
retaliation on the part of witnesses and the need for due process on the
part of respondents.
Response of Adrninistrative Heads of Unit
(48) In responding to complaints of discrimination or harassment including
sexual harassment, Administrative Heads of Unit may seek the assistance of the Equity Office.
(49) Administrative Heads of Unit deal immediately with allegations of
discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment, by
investigating, and when appropriate, ordering the behaviour to stop,
and taking preventive, interim, or remedial measures.
(50) If the Administrative Head of Unit believes that these complaint procedures could apply, the Administrative Head of Unit provides the complainant with a copy of this policy and explains available options.  In
addition, with the consent of the complainant, the Administrative Head
of Unit attempts to effect an informal resolution of the complaint.
(51) If the complaint cannot be resolved informally, and the complainant
wishes to access mediation or to make a written request for adjudication, the Administrative Head of Unit directs the complainant to the
Equity Office.
(52) If the Administrative Head of Unit believes that these complaint procedures do not apply, the Administrative Head of Unit confers with an
Equity Advisor about the matter and explains to the complainant why
this policy has no application. In addition, the Administrative Head of
Unit deals with the complaint on the basis of the appropriate University
policy, if necessary by referring the complainant to another University
office or support service, and informs the complainant of the existence
of extra-University support and complaint services.
(53) If at any time, the complainant is dissatisfied with the actions taken by
an Administrative Head of Unit, the complainant can lodge the same
complaint with an Equity Advisor or extra-University agencies.
Response of Equity Advisors
(54) If the Equity Advisor believes that these complaint procedures apply,
the Advisor provides the complainant with a copy of this policy and
explains available options.  In addition, with the consent of the complainant, the Equity Advisor attempts to effect an informal resolution of 6 Supplement • October 6,1994
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT - Draft Policy
the complaint. As well, the Equity Advisor takes measures to protect
the safety, academic, and other interests of the complainant pending
resolution of the complaint.
(55) If the complaint cannot be resolved informally, and the complainant
wishes to access mediation or to make a written request for adjudication, the Equity Advisor assists the complainant in so doing.
(56) If the Equity Advisor believes that these complaint procedures do not
apply, the Equity Advisor explains to the complainant why this policy
has no application and refers the complainant to another University
office or support service, or informs the complainant of the existence of
extra-University agencies.
B. Initiation of Procedures by Administrative Heads of Unit
(57) Administrative Heads of Unit may lodge complaints with an Equity
Advisor to resolve allegations of discrimination or harassment, including sexual harassment. An Administrative Head of Unit who lodges a
complaint is identified as the complainant, and the persons directly
affected by the conduct or comment that forms the basis of the complaint may be called upon as witnesses in any subsequent investigation
or adjudication.
(58) When an Administrative Head of Unit becomes a complainant, she or he
surrenders any rights or responsibilities assigned to administrators by
these procedures. The individual to whom this complainant reports
assumes the latter's rights and responsibilities. Any disputes that arise
over the applicability of any of the procedures shall be referred to the
Associate Vice President Equity, whose decision shall be final.
(59) If an Administrative Head of Unit lodges a complaint with an Equity
Advisor, and the Equity Advisor believes that these complaint procedures apply, the Advisor, in consultation with the complainant, considers the appropriateness of a non-adjudicative resolution of the complaint, and where appropriate follows the procedures provided for
informal resolution or mediation; advises and assists the complainant
in taking necessary measures to protect the interests of those directly
affected by the complaint; and if the complaint cannot be resolved
informally or by mediation, and the complainant wishes to make a
written request for adjudication, assists him or her in so doing.
(60) If the Equity Advisor believes that these complaint procedures do not
apply, the Advisor explains to the Administrative Head of Unit why this
policy has no application and refers him or her to another University
office or extra-university agencies.
(61) Where the identity of the persons responsible for acts of harassment is
unknown to the Administrative Head of Unit, the Associate Vice President Equity arranges an investigation and notifies appropriate authorities both inside and outside the University.  In addition, the Associate
Vice President Equity arranges to offer educational and counselling
support for individuals who suffer harassment from persons unknown.
GENERAL PROVISIONS
Right of Parties to Support and Assistance
(62) The complainant and respondent are at all times during these procedures
entitled to support and assistance.
(63) The complainant is entitled to the support and assistance of an Equity
Advisor.
(64) The respondent is entitled to the support and assistance of a member of his
or her choice from the Equity Resource Group.
(65) Members of unions and employee associations have all rights to representation that their collective agreements confer.
Obstructing the Process
(66) Any person whose willful actions or inactions obstruct the application of
these procedures or who willfully breaks an undertaking or agreement shall
be subject to discipline.
Retaliation
(67) No one shall suffer reprisal for bringing forward, in good faith, a complaint or
concern about discrimination or harassment, including sexual harassment.
The University considers retaliation or the threat of retaliation to be a serious
offense because it prevents potential complainants, witnesses, colleagues,
and administrators from acting on their concerns. See Appendix for examples of retaliation.
(68) All persons involved in these procedures shall report threats and other safety
concerns immediately to the Equity Office and relevant administrators.
(69) Adrninistrative Heads of Unit deal immediately with allegations of retaliation
by investigating, and when appropriate, ordering the behaviour to stop, and
taking preventive, interim, or remedial measures.
(70) In its deliberations and recommendations, the adjudicative body shall
consider any allegations of retaliation.
Confidentiality
(71) All members of the University community involved in a case are encouraged
to maintain confidentiality, particularly within the work or study area in
question and in shared professional or social circles. These members include
Equity Advisors, support staff, Administrative Heads of Unit, and witnesses,
as well as the respondent and the complainant. Although at times difficult to
avoid, the breach of confidentiality can undermine the provision of due
process, and thus prove a disservice to both the complainant and the respondent.
(72) Confidentiality is not the same as anonymity:  For a complaint to go forward
to mediation, investigation, or adjudication, the identity ofthe complainant
and the details of the complaint must be released to the Equity Advisor, the
respondent, and those involved in the application of these procedures.
(73) Terms of confidentiality may be agreed on in informal or mediation agreements, or ruled on by the Administrative Head of Unit.
(74) Individuals involved in a case may discuss information only with those who
need to know in carrying out their duties.  Similarly, the University may
release information that otherwise would be considered confidential to ensure
the health, safety, and security of any member of the University community.
(75) For educational purposes, the Equity Office may discuss specific cases and
their resolutions with the provision that confidentiality of persons and units
is not breached.
(76) Confidentiality may not apply to persons subject to extra-University judicial
processes.
Use of Documents
(77) Documents are used only for the purpose for which they were created and
are retained by the Equity Office. Access to Equity Office files is restricted to
current members of the Equity Office staff.  In cases involving repeat complaints or security and safety issues, a University Vice President may review
Equity Office files.
(78) Documents may be required by law to be released to extra-University
processes.
Multiple Proceedings
(79) A complaint may be pursued under these procedures even though the same
complaint may be pursued in extra-University processes.
(80) The fact that a complaint is being pursued under these procedures does not
preclude the complainant from pursuing an extra-University process.
(81) Where there are multiple complaints against an individual, a unit, or the
University, the complainants shall clarify whether the complaints comprise a
systemic complaint or a series of individual complaints.
(82) Where two or more complaints have been lodged against the same respondent, these complaints may be dealt with by a single adjudication panel.
Limited Role of Resource Group Members
(83) No member of the Equity Resource Group shall act in more than one capacity
in any given case.
Conflict of Interest
(84) Members of the University community are governed by the terms of the
University Conflict of Interest Policy. Individuals in an intimate or sexual
relationship with a subordinate shall disclose the relationship to the Administrative Head of Unit and shall cooperate with those measures the Administrative Head of Unit considers appropriate to avoid conflict of interest in
matters such as supervision and evaluation.
(85) When power differentials exist amongst or between faculty, staff, and students, those holding positions of authority shall not abuse, or seem to abuse,
the power with which they are entrusted.  Such relationships include, but are
not limited to, those between a coach, an academic advisor, an instructor, a
counsellor, a residence advisor, a tutor, a practicum supervisor, a research
head, or a director and his or her subordinate, junior colleague, or student.
Anyone who enters into a sexual relationship with a person where a professional power differential exists must realize that, if a charge of sexual harassment is subsequently lodged, it will be extremely difficult to defend the
conduct on grounds of mutual consent.
(86) An inappropriate sexual relationship may create a negative work or study
environment for others and give rise to a complaint.
Interim Solutions
(87) The complainant, respondent, or unit may require immediate measures to
preserve safety, morale, or efficiency while a situation is being resolved,
investigated, or adjudicated. Such measures should not be viewed as judgment of the credibility of the complainant or respondent, who may appeal
such measures with the Associate Vice President Equity.  His or her decision
is final, subject to the provisions of collective agreements.  See Appendix for
examples of interim solutions.
Remedy Options
(88) Once a case has been decided, the complainant or the respondent may
require measures be taken to correct damage done to her or his career
development, academic record, physical or emotional health, reputation, or
finances. Arrangements are negotiated with the appropriate University
officer.  See Appendix for examples of remedy options.
Discipline Options
(89) Discipline is be appropriate to the offense and relevant circumstances of the
case, and is applied after an admission or judgment of wrongdoing.  Considerations in determining discipline include, but are not limited to, work
history, previous discipline, respondent's acknowledgment of wrong, relationship of parties, degree of aggression and physical contact, number of events. Supplement • October 6,1994 7
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT - Draft Policy
and intent of respondent.  See Appendix for examples of discipline.
Appeals
(90) Nothing in this policy shall be construed to remove any rights of appeal or
rights to grieve that members of the University community have independent
of this policy, or to remove any rights to take action against the University or
members of the University community in other processes within or without
the University.
Concerns and Complaints about Procedures
(91) General or specific complaints about the application of these procedures may
be addressed to the Associate Vice President Equity.
THE EQUITY OFFICE
(92) The Equity Office has responsibility for
• providing advice to Administrative Heads of Unit and others seeking
direction in the handling of cases;
• advising and assisting those who bring forward complaints during all
stages ofthe procedures, including the initiation of a complaint, as well as
the undertaking of informal resolution, and arranging for mediation or
investigation;
• ensuring that the policy and procedures in this document have been
appropriately and effectively implemented;
• providing information and advice to any member of the University community on discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment;
• providing education on the prevention and remediation of discrimination
and harassment, including sexual harassment;
• publishing annually statistical and summary reports on the number of
complaints made, types of complaints, and outcomes; as well as reporting
annually on educational activities;
• providing annually an evaluation of this policy and its procedures to the
Vice Presidents and President.
EQUITY RESOURCE GROUP
(93) The Associate Vice President Equity appoints members of the Equity
Resource Group to serve renewable terms of two years.
(94) The Associate Vice President Equity ensures that at least four members of
the Equity Resource Group are available to advise respondents, mediate
cases, and investigate cases.
PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON DISCRIMINATION
AND HARASSMENT
(95) The Associate Vice President Equity ensures that the President's Advisory
Committee on Discrimination and Harassment reflects the diversity of
members of the University with regard to gender, culture, ethnicity,
disability, and sexual orientation.
(96) The tasks of this Committee are to
(a) advise and assist the Associate Vice President Equity in creating and
implementing an educational program designed to make all members of
the University aware of
• the nature of discrimination and harassment, including sexual
harassment;
• measures that should be taken to prevent discrimination and
harassment from occurring; and
• the procedures to be followed in the event of a complaint.
(b) advise and assist the Associate Vice President Equity in the evaluation
of Equity Office services, procedures, and educational programs.
DEFINITIONS
Administrative head of unit is Director of a service unit; Head of an academic
department; Director of a centre, institute or school; Principal of a college; Dean;
Associate Vice President; University Librarian; Registrar; Vice President; or
President.
Complaint under these procedures means a written complaint by an individual or
group that he/she/they have been discriminated against or harassed including
sexually harassed; or that there has been retaliation for consulting with an Equity
Advisor or for participating in proceedings under this policy; or that there has
been a breach of an undertaking as to future conduct.
Contractors include vendors of goods and services to the University, volunteers,
homestay families, persons in the community guiding practicum and internship
placements, and others with similar connections to the University.
Discrimination refers to intentional or unintentional distinctions in treatment for
which there are no bona fide and reasonable justification.  Such discrimination
imposes burdens, obligations, or disadvantages on specific individuals or groups
as defined by the British Columbia Human Rights Act (1984. amended 1992.)
The grounds protected against discrimination by the British Columbia Human
Rights Act include age, race, colour, ancestry, place of origin, political belief,
religion, marital status, family status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual
orientation, and unrelated criminal convictions.  The Act contains a number of
exemptions and defenses.  For example, the University's Employment Equity
Policy, which has as its object the amelioration of conditions of disadvantage, is
exempt from a complaint of discrimination under the Act.  Similarly, the Supreme
Court of Canada upheld the University's policy on mandatory retirement, and
therefore, it also is exempt under the Act.  See Appendix for examples.
Harassment refers to physical, visual, or verbal behaviour that a reasonable
person would consider to affect adversely a positive study and work environment
at the University.  Physical harassment includes, but is not limited to, physical
acts of aggression and unwanted familiarity.  Visual harassment includes, but is
not limited to, offensive posters, pictures, and graffiti, including derogatory
images on electronic media. Verbal harassment includes, but is not limited to,
spoken or written threats, intimidation, jokes, and other comments.  See Appendix for examples.
Member ofthe University community is a student, a member of faculty, or a
member of staff.
Sexual Harassment refers to comment or conduct of a sexual nature, when any
one or more ofthe following conditions are satisfied:
• the conduct is engaged in or the comment is made by a person who knows
or ought reasonably to know that the conduct or comment is unwanted or
unwelcome;
• the conduct or comment is accompanied by a reward, or the expressed or
implied promise of a reward, for compliance;
• the conduct or comment is accompanied by reprisal, or an expressed or
implied threat of reprisal, for refusal to comply;
• the conduct or comment is accompanied by the actual denial of opportunity, or the expressed or implied threat of the denial of opportunity, for
failure to comply;
• the conduct or comment is intended to, or has the effect of, creating an
intimidating, hostile, or offensive environment.
Such comment or conduct may include sexual advances; requests for sexual
favours; suggestive and/or offensive comments or gestures emphasizing sex,
sexual identity, or sexual orientation; or physical contact.  See Appendix for
examples.
APPENDIX
Examples of Discrimination include
refusal to provide services or facilities;
exclusion from employment or educational opportunities or benefits;
refusal to teach, work with, or study with someone;
failure to provide physical access
Examples of Harassment include
insults, innuendos, derogatory comments, taunting, or slurs; touching,
stroking, pushing, impeding or blocking movement, pinching, or any
unwelcome physical contact;
offensive attitudes such as a condescending approach that undermines self-
respect, leering, or similar gestures;
display of pornography or offensive materials
retaliation for complaining or supporting a complaint of harassment
Examples of Sexual Harassment include
verbal abuse or threats involving sexuality or gender;
unwelcome remarks, jokes, innuendos or taunting about the physical or
mental attributes of an individual or gender;
display of pornographic or other offensive or derogatory material;
practical jokes involving sexuality or gender that cause awkwardness or
embarrassment;
unwelcome invitations or requests for social or sexual interaction, whether
indirect or explicit;
leering, following, intimidating or stalking;
unnecessary physical contact, such as touching, patting, pinching or crowding;
gender-based condescension or disdain which undermines self-respect;
retaliation for complaining or supporting a complaint of sexual harassment;
harassment on the basis of sexual orientation;
use of media, including telephone and computer technology, to impose sexist
or sexual material on others;
consensual sexual behaviour that interferes with the work or study
environment of others;
inappropriate sharing of information or questions about a person's sexuality
or sexual orientation;
physical or sexual assault 8 Supplement ■ October 6,1994
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
DISCRIMINATION AND HARASSMENT - Draft Policy
Options for Informal Resolution of Discrimination and Harassment, including Sexual Harassment, include
discussing concerns directly with or writing to the respondent;
discussing concerns directly with the respondent, with the assistance of the
advisor, an administrative head of unit, or other third party;
requesting that the Advisor, Administrative Head of Unit, or other third party
meet with the respondent to discuss the complaint;
requesting that the Advisor or the Administrative Head of Unit work
separately with the parties to create a mutual agreement;
taking preventive action without notifying the respondent or the
Administrative Head of Unit;
requesting remedial measures from the Administrative Head of Unit, with or
without the involvement of the respondent;
requesting the Advisor or the Administrative Head of Unit to take on the
complaint;
requesting the Advisor or the Administrative Head of Unit offer educational
sessions to the University unit
Interim Solutions for Situations involving Discrimination and Harassment,
including Sexual Harassment, include
suspension of respondent from certain duties, areas, routines;
forbidding respondent to contact complainant;
re-routing work through other people;
shifting evaluation or supervision of complainant to someone other than the
respondent;
official leave or stress leave for complainant or respondent;
close daily monitoring of complainant or respondent;
support or counselling for complainant or respondent;
rules of conduct agreed to by both parties;
relocation of complainant or respondent;
restraining order sought against the respondent;
campus security and/or police involvement sought;
behavioural guidelines issued to individuals or groups within a unit;
administrative intervention regarding gossip or rumours
Retaliation in Situations involving Discrimination and Harassment, including Sexual Harassment, includes
unfair evaluation of work or performance;
breaking confidentiality, especially within the unit or profession;
turning mutual colleagues against the complainant;
spreading gossip about the complainant or witnesses;
identifying to the unit, class, or colleagues the complainant in a case against
oneself;
negatively affecting the career or study opportunities of a complainant,
witness, or others who are party to the complaint;
following, phoning, stalking, or otherwise monitoring the complainant,
witnesses, their friends, or family;
approaching the complainant or witnesses directly, unless invited to do so;
confronting, yelling at, or physically threatening a complainant or witness;
filing frivolous or vexatious charges or lawsuits;
actions by members of a unit to embarrass, intimidate, or exclude the
complainant or witnesses for having laid a complaint;
actions by an administrator to trivialize the complaint or discredit the
complainant;
withdrawal of services or relationships to which the person is entitled;
shunning
Remedy Options in Situations involving Discrimination and Harassment,
including Sexual Harassment, include
providing paid leave or leave of absence from program until health is
restored;
counselling provided by appropriate resource;
refunding tuition;
calling in a qualified neutral expert to evaluate disputed work;
changing complainant's unit assignment or moving his/her work area;
extending work or study deadlines until complainant can cope and is ready
to perform;
suspending academic or work requirements for a period of time;
redressing losses of opportunity, promotion, employment, etc.;
requesting an apology from the respondent;
assisting skill building, e.g. assertiveness, self-defense;
countering damage to reputation caused by the situation and procedures;
educating the unit about issues of discrimination and harassment, including
sexual harassment;
educating management staff about their responsibilities regarding
discrimination and harassment, including sexual harassment;
supporting the complainant and clarifying the University's judgment
regarding the respondent in a formal letter;
providing a letter of reference from a suitable supervisor;
circulating a statement regarding the case outcome;
helping the complainant or respondent re-establish in a new location or
program;
improving safety measures in the work area
Discipline Options in Situations of Discrimination and Harassment, including Sexual Harassment, include
oral warning
letter of reprimand on file, or note on transcript or personnel file, with time
and method of removal to be specified;
refusal to provide references, or requirement to mention the offense in any
recommendations provided;
apology by the respondent in person or by letter;
mandatory counselling for specific minimum number of sessions, with report
by counsellor;
attendance at educational courses on issues and awareness of discrimination
and harassment, including sexual harassment, with report by instructor;
memo to unit outlining basic facts and findings;
loss ofprivileges regarding use of facility, work with students or staff, etc.;
prohibition against leading field trips alone with students;
prohibition against individual contact with students, staff, etc., in the office;
loss of position or title;
relocation of work area away from the complainant;
change of routine to avoid contact with the complainant;
transfer to another unit with supervisor notified as to reason;
prohibition against contact with complainant or others in similar group;
demotion or denial of salary increment;
suspension without pay for specified days/weeks/months;
expulsion for specified time or permanently;
termination Calendar
UBC Reports ■ October 6,1994 5
October 9 through October 22
Arts. Faculty Development seminar room, bsmt. of David Lam
Research Centre from 3-5pm.
Call 822-9149.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Clinical Division Seminar
Pipercillin + Tazobactam Vs.
Imipenem In The Treatment Of
Serious Nosocomial Infections.
Dr. Fawzia Lalji, fellow, Infectious Diseases. UBC Hosp. G-
279 from 4- 5pm. Call 822-
4645.
Green College Lecture
News From Transylvania: A Domestic Correspondence During
The English Civil War. Paul
Stanwood, English. Green College recreation lounge at 5:30pm.
Call 822-8660.
Musical Performance
Classical South Asian Vina Solo
by Mrs. Lakshri Ranganathan.
Museum of Anthropology theatre gallery at 7:30pm. Call 822-
4604.
Continuing Studies Lecture
Interpreting The Family In The
Nineties: Changes And Challenges, The Family And The
Workplace. Susan Boyd, Chair
in Feminist Legal Studies, UBC;
Assoc. Prof. Phyllis Johnson,
School of Family and Nutritional
Sciences, UBC. Hotel Georgia,
York Room. 12:00-1:30pm. Call
222-5203.
Wednesday, Oct. 19
Orthopaedics Grand
Rounds
Imaging The Rotator Cuff: Diagnosis/Treatment Planning. Drs.
Hawkins, Forrest, Regan. Vancouver Hosp. Eye Care Centre
auditorium at 7am. Call 875-
4272.
Wednesday Noon Hour
Concerts
Indian Classical Music. Lakshri
Ranganathan, veena. Music Recital Hall at 12:30pm. Admission $2.50.   Call 822-5574.
J. V. Clyne Lecture
Counselling Of Students For The
21st Century: Work And Careers In The 21 st Century. Prof.
Frithjof Bergmann, philosopher,
U. Michigan, Ann Arbor.
Buchanan A-202 at 12:30pm.
Call 822-5675.
BC Transplant Society
Rounds
A Presentation On The Anti-rejection Drug, Cyclosporine
Neoral, Used For Organ Transplant Recipients. Dr. Diane
Bourassa, Vancouver
Hosp .Taylor-Fidler Theatre from
12-lpm. Refreshments. Call
877-2100.
Microbiology/Immunology
Seminar
Recombinant Expression, Purification/Characterization OfThe
Puf Q Gene Product of
Rhodobacter Capsulatus. Dr.
Shafique Fidai, Microbiology/Immunology. Wesbrook 201 from
121:30pm. Call 822-3308.
Canadian Studies Lecture
Living In Canada: Domestic
Space In The Nineteenth Century. Peter Ward, History.
Buchanan B-212 at 12:30pm.
Call 822-5193.
Applied Mathematics
Colloquium
Dynamic Optimization Models Of
Animal Behaviour. Dr. Colin W.
Clark, Mathematics. Math 203 at
3:30pm.  Call 822-4584.
Geography Colloquium
Monitoring Suspended Sediment
Variation In A Pro-glacial Environment: A New Perspective On Traditional Approaches. Dr. Nicholas
Clifford, Geography/Earth Resources, The Univ. of Hull, UK.
Geography 201 at 3:30pm. Refreshments.  Call 822-4929.
Geophysics/Astronomy
Seminar
Stress/Slab Coupling. KelinWang.
Geophysics/Astronomy 260 at
4pm. Refreshments at 3:45pm.
Call 822-2082/2267.
Centre for Biodiversity
Research
Ecological Diversity, Trophic
Structure/Productivity: Theories/
Data. Dr. Matthew Leibold, Ecology and Evolution, Univ. of Chicago . Family/ Nutritional Sciences
60 at 4:30pm.  Call 822-4239.
Green College Comparative
Literature Colloquium
Gods In Paradise: German Art
Nouveau In New Guinea, Maria
Ng; Ethnographic Curiosity/Colonial Agendas: The Role Of The
Visual In An 1814 Travel Narration, Maureen Ryan. Green College recreation lounge at 5:30pm.
Call 822-8660.
J. V. Clyne Lecture
A New Perspective On Education
And Work. Frithjof Bergmann,
professor of philosophy, U. Michigan, Ann Arbor. Carnarvon Community School activity room, 3400
Balaclava St. from 7:30-9:30pm.
Call Continuing Studies at 222-
5209.
Thursday, Oct. 20
Fine Arts Lecture
| Contemporary Art In India. Vivan
| Sundaram.     Lasserre   102  at
12:30pm.  Call 822-2755.
1994 Distinguished Medical
Research Lecture
Molecular Immunology/New Approaches To The Therapy Of Cancer, Allergy And Inflammation. Dr.
John W. Schrader, Biomedical
Research Centre, Medicine. IRC
#1 from 12:30-l:30pm. Call 822-
8633.
Students for Forestry
Awareness Lecture Series
Forest Practices Code: Development And Enforcement. Trevor
Swan, acting director, Enforcement Branch, Ministry of Forests.
MacMillan 166 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-
2727.
J. V. Clyne Lectures
New Work, New Culture: Implications For Labour Market Development/Human Services - A Panel
Discussion. Frithjof Bergmann,
Marcy Cohen, Hans Schutze and
Sharon Manson Singer. IRC #2
from 12:30-2:30pm. Call 822-
5675.
Philosophy Colloquium
Trouble For Tournaments. Leslie
Burkholder, Philosophy.
Buchanan D-348 from 1- 2:30pm.
Call 822-3292.
Physics Colloquium
Scientific Opportunities With Radioactive Beams At TRIUMF. John
M. D'Auria, SFU. Hennings 201 at
4pm.   Call 822-3853.
Medieval/Renaissance
Studies Seminar
Green   College   Lecture   Series.
Amants, Amour Et Art L'almer
Dans L'Heptamcron De Marguerite De Navarre, professor Robert
Aulotte. Green College recreation
lounge at 4:30pm. Call 822-5938.
Canadian Studies Workshop
The Spaces Of Postmodernism.
Richard Cavell, English; John
O'Brian, Fine Arts. Green College
small dining room at 8pm. Dinner
precedes the workshop. Please
book for dinner 3 days in advance
at 822-8660, ifyou wish to join us.
Call 822-5193.
Music Concert
Distinguished Artists: NEXUS,
master percussionists. Music Recital Hall at 8pm. Adult $16; student/senior $9.  Call 822-5574.
Marion Woodward Lecture
Challenges/Opportunities For
Nursing: Focus On The Next Decade. Katharyn A. May, DNSc, RN,
FAAN. IRC #6 at 8pm. Refreshments.   Call 822-7417.
Green College Canadian
Studies Workshop
The Spaces Of Postmodernism.
Richard  Cavell,   English;  John
O'Brian, FineArts. GrahamHouse,
Green College small dining room
at 8pm.  Call 822-8660.
Continuing Studies Lecture
International Scene. Working Towards Equality: Women In Indonesia. Asst. Prof. Tineke Hellwig,
Asian Studies. Hotel Georgia, York
Rm. 12:00-1:30pm, part of a series. Call 222-5203.
Friday, Oct. 21
Health Care/Epidemiology
Rounds
Violence in Youth. Dr. John
O'Brien-Bell, chair, Mayor's Committee on Youth Violence. Mather
253 from 9-10am. Free parking In
B-Lot.  Call 822-2772.
UBC Fisheries Centre
Seminar
Reducing Feed Wastage On
Salmon Farms. Dr. Royann Petrell,
Bio-Resource Engineering. Ralf
YorqueRoom, Hut B-8 from 12:30-
1:30pm.   Call 822-2731.
Occupational Hygiene
Programme Seminar
Radiation Studies/Exposure Incidents. Randy Ross, Radiation
Protection Officer, BC Ministry of
Health. CEME 1202 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-9595.
Theoretical Chemistry
Seminars
PotenUal Energy Surfaces From
The Spectra Of Van De Waals
Molecules. Chemistry 402, central wing at 4pm. Call 822-3997.
Institute of Asian Research
Seminar
Asia's Korea Dilemma. Dr. B.C.
Koh, U. of Illinois, Chicago. Asian
Centre auditorium from 5-
6:30pm.  Call 822-3814.
Saturday, Oct. 22
Vancouver Institute Lecture
The Future Of Work, The Future
Of Culture. Prof. Frithjof
Bergmann, Philosophy., U. Michigan, Ann Arbor. IRC #2 at
8:15pm. Free admission. Call
822-3131.
Notices
Homecoming '94
Oct. 13 - 16. All alumni, families
and friends are invited to attend
the annual UBC Homecoming activities and events. Highlights include Path of Learning and the
Homecoming Football Game. Call
822-3313.
Student Housing
A new service offered by the AMS
has been established to provide a
housing listing service for both
students and landlords. This new
service utilizes a computer voice
messaging system. Students call
822-9844, landlords call 1-900-
451-5585 (touch-tone calling) or
822-0888, info only.
Dance To A Latin Beat
Every Wed. at the Graduate Centre at 8:30pm. To find out more
about Mon. movies, Tues. pool
tourney, Thurs. coffee house and
Fri. folk, call the Graduate Centre
hot-line at 822-0999.
Campus Tours
School and College Liaison tours
provide prospective UBC students
with an overview of campus activities/faculties/services. Fridays at
9:30am. Reservations required one
week in advance. Call 822-4319.
Disability Resource Centre
The centre provides consultadon
and information for faculty members with students with disabilities. Guidebooks/services for students and faculty available. Call
822- 5844.
UBC Libraries
Library branches and divisions will
offer more than 100 training/tutorial sessions this fall. Learn how
to use the online catalogue/information system, or one of more
than 75 electronic databases in
the library. Check branches/divisions for times and dates. Call
822-3096.
Writing Course
The UBC Writing Centre offers a
one-term non-credit writing
course in language and composition to assist students preparing for 1st yr. English/LPI. Non-
UBC students are welcome. Call
822-9564.
Women Students' Office
Advocacy/personal counselling
services available. Call 822-2415.
Frederic Wood Theatre
1994/95 Season
Season Ticket Sales from 8:30am-
4:30pm. Frederic Wood Theatre
207 Mondays through Fridays.
Call 822-2678.
Sexual Harassment Office
Advisors are available to discuss
questions or concerns and are prepared to help any member of the
UBC community who is being sexually harassed find a satisfactory
resolution.  Call 822-6353.
Clinical Trial Dermatology
Acne Treatment Study. Anewacne
lotion vs. a proven acne medication. Volunteers not under doctor's care for acne, 25 yrs. or
younger. 5 visits over 12-week
period. Honorarium upon completion.  Call 875-5296.
Psychology Study
Music/Mood Study. Comprises 2
one-hour sessions, booked 2 days
apart. Participants will be paid
$20 upon completion of both sessions. Kenny 1708. Call 822-2022.
Audiology/Speech Sciences
Study
Volunteers needed with normal
hearing, who are native-English
speakers; 18-35 years old, with no
previous instruction in linguistics
to participate in a study of speech
perception in noise. Honorarium
paid.  Call Anita at 822-5054.
Statistical Consulting/
Research Laboratory
SCARL is operated by the Dept.
of Statistics to provide statistical
advice to faculty/graduate students working on research problems.  Call 822-4037.
Faculty and Staff Volleyball
Mondays/Wednesdays Gym B,
Osborne Centre at 12:30pm.
Drop-in or attend regularly for
recreation.  Call 822-4479.
Surplus Equipment
Recycling Facility (SERF)
Disposal of all surplus items.
EveryWednesday, 12-5pm. Task
Force Bldg., 2352 Health Sciences Mall. Call Vince at 822-
2582/Rich at 822-2813.
Fine Arts Gallery
Presently on view, a Group
Show of work by five graduates
of UBC's Master of Fine Arts
program. Open Tues.-Fri from
10am-5pm. Saturdays 12pm-
5pm. Free admission. Basement of Main Library. Call 822-
2759.
Nitobe Garden
Open daily from 10am-6pm. Call
822-6038. Winter hours in effect
Oct. 17: 10am-2:30pm, Monday-
Friday only.
Botanical Garden
Open daily from 10am-6pm.
Shop In The Garden, call 822-
4529; garden information, 822-
9666. Winter hours in effect
Oct. 17: 1 lam-5pm daily.
THE CANADIAN RED CROSS
SOCIETY
Is holding the following blood
donor clinics on campus:
Fri., Oct. 7
Tue.,Oct. 11
Woodward IRC
SUB Ballroom
Wed., Oct. 12 SUB Ballroom
Thu., Oct 13    SUB Ballroom
10:00-4:00
9:30 -3:30
9:30 - 3:30
9:30-
9:30-
Mon., Nov. 7    Woodward IRC
Tue., Nov. 29   Gage Maclnnes &
Murrin Lounges 3:00
3:30
3:30
9:00 6 UBC Reports ■ October 6,1994
New Rose Garden to link
north campus features
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
The new Rose Garden
Parkade, located on NW Marine
Drive, is an important part ofthe
growing cultural precinct at UBC,
says University Planner Andrew
Brown of Campus Planning and
Development.
"This is a complex pro] ect with
multiple benefits to the campus," he said.
"Besides providing safe and
convenient parking for 900 cars,
the project is unique because its
siting and design created opportunities for a major renewal of
landscape and urban space."
Despite its size, the parkade
is virtually invisible. Sitting atop
it, with sweeping views of the
ocean and Coast Mountains, will
be a reconditioned and expanded
Rose Garden and a renovated
flag plaza.
The renovations will restore
the area at the north end of Main
Mall to its original intent as a
ceremonial centre and major
entrance to campus, Brown said.
In the garden, many rose
bushes from the original garden
will be replanted in October by
Plant Operations grounds and
gardening staff. They will be augmented by the planting of new
varieties, making the Rose Garden larger than ever.
The Rose Garden will eventually be connected with the former
Faculty Club garden to the west
and the gardens adjacent to the
lobby of the Chan Centre for the
Performing Arts, which will be
constructed to the east.
The plaza, connected to the
parking levels by stairwells and
and an elevator, will include the
ceremonial flagstaff and a balcony overlooking the Rose Garden and the view north.
Brown said the plaza is an
important space that will link
the Morris and Helen Belkin Art
Gallery, currently under construction, the Chan Centre, the
Faculty Club site and the
Buchanan buildings, home to
the Faculty of Arts.
The parkade will also serve
Frederic Wood Theatre, the Museum of Anthropology and the
new Main Library. Itwas designed
in accordance with the 1992 Main
Campus Plan, which set out a
strategy of a series of parkades
built around the pedestrian core
of campus, Brown said.
The Rose Garden parkade is
outfitted with all the latest safety
features including bright lighting and'telephones.
The parkade was designed by
Aitken Wregglesworth Associates
and constructed by PCL Construction. Surface design work
Correction
The Sept. 22 issue of UBC
Reports incorrectly identified
Dr. Andrew Seal's new position. His correct title is associate dean, Undergraduate Education-Student Affairs.
He was also referred to as
head of the Division of General Surgery. From 1988 to
1993, he served as head ofthe
Division of General Surgery at
UBC Health Sciences Centre
Hospital and subsequently
University Hospital, UBC site.
was completed by Grizzi Perry
and Associates, landscape architects.
The cost of constructing the
$15.6-million parkade will be
recouped by parking fees.
THE J.V. CLYNE LECTURES AT UBC
PROFESSOR FRITHJOF BERGMANN
PHILOSOPHER, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN, ANN ARBOR
How will you survive and succeed in an economy where traditional jobs
are vanishing? Discover a new strategy to create opportunities, through
self-reliance and special skills development. The author of On Being
Free, The Future of Work and The Freedom of New Work presents
this series.
Counselling of Students for the 21st Century:
Work and Careers in the 21st Century
Wednesday, October 19     12:30 PM
UBC Buchanan Building, Room A-202
A New Perspective on Education and Work
Wednesday, October 19    7:30 PM   Continuing Studies
Carnarvon Community School, 3400 Balaclava Street
New Work, New Culture:
Implications for Labour Market Development & Human Services
Thursday, October 20     12:30 PM
UBC Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, Hall 2
PANEL: Hans Schutz, Academic Policy Advisor, OECD
Marcy Cohen, former Canadian Labour Force Development Board
Sharon Manson Singer, Social Work on Income Security
The Future of Work, The Future of Culture
Saturday, October 22   8:15 PM    The Vancouver Institute
UBC Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, Hall 2
tt...the best organized
International Congress
they had ever attended.9
John Ft. Ledsome. MD- International Congress
66...You provided meeting rooms for almost 4,000 people
and accommodation for over 2,000 for two weeks and did it
in a friendly and efficient manner.*
Dr. Gordon A. McBean - International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics
66...Y011 performed beyond the call of duty and were able
to foresee potential problems before they happened."
Dr. Daniel F. Gardiner- UBC Program for Executive Development
6*...a mark of excellence to supply the needs of a
conference and receive no complaints!"
Mary Lou Bishoff- Anglican Renewal Ministries Conference
Let us help you plan
the best conference you've ever attended
•Accommodation in highrise towers with spectacular
ocean and mountain views
• Set on 1,000 wooded acres only 15 minutes from
Vancouver city centre
• Flexible meeting areas for groups from 10 to 3,000
• Complete audio-visual services and satellite
communications available
• Catering for events from barbecues to dinner dances
• Comprehensive conference organization and
systems support
Write, phone
or fax for
video and
information
UBC
Conference
Centre
University of British Columbia
5961 Student Union Boulevard
Vancouver, BC Canada V6T 2C9
Telephone (604) 822-1060
Fax (604) 822-1069
CANADA'S LARGEST UNIVERSITY CONFERENCE CENTRE
The classified advertising rate is $ 15 for 35 words or
less. Each additional word is 50 cents. Rate includes
GST. Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to the UBC Community Relations
Office, 207-6328 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C.,
V6T 1Z2, accompanied by payment in cash, cheque
(made out to UBC Reports) or internal requisition.
Advertising enquiries: 822-3131.
The deadline for the Oct. 20,   1994
issue of UBC Reports is noon, Oct. 11.
Services
FINANCIAL PLANNING,
Retirement Income, Life
Insurance. Local, independent,
personalized service with
comprehensive knowledge at
no cost or obligation. Integrating your financial needs to your
own personal, professional
association, group and
government benefit plans.
Please call Edwin Jackson BSc,
BArch, CIF, 224-3540.
DAYCARE OPENINGS Full time,
Ages: 2.5 to 5 years, University
Kindercare Daycare. Pleasant,
spacious surroundings, small
group.Snacks and tender loving
care provided by ECE-qualified
staff. One block from UBC gates.
4595 W. 8th Ave. Call 228-5885.
EDITORIAL SERVICES Substantive
editing, copy editing, rewriting,
dissertations, reports, books. I
would be delighted to look at
your manuscript, show you how I
could improve it, and tell you
what I would charge. Please call
me for more information. Timothy
King, 263-6058.
ACCENT REDUCTION, formal
speaking skills and all areas of
pronunciation for advanced
levels. TSE preparation and
practice starting Sept. 1994.
Private, professional, intensive
instruction. Downtown location.
689-5918.
INVESTORS GROUP Canada's
largest financial services
company offers no/low load
mutual funds, group & individual
RRSPs, retirement & estate
planning, group mortgage
discounts, tax savings. Conservative, long-term investment
strategies that work. Call Dennis
J. Hovorka BA, MEd for
complimentary individual
consultation/informational
seminar for your department/
mailing list at 270-7700 (voicemail
#372).
SINGLES NETWORK Single science
professionals and others
interested in science or natural
history are meeting through a
nationwide network. Contact us
for info: Science Connection,
P.O. Box389,PortDover,Ontario,
N0A 1N0; e-mail 71554.2160®
compuserve.com; 1-800-667-
5179.
Accommodation
POINT GREY GUEST HOUSE A
perfect spot to reserve
accommodation for guest
lecturers or other university
members who visit throughout
the year. Close to UBC and other
Vancouver attractions, a tasteful
representation of our city and of
UBC. 4103 W.lOth Ave.
Vancouver, B.C. V6R 2H2. Call
(604) 228-8635.
FLOATING HOME Short-term
lease, bed-sitting room in floating
home. Private bath, balcony.
Sink, 2 burners, small fridge, some
furniture, N/P, N/S. Available
Oct.-April flexible. Call 940-3313.
GUEST COTTAGE Furnished guest
cottage, UBC Endowment Lands.
Offers Vancouver visitors a
peaceful alternative. Cozy 2
bdrm cedar cottage on 1 acre
natural forest setting. Fully
equipped with all the comforts
of home. Weekly/monthly
bookings. 222-0060.
FAXPHONE Canon 1200, one-
touch speed dialing, excellent
condition, $245. Answering
machine AT&T 1323, 1 year old,
playback date and time, 2
outgoing messages, $90.
University Hill Congregation, 224-
7011.
1986 HYUNDAI PONY, great
student car, 120,000km. Good
mechanical/body condition,
sunroof, AM/FM, all records,
$1895 obo. 264-8814.
Tuesday,
November 8th,
1994
Hyatt Regency
Hotel
VanCity  invites you to
*
Celebrate
NOW!
Networks Of Women
C 0 ,\ N E C T 1 N G
$80.00 (incl.
GST) plus applicable service
charges
A GALA CELEBRATION OF 15 YEARS OF WOMEN'S
NETWORKING IN BRITISH COLUMBIA
Celebrate NOW! supports The Canadian Breast Cancer
Foundation - B.C. Chapter and Women's Networks
Tickets are available through all TicketMaster outlets
To charge by phone call (604) 280-4444 UBC Reports • October 6,1994 7
Speakers Bureau has
topic for every audience
by Abe Hefter
Staff writer
Derek Carr is an expert on
Spain, but there's no bull when
it comes to the presentations he
makes as a member of the UBC
Speakers Bureau.
And he tries to keep the flamenco to a minimum, as well.
Carr, an associate professor
in Hispanic and Italian Studies,
is one of more than 200 UBC
faculty, professors emeriti and
staff who offer their expertise
through the UBC Speakers Bureau.
"I try to get rid of the stereotypes a lot of people have about
Spain," says Carr. "Bullfights
and flamenco are only part of
Spanish culture."
The Speakers Bureau, which
operates as a public service from
September through April, offers
more than 400 topics, including
prehistoric technology, pop music and moral change, forensic
dentistry, second careers, elite
bicycle racing and the aurora
borealis. Most speakers are available free of charge.
"The opportunity to meet with
people outside the university is
important to me," says Carr.
"You can do things you can't do
in a scholarly conference. It's
more informal and not strictly
academic.
Derek Carr
"The Speakers Bureau is one
way the university has been able
to reach out to a wider audience
in an informal setting."
Carr has been reaching out to
audiences throughout the Lower
Mainland for more than 15 years.
As an expert on Spain, he serves
up a 60-minute slice of a lifetime
of appreciation on topics such
as Spanish art and architecture,
as well as medieval culture and
history. He has long had a
particular fascination with
three artists: Velazquez, Goya
and El Greco.
"I've put together a number of
good slides on those three Spanish artists and trot them around
the circuit. The slide shows seem
to particularly appeal to my audiences, as opposed to delivering a plain old lecture."
Carr typically speaks to seniors and special interest groups,
usually at community halls, and
sometimes in people's basements. Last April, he spoke to a
group of music teachers with
the Association of the Royal
Conservatory of Toronto in a
private home. He thoroughly
enjoyed it, and so did the music teachers, who gave Carr a
"10" rating in their speaker
evaluation form.
The groups that have drawn
on the expertise ofthe university
community to support their endeavours include elementary
and high schools, parent
groups, clubs and special interest groups, professional associations and continuing education programmers.
If you would like more information on Derek Carr or any
other speakers available through
the UBC Speakers Bureau,
phone 822-6167.
Make a
Meal of it!
Available to students, faculty and staff, the Bonus Card is a convenient way to pay for meals
and snacks without carrying cash. It's a debit card you can use at most UBC Food Group
locations. Students do not pay GST with a minimum purchase of $250. Plus, cardholders
enjoy a special bonus amount calculated to reflect your purchase, and added to your account
balance. (The more you purchase, the greater your bonus!)
Use your Bonus Card at the
following locations:
• Pacific Spirit Place at SUB
• Totem Park Residence Cafeteria
• Magdas Convenience Store
at Totem
• Place Vanier Residence
Cafeteria
• Hubbards Convenience Store
at Place Vanier
• The Ponderosa on West (Vlall
• The Underground at Sedgewick
• Trekkers on Main Mall
• Express at Trekkers
• Yum Yums at the Old Auditorium
3%
Bonus
4%
Bonus
5%
Bonus
6%
Bonus
 I
$250-499   I $500-749   | $750-999  | $1,000 & up  |
Pick up a copy of our brochure at the Meal Accounts Office,
2071 West Mall or call 822-5839, and find out how to get
your Bonus Card, and make a meal ol itl
UBC FOOD GROUP
Serving You Well
People
by staff writers
Angelo Belcastro is the new director of the School of
Rehabilitation Sciences. His five-year appointment
began July 1.
Belcastro, who received his PhD from the University of
Alberta, joined UBC in 1987 with appointments in the
Faculty of Education's School of Human Kinetics and in the
Faculty of Medicine's Family Practice Dept.
Belcastro currently serves as president of the National
Organization for Sport Sciences Trust Fund and chairs the
National Fitness Appraisal Certification and Accreditation
Committee of the Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology
and Health Canada.
He is a member of the International Society for Heart
Research, the Canadian Physiological Society and the
International Society for Myochemistry.
Belcastro is a past president of the Canadian Association
of Sports Science and ofthe Sports Medicine Council of B.C.
From 1989 to 1992, he served as a member ofthe B.C.
Provincial Anti-Doping Advisory Committee.
In 1993, he was honoured with the Outstanding Scholar
Award presented to him by the School of Human Kinetics.
Pam Brown of the Heiltsuk Nation has been appointed
curator of ethnology and media by the Museum of
Anthropology.
Brown has an MA in anthropology from UBC and has
curated the exhibit. Cannery Days: A
Chapter in the Lives of the Heiltsuk, on
display in several communities on the
coast.
She has served as director on
several First Nations boards and is
currently a council member of the B.C.
Museums Association and the Aboriginal Cultural Stewardship Program.
At MOA, Brown will be responsible
for co-ordinating the Aboriginal Cultural
Stewardship Program and developing
new ways for First Nations to document
important parts of their traditions,
cultures, history and practices.
Brown
Two Computer Science Dept. researchers have been
elected fellows by the B.C. Advanced Systems Institute.
The fellowships, worth $90,000 over three years, will
allow them to use their experience and expertise to help
B.C.'s high-tech companies develop commercial products.
There are currently 45 ASI fellows at three B.C. universities.
The new fellows from UBC are Dinesh Pal, whose area of
expertise is developing computational tools for intelligent
machines and robots, and Mark Greenstreet, who has an
extensive background in the design of integrated circuits.
Both are also members of the Centre for Integrated
Computer Systems Research.
Cardiologist Simon Rabkin has been elected president of
the Canadian Hypertension Society.
Rabkin, a professor of Medicine, received his BSc and
MD from the University of Manitoba in 1967. He interned at
Montreal General Hospital before training in internal medicine at Ohio's Cincinnati General Hospital and Toronto
General Hospital.
He received his training in cardiology at the University of
Cincinnati and at Emory University in Atlanta, Ga.
Rabkin, a founding member of the editorial board of the
Canadian Journal of Cardiology, is a fellow of the Royal
College of Physicians (Canada), the American College of
Cardiology and the American College of Epidemiology.
His research interests include pharmacokinetics,
biomechanics, physiology and cardiovascular epidemiology.
Dual honours were recently conferred on Connie Eaves,
a professor of Medical Genetics and deputy director of
the Terry Fox Laboratory of the
B.C. Cancer Institute.
Eaves, who joined UBC in 1973, has
been elected a fellow of the Royal
Society of Canada and is the newly
appointed vice-president of the National Cancer Institute of Canada.
A graduate of the University of
Manchester with a PhD in immunology, she received her postdoctoral
training at Manchester's Christie
Hospital and Holt Radium Institute
and at the Ontario Cancer Institute in
Toronto.
Her research focuses on the development of new procedures to measure the stem cells of
normal and leukemic blood cells, and to define the mechanisms that control their growth.
Eaves 8 UBC Reports • October 6,1994
New recycling program
shows signs of success
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
This must be a joke.
That's the first reaction of
many UBC staff when confronted
with their new desktop garbage
bins. And that may be yours,
too, when the bins are distributed campus-wide next year.
It will happen when someone
replaces your regular garbage
can — where you've blithely
chucked old memos, newspapers, coffee cups, message slips
and all the detritus of daily office
life — with a miniature bin just
15 centimetres tall.
They look like toys, but they're
no joke.
In fact, the desktop bins are
part of one ofthe most successful recycling programs, called
Waste Free UBC, ever initiated
on campus.
In its pilot phase, Waste Free
UBC has increased paper recycling by at least 40 per cent in
departments where it has been
introduced, said Mary Jean
O'Donnell, operations coordinator of the Waste Reduction Program. In some departments it has reduced real garbage to almost nil.
Despite the program's success, there's still the initial shock
to overcome.
"People's first reaction is: "You
can't be serious,'" O'Donnell said.
"We've seen high levels of stress
among some individuals, but the
reaction is generally pretty positive once people understand what
it's all about."
To date, the tiny waste cans
are sitting on desks in Plant
Operations, the Centre for Human Settlements, the Dept. of
Clinical Dental Sciences, Main
Library and the Old Administration Building.
There are existing paper recycling programs in every building
on campus, of course, but despite best efforts only about 25
per cent of waste paper was being diverted from the landfill,
O'Donnell said.
Paper is the single largest
source of garbage on campus.
Overall, about 60 percent of campus waste consists of paper products . In offices, that number rises
to 80 to 90 per cent or more.
Looking for ways to encourage more recycling, Waste Reduction Program staff came upon
a scheme that originated at Bell
Canada. Adapted to UBC, the
three-step program involves removing all-too-convenient garbage cans, replacing them with
desktop models that users must
empty into a central office location, and providing easier access to recycling boxes.
"It certainly seems to work,"
O'Donnell said.
The program increased paper
recycling in Plant Operations by
40 per cent in just two months
and in the Main Library it is up
almost 50 per cent.
In the Old Administration
Building, the amount of paper
diverted to recycling increased
to 1,000 kilograms from 665 kilograms per month — the difference being the equivalent of six
trees.
It will take at least a year, but
the program will be expanded
campus-wide with the distribution of 5,000 desktop bins.
Waste Reduction staff are also
encouraging people to recycle
cans and bottles with a reminder
that those items can be returned
to the Food Services outlet where
they were purchased.
"We recognize that it's a fairly
radical step for most people, but
our philosophy is that you should
be able to bring it back where
you got it," said John Metras,
Waste Management Program coordinator.
"We want UBC to be at the
cutting edge of recycling efforts.
Recycling should not be just an
add-on, but part of everyone's
daily routine."
UBC has received a certificate
of recognition from the Greater
Vancouver Regional District
(GVRD) for playing a leadership
Gavin Wilson photo
Soon all of campus will have similar desktop bins in an effort
to reduce garbage and encourage recycling. John Metras,
Waste Management Program co-ordinator, and Mary Jean
O'Donnell, operations co-ordinator, show how it's done.
role in waste reduction and recycling.
The GVRD, which has a goal
of reducing waste in the region
by 50 per cent by the year 2000,
is encouraging businesses and
institutions to reduce, reuse and
recycle. It awarded certificates
to 90 local institutions and busi-
Will _
UBComing
Home?      «*cp*«,rw
if*
Homecoming Hotline
822-8967
Path of Learning Tour
Time: 10:00-4:00
Cost: Free
Contact:     Carol Forsythe, 822-9490
Tour of campus with a focus on the new buildings. Free passports and bus tours. Venues include: Cecil Green
Park,   Alumni Association, Museum of Anthropology, Botanical Garden, UBC Bookstore, Football Game,
Thunderbird Stadium ($3), Geological Sciences Museum, Centre for Integrated Computer Systems Research,
Computer Science, Disability Resource Centre, Student Services, School & College Liaison, Student Union
Building Cafeteria, First Nations Longhouse, David Lam Management Research Centre, War Memorial Gym.
Passport entitles you to eligibility for prizes including a chance to win a trip for two with Air Canada's Executive
First Class to Europe, destination of your choice. Winners will be notified by mail.
Homecoming
'94 Schedule of Events
Time
Event
Location
Cost
Contact
Wednesday, October 12
6:00-10:30
Pharmaceutical Sciences Professional Practice Night
Cecil Green Park
free
Raymond Lee, 822-4976
Thursday,
October 13
7:00-10:00
Drop In at Gate 4 Lounge
International House
free
Helene Rasmussen, 822-5021
12:30
Reception for International Scholars
Cecil Green Park
invitation
Gay Huchelega, 822-3472
5:30-8:00
Great Trekker Award Ceremony
SUB 214/216
$12.00
Leah Costello, 822-2050
Friday, October 14
11:00-2:00
Sanyo Ceremonial Tree Planting Rededication
Asian Centre
invitation
Cheryl Banfield, 822-2484
6:00
UBC Sports Hall of Fame Banquet,
Ponderosa
$75/ Cash bar
Buzz Moore, 822-3917
June Carlyle, 822-8205
11:30-2:30
Great Trek Remembered Luncheon
Cecil Green Park
invitation
Alumni Association, 822-8917
4:30-8:00
Oktoberf"eus"t
Tent, SUB Plaza
free
EUS office, 822-3218
7:00-10:00
Drop In at Gate 4 Lounge
International House
free
Helene Rasmussen, 822-5021
6:00
Geography Division AGM and Social
Geography Building
free
Monica Klassen, 597-9058
6:30
'84 Nursing Reunion
Cecil Green Park
$35
Alumni Association, 822-8917
750
Thunderbird Hockey UBC vs Saskatchewan Huskies
Winter Sports Centre
see sidebar
Don Wells, 822-3918
Saturday,
October 15
10:00-4:00
CICSR/CS Demonstration and tours
CICSR/CS Building
Gale Ross, 822-6601
10:30
Koerner Library Ground Breaking Ceremony
Main Mall
invitation
Joan King, 822-5414
2:15-3:30
Professors Emeriti Reception
Marquee Tent, South Plaza outside SUB
invitation
Joan King, 822-5414
4:15-5:30
Reception for Major Entrance Scholarship Winners
Marquee Tent, South Plaza outside SUB
invitation
Joan King, 822-5414
1:00
Football: UBC vs U. of Alberta
Thunderbird Stadium
see sidebar
Bob Philip, 822-9466
5:00
'54 Home Economics Reunion
Private residence
invitation
Alumni Association, 822-8917
10:00-4:00
Alumni Association Tour & Art Exhibit
Cecil Green Park
free
Leslie Konantz, 822-0616
6:30-10:00
UBC Alumni Association Event: "Murder at the Mansion"
Cecil Green Park
$25/person or
$132/teamof 6
Marlene King, 822-8923
10:00-2:00
Elementary School Volleyball Tournament
Maclnnes Field
free
June Carlyle, 822-8205
9:30-6:00
Martial Arts Demonstration
War Memorial Gym
free
TBC
11:00-4:00
4th Annual Apple Festival
UBC Botanical Garden
free
822-4529
1:00-5:00
Aquatic Centre Alumni Swim
Aquatic Centre
free with passport
Chris Neale, 822-4522
11:30, 1:45
Magic Show/Chemistry
Chemistry Bldg,, Rm TBC
free
Pete Wassell, 822-2389
10:00-4:00
First Nations House of Learning
First Nations Longhouse
free
Ethel Gardner, 822-8942
7:00-10:00
Intramural Sports' Reunion Banquet
Ponderosa
$30
Steve Molnar, 263-0145
Sunday, October 16
6:30-9:00
Rehabilitation Sciences Reception/General Meeting
Cecil Green Park
invitation
Nancy Cho, 739-4215
11:00-4:00
4th Annual Apple Festival
UBC Botanical Garden
free
822-4529
1:00-5:00
Aquatic Centre Alumni Swim
Aquatic Centre
free with passport
Chris Neale, 822-4522
Day of the
Longboat
Instructional Clinic
weekend on October 14,
15 and 16. Cost: UBC
$155, Community $235,
High School $105.
Commemorative shirt is
$5. Cost includes
Weekend Clinic, Race,
Salmon Barbecue and
Dance. Barbecue and
Dance will be held on
evening of the 22nd.
Contact: Nestor
Korchinsky, 822-2401.
UBC Bookstore
is open all day, 10:00-5:00
on Saturday, October 15.
Free Parking
Parking in North Parkade
next to SUB will be free on
Saturday and Sunday. All
B lots will also be free on
those days. Parking will be
available at the Alumni
Association, Cecil Green
Park, for $3.
Information Kiosk
Directions, maps,
programs, Path of
Learning Passports and
merchandise are avaiable
in front of the Bookstore.
Time: 10:00-4:00. Contact:
Carole Forsythe, 822-9490
Football:
Thunderbirds vs
U. of Alberta
Golden Bears
Cost: adults $6; students
$4; children under 12 and
UBC students free.
Hockey:
Thunderbirds vs
U. of
Saskatchewan
Huskies
Cost: adults $5; youth,
seniors, children under 12,
UBC students with AMS
cards $3.
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