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UBC Publications

UBC Reports Oct 31, 1991

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 UBC Archives Serial
•
Operating budget tops $310 million
By GAVIN WILSON
UBCs general purpose operating budget will
top $310 million in 1991/92, figures released by
the university show.
The balanced budget, outlined in a 124-page
tabloid released last week to the campus community, includes a one-time expenditure to write off
a deficit of S2.1 million accrued last year.
Salary increases account for virtually all of
the growth in expenditures in this year's budget.
Non-salary expenses will also be increased by
four per cent.
UBC employees' total compensation will be
limited to four per cent, phased in over the course
of the year.
The university's income budget reflects a
number of adjustments. From the provincial
governnment, the universty received an increase
in its base operating grant of 4.5 per cent.
Under the government's Access for All program, mutually agreed upon increases in
undergrauate and graduate enrolment are funded
at full average cost rates.
This year, the university received funding of
S3.1 million for an additonal 177 graduate students, as well as $2.5 million to allow for funding
of the previously unfunded undergraduate students.
In December, the Board of Governors approved a proposal to increase credit tuition fees in
each of the next three years at the rate of 4.5 per
cent, plus the annual increase in the Vancouver
Consumer Price Index.
Of the 1991/92 total increase of 10 per cent,
7.5 per cent will be directed to operating expenses and 2.5 per cent to two newly designated
funds: a teaching and learning enhancement fund
and a supplemental financial aid fund.
"These increases represent a significant improvement in our financial situation from where
we started this year," said Bruce Gellatly, vice-
president , Administration and Finance.
Wild Thing
Pholo by Media Services
Dean of Pharmaceutical Sciences John McNeill belts out his rendition ofthe 60s rock 'n roll classic during a karaoke festival Oct. 17,
held in aid ofUBC's annual United Way campaign. McNeill, and several other campus crooners, helped raise $250 toward this year's
goal of $280,000. Over 1,100 faculty and staff have donated more than $180,000 to date. Pledges to the campus United Way appeal
are still being accepted.
Senate urges removal of administration fee  UBC ranked
7ih in survey
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC's Senate will ask the
federal government to
rescind the three per
cent administrative fee
on Canada Student Loans that was
introduced this year.
Kelly Guggisberg. AMS direc-
Inside
NOT JUST A MEAL TICKET:
Ravindra Shah sees education as more than a ticket to
Job security. Profile, page 3
IMMIGRATION IN CANADA:
UBC Assistant Professor
DanHtebertexaminestheim-
pget of Canadian immigration policies. Forum, page 6
GENERAL BA: The General
BA program encourages
benefits of interdisciplinary
study. Paged
tor of external affairs, told Senate
the "guarantee fee" on the federal
portion of student loans hits hardest at those who need it most.
With the new fee, students who
received the maximum loan of
$7,140 — which is split evenly by
the federal and provincial governments — must pay $107. Students pay the fee only on the federal portion of the loan.
About 7,000 UBC students depend on loans to help them cover the
expenses of attending university.
Dan Worsley, assistant director of Awards and Financial Aid,
said the new fee has been widely
criticized by student financial aid
offices across the country.
"It means that some students will
be out $107 in living expenses forthe
year, and that's a couple of weeks of
groceries. Il is unfair," he said.
The fee was approved in August to help the federal government recoup losses on defaulted
student loans.
Worsley said that if the federal
government is concerned about
the high rate of defaults, it should
do a better job of educating students on the requirements of the
Canada Student Loan program.
Campus observes Remembrance Day
UBC will close on Monday, Nov.
11. in observance of Remembrance
Day.
No classes will be held and
the university's libraries will be
closed.
The Subway cafeteria will be
closed on Saturday, Nov. 9, in addition to Nov. 11 when all Food
Services outlets on campus will
close, with the exception of two residence dining rooms.
The Totem Park cafeteria will be
serving an a la carte menu between 8
a.m. and 7 p.m., while the Place
Vanier dining room will serve full
meals, opening for breakfast between
8-11 a.m., lunch from 11 a.m. - 2:30
p.m. and for dinner from 4:30 - 7 p.m.
A Remembrance Day service.
open to the public, will be held in
the foyer of the War Memorial
Gym on Nov. 11 at 10:45 a.m.
Faculty of Arts Professor Ian Slater,
author and managing editor of Pacific Affairs, will give the address.
President David Strangway will
read the scripture and music will
be provided by the UBC Brass
Quintet.
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC is ranked as the best university for undergraduate arts and science
students in Western Canada and seventh best in the nation in a survey
conducted by Maclean's magazine.
In the same report, Canadian university presidents ranked UBC fourth
best in the country.
Maclean's also ranked UBC
number one in Canada for varsity
sports, based on the 1990-91 results of
national finals in men's and women's
competitions.
UBC President David Strangway
is one of six university presidents profiled in the 41-page special report in
the magazine's Oct. 21 issue.
The main categories used in the
ranking were students, faculty, financial resources and reputation, as they
affected undergraduates in Arts and
Science.
"It was an interesting process that
was used. I hope that next time the data
are collected from the universities by
Maclean's on a more consistent basis.
There were many inconsistencies in
the statistical data," said Strangway. 2    UBC REPORTS October 31.1991
Brain scanner one of a kind in North America
By CONNIE FILLETTI
A new $3-million brain scanner is
the latest weapon being used by UBC
scientists in the war against
neurodegenerative diseases such as
Parkinson's, Huntington's, Dystonia
and Lou Gehrig's disease.
The positron emission tomography
(PET) scanner—recently acquired by
the UBC site of University Hospital
—is the only one of its kind in North
America.
It will allow medical researchers to
measure, for the first time, the functioning of small, distinct areas in the
human brain.
'The PET scanner develops images utilizing radiation emitted by the
patient, who has been injected with a
radioactive pharmaceutical that closely
resembles a natural substance used by
the body, such as glucose," explained
Thomas Ruth, director of the UBC/
TRIUMF PET program.
"The information is then fed
into a computer to be reconstructed into a map or picture of
the patient's brain where the radioactivity originated."
Ruth added that the scanner requires an even lower level of radiation
than its predecessor, which was built
at TRIUMF, and used in brain research at UBC since 1983.
Patients would be exposed to radiation levels comparable to, or less
than, those from other medical proce-
Photo by Michael La Brooy
Still in its wrappings, the new PET scanner arrives at University Hospital, UBC Site. The $3-million machine
will be used for research into neurodegenerative diseases.
dures such as having an X-ray, he said.
"In the case of Parkinson's, we
can now attempt to detect the disease
prior to the onset of symptoms," said
Dr. Donald Calne, head of Neurol
ogy at the UBC site of University
Hospital.
Calne directs a multi-disciplinary
team of researchers recently awarded
$6.1 million by the Medical Research
Council of Canada (MRC) to establish a Neurodegenerative Disorders
Centre.
He said that PET scanning will
allow the team to examine, in the case
of Parkinson's, the relationship between treatment and changes in the
brain, and the effect of different forms
of the disease on the brain.
In addition, Calne plans to use the
new scanner to examine more accurately and precisely the effect of normal aging in the brain. He hopes the
research will lead to an understanding of the pathological mechanisms
for neurodegenerative disorders,
and help to establish rational ways
for the development of new treatments.
Ruth said that because PET scanning makes use of radioisotopes, which
have very short life of anywhere from
two minutes to two hours, a PET facility must have a source of these radioisotopes close at hand.
"PET radioisotopes are produced by an accelerator such as a
cyclotron," Ruth explained. "The
TRIUMF facility, with its three
cyclotrons, represents the most
powerful source of radioisotopes
in the world. The strong collaboration between TRIUMF and the
UBC Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre in the PET program
was a major factor in the MRC's
decision to fund the tomograph
and research."
Additional funding was provided
by the President's Office, the B.C.
Ministry of Health and Siemans
Canada Ltd.
Effects of job loss on middle-
aged workers studied
By ABE HEFTER
Losing your job can lead to personal and professional turmoil. In the
middle-aged worker, the loss could be
even more devastating.
The psychological impact of unemployment in middle aged people is
the subject of a study being conducted
by Commerce and Business Administration Professor Larry Shetzer.
The study will look at the experience of unemployment at the psychological level and the impact it has on
career development on men and
women in the over 45 age bracket.
"An important feature of this study
is the fact that it will look at both men
and women," said Shetzer. "Most
studies of unemployment done in the
past have focused primarily on men in
the 20 to 30 age bracket."
Shetzer said people in their 40s
have different employment needs that
are only beginning to be studied. They
also face different problems associated with unemployment.
Research has shown that older people stay unemployed longer and have
a harder time getting hired again. In
addition, some of their skills are becoming obsolete and retraining isn't
always easy.
"Factors surrounding job loss, like
termination arrangements, severance
packages and career counselling opportunities, as well as the level of
support received from family, friends
and peers, all lead to positive or negative effects on career development in
the long term," said Shetzer.
Shetzer has been working to contact about 500 unemployed people to
take part in an anonymous, written
survey, in conjunction with a Vancouver job counselling service. The individuals have been unemployed in the
last two years.
The survey contains questions about
employment and job loss; the person's
attitudes towards work-related issues,
health and well being; the experience
of being unemployed, and job search.
"People in their mid-40s represent
the front end ofthe baby boom," said
Shetzer. "Demographics suggest that
the number of younger people entering the workforce is shrinking, making older people potentially more important to the work force.
"It is important that we understand
the unemployment experience in these
individuals and the effect it has on
future employment," he added.
Construction noise to be
avoided during exams
By GAVIN WILSON
Gage Towers residents who say
their studies were interrupted by
"hammering, blowtorches and loud
music" last spring can look forward
to peace and quiet during exam period this year.
Acting on complaints made by
students living in Gage Towers, Senate will urge Campus Planning and
Development to avoid renovations
and repairs to student residences during exam periods.
But Tim Miner, director of Campus Planning and Development, denies that the job that led to the complaints was conducted during exams
last term.
Earlier this year, a roofing company was contracted to tar the roof of
the conference centre at Gage Towers, home to more than 1,300 students.
Students complained that work
proceeded during the exam period,
but Miner said records show work
was completed in March, before exams began.
Student Senator Julie Lahey said
the work proceeded despite the 24-
hour quiet period enforced in university residences during exams.
Miner said that, in the past, some
work may have taken place during
exams, and his department will exercise additional caution in future.
Advertise in
UBC Reports
Deadline for paid advertisements for the
November 14 issue is noon, November 4.
For information, phone 822-3131
To place an ad, phone 822-6163
REQUEST FOR NOMINATIONS FOR THE PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY
COMMITTEE ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN
Florence Ledwitz-Rigby, Advisor to the President on Women and Gender Relations, is
forming a committee to advise the president on the status of women at UBC. Individuals
are invited to apply or to nominate someone else for membership on the committee.
While the committee will be modest in size, it should be representative of the women
staff, faculty and students, and be composed of individuals who are committed to
creating a positive climate on campus for all women.
Send nominations to Dr. Ledwitz-Rigby, Old Administration Building, Office of the Vice-
President, Academic. UBC REPORTS October 31.1991
Hat trick
Photo by Media Services
Hats from a collection of Cantonese opera costumes are displayed at the Museum of Anthropology. The
costumes were recently donated to the museum by the Jin Wah Sing Musical Society, and will be part of a
major exhibition on Cantonese opera in Vancouver planned for 1993.
Letters to the Editor
Still missing
The Editor
UBC Reports
Monday, October 28,1991 marked the 3-year anniversary ofthe disappearance,
from the UBC campus.of my nephew, Emerson Dobroskay. This is to renew our plea
for clues and remind people of the reward money; $ 10,000 for Emerson's safe return
or $5,000 for information leading to Emerson's whereabouts. The UBC RCMP have
yet to receive a single clue as to Emerson's disappearance. Would anyone who has any
information please call the UBC RCMP at (604) 224-1322.
A series ofbrain storming lectures was conducted by a private investigator, Leanne
Jones at the UVic, UBC and Malaspina campuses. At every lecture the students zeroed
in on a rock concert that was being held above the Pit Pub. A rock group called Butt
Hole Surfers was performing. The event dispersed at 1:00 a.m. on Friday, October 28,
1988 and the patrons trom the rock concert would have walked down the stairs and in
front ofthe Pit Pub (where Emerson disappeared from). Would anyone who has more
information about the rock concert or the Pit Pub please call the UBC RCMP.
We also request the public's assistance in investigating a phone number that was
written in Emerson's phone book a few hours before he disappeared. Emerson had
phoned Saskatoon at 8:00 p.m. to get a girlfriend's phone number. Someone (not
Emerson's handwriting) had crossed out the number Emerson had written in and
replaced it with a phone number beginning with the digits 640. Would anyone who
has any further information please call the UBC RCMP.
We plead with the persons who know the truth of what happened that night,
three years ago, to let us know if Emerson is dead or alive. It is so hard not
knowing if we should be looking harder for him.
Sincerely,
Teesh Backlund '
RR#l,Ladysmith, B.C.
V0R 2E0
UBC participates in
development project
for Vietnam
By CHARLES KER
A delegation of urban planners from Vietnam visited
UBC earlier this month in
an ongoing effort to further
Canadian university ties to that country.
UBC's School of Community
and Regional Planning is currently
directing a five-year project with
the National Center for Social
Sciences (NCSS) in Hanoi. It is
one of Canada's first government-
sponsored development projects
in Vietnam.
"UBC is in the unique and exciting position of helping build
and support a new relationship,"
said Peter Boothroyd, an associate professor with the centre. "It
gives us the chance to help Vietnamese scholars and at the same
time help the Canadian government with its assistance policy."
Together with the Institute of Asian
Research, the school's Centre for Human Settlements is using a $ 1 -million
grant from the Canadian International
Development Agency to improve Vietnam's teaching and research on development planning.
Twenty faculty from 10 departments are participating in the UBC
project. Their goal will be to enhance
NCSS research programming and
graduate training in four topic areas:
rural development, urbanization,
household economy, and social
policy.
The UBC team will advise the Vietnamese about planning literature,
help improve their library system and
strengthen the English-language skills
of faculty at the national center.
"For political, economic and linguistic reasons, Vietnam hasn't been
operating in the English-language
world," said Boothroyd. "Vietnamese
now want to learn to communicate
effectively and be made aware of the
kind of thinking that is going on in
Canada and other English-speaking
countries."
Last summer, Boothroyd and five
other UBC faculty members made an
inaugural trip to Hanoi to discuss how
the project should evolve.
As the centre for graduate education, the NCSS consists of 19 institutes which provide teaching, research
and policy analysis for the Vietnamese government.
Boothroyd said the Vietnamese
would like to learn more about such
things as the role of environmental
impact assessment on sustainable development and how to deal with problems of increased urbanization. But,
Boothroyd added, Vietnam will not be
starting from scratch.
For example, the country's advanced agricultural policy has about
30 per cent of Vietnamese farmers
working independently, integrating
livestock, fishpond and vegetable
farming to create an efficient ecological cycle.
"It's not a one-way relationship
because we will be learning from them
too," said Boothroyd.
The UBC project was one of 19
university proposals chosen from
some 120 applications. The proposals were submitted to the educational
institutions program administered by
CIDA.
Boothroyd added that other Canadian universities are hoping to develop collaborative research projects
dealing with heritage issues, slum-
upgrading and Vietnam's urban transportation system.
Among these, the University of
Moncton has received a $220,000 grant
to help develop solar energy research
in Vietnam.
Profile
Education important for
dentist/philosopher
'My whole life is a hobby."
By CONNIE FILLETTI
Ravindra Shah's office is overrun with the essays he has written
about humor, creativity, language
and wisdom. Books and journals,
stacked skyward, jockey for space
with the poetry, proverbs and quotations that festoon the walls.
Although you might think to find
Shah tucked
away in a corner of the Creative Writing
Dept., he is an
associate professor of Oral Biology
in the Faculty of Dentistry.
Becoming a dentist was a "matter of timing" according to Shah.
Having applied too late to medical
school in his native Bombay, India,
he sought admi ssion to the bachelor
of dental surgery program which
was still accepting applicants.
Upon graduating from the University of Bombay in 1966, Shah
established a short-lived private
practice. He was unable to reconcile
the dilemma of whether or not to
treat patients too poor to pay for
dental services.
Shah also found that he was lacking intellectual stimulation. In 1967,
he left Bombay and arrived in New
York City with seven dollars in his
pocket and a wealth of curiosity.
"I left home for adventure and education," he said.''You're trapped when
you can't develop your own capabilities and genius to the fullest."
Shah and his six siblings were
encouraged by their parents, who
did not have the benefit of a higher
education.
"They realized that if you wanted
to get ahead in post-independent
India, you needed education," Shah
said. "They never said it was a ticket
to security, but rather to one's personal growth. When I left Bombay,
my father told me that as long as I am
thinking, he would not worry about
me."
Shah tries to impart this philosophy to his dentistry students whom he
hopes to dissuade from the notion that
becoming dentists is a measure of value
and success, and the way to a lifestyle
that becomes more important to them
than life itself.
He       calls
teaching     his
"hobby", something to pursue
for pleasure that he never tires of and
always tries to bring something of
himself to.
"My whole life is a hobby," he
said. "I don't live life, I chase it. The
most important thing I can tell students is to make life a hobby. It is more
important to be peaceful than just
happy."
Unable to practice dentistry in the
United States, Shah took a series of
part-time jobs to pay for further studies at New York University (NYU).
Playing in chess tournaments in Washington Square, as well as freelance
writing assignments for various newspapers, including the New York Times,
helped pay tuition.
After completing his program at
NYU, Shah studied for his Master's of
Science at the State University of New
York, Buffalo, before going on to
Queen's University in Kingston, Ont.,
where he graduated with a PhD in
1974. He joined UBC a year later at
the urging of the late S. Wah Leung,
the founding dean of the Faculty of
Dentistry.
Although Shah doesn't believe in
setting priorities and makes time for
everything, work does occupy a significant portion of his day.
His committee service alone spans
four pages of his resume. The list recently
got longer with Shah's new appointment
Photo by Media Services
Shah
as chair of UBC s Committee on Animal Care. Helping to ensure that animals used in teaching and research are
treated with dignity and optimal care
has been a long-term commitment for
Shah. Prior to his appointment as chair,
he served as a member ofthe committee for 10 years.
He justifies the long hours by
saying how much he likes his faculty, his department and the enthusiasm shown by his students.
"I try to give that back by making myself available to both my
colleagues and my students," he
said.
Most days, it's not unusual to
find one of Shah's three graduate
students pitted against him in an
early morning game of squash, simultaneously discussing a research
project or just about anything else
under the sun.
Shah, who has been a first-year
faculty advisor for the past decade,
says he "treasures" his students and
claims unabashedly that they "love"
him. Perhaps that has something to
do with the fact that he talks about
them as people in his life, not as
students in his class. 4    UBC REPORTS October 31.1991
November 3 -
November 16
SUNDAY NOV. 3
Museum of Anthropology
Concert
Songs Of The Synagogue. Ancient And
Modern Melodies With Commentary.
Cantor Murray Nixon, Rabbi Wilfred Solomon of Congregation Beth Israel. Free
with Museum admission. Great Hall at
2:30pm. Call 822-5087.
MONDAY  NOV. 4
Mechanical Engineering
Seminar
Knowledge Based Vision For Contour
Generation. Lalith Gamage, PhD candidate. Combined Natural/Forced Convection In A Cross-Corrugated Channel.
Yinghu Piao, MASc candidate. Chemical/
Mechanical Engineering 1202 from 3:30-
4:30pm. Call 822-6200/4350.
Biochemistry/Molecular
Biology Seminar
Discussion Group. Characterization Of A Regulatory Cascade Responsible
For Controlling Photosynthesis Gene Expression In
Rhodobacter Capsulatus.
Dr. Carl Bauer, Microbiology/Molecular
Cellular Developmental Biology, Indiana
University. IRC #1 at 3:45pm. Call 822-
6896.
Anthropology/Sociology
Lecture
Initial Settlement In The Pacific: New
Terms And Frameworks. Dr. Roger
Green, Anthropology/Sociology, U. of
Auckland, AU. Anthro/Sociology 134 at
11:30am. Call 822-2878.
TUESDAY, NOV. 5
Medical Genetics Seminar
Effects Of Cocaine On The Fetus And
The Mother: The Known And The Unknown. Gideon Koren, director, Motherisk
Program, The Hospital for Sick Children,
U. of Toronto. IRC #1 from 4:30pm-
5:30pm. Refreshments at 4:15pm. Call
822-5312.
Botany Seminar
Regulation Of Genes Preferentially Expressed In
Plant Apices. Dr. Luca
Comai, Botany. Bio-Sciences 2000 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-2133.
USC Reports is the faculty and
staff newspaper ofthe University
of British Columbia. It is published every second Thursday by
the UBC Community Relations
Office, €328 Memorial RiL, Vancouver, B.C,\6T 1Z2.
Telephone 822-3131.
Advertising inquiries: 822-6163.
Managing Editor: Steve Crombie
Ass't Editor: Paula Martin
ContrBnitors:Ron Burke, Connie
FUetti, Abe Hefter, Charles Ker,
and Gavin Wilson.
J^L     Please
€■*#    recycle
CALENDAR DEADLINES
For events in the period November 17 to November 30, notices must be submitted by UBC faculty or staff on proper Calendar
forms no later than noon on Monday, November 4 to the Community Relations Office, Room 207, 6328 Memorial Rd, Old
Administration Building. For more information call 822-3131. The next edition of UBC Reports wil be published November 14.
Notices exceeding 35 words may be edited
Lectures In Modern Chemistry
3M Lectureship in Chemical Physics. Polymers For Microelectronics
Dr. Grant Willson, IBM Almaden Research Center, San Jose, CA. Chem.
250, South Block at 1pm. Call 822-
3266.
Economics Seminar
A Comparative Analysis Of Unemployment In Canada And The United States.
Craig Riddell, head, Economics
Buchanan D-225 from 4-5:30pm. Call
822-2876.
Oceanography Seminar
NutrientUptakeByMarcroalgae. Catriona
Hurd, Oceanography. BioSciences 1465
at 3:30pm. Call 822-2828
Statistics Seminar
Parametric Vs. Non-Parametric
ARCH A Monte Carlo Comparison.
D. Whistler, Commerce/Business
Admin. Angus 223 at 4pm. Call 822-
4997/2234.
Rehabilitation Medicine
Information Night
Informal program/admission enquiries for
prospective students. IRC #6 at 7pm.
Call 822-7392.
MOA Presentation/Discussion
Hath Not An Immigrant:
Realities/Stereotypes
Through Theatre. Ari
Solomon, Vancouver
actor, Kevin Ma, Chinese Cultural Centre
Performing Arts. MOA Theatre Gallery from 7:30-9:30pm. Call 822-
5087.
WEDNESDAY, N<
Microbiology Seminar Series
Isolation Of A cdc-2 cDNA From
Dictyostelium Discoideum. Christine
Michaelis, U. Freiburg; Microbiology, UBC.
Wesbrook 201 from 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-6648.
Geography Colloquium
Sediment Budgets In Logged Watersheds.
Dr. Harvey Kelsey, Geology, Western
Washington U. Geography201 at 3:30pm.
Refreshments at 3:25pm. Call 822-2985/
2663.
Physiology/Neuroscience
Seminar
Discussion Group. Drug Receptors And
Potassium Channels In The Mammalian
Brain. Alan North, MD, PhD, Inst, of
Advanced Biomedical Research, Oregon
U., Portland. IRC#4at3:30pm. Call 822-
2494.
Distinguished Medical
Research Lecture
Blood Coagulation And
Hemophilia. Dr. Ross T.A.
McGillivray, Biochemistry
. IRC#2from4-5pm. Call
822-4305.
UBC Anglican Community
Lecture
Freedom And Responsibility: A University Perspective. Dr. Paul Russell, Philosophy. Buchanan Penthouse from 4:30-
6:30pm. Call 224-5133.
Wednesday Noon Hour
Concert
Richard Naill, violoncello;
Marisa Gaetanne, soprano with Metroscope
Cello Project. School of
Music Recital Hall at
12:30pm. Admission $2
at the door. Call 822-5574.
h»
THURSDAY,
immnaBBannnMi
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
Computer Networking In The Laboratory.
Bill Schmalz, analytical computer specialist, Hewlett Packard (Canada), Toronto. IRC#1 at 12:30pm. Call 822-5061.
Pharmacology Seminar
Endocrine, Neurocrine And Paracrine Interactions In The Regulation Of
Gastrointestinal Function. Dr. Chris
Mcintosh, MRC Regulatory Peptide
Group; Physiology. IRC#2from 11:30am-
12:30pm. Call 822-2575.
Biotechnology Seminar
Transcriptional Regulations Of
Morphogenetic Genes In Aspergillus Dr.
Wm. Timberlake, Genetics, U. of Georgia
at Athens, GA. Wesbrook 201 at 3:30pm.
Refreshments at 3:15pm. Call 822-3155.
Physics Colloquium
Searches For The Top
Quark And For Quark Substructure. Melissa
Franklin, Harvard U.;
Fermi Laboratory.
Hennings 201 at 4pm. Call
822-3853.
Economics Seminar
A Theory Of Forward Induction In
Finitely Repeated Games. Nabil Al-
Najjar, U. of Quebec at Montreal.
Buchanan D-225 from 4-5:30pm. Call
822-2876.
Mechanical Engineering
Seminar
Knowledge Based Vision For Contour Generation. Lalith Gamage, PhD
candidate. Combined Natural/Forced
Convection In A Cross-Corrugated
Channel. Yinghu Piao, MASc candidate. Chemical/Mechanical Engineering 1202from3:30-4:30pm. Call
822-6200/4350.
Computer Graphics Research
Lecture
Centre for Integrated Computer Systems
Research (CICSR) Distinguished Lecture
Series. Unravelling The Physics And
Chemistry Of Environmental Problems
Using Visualization. Gregory J. McCrae,
Carnegie Mellon U. Scarfe 100 from 1-
2:30pm. Refreshments at 12:30pm. Call
822-6894.
MacMillan Forestry Lecture
Biodiversity And The Forestry Profession:
Perspectives For The 1990's And Beyond. Dr. Kenton R. Miller, Worid Resources Institute, Washington, DC.
Frederic Wood Theatre from 12:30-
1:30pm. Call 822-4935.
Education Abroad Information
Session
Update and general information on UBC
Senate approved international exchange
programs. Martha Kertesz, Program
Coordinator, Registrar's Office. IRC #6
from 12:30-2pm. Call 822-2844.
Continuing Education Lecture
!!u*jnasrr«wl
Keeping Canada Together
campus series. Public
Opinion And Constitutional
Change. Richard
Johnston, Political Science. Chair: Dean of Law,
Lynn Smith. Curtis 101/102 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Question period from 1:30-2pm.
Call 222-5238.
Anthropology/Sociology
Lecture/Discussion
Getting Out Of The Native Business:
The Tory Agenda In Action. Murray
Angus, The Aboriginal Rights Coalition (Project North). Anthrop/Sociol-
ogy 207-9 from 4-5:30pm. Call 822-
2878.
Distinguished Artists Concert
Lauren Wagner, soprano; Frederick
Weldy, piano. Prelude Lecture at 7:15pm,
Concert at 8pm. School of Music Recital
Hall. Call 822-5574.
"itl»|.MW.!lllfMl
IDAY, NOV. 8
Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand
Rounds
The Benefits And Risks Of Hormonal
Replacement Therapy. Dr. John C.
Stevenson, Consultant Endocrinologist,
U. of London, England. University Hospital, Shaughnessy Site D308 at 8am. Call
875-2171.
Pediatrics Resident Case
Management
Haematologic Presentation Of An
Unusual Disease. Dr. Anne Antrim.
G.F. Strong Rehab Centre Auditorium, 26th and Laurel at 9am.   Call
875-2118.
School of Music Concert
University Chamber Singers.
Cortland Hultberg, director. Music
Recital Hall at 12:30pm and 8pm.
Call 822-5574.
I'/AfijRDAY, NOV.9 |
Vancouver Institute Saturday
Night Lecture
Symmetries In Physics.
Professor Shelley Page,
Physics, U. of Manitoba.
IRC #2 at 8:15pm. Call
822-3131.
MOA Children's Story Hour
The Land, Plants And Animals Of British
Columbia. Theresa Neel, Kwagiutl educator. Free with Museum admission.
Rotunda from 11:15am-12:15pm. Call
822-5087
TUESDAY, NOV. 12 \
Women's Studies/Gender
Relations Series
The Recession, Women's Work And Social Welfare In Canada. Senator Lorna
Marsden, U. of Toronto. Family/Nutritional Sciences 320 from 12:30-1:30pm.
Call 822-9173.
Botany Seminar
Porcupine Habitat Interactions In The Kalum Valley,
B.C. Andrea Lawson, MSc
candidate. BioSciences
2000 from 12:30-1:30pm.
Call 822-2133.
Lectures In Modern Chemistry
C2 Complexes—Taming A Reactive Molecule. Dr. M.I. Bruce, Physical/Inorganic
Chemistry, U. of Adelaide, S. AU. Chemistry
250, South Block at 1pm. Call 822-3266.
Oceanography Seminar
Discovering The Past: Hindcasting Of Oceanographic Properties In Hecate Strait. Paul
LeBlond, Oceanography. BioSciences 1465
at 3:30pm. Call 822-2828.
Medical Genetics Seminar
Expression Of A Growth Regulated Yeast
Heat Shock Protein #70. Mark Heschl,
PhD, Medical Biochemistry, U. of Calgary.
IRC#1 from 4:30-5:30pm. Refreshments
at 4:15pm. Call 822-5312.
Statistics Seminar
Bayes And Admissibility Properties Of
Estimators In Truncated Parameter
Spaces. Constance van Eeden, adjunct
professor, Statistics. Angus 223 at 4pm.
Call 822-2234.
Museum of Anthropology
Readings
An Evening With Miriam
Waddington. MOA Theatre Gallery from 7:30-9pm.
Call 822-5087.
Faculty Women's Club General
Meeting
Manning Park - 50th Anniversary/Birds And
Boundary Bay: The Golf War. Helen Akrigg/
Dr. Rob Butler, Canadian Wildlife Service.
Cecil Green Parkat7:30pm. Call222-1983.
[WEDNESDAY, NOV. 131
LvnivaBnBBBMnBBBaananBaaaandl
Microbiology Seminar Series
Association Of A Photoactive Cancer
Therapeutic Agent (Benzoporphyrin Derivative) With Plasma Lipoproteins Improves Delivery And Therefore The Efficacy Of Photodynamic Therapy. Beth
Allison, Microbiology. Wesbrook201 from
12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-6648.
Forestry Seminar
Australasian Pulp and Paper Industry:
Legislation, Wastewater Treatment and
Environmental Impact. Dr. Paul
MacFadane, Forest Research Institute,
NZ. MacMillan 166 from 12:30-1:30pm.
Call 822-3553. UBCREPORTS October31.1991
People
Andrew elected to French academic order
Andrew
Francis Andrew, director of Language Programs and Services at the
Centre for Continuing
Education (CCE), has
been elected a Chevalier
de l'Orde des Palmes
Academiques.
The order, established
in France in 1808 by Napoleon the First, acknowledges the contributions of
senior university officers
to the field of education.
Andrew is being honored for his initiatives
in the area of teaching French to adults.
Joining UBC's French Department as a
lecturer in 1976, Andrew became coordinator of French programs at the CCE
the same year. He was appointed to his
current position in 1984.
In 1988. he was the first in Canada to
introduce the popular and highly successful multimedia immersion course. French
in Action, now used by educators across
the country to teach conversational French.
Andrew also developed innovative audio-lingual distance education French language courses, in collaboration with the
province's Open Learning Agency, and
created special  language programs  for
B.C. school teachers.
Among his future projects is the establishment of a French centre at UBC, a
multimedia resource library for faculty
and students to promote French culture.
Dr. Shaila Misri, a clinical associate
professor of psychiatry, has been elected
president of the Vancouver branch of the
Federation of Medical Women of Canada
(FMWC).
Misri joined UBC in 1975 and is the
founding director of University Hospital's
specialized clinics in pre-menstrual tension syndrome and post-partum illness.
The FMWC, founded in 1924, is a national organization committed to the professional, social and personal advancement of women physicians. Its mandate
includes encouraging networking among
women physicians at local, national and
international levels to promote their interests within medical organizations and government.
The federation also aims to improve the
management of women's health issues and
to influence health care policies affecting
women and the general population.
As president of the B.C. branch of the
FMWC, Misri's main responsibilities include organizing special programs which
address issues pertinent to both patients
and physicians.
Her appointment is for a one year term.
Forest Sciences Professor Gordon
Weetman has been awarded the 1991 gold
medal for Forestry Scientific Achievement.
Weetman received the honor at the national meeting of the Canadian Institute of
Forestry last month in recognition of his
long, illustrious career in the silviculture
of Canadian forests.
Early in his career, Weetman worked
primarily in the boreal forests of Quebec
and Ontario. More recently he has pursued
the science of silviculture in Western
Canada, where he has been the senior
silviculturist at UBC since 1979.
Weetman's major research interest is
the identification of mineral deficiencies
in conifers and the use of nutrient applications in modern forest management.
He has served on a range of professional committees and organizations
including a term as president of the
Canadian Institute of Forestry.
Andrew Mular, head of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering, has been named a
Henry Krumb Lecturer for 1992 by the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and
Petroleum Engineers
(AIME).
Mular was one of
three people selected as
a Krumb lecturer by
AIME. which has a
membership of more
than 19,000. Each lecturer i sj udged to be professionally outstanding
and exceptionally competent as a speaker and is
required to give a minimum of five lectures in
various regions ofthe United States.
The lecture series brings the experience
and expertise of institute leaders to local
sections of the AIME.
Mular
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
• research design
• sampling
>data analysis
> forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D.
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508       Home: (604) 263-5394
Classified
Classified advertising can be purchased from Community Relations.
Phone 822-6163. Ads placed by faculty, staff and students cost $12.84
for 7 lines/issue ($.81 for each additional word). Off-campus advertisers
are charged $14.98 for 7 lines/issue ($.86 for each additional word). (All
prices include G.S. T.) Monday, November 4 at noon is the deadline for
the next issue of UBC Reports which appears on Thursday, November
14. Deadline forthe following edition on November28 is noon Tuesday,
November 19. All ads must be paid in advance in cash, by cheque or
internal requisition.
For Sale
THE SHIELING GALLERY: Cardena
Road, Bowen Island, VON 1GO.
Paintings and Prints by Sam Black,
R.C.A., R.S.W.. Also Sculpture and
Ceramics. Open September to June
10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday or at other times by arrangement. Call: 947-9391
Services
NEW DAYCARE: UBC has a new
daycare centre opening October 1,
1991. If you need quality licenced
care for your child aged three to five
please come to 5590 Osoyoos Cres.
to apply or call 822-5343 for further
information.
Miscellaneous
DO IT RIGHT! Statistical and methodological consultation; data analysis; data base management; sampling techniques; questionnaire design, development, and administration. Over 15 years of research and
consulting experience in the social
sciences and related fields. 689-
7164.
XMAS PARTY: Need to book a place
for your Xmas Party? Some spaces
are still open at the UBC Medical
Student & Alumni Centre at 12th &
Heather.
Come and enjoy the warm ambience
the Centre provides and take advantage of its central location and reasonable cost. Full kitchen facilities
are included.
If you are curious and would like to
arrange to view the facility or to check
on availability, call 879-8496
Forestry to establish new
undergraduate program
By ABE HEFTER
New career opportunities in forestry are in the offing for UBC students from both arts and sciences backgrounds.
The Faculty of Forestry is moving
toward the establishment of a new
undergraduate program in conservation, recreation and natural areas management.
"Many of the problems associated
with land use management require
skills in the social sciences — eco-
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822-8231.
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nomics, psychology, philosophy and
sociology," said Forest Resources
Management Professor David Haley.
"This program will provide an opportunity for individuals to obtain a
comprehensive, multi-disciplinary
education in environmental studies as
they relate to forest and wildland resources."
Haley said there is a new breed of
forester evolving from the need to manage forests and associated wild lands.
"Employment opportunities for
such professionals will grow as concerns for biodiversity in natural landscapes mount and pressures on natural
environments to support a growing
spectrum of commercial and non-commercial uses increase," he said.
Haley, chair of afour-member committee struck to formulate the objectives and structure of the proposed
program, said students will have an
opportunity to enter one of three areas
of concentration following a two-year
common core program. They are
Nature Conservation, Wildland Recreation and Parks Management; Wildlife Management; and Conservation
and Natural Resource Planning.
"An important feature of the four-
year program will be summer
internships, intended to provide students with an opportunity to combine
academic study with practical and professional experience with cooperating
organizations."
Haley said concern for the management of recreation and non-timber forest resources began to take shape in the
Faculty of Forestry more than 20 years
ago. In 1968, the Faculty was the first
forestry school in the country to recognize the importance of forest and
wildland recreation in the forestry curriculum and for many years has led the
way in wildlife management research.
In structuring the program, Haley
said the committee consulted widely
with Canadian and international parks
professionals, as well as with a broadly
based committee within the university.
Haley said the program will also
enhance the more traditional Bachelor
of Science in Forestry program and
become an integral part of the Faculty's proposed Centre For Applied
Conservation Biology.
The public, in the meantime, will
have an opportunity to learn more
about biodiversity and the forestry
profession in the upcoming H.R.
MacMillan Lecture.
Dr. Kenton R. Miller, program director ofthe Forests and Biodiversity
Programme at the World Resources
Institute in Washington, D.C, will
offer his perspectives for the 1990s
and beyond at the Nov. 7 lecture at the
Frederic Wood Theatre from 12:30
p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
For more information on the lecture, call 822-2727.
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5200 HOLLYBRIDGE WAY, RICHMOND 8    UBCREPORTS October31.1991
General BA program offers alternatives
From international development to
backyard composting.
This detour in Gillian Elcock's
university education was made possible by the Faculty of Arts' General B A
degree.
Six years ago, Elcock enrolled in
international relations at UBC with
the goal of learning more about Third
World development.
But a growing interest in local ecology, combined with a desire for more
latitude in her courses, made Elcock
jump tracks to the new faculty offering.
"The General BA offered more
flexibility and freed me up so I could
pursue other interests," she said.
Photo by Media Scrvice-
Krista Hansen works on printing press as part of fine arts component
of her General BA degree. By combining fine art and psychology, she
plans to pursue art therapy.
Today, Elcock complements her
enthusiasm for organic gardening wilh
courses in botany, ecology and soil
science. Off campus, she puts her classroom know-how to work promoting
urban gardening and composting for a
public education project in Kitsilano.
Enrolment at UBC in the General
B A, which is also available at Cariboo
and Okanagan university colleges, has
tripled from 17 to 55 students. Coordinator Paul Tennant, a professor in
the Department of Political Science,
predicts the program's popularity will
grow substantially in the years ahead.
"Some students just can't appreciate the regimented aspects of a specific discipline," said Tennant. "The
General BA allows them to build on
their strengths and interests by designing their own curriculum from
the arts and science."
However, to stop students from
going on a random shopping spree of
courses, at least 18 credits must be
devoted to one discipline area. Elcock,
for instance, anchors her science
electives with a "mini-major" in anthropology.
Those eligible for the program must
have completed at least 60. bui no
more than 90, first- and second-year
credits with no less than a 60 per cent
overall average.
Tennant said the program will
have particular appeal to students
interested in areas such as Canadian,
ethnic. Native, and urban studies,
where there are no honors or majors
degree programs. It also provides
excellent preparation for graduate
work in education, law, library science or commerce and business administration.
Tennant added that the General BA
should also attract mature students
back to campus to either finish or start
Photo by Charles Ker
Gillian Elcock focuses on local ecology through organic gardening.
their university degree.
Krista Hansen will be among the
first group of General BA graduates
this year.
After two years taking general arts
courses, Hansen signed up for the
General BA. She now combines fine
arts and psychology with a goal of
getting involved with some form of art
therapy in the future.
Dean Patricia Marchak hopes the
new program will help promote the
benefits of interdisciplinary study.
"We have to be open to new ways
of organizing knowledge, and be open
to new ideas," said Marchak. "Disciplines are important, but there have to
be some alternatives available, too."
Thunderbirds host Soviet
Sparta volleyball team
By ABE HEFTER
The Russians are coming! The Russians are
coming!
To UBC.
And women's volleyball
coach Donna Baydock couldn't
be happier.
On Nov. 6, the UBC Thunderbirds will play host to
Sparta, the Soviet women's volleyball club team, as part of a
five-game tour. Sparta, one of
the first commercially sponsored teams from the Soviet
Union, will also play the
Thunderbirds Nov. 5 at
Capilano College.
Baydock has been the driving force behind the tour.
"This past May our women's
volleyball team played Sparta
in Moscow as part of a three-
week tour of the Soviet Union,
Sweden and Denmark," she
said.
"During our stay, we invited
the Sparta team to Canada. But
with the changes occurring in
the Soviet Union, we didn't know
if the team would be allowed to
leave Moscow."
As late as August, Baydock was
unsure if Sparta would be able to
accept UBC's invitation. As it
turned out, the political changes
in the Soviet Union helped eliminate some of the red tape associated with such a trip, according to
Baydock.
During their stay in Vancouver, Sparta will also see action
against the University of Victoria
and Simon Fraser University before leaving for Winnipeg for a
series of games.
Before heading to Winnipeg,
Sparta coaches and players will
host a clinic Nov. 5 at Capilano
College for Vancouver area volleyball players, where they'll get
a chance to learn from the best.
"The Soviets are the top volleyball players in the world." said
Baydock.
"During our trip to Moscow.
Sparta coach Leonid Berezin held
a clinic for our team members.
We've been working our offensive technique since then and look
forward to having Berezin assess
our progress when he gets a chance
to see our players in action next
month."
In the meantime, Baydock and
the T-Birds are anxiously looking
forward to hosting the Sparta players.
"We happened to be in Moscow during Victory Day celebrations. May 9, and had an opportunity to march in their parade,"
said Baydock. "And when we
saw the turmoil they were going
through during the failed coup
attempt, we were glued to our televisions in nervous apprehension."
But despite the upheaval in the
Soviet Union, Baydock said the
people they met were warm, gracious hosts.
"We're just thrilled to be able
to have them here, she added. "We
plan to show them the sights and
sounds of Vancouver."
Members ofthe UBC Women's Volleyball team, (from left) Jenny Rauh,
Mary Stothard, Harj Sandhu, Michelle Lachmann, chaperone June
Carly le and Erin Wood, in front of Moscow University last May. Displayed
is the now-defunct flag ofthe Russian Republic under Soviet rule. Lfi5T_CO?y
Do MoT^e/^ov/e
wperauiig uuaget tops $310 million
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC's general purpose operating budget will
top $310 million in 1991/92, figures released by
the university show.
The balanced budget, outlined in a 124-page
tabloid released last week to the campus community, includes a one-time expenditure to write off
a deficit of $2.1 million accrued last year.
Salary increases account for virtually all of
the growth in expenditures in this year's budget.
Non-salary expenses will also be increased by
four per cent.
UBC employees' total compensation will be
limited to four per cent, phased in over the course
of the year.
The university's income budget reflects a
number of adjustments. From the provincial
governnment, the universty received an increase
in its base operating grant of 4.5 per cent.
Under the government's Access for All program, mutually agreed upon increases in
undergrauate and graduate enrolment are funded
at full average cost rates.
This year, the university received funding of
$3.1 million for an additonal 177 graduate students, as well as $2.5 million to allow for funding
of the previously unfunded undergraduate students.
In December, the Board of Governors approved aproposal to increase credit tuition fees in
each of tjipne^lhre^yflafli^lherate0/4-5 BW^j
cent, plus the annual increase in the Vancouver
Consumer Price Index.
Of the 1991/92 total increase of 10 per cent,
7.5 per cent will be directed to operating expenses and 2.5 per cent to two newly designated
funds: a teaching and learning enhancement fund
and a supplemental financial aid fund.
"These increases represent a significant improvement in our financial situation from where
we started this year," said Bruce Gellatly, vice-
president , Administration and Finance.
Wild Thing
Photo by Media Services
Dean of Pharmaceutical Sciences John McNeill belts out his rendition ofthe 60s rock 'n roll classic during a karaoke festival Oct. 17,
held in aid of UBC's annual United Way campaign. McNeill, and several other campus crooners, helped raise $250 toward this year's
goal of$280,000. Over 1,100 faculty and staff have donated more than $180,000 to date. Pledges to the campus United Way appeal
are still being accepted.
Senate urges removal of administration fee UBC ranked
7ih in survey
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC's Senate will ask the
federal government to
rescind the three per
cent administrative fee
on Canada Student Loans that was
introduced this year.
Kelly Guggisberg, AMS direc-
inside
NOT JUST A MEAL TICKET:
Ravtadra Start) am education as rrioi»#iB» a ticket to
Job security PtttiHe, page 3
IMMIGRATION IN CANADA:
UBC Assistant Professor
D^HIeDetteiraniifiestfteim-
oact of Canadian imirrtgra-
timpoltetea,Fanim,pago6
GENERAL BA: The General
BA program encourages
benefits of InterdisdpiJnary
study. Pages
tor of external affairs, told Senate
the "guarantee fee" on the federal
portion of student loans hits hardest at those who need it most.
With the new fee, students who
received the maximum loan of
$7,140 — which is split evenly by
the federal and provincial governments — must pay $107. Students pay the fee only on the federal portion of the loan.
About 7,000 UBC students depend on loans to help them cover the
expenses of attending university.
Dan Worsley, assistant director of Awards and Financial Aid,
said the new fee has been widely
criticized by student financial aid
offices across the country.
"It means that some students will
be out $107 in living expenses for the
year, and that's a couple of weeks of
groceries. It is unfair," he said.
The fee was approved in August to help the federal government recoup losses on defaulted
student loans.
Worsley said that if the federal
government is concerned about
the high rate of defaults, it should
do a better job of educating students on the requirements of the
Canada Student Loan program.
Campus observes Remembrance Day
UBC will close on Monday, Nov.
11, in observance of Remembrance
Day.
No classes will be held and
the university's libraries will be
closed.
The Subway cafeteria will be
closed on Saturday, Nov. 9, in addition to Nov. 11 when all Food
Services outlets on campus will
close, with the exception of two residence dining rooms.
The Totem Park cafeteria will be
serving an a la carte menu between 8
a.m. and 7 p.m., while the Place
Vanier dining room will serve full
meals, opening for breakfast between
8-11 a.m., lunch from 11 a.m. - 2:30
p.m. and for dinner from 4:30-7 p.m.
A Remembrance Day service,
open to the public, will be held in
the foyer of the War Memorial
Gym on Nov. 11 at 10:45 a.m.
Faculty of Arts Professor Ian Slater,
author and managing editor of Pacific Affairs, will give the address.
President David Strangway will
read the scripture and music will
be provided by the UBC Brass
Quintet.
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC is ranked as the best university for undergraduate arts and science
students in Western Canada and seventh best in the nation in a survey
conducted by Maclean's magazine.
In the same report, Canadian university presidents ranked UBC fourth
best in the country.
Maclean's also ranked UBC
number one in Canada for varsity
sports, based on the 1990-91 results of
national finals in men's and women's
competitions.
UBC President David Strangway
is one of six university presidents profiled in the 41-page special report in
the magazine's Oct. 21 issue.
The main categories used in the
ranking were students, faculty, financial resources and reputation, as they
affected undergraduates in Arts and
Science.
"It was an interesting process that
was used. I hope that next time the data
are collected from the universities by
Maclean's on a more consistent basis.
There were many inconsistencies in
the statistical data," said Strangway. Operating budget tops $310 million
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC's general purpose operating budget will
top $310 million in 1991/92, figures released by
the university show.
The balanced budget, outlined in a 124-page
tabloid released last week to the campus community, includes a one-time expenditure to write off
a deficit of $2.1 million accrued last year.
Salary increases account for virtually all of
the growth in expenditures in this year's budget.
Non-salary expenses will also be increased by
four per cent.
UBC employees' total compensation will be
limited to four per cent, phased in over the course
of the year.
The university's income budget reflects a
number of adjustments. From the provincial
governnment, the universty received an increase
in its base operating grant of 4.5 per cent.
Under the government's Access for All program, mutually agreed upon increases in
undergrauate and graduate enrolment are funded
at full average cost rates.
This year, the university received funding of
$3.1 million for an additonal 177 graduate students, as well as $2.5 million to allow for funding
of the previously unfunded undergraduate students.
In December, the Board of Governors approved a proposal to increase credit tuition fees in
each of the ne^ct three years at the rate of 4.5 per  ^. 4,
cent, plus the annual increase in the Vancouver
Consumer Price Index.
Ofthe 1991/92 total increase of 10 per cent.
7.5 per cent will be directed to operating expenses and 2.5 per cent to two newly designated
funds: a teaching and learning enhancement fund
and a supplemental financial aid fund.
'These increases represent a significant improvement in our financial situation from where
we started this year," said Bruce Gellatly, vice-
president , Administration and Finance.
Wild Thing
Photo by Media Services
Dean of Pharmaceutical Sciences John McNeill belts out his rendition ofthe 60s rock 'n roll classic during a karaoke festival Oct. 17,
held in aid of UBC's annual United Way campaign. McNeill, and several other campus crooners, helped raise $250 toward this year's
goal of $280,000. Over 1,100 faculty and staff have donated more than $180,000 to date. Pledges to the campus United Way appeal
are still being accepted.
Senate urges removal of administration fee UBC ranked
7th in survey
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC's Senate will ask the
federal government to
rescind the three per
cent administrative fee
on Canada Student Loans that was
introduced this year.
Kelly Guggisberg, AMS direc-
inside
NOT JUST A MEAL TICKET:
Ravindra Shah sees education as more than a ticket to
Job security. Profile, page 3
IMMIGRATION IN CANADA:
UBC Assistant Professor
DanHlebertexaminestheim-
pact of Canadian immigrationpolicies. Forum, page 6
GENERAL BA: The General
BA program encourages
benefits of interdisciplinary
study. Pages
tor of external affairs, told Senate
the "guarantee fee" on the federal
portion of student loans hits hardest at those who need it most.
With the new fee, students who
received the maximum loan of
$7,140 — which is split evenly by
the federal and provincial governments — must pay $107. Students pay the fee only on the federal portion of the loan.
About 7,000 UBC students depend on loans to help them cover the
expenses of attending university.
Dan Worsley, assistant director of Awards and Financial Aid,
said the new fee has been widely
criticized by student financial aid
offices across the country.
"It means that some students will
be out $ 107 in living expenses for the
year, and that's a couple of weeks of
groceries. It is unfair," he said.
The fee was approved in August to help the federal government recoup losses on defaulted
student loans.
Worsley said that if the federal
government is concerned about
the high rate of defaults, it should
do a better job of educating students on the requirements of the
Canada Student Loan program.
Campus observes Remembrance Day
UBC will close on Monday, Nov.
11, in observance of Remembrance
Day.
No classes will be held and
the university's libraries will be
closed.
The Subway cafeteria will be
closed on Saturday, Nov. 9, in addition to Nov. 11 when all Food
Services outlets on campus will
close, with the exception of two residence dining rooms.
The Totem Park cafeteria will be
serving an a la carte menu between 8
a.m. and 7 p.m., while the Place
Vanier dining room will serve full
meals, opening for breakfast between
8-11 a.m., lunch from 11 a.m. - 2:30
p.m. and for dinner from 4:30-7 p.m.
A Remembrance Day service,
open to the public, will be held in
the foyer of the War Memorial
Gym on Nov. 11 at 10:45 a.m.
Faculty of Arts Professor Ian Slater,
author and managing editor of Pacific Affairs, will give the address.
President David Strangway will
read the scripture and music will
be provided by the UBC Brass
Quintet.
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC is ranked as the best university for undergraduate arts and science
students in Western Canada and seventh best in the nation in a survey
conducted by Maclean's magazine.
In the same report, Canadian university presidents ranked UBC fourth
best in the country.
Maclean's also ranked UBC
number one in Canada for varsity
sports, based on the 1990-91 results of
national finals in men's and women's
competitions.
UBC President David Strangway
is one of six university presidents profiled in the 41-page special report in
the magazine's Oct. 21 issue.
The main categories used in the
ranking were students, faculty, financial resources and reputation, as they
affected undergraduates in Arts and
Science.
"It was an interesting process that
was used. I hope that next time the data
are collected from the universities by
Maclean's on a more consistent basis.
There were many inconsistencies in
the statistical data," said Strangway. 2    UBC REPORTS October 31.1991
■-   » i
Brain scanner one of a kind in North America
By CONNIE FILLETTI
A new $3-million brain scanner is
the latest weapon being used by UBC
scientists in the war against
neurodegenerative diseases such as
Parkinson's, Huntington's, Dystonia
and Lou Gehrig's disease.
The positron emission tomography
(PET) scanner—recently acquired by
the UBC site of University Hospital
—is the only one of its kind in North
America.
It will allow medical researchers to
measure, for the first time, the functioning of small, distinct areas in the
human brain.
"The PET scanner develops images utilizing radiation emitted by the
patient, who has been injected with a
radioactive pharmaceutical that closely
resembles a natural substance used by
the body, such as glucose," explained
Thomas Ruth, director of the UBC/
TRIUMF PET program.
"The information is then fed
into a computer to be reconstructed into a map or picture of
the patient's brain where the radioactivity originated."
Ruth added that the scanner requires an even lower level of radiation
than its predecessor, which was built
at TRIUMF, and used in brain research at UBC since 1983.
Patients would be exposed to radiation levels comparable to, or less
than, those from other medical proce-
Photo by Michael La Brooy
Still in its wrappings, the new PET scanner arrives at University Hospital, UBC Site. The $3-million machine
will be used for research into neurodegenerative diseases.
dures such as having an X-ray, he said.
"In the case of Parkinson's, we
can now attempt to detect the disease
prior to the onset of symptoms," said
Dr. Donald Calne, head of Neurol
ogy at the UBC site of University
Hospital.
Calne directs a multi-disciplinary
team of researchers recently awarded
$6.1 million by the Medical Research
Council of Canada (MRC) to establish a Neurodegenerative Disorders
Centre.
He said that PET scanning will
allow the team to examine, in the case
of Parkinson's, the relationship between treatment and changes in the
brain, and the effect of different forms
of the disease on the brain.
In addition, Calne plans to use the
new scanner to examine more accurately and precisely the effect of normal aging in the brain. He hopes the
research will lead to an understanding of the pathological mechanisms
for neurodegenerative disorders,
and help to establish rational ways
for the development of new treatments.
Ruth said that because PET scanning makes use of radioisotopes, which
have very short life of anywhere from
two minutes to two hours, a PET facility must have a source of these radioisotopes close al hand.
"PET radioisotopes are produced by an accelerator such as a
cyclotron," Ruih explained. "The
TRIUMF facility, with its three
cyclotrons, represents the most
powerful source of radioisotopes
in the world. The strong collaboration between TRIUMF and the
UBC Neurodegenerative Disorders Centre in the PET program
was a major factor in the MRC's
decision to fund the tomograph
and research."
Additional funding was provided
by the President's Office, the B.C.
Ministry of Health and Siemans
Canada Ltd.
Effects of job loss on middle-
aged workers studied
By ABE HEFTER
Losing your job can lead to personal and professional turmoil. In the
middle-aged worker, the loss could be
even more devastating.
The psychological impact of unemployment in middle aged people is
the subject of a study being conducted
by Commerce and Business Administration Professor Larry Shetzer.
The study will look at the experience of unemployment at the psychological level and the impact it has on
career development on men and
women in the over 45 age bracket.
"An important feature of this study
is the fact that it will look at both men
and women," said Shetzer. "Most
studies of unemployment done in the
past have focused primarily on men in
the 20 to 30 age bracket."
Shetzer said people in their 40s
have different employment needs that
are only beginning to be studied. They
also face different problems associated with unemployment.
Research has shown that older people stay unemployed longer and have
a harder time getting hired again. In
addition, some of their skills are becoming obsolete and retraining isn't
always easy.
"Factors surrounding job loss, like
termination arrangements, severance
packages and career counselling opportunities, as well as the level of
support received from family, friends
and peers, all lead to positive or negative effects on career development in
the long term," said Shetzer.
Shetzer has been working to contact about 500 unemployed people to
take part in an anonymous, written
survey, in conjunction with a Vancouver job counselling service. The individuals have been unemployed in the
last two years.
The survey contains questions about
employment and job loss; the person's
attitudes towards work-related issues,
health and well being; the experience
of being unemployed, and job search.
"People in their mid-40s represent
the front end of the baby boom," said
Shetzer. "Demographics suggest that
the number of younger people entering the workforce is shrinking, making older people potentially more important to the work force.
"It is important that we understand
the unemployment experience in these
individuals and the effect it has on
future employment," he added.
Construction noise to be
avoided during exams
By GAVIN WILSON
Gage Towers residents who say
their studies were interrupted by
"hammering, blowtorches and loud
music" last spring can look forward
to peace and quiet during exam period this year.
Acting on complaints made by
students living in Gage Towers, Senate will urge Campus Planning and
Development to avoid renovations
and repairs to student residences during exam periods.
But Tim Miner, director of Campus Planning and Development, denies that the job that led to the complaints was conducted during exams
last term.
Earlier this year, a roofing company was contracted to tar the roof of
the conference centre at Gage Towers, home to more than 1,300 students.
Students complained that work
proceeded during the exam period,
but Miner said records show work
was completed in March, before exams began.
Student Senator Julie Lahey said
the work proceeded despite the 24-
hour quiet period enforced in university residences during exams.
Miner said that, in the past, some
work may have taken place during
exams, and his department will exercise additional caution in future.
Advertise in
UBC Reports
Deadline for paid advertisements for the
November 14 issue is noon, November 4.
For information, phone 822-3131
To place an ad, phone 822-6163
REQUEST FOR NOMINATIONS FOR THE PRESIDENT'S ADVISORY
COMMITTEE ON THE STATUS OF WOMEN
Florence Ledwitz-Rigby, Advisor to the President on Women and Gender Relations, is
forming a committee to advise the president on the status of women at UBC. Individuals
are invited to apply or to nominate someone else for membership on the committee.
While the committee will be modest in size, it should be representative of the women
staff, faculty and students, and be composed of individuals who are committed to
creating a positive climate on campus for all women.
Send nominations to Dr. Ledwitz-Rigby, Old Administration Building, Office of the Vice-
President, Academic. UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
The Evaluation of Teaching at UBC in 1991
The final report of the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching Evaluation (1990)
The Senate AdHocCommittee on Teaching Evaluation (1990) was established by
motion of Senate passed on October 10,
1990:
Whereas the Senate wishes to affirm its continuing interest in the
value of excellent teaching, be it
resolved that Senate establish an
ad hoc committee to review the
policy, administration and use of
teaching evaluations in consultation with the Faculties and students
and report back to Senate on its
recommendations.
Having conducted the review called for in
this motion, we find that, while the University
can show that formal teaching evaluation is
done in every Faculty, its effectiveness is
sometimes open to question and the effort
expended in doing it is seen by many students as wasted.
Our report is in three sections. The first
provides some necessary background, the
second summarizes our findings and the
third presents our conclusions and recommendations. A listing of all our recommendations follows this third section and material
amplifying or illustrating the text is provided
in the appendices.
I. TEACHING EVALUATION
AT UBC: CURRENT
REGULATIONS. PREVIOUS
—HVfiW§r*m f HE
APPROACH OF
THE PRESENT
COMMITTEE
Three kinds of background information
are necessary for an understanding of our
findings and recommendations. These are
information on (1) the current regulations
governing the evaluation of teaching at UBC,
(2) the findings of previous reviews and (3)
our own approach.
1.1 Current Regulations
There are currently two kinds of formal
specification about the evaluation of teaching, one in the UBC Faculty Handbook and
the other in the form of recommendations
approved by Senate. Both are reproduced
at Appendix A.
Teaching is, of course, only one of the
activities expected of a faculty member and
the evaluation of faculty members' performance includes assessments of scholarly activity and sen/ice as well as of teaching. The
Faculty Handbook (section 4.02) defines
"teaching", and for its evaluation specifies
the criteria and permits a range of methods,
requiring only that when student or colleague
opinions are sought, they shall be sought by
formal means. The motions of Senate require the annual evaluation of faculty members and specify that it shall include teaching
evaluation and that the results of the teaching evaluation are to be considered in reappointment, promotion and tenure decisions.
The Senate motions assign to individual
Faculties the responsibility for deciding the
timing and form of evaluations as well as the
instrumentation and procedures for their administration. The two most recent motions
(added in 1983) protect the anonymity of
student responses in the evaluations of teaching.
While the requirements in the Handbook
are in the hands of every faculty member, the
specifications of Senate are published only
in Senate minutes, unless some person or
group chooses to circulate them for particular purposes (they are reproduced, for exam
ple, in several departmental or Faculty minutes dealing with teaching evaluation policy).
1.2 Previous Reviews
Concern with the evaluation of teaching
at UBC is not new. Since 1974 there have
been three ad hoc committees of Senate (of
which ours is the third) established to address the subject. In addition, there has
been a President's Committee on Teaching
Evaluation, at least one survey of the Faculties' evaluation practices by the President's
office, and a survey by the Student Senate
Caucus. Appendix B lists these initiatives,
showing the kind of data they used and a
summary of their results.
From an examination of these reviews we
may make a number of observations:
(a) There is an underlying concern (explicit in some reviews, implicit in others) for
the quality of teaching. Evaluation is seen as
a means to the improvement of teaching at
UBC.
(b) Evaluation is also seen (especially by
the 1978 committee and the Senate of the
day) as a necessary component of decision
making for reappointment, promotion and
tenure.
(c) There has been a change over seventeen years from a quasi-voluntary participation in teaching evaluation to a required
participation, and the use of student questionnaires is now universal across the campus.
(d) There has been a reluctance to impose central regulation of methods for evaluation upon Faculties.
(e) Attempts to monitor the evaluation of
teaching have not worked. The 1978 recommendation that Faculties submit a report of
their evaluation activity to a Senate committee was set aside because the then active
President's Committee was seen as a suitable recipient of such reports and because
the then Chairman of Senate undertook to
inform Senate of what the Faculties had
done. In the event, the President's Committee ceased to function and the Chairman of
Senate never did give a report. No committee of Senate has been charged with monitoring the regulations adopted by Senate in
1978.
(f) Concern with the evaluation of teaching persists. The existence of at least six
reviews of one kind or another in seventeen
years suggests that in some sense the evaluation of teaching is a problem that won't go
away.
1.3 The Approach of the
Present Committee
The previous reviews of teaching evaluation have all examined the policies and procedures used in Faculties and Departments.
Some have obtained faculty members' opinions. None has sought a broadly-based
range of student views on UBC's teaching
evaluation. It was, however, a student initiative which led Senate to establish the present
committee. The motion which was carried in
Senate was proposed and seconded by student senators and was born of some uneasiness in the Student Senate Caucus about
the adequacy of the teaching evaluations on
campus. It seemed wise, therefore, to ensure that student views were obtained forthe
present examination, in addition to information about Faculty practices.
Accordingly, the committee obtained two
kinds of data:
(a) A statement by each Faculty (and,
where appropriate, each Department or
School) about its policies and practices concerning teaching evaluation.
(Our request for information included a
request for copies of any evaluation instru
ments used and for comments about the use
of the results. The letter of request is included at Appendix C.)
(b) Student responses to a fourteen-item
questionnaire which asked for their overall
opinion of teaching evaluation at UBC as
they had experienced it, and also sought
their views on the procedures for evaluation,
the instruments used for it and the use made
of the results.1
(Responses were received from over two
thousand students enrolled in 3rd and 4th
year undergraduate courses in the 1990-91
winter session. The distribution of respondents across programs matched closely the
enrollments in three groups of undergraduate programs: Arts, Science and "Other".
Descriptions of the method of questionnaire
design, sample selection, and data collection as well as of the characteristics of respondents are included at Appendix D, as is
a copy of the questionnaire itself.)
II. FINDINGS OF THE
PRESENT REVIEW
We deal first with the responses from
Faculties, Schools and Departments and
second with the results of the survey of
student opinion.
11.1 Policies and Practices of
the Faculties, Schools and
Departments
Inthe Facultiesof Arts, Graduate Studies,
Science and Medicine, teaching evaluation
is an activity devolved to the departmental
level. In all other Faculties, it is done on a
Faculty-wide basis, except that the two
schools in the Faculty of Applied Science
(Architecture and Nursing) carry out their
own separate procedures. There are thus
sixty-five different administrative units which
design and carry out teaching evaluations.2
A response to our letter of inquiry was
received from each of these units.3 The
response included in most cases a covering
letter answering our specific questions, copies of relevant policy statements or regulations and copies of the evaluation instruments used. In eight units, the matter of
teaching evaluation is currently under review and we received either no material or an
interim set.4 The entire compilation of what
we received will serve as a useful reference
for units wishing to review their practice and
we shall be recommending that it be lodged
in some centrally accessible location.
Our findings from the review of this material
are summarized in the following notes which are
grouped under appropriate headings.
11.1.1 Policies and Practices in General
(a) All units engage in the evaluation of
teaching.
1 We are grateful to the Office of the Vice
President, Academic for support in covering the
direct costs of the survey, and to Professors Frank
Echolls and Doug Willms for their technical assistance. The survey was managed by the Educational
Measurement and Research Group (EMRG) housed
in the Faculty of Education.
2 Technically, the Faculty of Science itself
should count as a sixty-sixth unit because it does
have a teaching evaluation form designed for Faculty-wide use. All procedures in Science, however,
are designed and handled at the department level
and the use of the Faculty-wide form is optional in
departments. Our analysis accordingly does not
treat the Faculty of Science as one of the sixty-five
units which have designed their own policies and
procedures.
3 In most cases we received a response directly. Some Deans asked the Office of the Associate
Vice-President to make available to us the responses
they had submitted for his 1989 survey. In the Faculty
of Medicine, departmental responses were collated
by the Dean's Office and forwarded to us as one
batch.
4 The Schools of Audiology & Speech Sciences and Rehabilitation Medicine; the departments
of Linguistics, Slavonic Studies, Theatre & Film,
Family Practice, Health Care & Epidemiology and
Pediatrics.
(b) Most do so in conformity with the
motions contained in Senate Minutes (see
Appendix A). There are, however, two kinds
of exception: (i) many student evaluation
instruments do not carry a note to the effect
that remarks might be printed so as to preserve anonymity and (ii) two units do not
require teaching evaluation to be done annually—in one case the departure from the
requirement is well rationalized and in the
other the procedures are thorough enough
to indicate that the quality of evaluations is
not compromised.
(c) In some units the management of
teaching evaluation is done by the Head. In
larger units it is often delegated to a particular faculty member. In some cases, units
have Teaching Evaluation Committees to
oversee the process and in a few cases
these committees include students or invite
student input.
(d) In all cases there is a statement (in the
letter, or in one or more of the documents) to
the effect that the results of teaching evaluation are considered in decisions about reappointment, promotion and tenure. In relatively few cases, however, is there a statement about their being used for the improvement of teaching.
11.1.2 The Use of Peer Evaluation
(e) Only twenty-seven of the sixty-five
units mention peer evaluation in their response letters or their documentation. Two
of those say that they do not do it in a formal
way.5
(f) There is wide variation in the way in
which peer evaluation is described. Most
frequently it is said to be used only for
decisions about reappointment, promotion
and tenure. In a few cases it is used "when
there is a problem". In a few other cases, by
contrast, peer evaluation is seen as an integral part of the entire evaluation process and
in two cases it is one of the instruments for
the improvement of teaching.
(g) Requirements for the conduct of peer
evaluation also show wide variation. Some
specify only classroom visits. Others may
call for classroom visits and interviews with
students orthe instructor, or both. Some ask
that colleagues examine all aspects of teaching, others that they concentrate upon the
integrity and currency of course content. In
some units, a peer review committee is asked
to consider not only its own observations of
an instructor's teaching, but also to assess
the student evaluations which have been
received.
11.1.3 Procedures for Evaluation by Students
(h) In most cases the procedures specified forthe administration of student evaluations promise to be effective and include the
kind of safeguards which allow students to
be assured that the process is fairly managed, that their evaluations are unlikely to be
tampered with, and that they need not fear
reprisals from an unfavourably rated instructor.
(i) With respect to such safeguards, however, there are two striking exceptions. In
one unit, an instructor who chooses to do so
may select a questionnaire of his or her
choice, administer it, and take sole responsibility for depositing the results in the file. In
the other unit, the regulations call for the
instructor him or herself to collect the evaluations, calculate the mean scores, summarize the comments, and submit the results to
the head of the unit for filing.
S Since the requirements of the Faculty Handbook and of the Senior Appointments Committee are
such that some "peer" consultation is required in
reappointment, promotion and tenure cases, and
since those cases also require the evaluation of a
candidate's teaching, the lack of mention of peer
evaluation in the material submitted by thirty-eight of
the sixty-five responses suggests that people tend to
think only of student evaluations when "teaching
evaluation" is mentioned. UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
The Evaluation of Teaching at UBC in 1991
G) There are some indications that, documents and regulations notwithstanding, the
administration of student teaching evaluations does not always work smoothly every
year in all units.
11.1.4 Instrumentation for Evaluation
by Students
(k) Of -the fifty-eight units whose instruments were available to us, fifty-three used
questionnaires which not only asked students to rate various items on a numerical
scale, but also invited comments. Four used
a form which requested only comments and
one used an instrument which required numerical answers with no invitation to add
comments.
(I) Forty-nine of the instruments included
a question which asked for the student's
overall view of the quality of either the instructor's teaching or the course, or both.
Nine had no such question.
(k) Fifty-four of the instruments asked
students to rate a number of specific elements of teaching performance. Of the four
open ended response forms, one suggested
examples of topics for response.
(I) Half of the instruments contain wording
which gives the students one or more reasons why they should answer the questions.
Half simply tell the student to answer the
questions.
(m) There is an enormous variety in the
appearance and content of the instruments
which we examined.
(n) The reasons for some of this variety
are clear: certain questions needed in some
disciplines are quite inappropriate for others.
For other aspects of the variation, however,
the reasons are less clear. Some instruments appear to have been developed a
number of years ago and not revised, others
are described as new. The number of questions to which students are asked to respond
ranges from one to forty and the elements of
teaching whierr^he questions encompass
range from the ordinary to the inspirational—
from "being on time for class" to "makes me
want to read more on my own". Some
instruments are unattractive, difficult to read
and with inadequate space for the comments they request. Others are attractive,
even stylish, and seem to invite a response.
11.1.5 The Use and Disposition of the
Results of Student Evaluations
(o) As noted above, all units use the
results in making decisions about reappointment, promotion and tenure, and relatively
few explicitly state that they are for the purpose of improving teaching. One may infer
from the fact that instructors receive the
results that they use them as a means to
improve their teaching, but it is the rare unit
which describes ways of facilitating this, let
alone insisting upon it. Some heads of units,
however, do note that they use the results as
a means of becoming alerted to problems,
and others note that they will discuss poor
ratings with instructors who receive them.
(p) tn one case, a respondent adds a third
use. The results are used (he presumes) by
students in selecting courses.
(q) In the majority of cases, students are
not told what their evaluations are used for.
Of the twenty-nine student evaluation instruments which provide students with a reason
why they are asked to evaluate, only about
half note that the results will be used in
improving teaching and in making personnel
decisions. The remainder give reasons such
as "this is the way we evaluate our instructors".
(r) A distinction is frequently made between the scores derived from numerical
rating scales and the comments written in
open-ended sections of the questionnaires.
In many cases, a statement indicates that
the comments are for the instructor's eyes
only.
(s) In all cases, the documentation states
or allows one to infer that the numerical
results are given to (or available for) the
instructor and the head of the unit. In some
units they are also passed to the person who
chairs a committee charged with the responsibility for reappointment, promotion and tenure cases or with decisions about merit
awards and prizes.
(t) In most cases the results are not avail
able to anyone outside this circle. Twelve of
the sixty-six units, however, make the numerical results available to students and in
one of them the department's policy notes
that they are to be available "to any interested member of the UBC community". The
extent to which this wider availability is made
known varies. In one case, printouts are
placed in the student lounge; in another they
are openly available for inspection in the
central office. In other units, the results are
available, but their availability is not "posted
on the bulletin board" and in one case availability to students is by means of a copy
being sent to the local student association.
II.2     The Views of Students
The total number of usable responses to
the student survey was 2,308. Three kinds
of analysis were performed on these responses: (i) an analysis of the scores of all
respondents on each item, (ii) cross tabulations and (iii) a content analysis of the written
comments. Each of these is dealt with
separately in the following paragraphs, and
the supporting statistics are given in Appendix E.
11.2.1 The Item Response Patterns
We can condense the responses to each
of the questionnaire items into four kinds of
finding. The first deals with question 2 on the
questionnaire which asked for an overall
judgement of the way UBC evaluates its
faculty members' teaching. Each of the
remaining three kinds of finding deals with
one ofthe groupings of questions 3 to 12 (the
procedures for evaluation, the content of the
instruments and the use made of the results).
(a) The Overall Judgement
The second item on the questionnaire
asked, "Overall, how would you rate the way
UBC evaluates its faculty members' teaching?".
Setting aside the 241 cases in which
respondents either did not answer this question or used a "Do not know" response, the
results fall fairly neatly into three categories.
Thirty-four percent rated UBC's teaching
evaluations as in the "Good" to "Excellent"
range, slightly less than thirty-five percent
rated it as "Just Adequate" and almost thirty-
one percent as in the "Less than Adequate"
to "Very Poor" range.
The fact that this latter (31%) group is
slightly smaller than the other two belies the
message given by the number of scores at
the extremes: more than five times as many
students give a "Very Poor" rating as give an
"Excellent" one.
(b) The Procedures Used
Three questions pertain to the procedures used in the evaluation of teaching.
Students were asked to indicate the extent to
wh|ch they believe it to be true that they are
asked to evaluate teaching (question 3), that
the procedures ensure that the completed
evaluation forms cannot be fiddled with (question 4), and that they can give honest evaluations of poor teaching because the procedures ensure that there can be no reprisals
from the instructor (question 5).
A comparison of the "I do not know" responses for these three questions shows
that whereas very few students said they did
not know how true it was that they were
asked to evaluate teaching, a full twenty-five
per cent of them said they were ignorant of
whether or not the procedures ensured that
there could be no fiddling and almost ten per
cent did not know whether they ensured no
instructor reprisals for unfavourable evaluations.
Of those respondents who were prepared
to provide ratings on these questions, the
majority (almost 81%) thought it was often,
usually or always true that students were
asked to evaluate teaching, and that instructor reprisals were unlikely (80.5%). A slightly
smaller majority (71.5%) used those categories to describe their belief about the effectiveness of procedures in ensuring that evaluations could not be tampered with.
(c) The Instruments Used
Two questions asked for respondents'
views on the quality of the instruments used
to obtain student evaluations of teaching.
Question 6 asked whether the forms used
provided adequate opportunity for students
to express their views and question 7 asked
about the extent to which they covered what
respondents thought was important about
teaching.
Few respondents in either question said
they did not know. Of those that did have an
opinion, the majority (61.6%) felt that it was
often, usually or always true that the forms
provided adequate opportunity for the expression of their views and a smaller majority
(53.2%) chose these categories to describe
the extent to which the forms used covered
what they thought was important about teaching.
For both these questions, the results are
somewhat less favourable than in the case
of the questions dealing with procedures.
Here we find about twenty percent of respondents in each question rating the content of the forms in the lowest three categories.
(d) The Use Made of the Results
The last five questions all bore in one way
or another on the use made of the evaluations of faculty members' teaching. The first
of them (question 8) is different from the
others and asks about the impact of teaching
evaluations.
Over twenty-eight per cent of respondents said they did not know to what extent it
was true that the evaluations had an impact
on improving teaching. Of those that did
answer, almost two thirds (64.9%) said that
it was never, rarely or not often true.
Question 11 asked to what extent it was
true that the results of the evaluations were
available to provide information to students
and most said either that they did not know
(30.1%) or that it was never, rarely or not
often true (54.4%).
Questions 9, 10 and 12 asked to what
extent respondents thought it was true that
results were used to inform decisions about
contract renewal, promotion and tenure, to
recognize meritorious teaching, and to provide helpful feedback to instructors.
Large numbers of respondents said they
did not know (52.3%, 45% and 32.4% respectively for the three questions). Of those
that claimed to know, most (57.2%) felt that
it was never, rarely or not often true that
results were used to inform personnel decisions. With respect to the use of results to
recognize meritorious teaching, about a third
of those who responded with a score fell into
each of the low, medium and high categories. In the matter of the results as providing
feedback to an instructor, almost half felt that
it was always, usually or often true that such
was the case.
11.2.2 Cross Tabulations
Cross tabulations were carried out of responses grouped according to the year and
the program area in which students declared
themselves to be.
The analysis showed that little difference
in mean scores is attributable to what year a
student was in. There are some differences,
however, in the mean scores of responses
grouped by program area. Because of the
small cell sizes in several of the categories
and because students were asked to consider evaluation in the Department in which
they had taken most of this year's courses
rather than in the Faculty to which they
belonged, we are not inclined to base conclusions on these results. They may, however, be usefully provocative for the Faculties and program areas involved, and for this
reason we have included the tabular results
in Appendix E.
11.2.3 The Written Comments
Forty-two per cent of the respondents
used the Comments section of the questionnaire to write one or more comments. The
969 questionnaires which contained such
material were carefully read and each comment noted. The total number of comments
was 1,129 and each could be classified into
one of six categories: the use of the evaluations, the procedures followed, the content
and design of the instruments, the nonavailability to students of results, positive
comments and "other". Appendix F displays
the categories and the number of comments
in each.
Almost half of all comments had to do with
the use to which the evaluations are put.
Comments about the procedures, the instruments and the non-availability of results together accounted for just over forty percent.
Only nineteen of the comments were positive and in two thirds of those, the favourable
observation was accompanied by an offsetting criticism. We present below a representative sample of the comments.
It seems to me that the issue is not whether
or not the courses are well evaluated, but
rather whether those evaluations are acted
upon. It seems to me there is scant evidence
of this.
Some instructors have expressed that
they have already received promotion and
tenure, and therefore the evaluation does
not do too much in the eyes of students.
We have been concerned about a certain
prof's teaching for the past two years and
nothing has been done to change it—in fact
she came down on us for it.
I really wish students' evaluation, when
repeatedly nega five (for a particular instructor), would have an impact on contract renewals, but I doubt it matters at all. If the
evaluations are not seriously considered,
then why do we have to evaluate?
Teaching evaluations—/ usually consider
them as a waste of my time as do most other
students I study with. I often wonder of what
good these evaluations are. Who exactly
looks at them? I often feel that these evaluations are done for the sake of doing them—
not really for the purpose of learning anything from them.
Students are not given any information
about teaching evaluations at UBC. Are
evaluations performed on everyone? Are
poor lecturers asked to take a course or
seminar on teaching methods?
I keep filling out evaluations about bad
profs, but they still keep on teaching.  This is
not a bitter response over bad grades (I'm
fairly satisfied with my grades) but an accurate analysis of a useless procedure.
On a few occasions I have experienced
with a class that we felt a certain professor
had used insulting teaching methods in class,
yet every year he is still here and every year
I hear that his class has given him a poor
evaluation.
I find that teacher evaluations are not
given out consistently. Why do some profs
neglect to give evaluations? Aren't they
mandatory?
Often professors don't give enough time
to fill out the evaluations, especially controversial professors who may not want lengthy
negative comments written by students.
Teachers should not see them before the
final exam. Somehow mine always do.
It is not fair that some professors ask their
students to be generous with their evaluations because salary increases and contract
renewals are at stake.
[The instruments] need to deal more with
the attitudes of professors ratherthan stressing attendance and preparedness.
The concept is right but the [evaluation]
form is weak. We need categories about
ability to teach and attitude in order to evaluate a prof on a form.
We never receive any feedback as to the
results of the questionnaires. For all we
know they immediately go into the garbage
can. It would be helpful to have a summary
evaluation posted on each teacher at years
end based on the questionnaire.
I can honestly say that only two out of my
five professors do really know how to teach
... almost every T.A. can't even speak English, let alone teach.
III. CONCLUSIONS AND
RECOMMENDATIONS
At the conclusion of our discussion of the
previous reviews of teaching evaluation we
noted that in some sense the evaluation of
teaching is a problem that won't go away. It
is now clear, however, that the root problem
is not inadequate evaluation of teaching, but
inadequate action on what the evaluation
reveals. UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
The Evaluation of Teaching at UBC in 1991
This root problem is the key one which we
have identified. A second kind of problem is
the variation in the quality of the way teaching evaluations are done. A third is the
problem of ensuring that those most affected
by teaching, the students, know that their
input is seriously sought and seriously considered. Our recommendations deal with
each of these kinds of problem in turn. A
fourth group of recommendations deals with
the implementation of changes.
111.1 The Problem of
Inadequate Action on What
Teaching Evaluation Reveals
Appropriate action resulting from superior
evaluations of teaching performance seems
now more frequent than it perhaps once
was. The University has extended its system of teaching awards and several Heads
have noted that they use evidence of meritorious teaching as a component of arguments
for merit pay as well as in building cases for
reappointment, tenure and promotion.
Action which follows poor assessments of
teaching performance, on the other hand, is
seen to be absent or inadequate. We recognize that the collective agreement specifies
the necessary actions in extreme cases of
poor performance—those which are likely to
lead to termination. Most cases, however,
are not so extreme and action is at the
discretion of heads of units. This can often
mean that little or no action is taken at all, and
all too frequently, any action which is taken
is either ineffective or seen to be so.
If this is to be remedied, two aspects of the
"appropriate action" issue need to be considered: who acts and what the action should
be. We believe that action is needed both by
heads of units and by instructors themselves.
We see also that two lands of action are
possible in the realm of discretionary action:
action to improve teaching and action leading to the best use of different kinds of
available teaching talent and the avoidance
of unsuitable assignments.
With respect to the improvement of teaching, we note that a variety of services is
available through the Faculty Development
Program (a project sponsored jointly by the
President's Office and the Faculty Association). These services have been well received by those who have used them. Help
is available for those who want to analyze
their own teaching in general as well as for
those who are interested in developing some
particular aspect of what they do in the
classroom. A new venture is focussing on
productive uses of peer evaluation, and consultation with experts out of one's own department can also be arranged.
From these observations come our first
three recommendations:
1. That Deans, Directors and Department
Heads take some action in response to results which showless than satisfactory teaching performance, that a report of such action
be submitted annually to the Vice President
(Academic) in the case of Deans and to the
Dean in the case of Directors and Heads,
and that the Vice President (Academic) provide annually to Senate a summary of these
reports.
2. That instructors whose evaluation results are less than satisfactory be strongly
urged to avail themselves of services such
as those available (or being developed)
through the Faculty Development Program.
3. That Deans, Directors and Department
Heads actively consider differentiated staffing so as to allow different kinds of teaching
strength to be appropriately used.
III.2 The Problem of Variation
in the Quality of Teaching
Evaluation
It has been a sine qua non of UBC's
approach over the years that there should be
no imposition of university-wide rules about
how teaching evaluation is done. While we
see the need for Faculty and departmental
autonomy in some respects, we are alarmed
at the extent to which there is variation
across the campus. Our alarm stems not
from the fact of variation, but from the way it
has allowed a few poor procedures and
indifferent instruments to persist. While there
are some instruments which are excellent, a
number of others give the appearance of
having been made in Faculty meetings at a
time when rules of thumb were all that were
available for guidance. Expertise is available now in several places on campus and
some of the more recent instruments are
clearly the result of its use.
We believe that all units would have much
to gain by examining the range of documents
which we have had available to us. We
believe also that some basic minimum standards of quality should be required in evaluations, and that the fairness of their adminis
tration should be above suspicion.
Accordingly we make two recommendations:
4. That the collected policies and instruments now in the possession of the Committee be made available for perusal by Deans,
Directors, Department Heads and interested
members of the University community.
5. That Deans, Directors, Department
Heads and members ofrele vant committees
review the procedures and instruments for
the evaluation of teaching in their units and,
where necessary, obtain expert help in their
revision so as to ensure that:
(a) Peer evaluation is appropriately and
systematically used,
(b) Procedures for obtaining studentevaluations are fairly managed and safe from
intervention by the instructor who is being
evaluated,
(c) Adequate time is allowed for students
to complete evaluations,
(d) Results are not given to instructors
until after they have submitted the final marks
for the course or courses in which they are
being evaluated,
(e) Instruments are of evident high quality
and respectful of students' right to know why
they are being asked to evaluate,
(f) Instruments include a question designed to assess the instructor's overall performance and include open-ended space for
comment.
III.3 The Problem of
Evaluation's Being Seen To
Be Done and Well Used
It seems very clear that students in general do not really know that evaluation of
teaching is required. They do not know how
it is supposed to work. And they do not know
what happens to their assessments. One
comment received in response to our own
questionnaire was to the effect that the writer
had no more expectation of knowing what
would come of this effort than of knowing
what became of all the other comments he or
she had written. There are at least three
consequences of the University's failure to
communicate well about evaluation: cynicism (which we have seen in some of the
verbatim student responses), resentment
that "nothing is done" about poor teaching,
and a sense that the University does not put
a high priority on teaching, whatever its
public statements may say.
Summary List of Recommendations
1. That Deans, Directors and Department Heads take some action in response
to results which show less than satisfactory
teaching performance, that a report of such
action be submitted annually to the Vice
President (Academic) in the case of Deans
and to the Dean in the case of Directors and
Heads, and that the Vice President (Academic) provide annually to Senate a summary of these reports.
2. That instructors whose evaluation
results are less than satisfactory be
strongly urged to avail themselves of
services such as those available (or being developed) through the Faculty Development Program.
3. That Deans, Directors and Department Heads actively consider differentiated staffing so as to allow different
kinds of teaching strength to be appropriately used.
4. That the collected policies and
instruments now in the possession of the
Committee be made available for perusal
by Deans, Directors, Department Heads
and interested members ofthe University
community.
5. That Deans, Directors, Department
Heads and members of relevant committees review the procedures and instruments for the evaluation of teaching in their
units and, where necessary, obtain expert
help in their revision so as to ensure that:
(a) Peer evaluation is appropriately and
systematically used,
(b) Procedures for obtaining student
evaluations are fairly managed and safe
from intervention by the instructor who is
being evaluated,
(c) Adequate time is allowed for students to complete evaluations,
(d) Results are not given to instructors
until after they have submitted the final
marks for the course or courses in which
they are being evaluated,
(e) Instruments are of evident high quality and respectful of students' right to know
why they are being asked to evaluate,
(f) Instruments include a question designed to assess the instructor's overall
performance and include open-ended
space for comment.
6. ThatSenatecausethefollowingstate-
ment to be inserted in the General Academic
Regulations Section of the Calendar (p. 24,
col. 2 of the 1991-92 Calendar):
The University recognizes the importance of high quality teaching for the
academic preparation of its students
and accordingly requires that instructors be annually evaluated by procedures which include provision for assessments by students.
7. That the instruments used to obtain
student evaluations carry a copy of this
statement and indicate clearly what the
results of the evaluation are used for.
8. That Senate reaffirm its requirement for an annual evaluation of teaching, less because the pattern of results
may change in one year, than because
each year's students should have the
opportunity to express their views.
9. That Deans, Directors and Department Heads give serious consideration to
making statistical summary results of the
evaluations in their units available for inspection by students and by other members ofthe University community who have
a legitimate interest in them.
10. That all units give serious consideration to establishing committees whose
function is to monitor the processes
whereby teaching is evaluated and
whose membership includes student representation.
11. That our report be circulated to
Faculties, Schools, Departments and the
AMS Students' Council, and that a copy
be lodged in the Library.
.   12. That action based on these recommendations begin in January 1992.
13. That during the term of the Senate of 1993-96 there be established an
ad hoc committee to review the progress
made following these recommendations.
14. That Senate discharge the Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching
Evaluation (1990).
To prevent these consequences we believe that the ignorance of students about
teaching evaluation in the University is something which needs to be changed. This will
require an affirmation of policy, new action,
and in some cases, a rethinking of present
reasons for not acting. Accordingly, we
make five recommendations:
6. That Senate cause the following statement to be inserted in the General Academic
Regulations Section ofthe Calendar (p. 24,
col. 2 of the 1991-92 Calendar):
The University recognizes the importance
of high quality teaching for the academic
preparation of its students and accordingly
requires that instructors be annually evaluated by procedures which include provision
for assessments by students.
7. That the instruments used to obtain
student evaluations carry a copy of this statement and indicate clearty what the results of
the evaluation are used for.
8. That Senate reaffirm its requirement for
an annual evaluation of teaching, less because the pattern of results may change in
one year, than because each year's students should have the opportunity to express their views.
9. That Deans, Directors and Department
Heads give serious consideration to making
statistical summary results of the evaluations in their units available for inspection by
students and by other members of the University community who have a legitimate
interest in them.
10. That all units give serious consideration to establishing committees
whose function is to monitor the processes whereby teaching is evaluated
and whose membership includes student representation.
III.4 Recommendations
Concerning Implementation
We are not sure of the extent to which
Faculties, Schools and Departments are
aware of the kinds of problem which we have
described here. It seems clear to us that
there is no room for complacency at UBC
about the way we handle the evaluation of
teaching, and yet we have arrived at this view
only as a result of the work we have done. It
is unlikely that those who have not seen our
data will share our concern. Implementation
of a set of recommendations is more likely to
the extent that people understand the reasons for the recommendations. It is also
helped if there is a time set for it, and if some
subsequent review is scheduled. Accordingly we make three recommendations:
11. That our report be circulated to Faculties, Schools, Departments and the AMS
Students' Council, and that a copy be lodged
in the Library.
12. That action based on these recommendations begin in January 1992.
13. That during the term of the Senate of
1993-96 there be established an ad hoc
committee to review the progress made following these recommendations.
Finally, in accordance with the rules of
Senate, we recommend:
14. That Senate discharge the Senate Ad
Hoc Committee on Teaching Evaluation
(1990).
J. Graham T. Kelsey, Co-chair
Faculty of Education
Orvin C. W. Lau, Co-chair
Student Member of Senate
Richard L. Chase
Faculty of Science
Manfred L. Hanik
Student Member of Senate
Stephen W. T. Mak
Student Member of Senate
Philip Resnick
Faculty of Arts
Minoru Sugimoto
Convocation Member of Senate
John Vanderstoep
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences
Wendy A. King
Student Member of Senate
Benjamin D. Prins
Student Member of Senate UNIVERSITY     OF     BRITISH     COLUMBIA
The Evaluation of Teaching at UBC in 1991
APPENDIX A
Formal specifications about
the evaluation
of teaching at UBC
(as of June 1991)
I. The Faculty Handbook
The Faculty Handbook (Conditions of Appointment, I, section 4.02, page C-6) reads as
follows:
Teaching includes all presentation whether
through lectures, seminars and tutorials, individual and group discussion, supervision of individual students' work, or other means by which
students, whether in degree or non-degree programmes sponsored by the University, derive
educational benefit AnindMdual'sentireteach-
ingcontributionshallbeassessed. Evaluationof
teaching shall be based on the effectiveness
rather than the popularity of the instructor, as
indicated by his command over subject matter,
familiarity with recent developments in the field,
preparedness, presentation, accessibilityto stu-
dentsandinfluenceon the intellectual and scholarly development of students. The methods of
teaching evaluation may vary; they may include
student opinion, assessment by colleagues of
pertbrmanceinuniversitylectures, outsiderefer-
ences concerning teaching at other institutions,
course material and examinations, thecalibreof
supervised essays and theses, and other relevant considerations. When the opinions of
students or of colleagues are sought, itshallbe
ckz)ne through formal procedures. Consideration
shall be given to the ability and willingness ofthe
candidate to teach a range ofsubjectmatterand
at various levels of insttuction.
II. Recommendations approved by Senate
Approved March 22, 1978:
• That annual systematic, objective and cumulative evaluations should be obtained for all
faculty members and instructors, and for undergraduate courses for which this is practicable.
•That such evaluation include teaching evaluation, and that teaching evaluation be considered in reappointment, promotion and tenure
decisions.
• That the timing and form of such evaluation
be decided by each Faculty.
• That the evaluation instruments be developed and administered by the Faculties and/or
departments concerned.
Approved May 18, 1983:
• That teaching evaluation forms should not
require students to provide their name, student
number or grade point average. (This does not
preclude information such as Year, Faculty,
Major, 1st/2nd/pass/fail.)
• That teaching evaluations bear a reminder
that students may wish to print their remarks in
order to avoid recognition of their handwriting.
APPENDIX B
Reviews of the evaluation of
teaching at UBC, 1974-1991
1974 (Dec) Report (to Senate) of the Ad
Hoc Committee of Senate (Chair R. Daniells)
Described procedures in use; sought faculty
members' views.
Recommended establishment of a Presi-
deritsPemTanentCommitteeon Teaching Evaluation; this committee to set up a series of short
courses on the improvement of teaching to be
offered according to demand.
1977 (May) Report (to the President) of the
President's Permanent Committee on Teaching
Evaluation (Chair R. Bulley) *
Primary objective: to advise the President on effective methods for improving the
quality of teaching at UBC.
Chief recommendations:
• Teactmg ability of all candidates for
new positions should be assessed;
* This Committee appears not to have met since
1977.
*Full and concrete evidence of teaching
competence to be submitted in support of recommendations for promotion, tenure and merit
pay;
• Establishment of an office to work with
faculty members to improve their instruction;
• Faculties should submit an annual
report to the Senate Committee on Teaching
Evaluation showing which courses were evaluated, how, who has access to the results and
what other methods were used in addition to
evaluation by students.
1978 (March) Report (to Senate) ofthe
Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching Evaluation
(1976) (Chair B. Moyls)
Surveyed Faculties' procedures and
found (1) nearly all Faculties & Departments
usedstudentquestionnairesand(2)therequire-
ment for annual evaluation was not universal.
Recommended regulations which were
adopted by Senate and are still (1991) current.
Recommended also that Faculties report annually toacommittee of Senate (this recommendation not adopted).
1983 (May) Report (to Senate) ofthe results
of a survey of evaluation procedures conducted
by the Student Senate Caucus (L. Smyth and S.
Provost)
Surveyed policies & procedures used by
Deans, Department Heads and Directors of
Schools and the opinions of these people on the
effectiveness and relevance of student evaluations of professors. Also sought the views of
Presidentsof Undergraduate Student Societies.
Recommendation resulted in the adoption by Senate of two additional regulations
which are still (1991) current.
1989-90 Survey by the President's Office
(A. J. McClean) of evaluation procedures used
in each Faculty
1990-91 Senate Ad Hoc Committee on
Teaching Evaluation (1990) (Co-chairs: J. G. T.
Kelsey and O. Lau)
Whereas the Senate wishes to affirm its
continuinginterestinthevalueofexcellentteach-
ing, be it resolved that Senate establish an ad
hoc committee to review the policy, administration and use of teaching evaluations in consultation with the Faculties and students and report
back to Senate on its recommendations.
APPENDIX C
Letter used to request information from
deans, heads and directors
December 21, 1990
Re: Senate Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching
Evaluation (1990)
We are writing as co-chairs of the Senate
Ad Hoc Committee on Teaching Evaluation
(1990). As a first step, the committee is
trying to compile an inventory of the policies
and practices currently used across the University forthe evaluation of teaching, and we
would like to ask for your help.
Specifically, we would be grateful for your
responses to the following:
1. Does your Faculty have a written policy
governing the evaluation of teaching? If so,
please may we have a copy? If not, can you
describe the practice normally followed?
2. Please may we have a copy of any
instrument(s) used in the Faculty for data
collection in teaching evaluation?
3. Please can you provide us with information (if it is not included in your Faculty's
policy) about (a) the procedures whereby
data collection instruments are used, (b) the
disposition of, and access to results, and (c)
the uses to which the results are put.
4. Please can we know the name of a
contact person in your Faculty to whom we
can go for further information if it should be
necessary?
It would help our work greatly if we could
have your response by January 31 st. Please
accept our thanks in advance.
Yours sincerely,
Orvin Lau
Graham Kelsey
(Note: The term "Faculty" changed to
"Department" or "School" as appropriate )
APPENDIX D
Notes on procedures
followed in designing
the questionnaire and
conducting
the survey of students
These notes describe first the design of the
survey instrument, second the methods used to
select the sample of students and third the
characteristics of those who responded.
1. The Instrument
A twelve-item questionnaire with space for
respondent comments was used. It was developed in subcommittee, pilot tested by students
from two classes and then reviewed by two
faculty members with expert knowledge in questionnaire construction. A revised version was
again piloted with a group of six students and
final adjustments were made. The instrument
was designed so as to permit machine scoring
of all responses except the written comments.
A copy of the questionnaire is to be found
immediately following these notes. It was designed to provide (i) information about the program and year in which the respondent was
registered, (ii) the respondent's "overall" rating of
the way teaching is evaluated at the University,
(iii) student views about ten particular aspects of
teaching evaluation, and (iv) any other comments the respondent wished to offer about
teaching evaluation. The ten aspects of evaluation which were the focus of the third of these
sections covered the procedures used to evaluate teaching, the content ofthe instruments used
and the use made of the results.
Respondents were instructed that in making
their judgements about the evaluation of teaching they were to think of the way they had
experienced it in the department in which they
were taking most of theircoursesthis year. This
instruction was designed to provide a reasonably tangible focal point for respondents, without
limiting their consideration to the course they
were taking at the time of the response. It was
also designed to minimize the possibility that
instructors might be disinclined to cooperate in
the questionnaire's administration because they
felt they themselves were being targeted.
2. The Sampling
The key considerations in deciding sample
size were, on the one hand, the need for a big
enough sample to give credible results, and on
the other, the need to be attentive to costs and
the difficulties of administering the questionnaire
in such a way that all or most programs were
included.
A target sample of close to 4,000 seemed to
meet the first need. Forthesecond.theCommit-
tee ascertained that Deans, Directors and Department Heads were willing to be the means of
administering the questionnaire. The target
population consisted of undergraduate students
who were likely to have experienced teaching
evaluations at this University over a period of
more than one year. (There is evidence that the
conduct of and response to teaching evaluation
is somewhat different for graduate students.) An
examination of class sizes in various faculties
and years led to the decision to distribute questionnaires to students in selected 300 and 400
level courses. The number of questionnaires
sent to each unit matched approximately the
proportion of undergraduate students enrolled in
those courses in that unit. We thus had an
approximately proportionate sample of students
enrolled in 300 and 400 level courses in all
Faculties atUBC except theFaculty of Graduate
Studies. A total of 3,970 questionnaires was
distributed.
Batchesof questionnaires were sentto Deans
of those Faculties which used Faculty-wkJeevalu-
ation procedures (all except Arts and Science),
to Directorsof Schools and to Department Heads
in the Faculties of Arts and Science where
departments manage their own teaching evaluations.! These administrators were asked to
identify courses at the 300 and 400 level whose
instructors were willing to allow the administration of the questionnaire, and to ask those
instructors to administer the questionnaire to
their students. Completed questionnaires were
to be returned to the administrator or his or her
delegate who would then return them in one
batch to the Committee. Students who had
already completed the questionnaire in another
class were instructed not to do it a second time.
3. The Respondents
The number of questionnaires returned was
2,308, a response rate of 58 per cent. This was
considered a very satisfactory return rate in view
of the method used for the administration of the
instrument which, in effect, interposed one, or in
some cases two buffers between the Committee
and the eventual respondent. More important
than the return rate is the extent to which the
pattern of returns reflected the target population.
Table 1 shows the number of returns compared
with the number of regular Winter Session students enrolled in the second and subsequent
years of undergraduate programs, and clearly
shows the close match between the numbers
enrolled and the numbers responding.
The aim of obtaining respondents who had
more than one years experience of the way
teaching is evaluated was also achieved. Just
over seventy-seven per cent of respondents
declared themselves to be in third or fourth year,
almost thirteen percent were in second year (but
this included some Education students whose
second year of the Education program follows
four years in other Faculties), and just under ten
per cent showed themselves as fifth year or
Graduate. First year responses accounted for
less than one per cent of the respondents.
t Departments in the Faculty of Medicine also
manage their own teaching evaluations. The Dean's
Office, however, agreed that to have the questionnaires administered by Departments would yield
unworkably low sample sizes, and accordingly the
survey was done on a Faculty-wide basis.
Table 1
Enrollments in Target Population and Number of Questionnaire Returns
Program Area
Arts
(a)
Sciences
(c)
(b)
Enrollment as
of
Survey Responses
Nov. 1990 (excludes
first year)
No.
% of total
No.
% of total
enrollment
responses
5826
37.5
861
37.3
4381
28.2
562
24.4
5324
34.3
859
26
37.2
1.1
Other
Not known
Total 15531 100.0 2308 100.0
(a) Excluding Family & Nutritional Sciences and Social Work which are included in "other".
(b) Includes Science, Agricultural Sciences, and Applied Science (except for Architecture and Nursing
which are included in "other").
(c) Architecture, Commerce & Business Administration, Dentistry, Education, Family & Nutritional
Sciences, Forestry, Law, Medicine, Nursing, Pharmaceutical Sciences, Physical Education &
Recreation and Social Work. UNIVERSITY     OF    BRITISH     COLUMBIA
The Evaluation of Teaching at UBC in 1991
APPENDIX E
Statistical results from the survey of students
la.   In what Faculty or program are you currently registered?
Value Label
Made comments
No comments
Valid    Cum
Value Frequency Percent Percent Percent
TOTAL
969
1339
42.0
58.0
42.0
58.0
42.0
100.0
2308
100.0
100.0
COUNT
969
1339
VALUE
1.00 IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
2.00 Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
I I I I . I I
0       12       24       36       48       60
Percent
Valid Cases
2308
Missing Cases
lb.   In what year are you registered?
Value Label
1
2
3
4
5
GRAD
COUNT
Valid    Cum
Value Frequency Percent Percent Percent
1
17
.7
.7
.7
2
291
12.6
12.8
13.5
3
980
42.5
43.1
56.6
4
801
34.7
35.2
91.8
5
125
5.4
5.5
97.3
6
62
2.7
2.7
100.0
•
32
1.4
MISSING
TOTAL
2308
100.0
100.0
17
1.00
291
2.00
980
3.00
801
4.00
125
5.00
62
6.00
IX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXX
I XXX
I I I I I—
0       10        20        30        40
Percent
..I
50
Valid Cases
2276
Missing Cases
32
2.    Overall, how would you rate the way UBC evaluates its faculty members' teaching?
Value Label
Valid    Cum
Value Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Valid
Cum
Value Label
Value
Frequency
Percent
Percent
Percent
Agricultural Science
1
24
1.0
1.1
1.1
Applied Science
2
240
10.4
10.5
11.6
Architecture
3
4
.2
.2
11.7
Arts
4
794
34.4
34.8
46.5
Commerce/Bus. Admin.
5
196
8.5
8.6
55.1
Dentistry
6
29
1.3
1.3
56.4
Education
7
136
5.9
6.0
62.4
Family/Nut. Science
8
51
2.2
2.2
64.6
Fine Arts
9
34
1.5
1.5
66.1
Forestry
10
46
2.0
2.0
68.1
Law
11
93
4.0
4.1
72.2
Medicine
12
105
4.5
4.6
76.8
Music
13
33
1.4
1.4
78.2
Nursing
14
43
1.9
1.9
80.1
Pharmaceutical Sci.
15
71
3.1
3.1
83.2
Science
16
298
12.9
13.1
96.3
Other
17
85
3.7
3.7
100.0
•
26
1.1
MISSING
2308
100.0
100.0
COUNT
24
l.oo
IX
240
2.00
|XXXXXXXXXXXXX
4
3.00
1
794
4.00
1 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
196
5.00
1XXXXXXXXXXX
29
6.00
IXX
136
7.00
IXXXXXXX
51
8.00
IXXX
34
9.00
|XX
46
10.00
IXXX
93
11.00
IXXXXX
105
12.00
IXXXXXX
33
13.00
IXX
43
14.00
|XX
71
15.00
IXXXX
298
16.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
85
17.00
IXXXXX
 I
0         8        16        24        32
40
Percent
Valid Cases
2282
Missing Cases   26
3.    EXTENT TRUE: Students are asked to evaluate instructors1 teaching
Valid    Cum
Value Label Value Frequency Percent Percent Percent
Very poor
1
93
4.0
4.5
4.5
Poor
2
162
7.0
7.8
12.3
Less than adequate
3
390
16.9
18.9
31.2
Just adequate
4
720
31.2
34.8
66.0
Good
5
574
24.9
27.8
93.8
Very good
6
111
4.8
5.4
99.2
Excellent
7
17
.7
.8
100.0
.
41
1.8
MISSING
I do not know
0
200
8.7
MISSING
TOTAL
2308
100.0
100.0
Never true
Rarely true
Not often true
Sometimes true
Often true
Usually true
Always true
I do not know
1
10
.4
.4
.4
2
42
1.8
1.9
2.3
3
97
4.2
4.3
6.6
4
283
12.3
12.6
19.2
5
391
16.9
17.4
36.6
6
854
37.0
38.0
74.6
7
572
24.8
25.4
100.0
.
27
1.2
MISSING
0
32
1.4
MISSING
TOTAL
2308
100.0
100.0
COUNT
VALUE
VALUE
93
1.00
IXXXXXX
162
2.00
IXXXXXXXXXX
390
3.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
720
4.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
574
5.00
1xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
111
6.00
1XXXXXXX
17
7.00
IX
. .1	
0        8
16       24
32        4
Percent
Mean
3.929
Median
4.000     Mode
4.000
Std Dev
1.212
Minimum
1.000     Maximum
7.000
Valid Cases
2067
Missing
Cases  241
10
1.00
IX
42
2.00
|XX
97
3.00
IXXXXX
283
4.00
I XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
391
5.00
1 XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
854
6.00
1XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
572
7.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
0         8        16        24        32        4
Percent
Mean
5.602
Median       6.000     Mode        6.000
Std Dev
1.254
Minimum      1.000     Maximum      7.000
Valid Cases
2249
Missing Cases   59
EXTENT TRUE: The procedures ensure that completed student evaluation
forms cannot be fiddled with
Valid    Cum
Value Label Value Frequency Percent Percent  Percent
Never true
Rarely true
Not often true
Sometimes true
Often true
Usually true
Always true
I do not know
COUNT
1
70
3.0
4.1
4.1
2
70
3.0
4.1
8.2
3
118
5.1
6.9
15.2
4
226
9.8
13.3
28.5
5
311
13.5
18.3
46.8
6
580
25.1
34.2
81.0
7
323
14.0
19.0
100.0
.
32
1.4
MISSING
0
578
25.0
MISSING
100.0
5.    EXTENT TRUE: Students can give honest evaluations of poor teaching because
procedures ensure there can be no reprisals from the instructor
Value Label
Never true
Rarely true
Not often true
Sometimes true
Often true
Usually true
Always true
I do not know
Valid
Cum
ie
Frequency
Percent
Percent
Percent
1
19
.8
.9
.9
2
41
1.8
2.0
2.9
3
116
5.0
5.7
8.6
4
223
9.7
10.9
19.5
5
323
14.0
15.8
35.3
6
754
32.7
36.8
72.1
7
572
24.8
27.9
100.0
36
1.6
MISSING
0
224
9.7
MISSING
2308
100.0
70
1.00
IXXXXX
70
2.00
IXXXXX
118
3.00
IXXXXXXXXX
226
4.00
1XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
311
5.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
580
6.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
323
7.00
I XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
 I
0        8       16       24       32
40
Percent
Mean
5.161
Median       6.000     Mode
6.000
Std Dev
1.587
Minimum      1.000     Maximum
7.000
Valid Cases
1698
Missing Cases  610
19
41
116
223
323
754
572
Mean
Std Dev
Valid Cases
1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
5.607
1.335
2048
IX
IXXX
IXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
I I I I I I
0        8       16       24       32       40
Percent
Median
Minimum
6.000
1.000
Mode
Maximum
6.000
7.000
Missing Cases  260 UNIVERSITY     OF     BRITISH     COLUMBIA
The Evaluation of Teaching at UBC in 1991
6.    EXTENT TRUE: The forms used provide adequate opportunity for me to express my views
Valid    Cum
Value Label
Never true
Rarely true
Not often true
Sometimes true
Often true
Usually true
Always true
I do not know
TOTAL      2308    100.0    100.0
e
Frequency
Percent
Percent
Percent
1
61
2.6
2.7
2.7
2
167
7.2
7.4
10.2
3
231
10.0
10.3
20.4
4
404
17.5
18.0
38.4
5
437
18.9
19.5
57.9
6
617
26.7
27.5
85.4
7
328
14.2
14.6
100.0
37
1.6
MISSING
0
26
1.1
MISSING
7.    EXTENT TRUE: The forms used cover what I think is important about teaching
Valid    Cum
Value Label Value  Frequency  Percent  Percent  Percent
Never true
Rarely true
Not often true
Sometimes true
Often true
Usually true
Always true
I do not know
1
65
2.8
2.9
2.9
2
159
6.9
7.1
10.0
3
252
10.9
11.3
21.3
4
567
24.6
25.4
46.7
5
561
24.3
25.1
71.9
6
494
21.4
22.1
94.0
7
134
5.8
6.0
100.0
42
1.8
MISSING
0
34
1.5
MISSING
2308
100.0
100.0
COUNT
61
167
231
404
437
617
328
1.00
IXXXXX
Ixxxxxxxxxxxx
Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
I I I I I I
0 6       12        18        24        30
Percent
6.000
7.000
Mean
4.849
Median                5.000
Mode
Std Dev
1.592
Minimum               1.000
Maximum
Valid Cases
2245
Missing Cases         63
65
1.00
IXXXXX
159
2.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXX
252
3.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
567
4.00
1XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
561
5.00
1XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
4 94
6.00
1XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
134
7.00
1XXXXXXXXXX
I I	
..I I I I
0                     6
12                   18                   24                   30
Percent
Mean
4.531
Median
5.000             Mode                      4.000
Std Dev
1.434
Minimum
1.000              Maximum                7.000
Valid Cases
2232
Missing  Cases
76
8.    EXTENT TRUE: The evaluations have an impact on improving teaching
Valid    Cum
Value Label Value Frequency Percent  Percent  Percent
Never true
Rarely true
Not often true
Sometimes true
Often true
Usually true
Always true
9.
I do not know
284
435
330
336
128
86
16
1
284
12.3
17.6
17.6
2
435
18.8
26.9
44.5
3
330
14.3
20.4
65.0
4
336
14.6
20.8
85.8
5
128
5.5
7.9
93.7
6
86
3.7
5.3
99.0
7
16
.7
1.0
100.0
31
1.3
MISSING
0
662
28.7
MISSING
TOTAL
2308
100.0
100.0
1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
I xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
IXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXX
IXX
I I I I I	
0 6        12        18        24
Percent
. .1
30
Mean
Std Dev
Valid Cases
2.945
1.461
Median
Minimum
3.000
1.000
Mode
Maximum
2.000
7.000
Missing Cases   693
EXTENT TRUE: The results ofthe evaluations are used to inform decisions about
professors' contract renewal, promotion and tenure
Value Label
Never true
Rarely true
Not   often true
Sometimes true
Often true
Usually true
Always true
I do not  know
Value
Valid
Cum
e
Frequency
Percent
Percent
Percent
1
223
9.7
20.9
20.9
2
230
10.0
21.6
42.5
3
157
6.8
14.7
57.2
4
206
8.9
19.3
76.5
5
126
5.5
11.8
88.3
6
91
3.9
8.5
96.8
7
34
1.5
3.2
100.0
34
1.5
MISSING
0
1207
52.3
MISSING
TOTAL
2308
100.0
100.0
223
230
157
206
126
91
34
1.00
2.00
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXX
I I I I I	
0        5       10       15       20
Percent
. .1
25
Mean
Std Dev
Valid Cases
3.179
1.722
1067
Median
Minimum
3.000
1.000
Mode
Maximum
2.000
7.000
Missing Cases 1241
10.   EXTENT TRUE: The results ofthe evaluations are
used to recognize meritorious
11.   EXTENT TRUE: The results of the evaluations are available to provide inform
teaching
Valid
Cum
ation for students
Valid
Cum
Value Label
Value    Frequency
Percent
Percent
Percent
Value  Label
Value
Frequency
Percent
Percent
Percent
Never true
1
111
4.8
9.0
9.0
Never true
1
779
33.8
49.4
49.4
Rarely true
2
158
6.8
12.9
21.9
Rarely true
2
298
12.9
18.9
68.3
Not often true
3
182
7.9
14.B
36.7
Not  often true
3
177
7.7
11.2
79.5
Sometimes true
4
356
15.4
29.0
65.7
Sometimes true
4
152
6.6
9.6
89.1
Often true
5
211
9.1
17.2
82.9
Often true
5
75
3.2
4.8
93.9
Usually true
6
171
7.4
13.9
96.8
Usually true
6
65
2.8
4.1
98.0
Always true
7
39
41
1.7
1.8
3.2
MISSING
100.0
Always true
7
32
36
1.4
1.6
2.0
MISSING
100.0
I do not know
0
1039
45.0
MISSING
I  do  not  know
0
694
30.1
MISSING
TOTAL
2308
100.0
100.0
TOTAL
2308
100.0
100.0
COUNT
VALUE
COUNT
VALUE
111
1.00
Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
779
1.00
1XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
158
2.00
1xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
298
2.00
1XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
182
3.00
1xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
177
3.00
1xxxxxxxxxxx
356
4.00
ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
152
4.00
1XXXXXXXXXX
211
5.00
1xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
75
5.00
IXXXXX
171
6.00
Ixxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx
65
6.00
IXXXX
39
7.00
IXXXXX
32
7.00
IXX
 I
I I..
0                   10
 I. . .
20
 I. .
30
 I.
40
 I
0                     6
12
18
24
30
50
Percent
Pe
rcent
Mean
3.869
Median
4.000
Mode
4.000
Mean
2.220
Median
2.000
Mode
1.000
Std Dev
1.573
Minimum
1.000
Maximum
7.000
Std Dev
1.593
Minimum
1.000
Maxi
Tium
7.000
Valid Cases
1228
Missing Cases
1080
Valid Cases
1578
Missing Cases       730
12.   EXTENT TRUE: The results of the evaluations are used to provide helpful
feedback to instructors
12.   continued
Value Label
Never true
Rarely true
Not often true
Sometimes true
Often true
Usually true
Always true
I do not know
Valid    Cum
Value Frequency Percent  Percent  Percent
1
85
3.7
5.6
5.6
2
122
5.3
8.1
13.7
3
127
5.5
8.4
22.1
4
430
18.6
28.5
50.6
5
330
14.3
21.9
72.5
6
318
13.8
21.1
93.5
7
98
4.2
6.5
100.0
.
51
2.2
MISSING
0
747
32.4
MISSING
TOTAL
2308
100.0
100.0
85
122
127
430
330
318
98
1.00
2.00
3.00
4.00
5.00
6.00
7.00
IXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
I XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
IXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX
Ixxxxxxxxxxx
I I I I I I
0 6       12        18        24        30
Percent
4.000
7.000
Mean
4.420
Median                   4.000
Mode
Std Dev
1.544
Minimum               1.000
Maximum
Valid Cases
1510
Missing Cases      798 UNIVERSITY     OF    BRITISH     COLUMBIA
The Evaluation of Teaching at UBC in 1991
Crosstabulations showing number of respondents per category
Crosslabulalion:   Faculty/Program x Overall Rating
Row Total
24
239
4
789
190
29
133
51
33
46
88
103
31
43
71
297
84
I do not
know
Low
-(1.2.3)
Adequate
(4)
High
(5.6.7)
Agricultural Sciences
1
3
5
15
Applied Sciences
21
108
59
51
Architecture
2
1
1
Arts
83
194
268
244
Commerce/Business Admin.
B
52
56
74
Dentistry
3
9
6
11
Education
3
43
49
38
Family/Nut. Sciences
3
12
14
22
Fine Arts
1
4
13
15
Forestry
11
14
21
Law
6
27
29
26
Medicine
16
17
25
45
Music
5
14
9
3
Nursing
4
9
18
12
Pharmaceutical Sciences
3
16
27
25
Science
30
104
92
71
Other
11
18
30
25
Crosslabulalion:
Faculty/Program x Students asked lo evealuale instructors' leaching
Row i'ota!
24
239
4
790
:95
29
'.36
51
3-
45
90
101
31
42
70
294
34
i do not
know
Rarely
(1.2.3)
Sometimes
(4)
Lsjaliy
(5,6.7)
Agricultural Sciences
23
Applied Sciences
11
21
23
!79
Architecture
1
2
Arts
11
56
109
614
Commerce Business Admin
a
i '
:74
Dentislrv
3
7
19
Education
7
15
113
l'amily/\ul. Sciences
3
6
42
F':ne Arts
3
30
Forestry
;)
2
4
37
Law
3
3
84
Medicine
1
■>
6
95
Music
2
4
25
Nursing
■)
38
Pharmaceutical Sciences
1
4
61
Science
1
24
59
210
Other
3
9
15
57
Crosstabulation:  Faculty/Program x Procedures ensure forms cannot be fiddled with
Row Total
24
237
4
786
195
29
135
51
34
46
90
103
33
43
69
294
83
I do not A
know
Rarely
(1.2.3)
Sometimes
(4)
' ■ Usua'lv
(5.6,7)
Agricultural Sciences
5
1
IB
Applied Sciences
62
44
■     27
104
Architecture
2
2
Arts
192
79
76
439
Commerce/Business Admin.
32  "
25
16
122
Dentistry
2
5
6
16
Education
22
' 11
14
88
Family/Nut. Sciences
10
6
1
34
Fine Arts
10
1
3
20
Forestry
13
2
5
26
Law
20
6
3
61
Medicine
43
6
10
44
Music
13
2
4
14
Nursing
2
5
5
31
Pharmaceutical Sciences
26
13
6
24
Science
93
42
33
126
Other
24
'      7
'11
41
Crosstabulation
Faculty/Program x Procedures ensure no reprisals from i
istruclor
Rort   :01a
31
336
7H8
'.%
38
!35
5!
14
46
89
:03
43
6~
294
83
. co not
know
(1.2.3)
Somen rues
(4)
Ls.ia.lv
(5.6.7)
Agricultural Sc.ences
4
19
Applied Sc.ences
:7
30
30
159
Architecture
4
Arts
92
34
85
577
Co'iimerce/lJi.siness Adinin
:,;
'6
10
156
Dentistry
>
6
5
'5
Education
9
11
23
39
Family 'Nut Sciences
')
3
4
17
Fine Arts
5
2
27
Forestry
4
;;
6
34
Law
7
3
4
7 5
Medicine
19
7
12
65
Music
7
>
4
17
Nursing
6
7
30
Pharmaceutical Scenccs
I)
tt
50
Science
34
' 7                    30
223
Other
9
6         j         10
38
Crosstabulation:  Faculty/Program x Fo
rms provide
opportunity
to express my views
Row Total
24
237
4
785
195
29
134
51
34
46
90
102
32
43
69
294
82
1 do not
know
Rarely
(1.2,3)
Sometimes
(4)
Usually
(5.6,7)
Agricultural Sciences
2
2
2
:b
Applied Sciences
6
54
35
142
Architecture
1
3
Arts
7
140
158
480
Commerce/Business Admin.
2
31
26
136
Dentistry
5
4
20
Education
52
28
54
Family/Nut. Sciences
10
4
37
Fine Arts
1
1
8
24
Forestry
1
8
8
29
Law
25
14
51
Medicine
1
8
18
75
Music
14
5
13
Nursing
6
13
.   21
Pharmaceutical Sciences
1
15
8
45
Science
2
65
55
172    '
Other
2
18
15    ■
■17
Crosstabulation:
Faculty/Program x Forms
cover w
liat is important about teaching
Row Tola.
24
238
4
778
i95
29
' 35
5!
34
46
89
104
32
68
294
33
! do no'.
KilUW
Rarelv
(1.2.3)
Sometimes
(4)
Fsuallv
(5,6,7)
Agt.cihturai Sciences
;
6
15
Applied Sciences
8
53
47
130
Arcniteclure
>
■J
Arts
'.  1
153
if.
392
Commerce/Uusiness Adin.ii
40
37
118
Dent strv
5
7
15
Ldjcat.on
4
37
57
FairMv/Nd. Sciences
'2
5
34
Fine Arts
6
9
19
i'orcslrv
•;
9
23
Law
H
19
45
Med'cine
z
16
25
61
Vjs.c
7
10
:5
Nursing
8
1 <)
2:
Pharmaceutical Sciences
1
19
17
31
i-cience
5
60
71
:53
Oilier
29
:3 UNIVERSITY    OF    BRITISH    COLUMBIA
The Evaluation of Teaching at UBC in 1991
Crosstabulation:
Faculty/Program x Evaluations have impact on improved Leaching
R;:w  ,'uta.
21
iO
785
195
29
136
46
39
33
'3
G9
291
82
i do not
know
Rarely
(1.2,3)
So'ii •: mes
; ii
(5.8.7)
Agricultural Sciences
11
7
5
Applied Sciences
46
146
:.■
'5
Architecture
1
1
1
Arts
273
331
!()<
80
Commerce'blusiness Admin.
37
92
19
f7
Dentistry
6
11
5
7
Education
32
72
22
10
Familv/Nut. Sciences
15
23
6
Fine Arts
15
13
:
)
Forestry
13
26
5
>
Law
19
44
';"";
' 1
Medicine
35
25
'6
Music
13
15
5
Nursing
6
21
0
6
Pharmaceutical Sciences
18
23
■ ii
'0
Science
86
157
28
23
Other
32
29
' 5
6
Crosstabulation:
Facully/I
rograrn x Re
suits used Lo inform decisions
Row Total
do not
know
Rarely
IF2.3)
S:)i[iel:ines
(4)
Isuady
(5,6,7)
Agricu
Hil'al Sc c'ices
3
I
3
11
24
\yi!. e:l Sc c:cc<
'' ,j
h'i
19
12
238
Arch lecture
'
z
1
4
Arls
397
191
79
113
780
'Vim! '■;•(• (
.Si'lP"   V]-'KI
H'
55
24
33
194
Dciii.slrv
5
6
29
Education
6'
44
13
18
136
FaniiK
Ni.:   Sciences
'iO
: i
4
4
51
nc A-s
;.;
4
2
34
I ori'strv
31
5
6
46
..an
•_z
23
6
9
88
Meceine
85
■ )
3
3
104
Vus.c
22
33
Nursing
'; ■
H
4
7
43
P'larmace.I.cal .-"r c'lfi--
8
6
69
VV Ciii c
' 71)
34        !         24
13
297
Other
48
22        !          7
7
84
Crosstabulation:   Faculty/Program x Results used to recognize
meritorious
leaching
Row   I'o'.al
'At
4
783
194
29
136
50
34
46
86
32
43
69
297
82
1 do not
know
Rarely
(1,2,3)
Some 1 lines
;i)
15,6.7)
Agricultural Sciences-
7
4
i
12
Applied Sciences
102
69
■■<
.3
Architecture
1
2
1
Arts
378
139
128
138
Commerce/Business Admin
74
43'
34
43
Dentistry
13
6
3
7
Education
56
26
29
23
Family/Nut. Sciences
22
11
10
Fine Arts
22
3
8
5
Forestry
25
11
)
5
Law
36
19
9
22
Medicine
60
9
25
Music
19
10
■;
Nursing
20
6
5
12
Pharmaceutical Sciences
26
5
14
24
Science
130
64
53
5:
Other
37
17
16
12
Crosslabulalion:   Faculty/Program x Results are available lo provide info for students
i do nol
know
Rarely
C.2.:J)
Sometimes
(4)
Usually
(5,6,7;
\gr:
■nilura' Sciences
B
14
1
\pp,.cc tv.eiiccs
JO
i <:;
3
a
Architecture
2
2
Arts
263
424
44
57
Commerce
Business Admin.
45
104
:6
28
Dentistrv
5
23
Education
55
67
9
3
Fain
V'NuI  Sciences
li
39
1
Fine Arts
18
14
1
1
Forestry
13
32
1
haw
25
25
9
29
Medicine
40
57
2
4
Music
12
IH
1
1
Nursing
12
25
3
3
Pha-na
•etiticai Sciences
21
35
7
6
Science
73
161
34
26
Otner
32
44
5
3
Row Total
23
i'Stj
4
788
193
28
134
51
34
46
88
103
32
43
69
294
Crosstabulation:   Faculty/Program x Results are used to provide helpful feedback
1 do not
know
Rarely
(1.2.3)
s'omelimes
(1)
Csualiv
Row   oil;!
m
771)
:92
.J9
5:
34
H 1
1 \
69
295
iM
Agricultural Sciences
4
1
i
:o
Applied Sciences
63
51
56
66
Architecture
1
1
Arts
273
109
!3
Z")Zi
Commerce/Business Admin.
33
21
16
'0.)
Dentistry
6
4
'0
9
Education
43
23
16
Family/Nut. Sciences
20
6
■ i
Fine Arts
17
4
3
3
Forestry
12
10
•)
'.!
Law
28
10
'3
Medicine
39
8
'6
S9
Music
16
4
6
Nursing
15
4
Pharmaceutical Sciences
19
9
14
27
Science
115
57
".7
76
Other
39
6
' (;
APPENDIX F
DISTRIBUTION OF STUDENTS' WRITTEN COMMENTS
ACROSS SIX CATEGORIES
CATEGORY
Frequency of
Comment
No.
%
A The use of the evaluations
B The procedures followed
C The content and design of the instruments
D The non-availability of results to students
E      Positive comments (in two thirds of which the favourable comment is
accompanied by an offsetting criticism)
F      Other
(a) Comments about the questionnaire itself (33)
(b) Comments on the quality of or the orientation to teaching at UBC (63)
Total
537 47.6
204 18.1
136 12.0
137 12.1
19 1.7
96 8.5
1129   1O0.0 UBC REPORTS October 31.1991
November 3 -
November 16
Applied Mathematics
Colloquium
Asymptotic Approximations Of Integrals.
Dr. Roderick Wong, head, Applied Mathematics, U. of Manitoba. Math 104 at
3:45pm. Call 822-4584.
Geography Colloquium
Aboriginal Representation In Contemporary Canada. Prof. Paul Tennant, Political Science. Geography 201 at 3:30pm.
Refreshments at 3:25pm. Call 822-2985/
2663.
Wednesday Noon Hour
Concert
Robert Silverman, piano.
Music Recital Hall at
12:30pm. $2 at the door.
Call 822-5574.
FRIDAY, NOV. 15     |      Graduate Student Centre
THURSDAY, NOV. 14 j
Music Concert
University Singers, James Fankhauser,
dir. Music Recital Hall at 12:30pm. Call
822-5574.
Panel Discussion
Canada's Contitutional Crisis: Alternative
Futures? Rejean Beaudoin, French;
Steven Point, Native Law; Philip Resnick,
Political Science; Veronica Strong-Boag,
Women's Studies. Chair Dean of Law
Lynn Smith. Curtis 101/102 from 12:30-
1:30pm. Question period from 1:30-2pm.
Call 222-5238.
Economics Seminar
Recent Developments In The Theory Of
The Firm. Oliver Hart, MIT. Buchanan A-
106 from 12:30-2pm. Call 822-2876.
Pharmacology Seminar
Facilitation And Potentiation At The
Neuromuscular Synapse. Dr. David
Quastel, Faculty of Medicine. IRC #2
from 11:30am-12:30pm. Call 822-2575.
Statistics Seminar
Bayesian Hierarchical Modeling,
Gibbs Sampling And Decision Theory
-An Application. Professor J. Berger,
Purdue U. Angus 223 at 1pm. Call
822-4997/2234.
History Seminar
Cross-Cultural Comparison: A Strategy For Training Historians. Prof.
Edward L. Farmer, History; dir. Area
Studies Programs, U. of Minnesota.
Buchanan Penthouse from 3:30-
5:30pm.  Call 822-2561.
Physics Colloquium
Edge Melting Studies By
Scanning Tunnelling
Microscopy. Randy
Feenstra, IBM Watson.
Hennings201 at4pm. Call
822-3853.
Psychology Speaker
Valid And Invalid Cues To Personality.
Del Paulhus, Psychology. Suedfeld
Lounge in Kenny at 4pm. Call 822-3286.
Philosophy Colloquium
Connectionism, Rule-Following And Internal Representation. Bob Hadley,
SFU. Buchanan D-344 at 4pm. Call
822-3292.
Paediatrics Grand Rounds
Cancelled. Call 875-2118.
Obstetrics/Gynecology Grand
Rounds
Fetal Dysrhythmia. Dr. Antoni Duieba
and Dr. Duncan Farquahrson. University
Hospital, Shaughnessy Site D308 at 8am.
Call 875-2171.
Koerner Memorial Lecture
Numbers: Medieval Islamic Concepts
And Computations. Edward S. Kennedy,
prof.emeritus Mathematics, American U.
of Beirut. Buchanan A-104 at 12:30pm.
Call 822-2879.
Twenty-first Medieval
Workshop
Sessions 1-3. Numbers: Theory And
Practice. All day workshop. Buchanan
Penthouse from 9am-12pm. Lasserre
104 from 3pm-5:30pm. Registration $20
plus GST. Programs available in the
French Department. Call 822-2879.
History Lecture
Fundamentalism Or Convergence: Identifying A Shrinking World. Prof. Edward L
Farmer,History<*Bctor,Area
Studies Programs, U. of Minnesota. l3uchananA-205froni
2:30-320pm. Call 822-5195.
Economics Seminar
ATheory Of Debt Based On The Inalienability
OfHuman Capita). OHverHait MIT. Buchanan
D-225 from 4-5:30pm. Call 822-2876.
Chemical Engineering Seminar
De-Inking Of Newspaper Printed With Water-Based Flexographic Ink. Susan Nesbit,
graduate student ChemEngineering 206 at
3:30pm. Call 822-3238.
School of Music Concert
University Singers. James Fankhauser,
director. Music Recital Hall at 8pm. Free
admission. Call 822-5574.
SATURDAY, NOV, 161
Vancouver Institute Saturday
Night Lecture
E.S. Woodward Lecture.
The Modem Corporation:
The Theory Of Its Financial Structure. Professor
Olivers. Hart, Economics,
MIT. IRC #2 at 8:15pm.
Call 822-3131.
Twenty-first Medieval
Workshop
Sessions 4-7. Numbers: Theory And Practice. All day workshop. Lasserre 104 from
9am-12:30pm and 2-5:30pm. Registration
$20 plus GST. Programs available in the
French Department. Call 822-2879.
NOTICES
UBC Speakers Bureau
Would your group like to know more about
topics ranging from Prehistoric Technology to Hormones and You. More than
500 topics to choose from. Call 822-6167
(24-hr. ans. machine).
Live entertainment every Friday in the
Fireside Lounge from 8-11pm. Call
822-3203.
Carpool Matching
A service for faculty,
staff and students. Call
Karen Pope, Dean's
Office, Applied Science
at 822-3701 and find
your area match.
Call For Former UBC Athletes
Athletics is updating its mailing list
of former athletic team players: originators/contributors to programs in
place today. If you qualify or are
knowledgeable in the location of any
other past player, call 822-8921 after 4:30pm.
Freddy Wood Theatre
Performance
Romeo And Juliet by
William Shakespeare, directed by Neil Freeman.
Nov. 6-16 at 8pm. Adults
$10, students/seniors $7.
Preview Wed. 2 for $10.
Reservations at Theatre Building 207
call 822-2678.
Fine Arts Gallery
Open Tues.-Fri. from I0am-5pm. Saturdays 12pm-5pm on. Free admission.
Main Library. Call 822-2759.
Annual November Book Sale
New selection of titles daily. UBC Bookstore, Nov. 2-16. Mon.-Fri. 8:30am-5pm,
Wed. 8:30am-8:30pm, Sat. 9:30am-5pm.
Call 822-2665.
Health Sciences Bookshop
Open Saturday
The Bookshop is open Mon.-Sat. from
9:30am-5pm in the Medical Student/
Alumni Centre at Heather and 12th Ave.
Call 879-8547.
Executive Programmes
One/Two day Business
Seminars. Nov. 1-15:
Speed Reading, $595;
Writing Financial/Technical Reports, $395; Financial Management
For Non-Financial Managers, $550;
Pricing For Profit $500; Time Management, $495; Financial Planning
With Spreadsheets, $595. Call 822-
8400.
Centre for Continuing
Education Programmes
Pacific Rim 4th Annual Conference:
Teachers of Japanese, Mandarin
And Pacific Rim Studies. Nancy
Greene Lodge, Whistler, Nov. 8-9.
Registration required. Call 222-
5227.
Languages Immersion Weekend:
Three-day immersion programs in
French, Japanese and Mandarin.
Nancy Greene Lodge, Whistler, Nov.
9-11. Registration required. Call
222-5227.
Professional Development Series:
November Workshops for Practising
Language Teachers: Teaching English in Japan, Videotaping in the Language Class, Stimulating Student
Talk, Public Speaking, Debating.
Tues. evenings from 7-9pm. Call
222-5208.
Statistical Consulting/
Research Laboratory
SCARL is operated by the Department of Statistics to provide statistical advice to faculty and graduate
students working on research problems. Forms for appointments available in Ponderosa Annex C-210. Call
822-4037.
Stop Smoking Seminar
Eight, one-hour sessions of 3 weeks
duration, sponsored by Occupational
Health/Safety. Registration fee of
$35 is refundable upon completion,
and will be paid in April/92 to coincide with the introduction of the University Clean Air Policy ACU-
Koerner Pavilion 426/427 Nov. 12 -
26th from 12-1pm.   Call 822-2029.
Wellness Health Fair
Information/personal assessment for risk
of heart disease (blood pressure,
cholestorol screening), fitness testing.
SUB Main Concourse Nov. 4,5,6 from
11am-2pm. Call 822-4858.
Muscle Soreness Study
Volunteers, ages 20-45 yrs. required for a
study of muscle soreness after exercise.
If you primarily walk as a form of exercise,
or are not exercising at present, call Donna
Maclntyre at Rehab Medicine, 822-7571.
High Blood Pressure Clinic
Retirement Study
::
Volunteers (over 18 years)
needed, treated or not, to
participate in clinical drug
trials. Call Dr. J. Wright or
Mrs. Nancy Ruedy in Medicine at 822-7134.
Seniors Hypertension Study
Volunteers aged 60-80 years with mild to
moderate hypertension, treated or not,
needed to participate in a high blood
pressure study. Call Dr. Wright or Nancy
Ruedy in Medicine at 822-7134.
Herpes Research Study
Participants needed for treatment
studies of shingles (herpes zoster)
and first herpes simplex infections,
with new antiviral agents. Also ongoing study for males 18-45 years
with recurrent herpes simplex. Dr.
Stephen Sacks, Medicine, sponsoring physician. Call 822-7565 or leave
your name/number at 687-7711,
pager 2887.
Heart/Lung Response Study
At rest and during exercise. Volunteers age
45-75 years, all fitness levels, required. No
maximal testing. Scheduled atyourconven-
ience. Call Fiona Manning, School of Rehab.
Medicine, 822-7708.
Lung Disease Study
Subjects with emphysema or fibrosis
needed to investigate means of improving lung function without drugs.
Call Fiona Manning, School of Rehab
Medicine, 822-7708.
Bereavement Study
Participants needed for
a study investigating
the long-term effects of
adolescent bereavement. Must have lost
either parent at least
five years ago, and have been between 13 and 17 years at the time of
the loss. Two one-hour interviews
required. Please call Ann McKintuck
in Nursing at 224-3921/3999.
Women concerned about
retirement planning needed
for an 8-week Retirement
Preparation seminar. Call
Sara Cornish Counselling
Psychology at 931 -5052.
Personality Study
Volunteers aged 30 or more needed to complete a personality questionnaire. Required, 2
visits, about 3 hours total. Participants receive
a free personality assessment and a $20
stipend. Call Janice in Dr. LJvesleys office.
Psychiatry, Detwiller 2N2, 822-7895
PMS Research Study
Volunteers needed for a study of an
investigational medication to treat
PMS. Call Doug Keller, Psychiatry,
University Hospital, Shaughnessy
site at 822-7318.
Hair Loss Research
Women aged 19-49 years experiencing
moderate hair loss, crown area only, are
needed for study. Must be able to attend
1-2 times weekly for 9 months. Honorarium paid. Call Sherry in Dermatology
at 874-8138.
Dermatology Acne Study
Volunteers between 14-35 years with
moderate facial acne needed for 4 visits
during a three month period. Honorarium
paid. Call Sherry at 874-8138.
Stress/Blood Pressure Study
Learn how your body responds to stress.
Call Dr. Wolfgang Linden in Psychology
at 822-3800.
Surplus Equipment Recycling
Facility
.-MBtwtreiE A|| surp|us items     Every
Wednesday, 12-3pm.
Task Force Bldg., 2352
Health Sciences Mall. Call
822-2813.
Student Volunteers
Find an interesting and challenging volunteer job with Volunteer Connections,
UBC Placement Services, Brock 307. Call
822-9268.
Narcotics Anonymous
Meetings
Every Tuesday (including holidays)from12:30-
2pm, University Hospital, UBC Site, Room
M311 (through Lab Medicine from Main Entrance). Call873-1018(24-hourHelpLine).
Fitness Appraisal
Administered by Physical Education and
Recreation through the John M.Buchanan
Fitness and Research Centre. Students
$25, others $30. Call 822-4356.
Faculty/Staff Badminton Club
Fridays from 6:30-10pm in Gym A of the
Robert Osborne Centre. Cost is $15 plus
library card. Call Bernard at 822-6809 or
731-9966.
Botanical Garden
Open from 10am-5pm daily. Free admission. Call 822-4208.
Nitobe Garden
Open Mon-Fri from 10am-3pm. Free on
Wednesdays. Call 822-6038. 6    UBCREPORTS October31,1991
Forum
Immigration policy and Canadian society
Daniel Hiebert. an assistant professor
in UBC's Department of Geography,
has been studying ethnicity in Canada
for the past eight years. The following is
an excerpt from an article to be published in The Canadian Geographer
magazine.
By DANIEL HIEBERT
Immigration has been a central component
of nation-building in Canada, establishing the
pace of demographic and, less directly, economic growth.
Always politically charged, the formation
of immigration policy has become especially
contentious with the federal government's recently stated intention to allow an increase in
the pace of immigration during the early 1990s.
In Canada, jurisdiction over immigration is
jointly shared among federal and provincial
governments. Together they exercise controls
over: the ethnic makeup of incoming immigrants (through granting differential access to
people from different countries); the total
number of immigrants admitted; the categories of immigrants admitted (e.g. family-class
vs. refugees); and the regional settlement of
immigrants once they arrive.
Until quite recently, Canadian governments
sought to maintain a "white" society by selective advertising abroad and by granting prospective immigrants from Europe, the United
States, and certain Commonwealth countries
preferential treatment.
Following an influential White Paper in
1966, the distinction between "preferred" and
"non-preferred" countries was replaced by a
points system whereby, in theory, applicants
from all countries and of all ethnic origins
were treated equally.
Statistics suggest that the effects of this shift
in policy have been significant. The vast majority of immigrants arriving in Canada prior to
1967 were of European background, while from
1967-1990 the flow of immigrants to Canada
has been profoundly internationalized.
The latest announcement, by the Minister
for Employment and Immigration in October
1990, calls for an annual target of 250,000
immigrants during the 1992-1995 period. If
this policy is continued, some 2.5 million
immigrants will enter the country during the
1990s.
Assuming that selection criteria remain unchanged, such a movement will contain approximately one million persons from Asian
countries and 750,000 each from European
countries and the rest of the world.
The categorization of classes of immigrants
constitutes another government control over
immigration. The main categories (or programs) under which immigrants may enter
Canada are: refugees, family reunification and
independent immigrants. Criteria for refugee
admission ostensibly reflect purely humanitarian concerns: those in need of asylum are
granted entry.
However, the federal government gives
preference to applicants deemed best able to
become self-supporting, those with skills and/
Hiebert
or capital. Economic considerations enter the calculus of admissions policy
more directly in the selection of independent immigrants who are expected to
fill gaps in the Canadian
labor market, or bring capital into the country.
Since the late 1970s.
Canadian "marketing"
abroad has increasingly
been targeted toward business migrants, with
slick brochures distributed and lectures presented
to business groups. Federal and provincial governments view this business program as a great
success. In 1988 alone these immigrants intended
to bring nearly $3.5 billion into Canada.
But critics decry the emergence of a two-
tiered system that accords preference to the affluent while other applicants endure long lines and
a much lower probability that they will be allowed to immigrate.
The federal government has stated unequivocally that one of the primary goals of immigration
is to "foster the development of a strong and
viable economy and the prosperity of all regions
in Canada." However, attempts to channel immigrant settlement have achieved few results.
Most immigrants gravitate to areas of demonstrated economic growth: they have avoided the
Atlantic provinces, Manitoba and Saskatchewan
and have been attracted to Alberta (during the
booming 1970s), British Columbia and, especially, Ontario. An even greater degree of concentration is apparent when urban destinations
are considered.
In 1988, Toronto. Montreal and Vancouver
together accounted for nearly two-thirds of the
stated destinations of those arriving in Canada,
and four of every five immigrants intended to
settle in just ten cities.
Given the increase in annual immigrant targets to 250,000 by 1992, immigration will begin
to account for nearly half of Canada's population
growthduringthe next decade. Ifcurrent patterns
of settlement persist, the wealthier provinces will
benefit most from the flow of immigrants, further
entrenching regional disparities across the country.
The immediate impact of immigration will be
felt in large cities.
If 2.5 million arrive during the 1990s, nearly
one million will be bound for Toronto, 350,000
for Montreal, and 300,000 for Vancouver. The
demographic and cultural composition of these
and a handful of other cities will become increasingly detached from the remainder of the country. Moreover, they will reap most of the economic benefits associated with immigration as
they attract new sources of capital and entrepreneurship.
These dynamic changes will not occur without economic and social stress: provincial and
municipal resources — particularly in the areas
of education and housing — will be severely
strained; the entry of a wide spectrum of immigrants, from destitute refugees to the extremely
wealthy, will exacerbate the gap between poor
and rich; and the potential for racist behavior will
260
i
i
i             i             i
)
Targets-
/""■
(/3
<      220
oc
o —
Actual landings
/
/
/
/
5 ?  180
u_  o
0£   140
<r —
LU
5       100
-
60
-
20
19
i
i             i             i
15
1950
1955
1960
1965     1970     1975
1980
1985     1990    1995
surely rise as the population becomes more diverse during a period of economic restructuring.
Educators and researchers can play an important role in defusing the potentially destructive
impact of immigration in the 1990s.
First and foremost, we must avoid racist bias
in our teaching. Ethnic groups should not be
portrayed as "naturally" homogeneous, "naturally" separate, or "naturally" antagonistic to one
another. We should also be vigilant against the
use of ethnic stereotypes, whether in the classroom or on washroom walls.
Further research on the administration of immigration in Canada should also be a priority.
Critics have pointed to numerous flaws in the
various programs established to lure business
immigrants, and the federal government has been
most reluctant to introduce a system to monitor
the actual financial and employment contributions made under these programs.
While Canada has a reputation as one of
the world's most humane nations in terms of
its intake of refugees, serious questions of this
aspect of immigration administration also need
to be investigated. Why, for example, are
three-quarters of refugees admitted into
Canada men, when 80 per cent ofthe world's
refugees are women and children?
Immigration has changed, and will continue to change, the cultural composition of
the Canadian population. 1 believe that educators should try to ensure that immigration
policy and administration is unbiased and
humane, and that the arriving immigrants
enter Canada without fear of social or economic discrimination.
Table 1:
NATIONAL ORIGIN OF CANADIAN IMMIGRANTS IN SELECTED YEARS, 1961-1990
WorId Heai
11)71.
1990
Air]Cd
1088
%
1.5
Asia   ( i
M i del 1
o East)
2901
%
4-.0
A'jstrvi
i a  t O
cear: ia
1432
%
2 . C
South •
t'er.t .
A.mer tea
27.38
%
3.8
Eurote
5193
%
75 .4
"j . £ . Ar
or ica
11 ol
%
16.1
Other
77
%
0.1
2841
4887
2.3
3.8
22459
48830
18.4
38.0
2902
j 5 ^ 1
2.4
16687
13/60
13.6
12.3
51743
46295
42.4
3 6.0'
24366
10559
20.1
8.2
902
97 0
0.7
0 .7
13324
6.3
110665
52.2
2613
1.2
28205
13.3
51399
24.2
5960
2.8
0
0.0
1689
00
128618
212166
Source: Employment and Immigration Canada Immigration Statistics Ottawa:
Ministry of Supply and Services, various years.
Note: Statistics for 1990 are preliminary
Resource Centre aids preparation for potential disasters
Earthquakes, hurricanes, oil spills, forest fires, flash-floods and mudslides.
Preparing for these and other human and
natural disasters will be the focus of the
Disaster Preparedness Resource Centre
which opened on campus earlier this month.
Henry Hightower, a professor in UBC's
School of Community and Regional Planning,
said the centre will be a valuable resource for
both professionals and academics.
"We generally have little experience of major natural disasters here so we need to draw on
as much information and experience wherever
these things happen," he said.
Hightower said the UBC centre will eventually be linked electronically to similar
centres in the U.S.. Australia. Britain, Indonesia and the Pacific Rim. The UBC site
will acquire books, journals, slides, and
videotapes documenting effects of disasters and public response.
"We'll be able to see what worked, what
didn't and what happened in the reconstruction phase that followed," said
Hightower. "The planning has to be done
now because when the ground starts shaking, it's too late to go to the library."
The centre will be of use to municipal
planners, utility companies, developers and
community groups. It will also provide
opportunities for graduate work in the field.
Part of UBC's Centre for Human Settlements, the centre officially opened Oct. 21.
Ted Finn, Deputy Minister of Emergency
Preparedness Canada presented a $29,500
grant towards the project. UBCREPORTS October31,1991        7
People
Andrew elected to French academic order
Andrew
Francis Andrew, director of Language Programs and Services at the [
Centre for Continuing
Education (CCE), has
been elected a Chevalier
de l'Orde des Palmes
Academiques.
The order, established
in France in 1808 by Napoleon the First, acknowledges the contributions of
senior university officers
to the field of education.
Andrew is being honored for his initiatives
in the area of teaching French to adults.
Joining UBC's French Department as a
lecturer in 1976, Andrew became coordinator of French programs at the CCE
the, same year. He was appointed to his
current position in 1984.
In 1988, he was the first in Canada to
introduce the popular and highly successful multimedia immersion course, French
in Action, now used by educators across
the country to teach conversational French.
Andrew also developed innovative audio-lingual distance education French language courses, in collaboration with the
province's Open Learning Agency, and
created special  language programs  for
B.C. school teachers.
Among his future projects is the establishment of a French centre at UBC, a
multimedia resource library for faculty
and students to promote French culture.
Dr. Shaila Misri, a clinical associate
professor of psychiatry, has been elected
president of the Vancouver branch of the
Federation of Medical Women of Canada
(FMWC).
Misri joined UBC in 1975 and is the
founding director of University Hospital's
specialized clinics in pre-menstrual tension syndrome and post-partum illness.
The FMWC, founded in 1924, is a national organization committed to the professional, social and personal advancement of women physicians. Its mandate
includes encouraging networking among
women physicians at local, national and
international levels to promote their interests within medical organizations and government.
The federation also aims to improve the
management of women's health issues and
to influence health care policies affecting
women and the general population.
As president of the B.C. branch of the
FMWC, Misri's main responsibilities include organizing special programs which
address issues pertinent to both patients
and physicians.
Her appointment is for a one year term.
Forest Sciences Professor Gordon
Weetman has been awarded the 1991 gold
medal for Forestry Scientific Achievement.
Weetman received the honor at the national meeting of the Canadian Institute of
Forestry last month in recognition of his
long, illustrious career in the silviculture
of Canadian forests.
Early in his career. Weetman worked
primarily in the boreal forests of Quebec
and Ontario. More recently he has pursued
the science of silviculture in Western
Canada, where he has been the senior
silviculturist at UBC since 1979.
Weetman's major research interest is
the identification of mineral deficiencies
in conifers and the use of nutrient applications in modern forest management.
He has served on a range of professional committees and organizations
including a term as president of the
Canadian Institute of Forestry.
Andrew Mular, head of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering, has been named a
Henry Krumb Lecturer for 1992 by the American Institute of Mining. Metallurgical and
Petroleum Engineers
(AIME).
Mular was one of
three people selected as
a Krumb lecturer by
AIME. which has a
membership of more
than 19/XX). Each lecturer i sj udged to be pm >-
fessionally outstanding
and exceptionally competent as a speaker and i s
required to give a minimum of five lectures in
various regions ofthe United States.
The lecture series brings the experience
and expertise of institute leaders to local
sections ofthe AIME.
Mular
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
• data analysis
• forecasting
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• sampling
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D.
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508      Home: (604) 263-5394
Classified
Classified advertising can be purchased from Community Relations.
Phone 822-6163. Ads placed by faculty, staff and students cost $12.84
for 7 lines/issue ($.81 for each additional word). Off-campus advertisers
are charged $14.98 for 7 lines/issue ($.86 for each additional word). (All
prices include G.S. T.) Monday, November 4 at noon is the deadline for
the next issue of UBC Reports which appears on Thursday, November
14. Deadline forthe following edition on November 28 is noon Tuesday,
November 19. All ads must be paid in advance in cash, by cheque or
internal requisition.
For Sale
THESHIELINGGALLERY:Cardena
Road, Bowen Island, VON 1GO.
Paintings and Prints by Sam Black,
R.C.A., R.S.W.. Also Sculpture and
Ceramics. Open September to June
10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Saturday and Sunday or at other times by arrangement. Call: 947-9391
Services
NEW DAYCARE: UBC has a new
daycare centre opening October 1,
1991. If you need quality licenced
care for your child aged three to five
please come to 5590 Osoyoos Cres.
to apply or call 822-5343 for further
information.
Miscellaneous
DO IT RIGHT! Statistical and methodological consultation; data analysis; data base management; sampling techniques; questionnaire design, development, and administration. Over 15 years of research and
consulting experience in the social
sciences and related fields. 689-
7164.
XMAS PARTY: Need to book a place
for your Xmas Party? Some spaces
are still open at the UBC Medical
Student & Alumni Centre at 12th &
Heather.
Come and enjoy the warm ambience
the Centre provides and take advantage of its central location and reasonable cost. Full kitchen facilities
are included.
If you are curious and would like to
arrange to view the facility or to check
on availability, call 879-8496
Forestry to establish new
undergraduate program
By ABE HEFTER
New career opportunities in forestry are in the offing for UBC students from both arts and sciences backgrounds.
The Faculty of Forestry is moving
toward the establishment of a new
undergraduate program in conservation, recreation and natural areas management.
"Many ofthe problems associated
with land use management require
skills in the social sciences — eco-
IS YOUR BABY
BETWEEN
2 & 22 MONTHS?
Join our research
on infant
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at U.B.C! Just
one visit to our
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Please contact
Dr. Baldwin for
more information:
822-8231.
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area-Ready Art
Photography
"Servinc UBC since 1986"
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nomics, psychology, philosophy and
sociology," said Forest Resources
Management Professor David Haley.
"This program will provide an opportunity for individuals to obtain a
comprehensive, multi-disciplinary
education in environmental studies as
they relate to forest and wildland resources."
Haley said there is a new breed of
foresterevolving from the need to manage forests and associated wild lands.
"Employment opportunities for
such professionals will grow as concerns for biodiversity in natural landscapes mount and pressures on natural
environments to support a growing
spectrum of commercial and non-commercial uses increase," he said.
Haley, chairof a four-member committee struck to formulate the objectives and structure of the proposed
program, said students will have an
opportunity to enter one of three areas
of concentration following a two-year
common core program. They are
Nature Conservation, Wildland Recreation and Parks Management; Wildlife Management; and Conservation
and Natural Resource Planning.
"An important feature of the four-
year program will be summer
internships, intended to provide students with an opportunity to combine
academic study with practical and professional experience with cooperating
organizations."
Haley said concern for the management of recreation and non-timber forest resources began to take shape in the
Faculty of Forestry more than 20 years
ago. In 1968, the Faculty was the first
forestry school in the country to recognize the importance of forest and
wildland recreation in the forestry curriculum and for many years has led the
way in wildlife management research.
In structuring the program. Haley
said the committee consulted widely
with Canadian and international parks
professionals, as well as with a broadly
based committee within the university.
Haley said the program will also
enhance the more traditional Bachelor
of Science in Forestry program and
become an integral part of the Faculty's proposed Centre For Applied
Conservation Biology.
The public, in the meantime, will
have an opportunity to learn more
about biodiversity and the forestry
profession in the upcoming H.R.
MacMillan Lecture.
Dr. Kenton R. Miller, program director ofthe Forests and Biodiversity
Programme at the World Resources
Institute in Washington, D.C, will
offer his perspectives for the 1990s
and beyond at the Nov. 7 lecture at the
Frederic Wood Theatre from 12:30
p.m. to 1:30 p.m.
For more information on the lecture, call 822-2727.
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5200 HOLLYBRIDGE WAY, RICHMOND 8    UBC REPORTS October 31,1991
General BA program offers alternatives
From international development to
backyard composting.
This detour in Gillian Elcock's
university education was made possible by the Faculty of Arts'General BA
degree.
Six years ago, Elcock enrolled in
international relations at UBC with
the goal of learning more about Third
World development.
But a growing interest in local ecology, combined with a desire for more
latitude in her courses, made Elcock
jump tracks to the new faculty offering.
"The General BA offered more
flexibility and freed me up so I could
pursue other interests," she said.
Pho(ob\ \U\lu StrMces
Krista Hansen works on printing press as part of fine arts component
of her General BA degree. By combining fine art and psychology, she
plans to pursue art therapy.
Today. Elcock complements her
enthusiasm for organic gardening with
courses in botany, ecology and soil
science. Off campus, she puts herclass-
room know-how to work promoting
urban gardening and composting for a
public education project in Kitsilano.
Enrolment at UBC in the General
BA, which is also available at Cariboo
and Okanagan university colleges, has
tripled from 17 to 55 students. Coordinator Paul Tennant. a professor in
the Department of Political Science,
predicts the program's popularity will
grow substantially in the years ahead.
"Some students just can't appreciate the regimented aspects of a specific discipline," said Tennant. "The
General BA allows them lo build on
their strengths and interests by designing their own curriculum from
the arts and science."
However, to stop students from
going on a random shopping spree of
courses, at least 18 credits must be
devoted to one discipline area. Elcock.
for instance, anchors her science
electives with a "mini-major" in anthropology.
Those eligible for the program must
have completed at least 60. but no
more than 90, first- and second-year
credits with no less than a 60 per cent
overall average.
Tennant said the program will
have particular appeal to students
interested in areas such as Canadian,
ethnic. Native, and urban studies,
where there are no honors or majors
degree programs. It also provides
excellent preparation for graduate
work in education, law. library science or commerce und business administration.
Tennant added that the (ieneral B A
should also attract mature students
back to campus to either finish or start
Photo by Charles Ker
Gillian Elcock focuses on local ecology through organic gardening.
their university degree.
Krista Hansen will be among the
first group of General BA graduates
this year.
Alter two years taking general arts
courses. Hansen signed up for the
General BA. She now combines fine
arts and psychology with a goal of
getting involved with some form of art
therapy in the future.
Dean Patricia Marchak hopes the
new program will help promote the
benefits of interdisciplinary study.
"We have to be open to new ways
of organizing knowledge, and be open
to new ideas," said Marchak. "Disciplines are important, but there have to
be some alternatives available, too."
Thunderbirds host Soviet
Sparta volleyball team
By ABE HEFTER
The Russians are coming! The Russians are
coming!
To UBC.
And women's volleyball
coach Donna Baydock couldn't
be happier.
On Nov. 6, the UBC Thunderbirds will play host to
Sparta, the Soviet women's volleyball club team, as part of a
five-game tour. Sparta, one of
the first commercially sponsored teams from the Soviet
Union, will also play the
Thunderbirds Nov. 5 at
Capilano College.
Baydock has been the driving force behind the tour.
"This past May our women's
volleyball team played Sparta
in Moscow as part of a three-
week tour of the Soviet Union,
Sweden and Denmark," she
said.
"During our stay, we invited
the Sparta team to Canada. But
with the changes occurring in
the Soviet Union, we didn't know
if the team would be allowed to
leave Moscow."
As late as August, Baydock was
unsure if Sparta would be able to
accept UBC's invitation. As it
turned out, the political changes
in the Soviet Union helped eliminate some of the red tape associated with such a trip, according to
Baydock.
During their stay in Vancouver, Sparta will also see action
against the University of Victoria
and Simon Fraser University before leaving for Winnipeg for a
series of games.
Before heading to Winnipeg.
Sparta coaches and players will
host a clinic Nov. 5 at Capilano
College for Vancouver area volleyball players, where they'll get
a chance to learn from the best.
"The Soviets are the top volleyball players in the world." said
Baydock.
"During our trip to Moscow,
Sparta coach Leonid Berezin held
a clinic for our team members.
We've been working our offensive technique since then and look
forward to having Berezin assess
our progress when he gets a chance
to see our players in action next
month."
In the meantime, Baydock and
the T-Birds are anxiously looking
forward to hosting the Sparta players.
"We happened to be in Moscow during Victory Day celebrations. May 9. and had an opportunity to march in their parade,"
said Baydock. "And when we
saw the turmoil they were going
through during the failed coup
attempt, we were glued to our televisions in nervous apprehension."
But despite the upheaval in the
Soviet Union. Baydock said the
people they met were warm, gracious hosts.
"We're just thrilled to be able
to have them here, she added. "We
plan to show them the sights and
sounds of Vancouver."
Members ofthe UBC Women's Volleyball team, (from left) Jenny Rauh,
Mary Stothard, Harj Sandhu, Michelle Lachmann, chaperone June
Carlyle andErin Wood, in front of Moscow University last May. Displayed
is the now-defunct flag ofthe Russian Republic under Soviet rule.

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