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UBC Reports Nov 2, 1983

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 Volume 29, Number 19
November 2, 1983
Robert Wyman
Stan Persky
2 campaign for
chancellorship
W. Robert Wyman, the head of one of
British Columbia's major investment firms
and chairman of the Canadian Chamber of
Commerce, has been nominated for
chancellor of the University of B.C.
Also seeking the chancellor's job is Stan
Persky, the teacher-author-editor who has
twice been defeated by J.V. Clyne, the
current chancellor. Mr. Clyne is nearing
the end of his second three-year term and
is therefore ineligible for re-election.
Any person not an employee of a
university is eligible for nomination,
(providing he/she has seven graduates to
act as nominators). All graduates of UBC
are eligible to vote through a mail ballot to
be conducted early in 1984. Nomination
deadline is Nov. 7.
The chancellor, although unpaid, is the
University's senior representative and
occupies seats on the Board of Governors
and the Senate. It is the chancellor who
confeirs degrees on behalf of the university.
Mr. Wyman, a 1956 UBC graduate, is
chairman of Pemberton, Houston,
Willoughby Inc., one of British Columbia's
major investment firms and has recently
achieved national prominence as the new
chairman of the Canadian Chamber of
Commerce.
Mr. Persky, also a UBC graduate, is
editor of Solidarity Times, the weekly
newspaper started by the Solidarity
Coalition. He has written two books on
provincial politics and one on the Solidarity
trade union movement in Poland.
Walkout won't close University;
'Our obligation is to students'
UBC will remain open if campus unions
join the walkout of public service workers
that was started yesterday by members of
the B.C. Government Employees Union.
"It may not be business as usual,"
President George Pedersen told UBC
Reports, "but our first obligation is to our
students and we will keep going just as
long as is possible."
According to a 'strike timetable' drawn
up by the Solidarity Coalition, unions
involved with education will join the strike
next Tuesday, Nov. 8, if a settlement isn't
reached before then.
What such a walkout would mean to the
University can't be determined in advance,
but UBC policy as regards strikes and
picket lines is straighforward:
If you come to work you get paid; if you
don't come to work you don't get paid.
This applies to all employees, including
faculty, union or non-union.
Employees on salary would lose one-
twenty-second of their monthly salary for
each day away from the job.
President Pedersen said employees who
work during a strike are expected to
perform only their regular duties in their
normal places and times, and are not
required to perform duties outside the
scope of their employment. He said the
rescheduling or relocation of classes to
avoid picket lines would not be acceptable.
Although the UBC Faculty Association is
a member of the Solidarity Coalition, the
association's agreement with the University
contains a 'no-strike' clause, which the
association says will be honored.
The two largest unions on campus — the
Canadian Union of Public Employees
(CUPE) and the Association of University
. and College Employees (AUCE) — both
are expected to call upon their members to
strike next Tuesday if a request to do so
comes from either Solidarity or the B.C.
Federation of Labor.
Talks between the unions and the
University prior to any job action will
determine what parts of UBC operations
are to be considered essential. In past labor
disputes, union members involved in
security, in certain aspects of hospital
work, in the care of animals, etc. have
remained on the job.
If a withdrawal of services does come, all
Food Services outlets on campus, except
the dining rooms in Totem Park and Place
Vanier, will close. Director Christine
Samson said management personnel would
keep the residences going for as long as
possible.
"It wouldn't be too difficult for a day or
two, but after that deliveries could be a
real problem," she said.
Management and volunteers could also
keep the cafeteria open in the Faculty
Club, according to manager Ed Puis, but
only as long as deliveries were being made.
The Student Union Building would
remain open, even though the cafeteria
would not.
Manager Jim Bremner said the Aquatic
Centre would remain open as long as it
could, as would the Graduate Student
Centre and the Museum of Anthropology.
Close to 70 BCGEU members work on
the UBC campus, including 58 firemen.
The fire hall is being picketed, but Chief
H.A. Crawford said essential services are
being maintained. Telephones are being
answered and the firmen are responding to
emergencies. The 10 BCGEU employees in
the provincial fisheries research lab in the
annex of the Institute of Animal Resource
Ecology, Main Mall, are picketing only
their own work area.
m
Twisted wreckage of boiler that exploded in UBC's Powerhouse Friday can be seen
through plant's broken windows. Physical Plant glazier Fred Laub is knocking loose glass
out of window frames.
Steam plant boiler explodes
The newest and largest of five boilers in
the UBC steam plant exploded just before
nine o'clock Friday night, causing damage
Terrace undergrad
gets $5,000 award
The largest undergraduate award for a
single year of study at UBC has been
earned by Ann Anson, a single parent
from Terrace who is in her third year of
rehab medicine.
She is the first recipient of a $5,000
scholarship awarded by ICBC to help
outstanding students of physical therapy.
Ms. Anson was the unanimous choice of
the selection committee, which assessed
applicants on the basis of scholastic
achievement, financial need and
involvement in University affairs.
estimated between $500,000 and $1
million.
Exact cause of the explosion has not yet
been determined but preliminary
indications are that it was a natural gas
explosion rather than a steam explosion.
Two power engineers on duty at the
time, Karl Heep and Ed Livera, were
shaken but not injured by the blast. Mr.
Heep immediately shut off the flow of gas
to the boiler.
The boiler was rated at 150,000 pounds
oer hour, which equals the reserve capacity
of the steam plant.
Neville Smith, director of Physical Plant,
said it had not been determined yet
whether the boiler could be repaired. He
said it may be necessary to replace it.
The loss is covered by insurance. UBC Reports November 2, 1983
Dr. John Hayward (left) and Dr. fohn Brown display medals
Prof, grad get medals
A UBC faculty member and a UBC
graduate have won two of the three gold
medals awarded annually by the B.C.
Science Council for outstanding
achievements in the natural, applied and
health sciences.
Awarded the 1983 gold medal in the
health sciences is Dr. John Brown of the
Department of Physiology in UBC's
medical faculty, leader of a research group
that has discovered two hormones that
regulate the gastrointestinal tract.
A second medal went to Dr. John
Hayward of the Department of Biology at
the University of Victoria for research and
development of a thermal flotation jacket,
manufactured in Richmond, which helps
prevent the loss of body heat when the
wearer is immersed in cold water.
Dr. Hayward graduated from UBC in
1958" with the degree of Bachelor of
Science in zoology and later returned to
the campus for studies which led to his
Ph.D. in comparative physiology in 1964.
GIP, one of the two hormones discovered
by Dr. Brown at UBC, functions as an
inhibitor of gastric acid secretion and as a
signaler to the pancreas in the regulation
of the secretion of insulin.
Motilin, the second hormone discovered
by the UBC group, regulates contraction of
the muscles of the gut and has been found
in the cells of the brain as well as the small
intestine.
Dr. Brown has received numerous
awards for his work over the past decade,
including UBC's top research prize, the
Jacob Biely Research Prize, as well as the
Ernst Oppenheimer Award of the U.S.
Endochrinology Society and the
MacLaughlin Medal of the Royal Society
of Canada.
Dr. Brown was awarded the honorary
degree of Doctor of Science in 1977 by the
University of Newcastle in England, where
he received his Ph.D. degree in 1964. He
was elected a fellow of the Royal Society of
Canada in 1980.
UBC the next Beachcombers?
UBC could soon become the best-known
university in Canada.
It all hinges on audience response to two
pilot episodes of a new CBC television
series that will be shot on campus in
November.
If the episodes succeed, UBC will
become as familiar to Canadians as, say,
Gibson's Landing, the setting for The
Beachcombers.
The proposed series, in fact, is a spin-off
from The Beachcombers, featuring one of
that series' most popular characters,
Constable John Constable. Constable John,
played by Jackson Davies, is attached to
the RCMP's University detachment, lives in
Kits, sails in English Bay, hates the
Toronto Maple Leafs, and likes cooking.
The crew from The Beachcombers that
will be shooting the episodes include at
least two UBC alumni, Mr. Robert
Frederick, producer, and Mr. Nick
Orchard, production manager. Both are
graduates of the theatre department's film
program.
The Beachcombers is the most successful
television series in Canadian history but
after 12 years of production will inevitably
come to an end. Constable John Constable
is an attempt to establish a new and
younger series for the national network
from the Vancouver offices of the CBC.
About two million Canadians watch The
Beachcombers, and it has been seen by
many additional millions in 45 other
countries. The Beachcombers has had a
major impact on the tourism industry of
the province.
(In his spare time, Constable John is a
UBC student taking — you guessed it —
film and theatre courses.)
Pedersen calls for
better planning
Universities must plan better for the
future, President George Pedersen of UBC
said in a recent speech.
Speaking to the convocation of the
Society of Management Accountants on
Oct. 22, Dr. Pedersen said there is a very
great need for educational institutions to
solicit the cooperation of business, industry
and other economic and occupational
groups in planning programs that society
will require in the years ahead.
In an address entitled "Between a Rock
and a Hard Place: The Public Interest and
the Need for Restraint", the president said
levels of public spending are being lowered
deliberately throughout the western world,
and this was difficult to argue against,
since "our social spending and public debt
has reached frightening proportions."
He said, however, that it is difficult for
the universities to cut back but at the same
time maintain programs that will be
essential in Canada's future.
"It is true that we can, at least in the
short run, increase our political capital by
making dramatic cutbacks," Dr. Pedersen
said. "But is this the right thing to do
when we know that some of the programs
we eliminate will be of fundamental
importance to our own economic survival
in the near future?
"We are caught between a rock and a
hard place in trying to safeguard, the
public interest in this respect."
He said that because nobody knows
which research and scholarship will
produce the most valuable results in the
future, it is "almost impossible" to know
which areas should be saved and which
not.
"There may be no 'good' or 'best' answer
Pulp centre
head named
Dr. Richard J. Kerekes has been
appointed director of the UBC Pulp and
Paper Centre to be built at the corner of
East Mall and Agronomy Road.
Dr. Kerekes is an honorary professor in
UBC's Department of Chemical
Engineering and is a division director in
the Pulp and Paper Research Institute of
Canada (PAPRICAN).
The $6-million centre will be for
graduate student research and education
related to the pulp and paper industry. In
addition to student research, the building
will house a pulp and paper library and
teaching laboratories. The industry will
provide approximately $1 million a year
toward the operational costs of the centre.
Planning funds for the building were
approved last spring by the provincial
government. Working drawings are now in
preparation.
Dr. Kerekes arrived at UBC in
November, 1978, to establish the
collaborative postgraduate program
between PAPRICAN and UBC. He and his
group are currently housed in the
Department of Chemical Engineering. The
postgraduate program was recently
extended to the Department of Electrical
Engineering by the transfer of Dr. Guy
Dumont of PAPRICAN to UBC.
The centre is not to be confused with
another PAPRICAN project, a $15-million
staff research facility funded by the federal
government, which will be built as part of
UBC's Discovery Park, south of the B.C.
Research building on Wesbrook Mall.
to this dilema," the president said.
"We may well have to just keep on
'muddling through' as public and private
organizations tend to do in difficult times.
However, I think there are some positive
steps that the universities can take that
may result in a slightly better future for us
all.
"One thing we can do — and I believe
that this is essential — is to try to plan
better for the future and not just to plan
by ourselves in isolation from the world
around us. There is a very great need for
educational institutions and agencies at all
levels to solicit the cooperation of business,
industry, and the other major economic
and occupational groups in planning the
kinds of educational and training programs
that we will require as a society in the
years ahead.
"Over the last decade, we have made
some important moves in this regard, but
there is still much to be done if we are
going to prepare properly for the future
and if we are to achieve the educational
and technical leverage necessary to
promote and maintain healthy economic
growth.
"This means, of course, that we must
help business and industry make their
human resources, management, technical,
and other heeds known to us so that we
can undertake programs to see that those
needs are met. In the future, I can see that
we will be involved in many kinds of joint
undertakings. Such endeavors will be good
for higher education and, I think, for the
world outside the university walls.
"It is also imperative, I believe, that the
University exhibits greater leadership in
addressing some of the broader problems
in public schooling.
"The quality of public schooling, we
have come to recognize, is a crucial factor
not only in determining the life-chances of
an individual but also the economic future
of nations.
"In Canada, perhaps we have yet to fully
appreciate the national importance of
excellence in education. Historically, at
least, we have always been somewhat tardy
in exploiting the advantages to be gained
from knowledge and somewhat indifferent
to the need for research and development
in education and in industry."
Shrum Bowl
called off
The Shrum Bowl — the annual football
game for charity between UBC
Thunderbirds and SFU Clansmen — will
not be played this year.
The game had been tentatively
scheduled for Nov. 30 at B.C. Place
Stadium, with proceeds going to the
United Way.
The Western Intercollegiate Football
League has ruled, however, that UBC must
not play the game because it would be in
direct contravention of rules 10 and 26 of
the WIFL. Rule 10 says a member team
may play a maximum of 10 games a
season, excluding playoffs, and the Shrum
Bowl would have been the 11th game for
UBC. Rule 26 says no games will be played
on or after the weekend of the Vanier Cup
for the Canadian intercollegiate
championship, scheduled this year for Nov.
19.
UBC has won four of the past five
Shrum Bowls.
Educators not a protected species, says President
Institutions of public education may not
survive in their present form, UBC
President George Pedersen told a public
meeting at Okanagan College in Kelowna
yesterday.
Dr. Pedersen, who earlier yesterday
addressed the Kelowna Rotary Club, said
that the process of learning "more and
more may occur in the home or in the
office, away from the structure of the
classroom or the college or university
campus."
The president said the public is "not at
all convinced" about the value of
traditional approaches to education.
"This lack of support, together with new
systems for delivering and packaging
educational programs, may well mean an
end to some of our long-standing ideas
about what schools, colleges, and
universities should be.
"Let me put this another way. If basic
educational services and instructional
programs can be delivered efficiently
through new technical systems, why should
the public continue to support what some
feel to be overly-expensive educational
institutions?
"In short, we may speculate that there
are social, economic, and technological
forces that could dramatically alter the
character and activities of public education
by the year 2000.
"To be sure, not all of these possibilities
may come to pass. But I think it would be
myopic of us to close our eyes and pretend
that such possibilities do not exist, or that
as educators we are somehow a protected
species — for this is clearly not the case.
"Already, one hears murmurings among
leading educational and social thinkers that
the wholesale privatization of public
education is not an impossibility and that
some dramatic restructuring of the
educational enterprise must take place if
public education is to be reformed.
"Ultimately, what I am saying, I
suppose, is that unless we can continue to
prove our value to society, and unless we
can find ways to encourage excellence in
public education at all levels, we will find
ourselves extremely vulnerable to the forces
outside our institutions." UBC Report* November 2, 1983
UDC
CaundaR
Calendar Deadlines
For events in the weeks of Nov. 20 and 27,
material must be submitted not later than
4 p.m. on Thursday, Nov. 10. Send notices
to Information Services, 6328 Memorial
Road (Old Administration Building). For
further information, call 228-3131.
The Vancouver Institute.
Saturday, Nov. 5
The Impending Crisis in
Forestry. Dr. W.E.
Hillis, Chief Research
Scientist, Commonwealth
Scientific and Industrial
Research Organization,
Australia.
Saturday, Nov. 12
AIDS: A Medical and
Social Problem. Dr.
Kevin Cahill, Lenox
Hill Hospital, New
York, and the New
Jersey College of
Medicine.
Both lectures in Lecture Hall 2 of the
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre at
8:15 p.m.
SUNDAY, NOV. 6
Symphony Orchestra.
UBC Symphony Orchestra and the Vancouver
Youth Symphony Orchestra play music of
Debussy, Liszt, and Roy Harris. Barrie
Barrington, piano. Conducted by Gerard
Schwarz. Tickets $4 regular, $2 students and
seniors. For further information, call the
Vancouver Youth Orchestra, 875-1664, or UBC
music department, 228-3113. Old Auditorium.
2:30 p.m.
MONDAY, NOV. 7
Legislation Lecture.
An Overview of the Residential Tenancy
Legislation. George Klippert, Law, UBC. Third
of a series of four free lectures focusing on
recent B.C. legislation. Robson Square Media
Centre. 12 noon.
Cancer Research Seminar.
The Effect of Stem Cell Loss on Development of
Stable Chemotherapeutic Resistance: A
Mathematical Approach. Andrew J. Coldman,
Epidemiology, Biometry and Occupational
Oncology. Lecture Theatre, B.C. Cancer
Research Centre, 601 W. 10th Ave. 12 noon.
GRANT'
DCADLINCS
Faculty members wishing more information
about the following research grants should
consult the Research Services Grant Deadlines
circular which is available in departmental and
faculty offices. If further information is
required, call 228-3652 (external grants) or
228-5583 (internal grants).
December (application dates in
brackets)
• Agriculture Canada — Operating Grant (1)
• Agriculture Research Council of Alberta
— Farming for the Future (1)
• American Chemical Society: PRF
— Research Type AC (1)
• American Council of Learned Societies
— Mellon Fellowships for Chinese Studies (1)
• American Council of Learned Societies
— Eastern European Studies Grant (1)
— Grants-in-Aid (15)
• Assoc, of Commonwealth Universities
— Commonwealth Medical Fellowships (31)
• Baker, E.A. Fdn. for Prevention of Blindness
— Fellowship (15)
— Research (15)
• Canada Council: Arts Awards
— Visiting Foreign Artists (15)
• Canadian Cancer Society
— McEachern Fellowships (1)
• Canadian Fedn. of Univ. Women
— Graduate Fellowships for Women (15)
• Canadian Life & Health Insurance Assoc.
Inc.
— Medical Scholarships (15)
German Conversation.
Mahlzeit! German Conversation. Bring your own
lunch. Everyone welcome. International House.
12:30 p.m.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
Hydrodynamic Coefficients for Axisymmetric
Objects. J. Chan, Mechanical Engineering,
UBC. Room 1202, Civil and Mechanical
Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
The Pedersen Exchange.
An opportunity for members of the University
community to meet with President George
Pedersen to discuss matters of concern. Persons
wishing to meet with Dr. Pedersen should
identify themselves to the receptionist in the
Librarian's office, which is immediately to the
left of the main entrance to the Main Library
Building. 3:30 to 5 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Baroclinic Amplitude Vacillation. Dr. Philip G.
Drazin, Mathematics, University of Bristol,
England. Room 229, Mathematics Building.
3:45 p.m.
Biochemical Discussion Group
Seminar.
The Biosynthesis of Teichuronic Acid: The Cell
Wall Polysaccharide of Micrococcus Species. Dr.
John Anderson, Biochemistry, University of
Minnesota. Lecture Hall 4, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 4 p.m.
Zoology Physiology Group Seminar.
Blood Cell Transit through the Lungs. Dr. J.C.
Hogg, Respiratory Division, St. Paul's Hospital.
Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
4:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, NOV. 8
Botany Seminar.
The Flavenoids of Menziesia — Cryptic Pattern
or no Pattern at all? B. Bohm, Botany, UBC.
Room 3219, Biological Sciences Building.
12:30 p.m.
Forestry Seminar.
Panel Discussion on Forestry in Ontario. Drs.
J.H.G. Smith, O. Sziklai, J. Crane, Forestry,
UBC. Room 166, MacMillan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Practical Writing Lecture.
John Frazee, president of Finning Tractor and
Equipment Company Ltd., will speak on
Written Communication in Business. Room
A106, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Accounting Workshop.
The Derived Demand for Consolidated Financial
Reporting. Prof. Greg Whittred, Accountancy,
University of New South Wales. Penthouse,
Angus Building. 2:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Reconstruction of Catch and Escapement Data:
Assessing the Effects of Enrichment on Great
Central Lake Sockeye. Dr. Kim Hiat, Pacific
Biological Station, Nanaimo, B.C. Room 1465,
Biological Sciences Building. 3 p.m.
Biochemical Discussion Group
Seminar.
Studies on Two Genes Amplification Systems in
CHO Cells. Dr. Lou Siminovitch, Hospital for
Sick Children, University of Toronto. Lecture
Hall 4, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. 4 p.m.
Chemistry Lecture.
Zero Field Nuclear Magnetic Resonance. Prof.
Alex Pines, Chemistry, University of California,
Berkeley. Room 250, Chemistry Building.
4 p.m.
Ophthalmology Seminar.
Monoclonal Antibodies and Genetic Engineering
as Probes for Basic and Clinical Research in
Ophthalmology. Dr. Dominic Man-Kit Lam,
Houston, Texas. Auditorium, Eye Care Centre,
2550 Willow Street. 4:30 p.m.
Pacific Rim Lecture.
Japanese Tourism in Western Canada. Dr.
Clyde Weaver, School of Community and
Regional Planning, UBC. Room 604, Asian
Centre. 4:30 p.m.
Family Housing Film.
Blackbeard's Ghost. Auditorium, Student Union
Building. 6:30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 9
Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Seminar.
Vasopressin and Blood Pressure Control. Dr.
C.C.Y. Pang, Pharmacology & Therapeutics,
UBC. Room 317, Block C, Medical Sciences
Building. 12 noon.
Poetry Reading.
Canadian poet Fred Wah. Room B312,
Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Noon-Hour Concert.
The Unashamed Transcriber. George
Zukerman, bassoon. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Ethnic Studies Lecture.
A Social-Psychological Analysis of Canada's
Multiculturalism Policy. Prof. John W. Berry,
Psychology, Queen's University. Room A203,
Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Ophthalmology Seminar.
Functional Organization and Development of
the Vertebrate Retina. Dr. Dominic Man-Kit
Lam, Houston, Texas. Meeting Room F167,
Acute Care Unit, "Health Sciences Centre
Hospital. 1:30 p.m.
• Canadian Lung Association
— Fellowship (15)
— Research (15)
• Cattell, James McKeen Fund
— James McKeen Cattell Sabbatical Award
(1)
• Damon Runyon-Walter Winchell Cancer
Fund
— Cancer-directed Fellowship (15)
— Postdoctoral Fellowship Grant (15)
• Deutscher Akadem. Austauschdienst (DAAD)
— Study Visits of Foreign Academics (1)
• Donner Canadian Foundation
— Program and Research (1)
• Environment Canada: Atmospheric Envir.
— Science Subvention Program (31)
• Environment Canada: Inland Waters Dir.
— Water Resources Research Support
Program (3)
• Fisheries and Oceans Canada
— Science Subvention Program (1)
• Hamilton Foundation
— E.B. Eastburn Fellowship Fund (31)
• Health & Welfare Canada: NHRDP Projects
— NHRDP Demonstration Projects (1)
— NHRDP Preliminary Development
Projects (1)
— NHRDP Research Grant (1)
— NHRDP Studies (1)
• Health & Welfare Canada: Welfare
— National Welfare Grant (15)
— National Welfare: Manpower Utilization
Grant (15)
— National Welfare: Research Group
Development (15)
• Human Nutrition Research Council
— Research Fellowship (1)
• Huntington Society of Canada
— Postdoctoral Fellowship (31)
— Research in Huntington's Disease (31)
• International Agency for Research on Cancer
— Fellowship for Cancer Research Training
(31)
• International Union Against Cancer
— Yamagiwa Yoshida Int'l Cancer Study
Grants (31)
• Japan Foundation
— Fellowship Programs (1)
— Institutional Project Support Programs (1)
— Research Program (1)
• Malignant Hyperthermia Assoc.
— Grant-in-Aid (15)
• MRC: Awards Program
— Centennial   Fellowship (1)
— MRC Fellowship (1)
— Visiting Scientists (1)
• MRC: Special Programs - INSRM/MRC
Exchange (1)
• MRC: Grants Programs
— Biotechnology Development (1)
• National Museum of Man
— Research Contract (1)
• National Research Council (Intl. Relations)
— Natl. Recherche Scientifique-France
Exchange (31)
• North Atlantic Treaty Organization
— Senior Scientist Program (15)
• Secretary of State
— Canadian Ethnic Studies Program:
Professorships (15)
— Canadian Ethnic Studies: Research (15)
• Social Science Res. Council (US)
— International Research (1)
• SSHRC: Research Communic. Div.
— Program of Aid to Associations (Societies)
(15)
• Transport Canada
— Negotiated Research Contributions (1)
• University of British Columbia
— Arctic & Alpine Research Grants (12)
• Woodward's Fdn. (Mr. & Mrs. P.A.)
— Foundation Grants (1)
• World University Services
— Awards to Foreign Nationals: Fellowships
(1)
Note: All external agency grant requests must
be signed by the Head, Dean, and Dr. R.D.
Spratley. Applicant is responsible for sending
application to agency.
Chemical Engineering Seminar.
Tracer Techniques. William Goldblatt,
Chemical Engineering, UBC, and Dissolved Air
Flotation for Oil Removal. Isabelle Fusey,
Chemical Engineering, UBC. Room 206,
Chemical Engineering Building. 2:30 p.m.
Geography Colloquium.
Western Canada's Pacific Rim Trade. R.
Hayter. Geography, SFU. Room 201, Geography
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Statistics Workshop.
Estimating Conditional Heteroscedasticities. Dr.
Dilip Madan, Economics, University of
Maryland. Room 223, Angus Building.
3:30 p.m.
Economic Theory Workshop.
Existence of Variable Goods Aggregates in a
Competitive Economy. Charles Blackorby and
William Schworm, Economics, UBC. Room 351,
Brock Hall. 4 p.m.
Geophysics Seminar.
Conductive Structures under the Rocky
Mountains Main Ranges and Trench. Prof. D.I.
Cough, Institute of Earth and Planetary Physics,
University of Alberta. Room 260, Geophysics
and Astronomy Building. 4 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology.
Similarities in Energy Budgets and Life History
Patterns of Animal Populations. Dr. David
Lavigne, Zoology, University of Guelph. Room
2449, Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Frederic Wood Theatre.
Opening night of William Shakespeare's Love's
Labour Lost. Continues until Nov. 19 (except
Sunday). For ticket information, call 228-2678.
Frederic Wood Theatre. 8 p.m.
Men's Basketball.
UBC vs. SFU. War Memorial Gym. 8:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOV. 10
Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar.
The Perinatal Role of Carnitine. Dr. Peter
Hahn, Developmental Medicine, UBC. Lecture
Hall 3, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre. 12:30 p.m.
UBC Chamber Strings.
Music of Vivaldi, Mozart and Suk, directed by
John Loban. Recital Hall, Music Building.
12:30 p.m.
Co-operative Education Meeting.
Information meeting for students in first-year
Science, Forestry, Applied Science and
Agricultural Sciences who are interested in
gaining study-related work experience. Room
200, Computer Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Asian Research Film.
Maureen Forrester in China. Free admission.
Auditorium, Asian Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Educators for Nuclear Disarmament.
Pauline Jewett, M.P. on The New Arms Race or
New Ways of Thinking? and film Voyage of the
Pacific Peacemaker. Hebb Theatre. 12:30 p.m.
Plant Science Seminar.
Epigenetic Change in Plants. Danielle Donnelly,
SFU. Room 342, McMillan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
Anomalous X-Ray Diffraction and the Study of
Liquid Structures. William Warburton,
Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Stanford.
Room 318, Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
Physics Colloquium.
Monopoles and How You Would Find Them.
Stephen Parke, Stanford Linear Ace. Room 201,
Hennings Building. 4 p.m.
SUB Films.
Mary Poppins. Continues until Nov. IS with
shows at 7 p.m. on Thursday and Sunday and
at 7 and 9:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.
Auditorium, Student Union Building. 7 p.m.
Leisure and Cultural Studies
Seminar.
Ideology and the Discourse of the Bodily
Professions. Jean Harvey, University of Paris.
Sponsored by the Leisure and Cultural Studies
Workgroup, School of Physical Education and
Recreation, UBC. Faculty Lounge, War
Memorial Gym. 7:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 11
Remembrance Day — University
closed.
Remembrance Day Service. Address will be
given by President George Pedersen, Scripture
will be read by Allan Russell of The War
Amputations of Canada, and the service will be
conducted by G. Howard Turpin of Vancouver
Community College. Music by the UBC Brass
Quintet. Foyer, War Memorial Gymnasium.
10:45 a.m.
Continued on Page 4 UBC Reports November 2, 1983
UDC
CalcndaR
Continued from Page 3
SATURDAY, NOV. 12
Family Housing Film.
Blackbeard's Ghost. Auditorium, Student Union
Building. 3 p.m.
Men's Basketball.
UBC vs. SFU. War Memorial Gym. 8:30 p.m.
MONDAY, NOV. 14
Legislation Lecture.
Restraint Legislation and Labor Relations. Dr.
Mark Thompson, Commerce, UBC. Last of four
free lectures focusing on recent B.C. legislation.
Robson Square Media Centre. 12 noon.
Cancer Research Seminar.
Gene Amplification as a Mechanism for
Initiation/Promotion in Cancer. Dr. Marty Pall,
Genetics, Washington State University, Pullman,
Washington. Lecture Theatre. B.C. Cancer
Research Centre, 601 W. 10th Ave. 12 noon.
Germanic Studies.
Mahlzeit! German Conversation. Bring your
Lunch. Everyone Welcome. International
House. 12:30 p.m.
The Pedersen Exchange.
An opportunity for members of the University
community to meet with President George
Pedersen to discuss matters of concern. Persons
wishing to meet with Dr. Pedersen should
identify themselves to the receptionist in the
Librarian's office, which is immediately to the
left of the main entrance to the Main Library
Building. 3:30 to 5 p.m
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
Automatic Programming of a Welding Robot.
R. Buchal, Mechanical Engineering, UBC.
Room 1202, Civil and Mechanical Engineering
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Collacation Methods for Singular Perturbation
Problems. Dr. Uri Ascher, Computer Science.
UBC. Room 229, Mathematics Building.
3:45 p.m.
Zoology Physiology Group Seminar.
Central Chemoreceptors and the Regulation of
Fetal Breathing Movements. Dr. John M.
Bissonnette. Obstetrics & Gynecology, Oregon
Health Sciences University. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
CO
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TUESDAY, NOV. 15
Forestry Seminar.
Shoot Morphology and Productivity of Conifers.
Dr. J. Leverenz, University of Washington,
College of Forest Resources. Room 166,
MacMillan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Botany Seminar.
Evolutionary Conservation of the Cyclic AMP
Control System: Evidence from Neurospora and
other Lower Eukaryotes. M.L. Pall. Washington
State University, Pullman, Washington. Room
3219, Biological Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Electrical Engineering Seminar.
Harmonic Reduction in Static Reactive Power
Compensators Using Sequence Control. Prof.
G.K. Dubey, Electrical Engineering, Indian
Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. Room
402. Electrical Engineering Building. 1:30 p.m.
Accounting Workshop.
Comparative Value of Accounting Reports for a
Simple Manufacturing Firm. Prof. Amin
Amershi, Commerce, UBC. Penthouse. Angus
Building. 2:30 p.m.
Cecil H. and Ida Green Lecture.
All Roads Lead to Steel   -   But are they Ever
Different. Prof. Ursula Franklin, Metallurgy and
Materials Science, University of Toronto. Room
317. Metallurgy Building. 3:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Oceanography of New Zealand Fjords. Dr. B.R.
Stanton, New Zealand Oceanographic Institute.
Room 1465, Biological Sciences Building.
3 p.m.
Chemistry Lecture.
Multiple Bonding Between the Heavier Main-
Group Elements. Prof. Alan H. Cowley,
Chemistry, University of Texas, Austin, Texas.
Room 250, Chemistry Building. 4 p.m.
Zoology Seminar.
Looking at the World Through Neural Crest
Colored Glasses. Carl Cans. Room 2000,
Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Pacific Rim Lecture.
China's New Economic Directions: Policies,
Problems, Prospects. Dr. Paul Lin, research
associate, Institute of Asian Research, UBC.
Room 604, Asian Centre. 4:30 p.m.
Gerontology Lecture.
Chemistry of Aging: Neurotransmitters and
Alzheimer Type Dementia. Dr. Edith G.
McGeer, Psychiatry, UBC. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
7 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16
Obstetrics & Gynaecology Seminar.
Cardiovascular Control of Vasopressin Release.
Dr. Nadine Wilson, Physiology, UBC. Room
2N9, Grace Hospital. 12 noon.
Anatomy Seminar.
A Quantitative Fluorescent Cytochemical Assay
for Enzymes on the Surface of Living Cultured
Cells. Dr. S. Myrdal, Anatomy, UBC. Room 37,
Block B, Medical Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Pharmacology & Therapeutics
Seminar.
Release of Noradrenaline Induced by
Veratridin. Dr. V. Palaty, Anatomy, UBC.
Room 317, Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
12:30 p.m.
Committee on Science, Technology
and Society.
Conference Reports by S. Straker, History,
F. Fisher, Education and   A. Thompson,
Westwater Research and Law. Salon F, Faculty
Club. 12:30 p.m.
Ethnic Studies Lecture.
Multiculturalism, Good or Bad? A Linguist's
Perspective. Prof. Bernard Saint-Jacques,
Linguistics, UBC. Room A203, Buchanan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Noon-Hour Concert.
Sarah Cunningham, Viola da Gamba, and Mitzi
Myerson, Harpsichord. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Geography Colloquium.
Prehispanic Wetland Agriculture in Veracruz,
Mexico. A. Siemens, Geography, UBC. Room
201, Geography Building. 3:30 p.m.
Marketing Workshop.
Organizational/Political Dimensions of
Consumer Pressure Groups. Prof. James D.
Forbes, Commerce, UBC. Penthouse, Angus
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Preventive Medicine Seminar.
Health Promotion in the Ministry of Health.
Clair Buckley, Health Promotion, B.C. Ministry
of Health. Room 112, James Mather Building.
4 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology Seminar.
Economics Versus Ecology? Dr. Colin Clark,
Mathematics, UBC. Room 2449. Biological
Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Comparative Literature Colloquium.
Translating Emily Dickinson: Theory and
Practice. Chantal de Grandpre. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 4:30 p.m.
Faculty Club.
Pre-Senate dinner buffet. Reservations required.
Faculty Club. 5:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOV. 17
Psychiatry Lecture.
The Use of Tricyclic Antidepressants in the
Treatment of Insomnia. Dr. Catesby Ware.
Sleep Disorders Centre, San Antonio, Texas.
Room 2NA/B, Psychiatric Unit, Health Sciences
Centre Hospital. 9 a.m.
Educators for Nuclear Disarmament.
What is Wrong with Deterrence? George
Hermanson, University Campus Ministry. Hebb
Theatre. 12:30 p.m.
Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar.
Biochemical & Functional Abnormalities in the
Diabetic Rabbit. Shabir Btumji, Pharmaceutical
Sciences, UBC. Lecture Hall 3, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Plant Science Seminar.
Anther Culture in Crucifers as a Breeding Tool.
Dr. W. Anderson, N.W. Washington Research
and Extension Centre, Mt. Vernon,
Washington. Room 342, MacMillan Building.
12:30 p.m.
UBC Choral Union.
Directed by James Schell. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
Multiple-Quantum NMR Spectroscopy. Gary
Drobny, University of Washington. Room 318,
Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
Cecil H. and Ida Green Lecture.
The Organization of Bronze Production in Early
China. Prof. Ursula Franklin, Metallurgy and
Materials Science, University of Toronto. Room
205, Anthropology and Sociology Building.
3:30 p.m.
Biomembrane Discussion Group
Seminar.
Models of Cell Adhesion. Dr. George Bell,
Theoretical Biology, Los Almos National
Laboratories. Lecture Hall 3, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 4 p.m.
Physics Colloquium.
New Light on Old Dirt. David Huntley, SFU.
Room 201, Hennings Building. 4 p.m.
SUB Films.
War Games. Continues until Nov. 20 with shows
at 7 p.m. on Thursday and Sunday and at 7
and 9:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday.
Auditorium, Student Union Building. 7 p.m.
Women's Basketball.
UBC vs. Seattle Pacific University. War
Memorial Gym. 7:30 p.m.
UBC Collegium Musicum.
Music of the 15th century directed by John
Chappell. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 18
UBC Collegium Musicum.
Music of the 15th century directed by John
Chappell. Recital Hall, Music Building
12:30 p.m.
Leon and Thea Koerner Lecture.
The Guild Culture of Medieval Italy: A Political
Language in Search of a Theory. John Najemy,
Cornell University. The lecture is part of a two-
day Medieval Studies workshop being held Nov.
18 and 19 on the campus. For details of the
workshop, see the notices section of this
Calendar. Room A102, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
New Advances in Retinoblastoma. J. Carruthers.
Parentcraft Room, Grace Hospital. 1 p.m.
Finance Workshop.
Term Structure. Prof. Eduardo Schwartz,
Commerce, UBC. Penthouse, Angus Building.
3:30 p.m.
Cecil H. and Ida Green Lecture.
The Chineseness of Chinese Technology:
Reflections on Ancient Bronze Casting. Prof.
Ursula Franklin, Metallurgy and Materials
Science, University of Toronto. Auditorium,
Asian Centre. 3:30 p.m.
Linguistics Colloquium.
Some Disturbing Ideas about Second Language
Acquisition. Bernard Saint-Jacques, Linguistics,
UBC. Room D224, Buchanan Building.
3:30 p.m.
Women's Volleyball.
UBC vs. University of Lethbridge. War
Memorial Gym. 6 p.m.
International House.
Pot-luck dinner featuring food from around the
world. Bring a main course dish. For
reservations, call 228-5021. International House.
6:30 p.m.
Faculty Club.
Wine tasting and gourmet dinner. Wine tasting
is $9.50 per person, dinner is $17.50.
Reservations required. Faculty Club. 6:30 p.m.
Lecture/Discussion.
The Invisible University: The Joys and Benefits
of Using your Mind for All it's Worth. Ronald
Gross, author of The Independent Scholar's
Handbook. Cost is $4; $3 for students and free
to those attending a workshop on Saturday,
Nov. 19 with Ronald Gross. To register for
either event, call 228-5261. Lecture Hall 6:
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
8 p.m.
Hockey.
UBC vs. Calgary Dinosaurs. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre. 8 p.m.
UBC Choral Union.
Directed by James Schell. Recital Hall, Music
Building. 8 p.m.
Volleyball.
UBC vs. Lethbridge Pronghorns. War Memorial
Gym. 8:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, NOV. 19
Therapy Workshop.
A two-day workshop on Reality Therapy for the
Busy Counsellor and Therapist is being
sponsored by UBC's Centre for Continuing
Education. Workshop will be led by Dr. John
Banmen, Counselling Psychology, UBC. For
information, call 222-5261. Acute Care Unit,
Health Sciences Centre Hospital. 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
Women's Volleyball.
UBC vs. University of Calgary. War Memorial
Gym. 6 p.m.
Hockey.
UBC vs. Calgary Dinosaurs. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre. 8 p.m.
Volleyball.
UBC vs. Calgary Dinosaurs. War Memorial
Gym. 8:30 p.m.
Notices . . .
Medieval Studies Workshop
A two-day workshop will be held on Friday,
Nov. 18 and Saturday, Nov. 19 in the
auditorium of the Vancouver School of
Theology. 6050 Chancellor Boulevard. Topics
include Professional Corporations in Late
Medieval England: Italian Towns: Corporations
and Alternatives: Guilds and Governments;
Societies of Foreigners; Social Relations and
Organizations; and Art and Urban Institutions,
as well as a Leon and Thea Koerner lecture by
John Najemy of Cornell University on The Guild
Culture of Medieval Italy: A Political Language
in Search of a Theory. For registration details,
call Dr. Richard Unger at 228-5162.
Museum Exhibit
The Museum of Anthropology is presenting a
exhibit of objects from their permanent
collection Nov. 15 through Jan. 15 in the
rotunda of the museum. The opening of the
exhibit coincides with the museum gift shop's
five-day Christmas sale (Nov. 15 to 20). Folk
crafts, art objects and Christmas ornaments
from around the world will be available for
purchase. The gift shop is open from noon to
5 p.m.
UBC Observatory
The University telescopes atop the Geophysics
and Astronomy Building are open for free
public viewing every clear Saturday night from
7 to 11 p.m. Call 228-6186 for more
information.
Faculty Club Display
A show and sale of sterling silver jewellry by
Ann Davern, enamelled works by Jean Grant
Horner and petit point jewelry and gifts by
Elaine Carlson Horner will take place on
Saturday, Nov. 12 in Salons B and C of the
Faculty Club from 1 to 5 p.m.
Faculty/Staff Badminton Club
The club meets in Gym B of the Osborne Centre
on Tuesday evenings from 8:30 to 11:30 p.m.
and Friday evenings from 7:30 to 10 p.m.
(except Friday, Nov. 4 and 11). New members
welcome.
Asian Centre Exhibit
An exhibition of photography by Ted Scott,
Vancouver architect, screen-printer, and
photographer, is on display at the Asian Centre.
The show, entitled "Japanese People and
Japanese Things ", consists of 50 color and
monochrome images made by Mr. Scott in
Japan in the 1970s. The exhibition will be open
noon and 6 p.m. daily, including weekends,
until Nov. 20.

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