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UBC Reports Mar 3, 1977

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Array ay
Board to ask Council for more money
Recognizing that there is a serious
shortfall in operating funds granted to
UBC for next year, the University's
Board of Governors voted Tuesday to
make a formal request to the
Universities Council for additional
funds for 1977^78.
Unless the Council grants this
additional money, academic cutbacks
and tuition increases will take place,
Thomas Dohm, chairman of the
Board, said.
To make necessary provision for
the possibility that the Council may
reject the University's request, the
Board approved tuition increases of
$108 to $112 per year (about 25 per
cent) for most students in the
Faculties of Arts, Science and
Education, as well as some other
schools. The Board also approved
tuition increases of $130 to $194 per
year (about 30 per cent) for students       made immediately.
in the Faculties of Medicine,
Dentistry, Pharmacy, Law, Commerce
and Engineering.
These increases will take effect if
the Universities Council rejects UBC's
request for the necessary additional
funds.
Mr. Dohm stated that the request
to   the   Universities   Council   will   be
Vol. 23, No. 4, March 3, 1977. Published by
Information Services, University of B.C., 2075
Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5.
ISSN 0497-2929. J. A. Banham and Judith
Walker, editors.
ubc reports
President replies to education minister's query
Education Minister Patrick McGeer has asked for a
statement of the policies of B. C. 's three public universities
concerning "non-university remuneration for faculty and
staff members." He said the information would be needed
to answer questions that might arise in the legislature.
UBC's president, Dr. D. T. Kenny, replied as follows:
Dear Dr. McGeer:
In response to your telegram of February 28, 1977, I am
enclosing copies of (1) the University's policy on
supplementary income, approved by the Committee of
Deans in 1963 and in effect since that time, and (2) a copy
of portions of 777e Faculty Handbook relevant to
supplementary income and the use of university facilities.
In the latter, may I call your particular attention to page
C-8, Sections 10, 12 and 13; and page C-9, Section 4.
I assume that your inquiry has been prompted by recent
articles in the Vancouver Sun concerning the outside
professional activities of one of this University's 1800
faculty members. I appreciate the concern these articles
may have caused. I assure you that I share that concern. I
was not myself aware of the magnitude of the outside
employment described in the articles. If the account given
there is factually correct, the matter is a serious one.
Immediately after the appearance of the articles I started a
detailed inquiry into the case in question.
Outside professional activity by faculty members is
often of substantial benefit to the University and the
individual in terms of increased teaching and research
effectiveness.   It   has  been  clear  to  me  for  some  time,
however, that there is a need for a more detailed and
effective policy in this area. Together with the Committee
of Deans, I have been studying the matter for some months
and propose to initiate a thoroughgoing review and revision
of our policy and of the procedures needed to ensure strict
adherence to it.
Meanwhile, I will continue vigorously to review the total
University situation and rectify any abuses which may be
occurring under the present policy.
May I add, however, that to improve the effective
implementation of our policy will require increased
co-operation from agencies of government, including the
provincial government. These agencies have long been
among the main outside employers of University faculty
members, for such work as royal commissions,
consultancies and so on. Since I became president of the
University in July, 1975, I am aware of only one instance
when the provincial government has consulted me in
advance of contracting for paid services from UBC faculty
members. I am sure you will agree that such practices can
only increase the difficulty of working towards
improvement in this important area. I would like to request
that in future government agencies should address to the
president requests for the release of faculty members of this
University. I hope that I may count on the co-operation of
the government in my continued efforts to improve the
implementation of our policy.
Cordially yours,
Douglas T. Kenny
President
UNIVERSITY'S POLICY ON
SUPPLEMENTARY INCOME
1. Faculty members are appointed
on a 12-month basis. It is expected
that, with the exception of the usual
period for vacation, they will be
engaged for the whole of each year in
teaching and the pursuit of scholarly
interests.
2. It is recognized that faculty
members share the responsibility for
the efficient operation of the
University, towards which the deans,
heads and directors have a special
obligation.
3. When a faculty member proposes
to undertake substantial work for
which he will receive remuneration,
either from an outside source or from
University funds over and above his
salary, he should ensure that, in doing
so, he is acting in accordance with the
principles set out in paragraphs (1) and
(2) above. Toward this end, he should
consult his head, director or dean,
before accepting a commitment to
undertake such work.
Approved by the
Committee of Academic Deans
on October 17, 1963
From 77?<? Faculty Handbook:
10. Rental of Equipment: External
Users. To protect the University's
status as a tax-exempt educational
institution, rental of University
equipment or facilities or their use for
commercial or consulting purposes is
generally not permissible unless no
equivalent equipment or facilities are
available locally or use of such
equipment or facilities is in the public
interest. All arrangements for such use
must be made through the Office of
Continued on p. 3 Universities Council Statement:
Operating grants '77-78
Future funding criteria
Here is the full text of the report of
the Universities Council of B.C. on the
allocation of the 1977-78 operating grant
between UBC, Simon Fraser University
and the University of Victoria.
REPORT ON THE ALLOCATION OF THE 1977-78
OPERATING GRANT AMONG THE UNIVERSITY OF B.C.,
SIMON FRASER UNIVERSITY AND
THE UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA
$8,879,750 has been met by a
reduction proportionate to each
university's share of the original grant
request, as adjusted by current data.
The resulting allocation appears below
and in detail as Table 1.
Subject to approval of Vote 161 by
the Legislature, the allocation of the
operating grant will be:
The University of B.C. $111,315,322
Simon Fraser University 41,234,407
University of Victoria 31,950,271
Total $184,500,000
The current session of the B.C.
Legislature has been asked to vote on
the allocation of $184,500,000 toward
the operating expenditure for the
1977-78 fiscal year of the University
of B.C., Simon Fraser University and
the University of Victoria. The
amount of $184,500,000 proposed by
the minister in the provincial budget is
$9,735,000 less than the
$194,235,000 recommended in
October, 1976, to the minister of
education by the Universities Council
of B.C.
After considering the impact of the
indicated funding shortfall — a
significant part of which may well be
met by student fee increases — the
Universities Council has concluded
that the priorities identified in its
October, 1976, recommendation
should stand as the primary basis for
its allocation.
While some modifications in salary
base and enrolment projections have
been made in light of "further
information not previously available,
the   resulting   total   funding   gap   of
FUTURE FUNDING CRITERIA
In its review of the universities'
submissions and in reaching its
conclusions about final allocations, the
Council identified a number of areas
warranting increasing attention in the
future. In the common concern of the
universities and the Council for
continued and enhanced effectiveness,
it is the intention of Council to give
particular emphasis to the following
matters in its review of 1978-79
funding requests and allocations.
TABLE I
1977-78 OPERATING GRANT ALLOCATION
UBC SFU                U.VIC.                TOTAL
Base*                         $117,410,013 $41,741,620   $32,139,625   $191,291,258
Inflation factors**          6,678,128 2,551,173        2,010,971         11,240,272
Growth and development factors***          2,094,101 1,135,614        1,097,425          4,327,140
1977-78 operating expenditure         $126,182,242 $45,428,407   $35,248,021    $206,858,670
Student fee & other
revenue                   (14,866,920) (4,194,000)     (3,297,750)     (22,358,670)
1977-78 operating                 =
grant                      $111,315,322 $41,234,407   $31,950,271    $184,500,000
*Base is the estimate of operating expenditures required by each university during
the year commencing April 1, 1977, if throughout the 1977-78 year there were no
price and wage increases, no change in the size and mix of the April 1 work force,
and no change in the level of services provided.
**lnflation  factors  is  an  estimate  of the funding amounts available to each
university to cope with price and wage increases arising out of inflation.
***Growth  and  development factors  is an estimate of the funding amounts
available to each university for development of staff and services.
2/UBC Reports/March 3, 1977
1. Establishment of standards for
faculty service loads. A definition of a
standard service load in terms of hours
devoted to teaching, preparation,
research, administration and public
service should be established. A
reasonable balance — obviously
varying between individuals — should
ensure that faculty members not
substantially engaged in research
activities of demonstrated quality or
high promise, or in other significant
non-teaching activity will carry higher
teaching loads. Some means of
evaluation of quality and promise as
well as a means for defining the extent
(i.e. the amount) of an individual's
research effort will have to be devised
to ensure an equitable distribution of
faculty service loads.
2. Recognition of demographic
trends. The promotion of an individual
to a higher faculty rank and the
awarding of a higher salary presumably
acknowledges his or her superior
teaching and/or research output. The
Council views with some concern the
prospect that the coming decade of
limited growth in university enrolment
may result in the aging of a relatively
immobile faculty, accompanied by
steadily increasing salary costs and
without proportionate gains in
contribution. A key question: How
effectively will universities carry out
their responsibilities with regard to
peer evaluations of individual
contributions, and will they take
action on their findings to insure that
opportunities are afforded younger
people capable of making a mark as
teachers and/or researchers?
3. Reduction of course offerings
for which there is little demonstrated
demand; elimination of course
offerings in disciplines where
unnecessary duplication may exist in
the province. The ultimate goal in
accessibility of post-secondary
education would be to make available
to each individual in every community
in the province high quality
instruction in every discipline. The
cost of achieving such a goal is beyond
reasonable reach and would
undoubtedly require the province to
sacrifice support for some of the other
essential services which it currently
provides. The Council appreciates
that universities must have the means
to embark on innovative programs and
to pursue imaginative new approaches.
Additions to program in line with
emerging areas of interest should,
however, be accompanied by moves to
eliminate unnecessary duplication of
course offerings and to" curb
proliferation of undergraduate course
offerings in traditional disciplines.
Unless something is dropped to make
room for something new, the financial burden will go beyond the capacity of
public acceptance.
4. Investigation of new methods of
instruction. The Council is of the
opinion that the universities may not
be directing sufficient attention to the
areas of teaching methodology and use
of audio-visual and computerized
media to provide the student with
better instruction while reducing the
dependency on such a heavy
concentration of manpower in
instructional activity. New, automated
methods will never substitute for
seminars, student research and
experimentation, and give and take
with stimulating teachers; but much
can be done to take advantage of
current and emerging technology
without losing other values.
5. Protection of the university
position. The conferring of a degree
attesting to an individual's level of
skill, scholarship, and capacity for
thought is the symbol which sets
universities apart from other
educational institutions. Universities
must therefore guide public policy by
ensuring that entrance and
matriculation standards are maintained
at a level which preserves the
university degree as a distinctive
mark of scholarship and independent
thinking ability. If high standards
reduce enrolments while increasing the
quality of graduates, the net cost to
the public could be lower, and the
benefit to the university student and
the public could be greater. Those who
do not meet university standards may
still receive post-secondary training at
colleges and technical institutes. It is
not intended, of course, to reduce the
accessibility to universities for
qualified people and in particular for
those whose early progression to
university may have been hindered or
interrupted.
ALLOWANCE FOR
PROGRAMS OF EXCELLENCE
Statements by senior university
administrators, comments made in the
Gaudry report on the State of
Research and Research Funding in
British Columbia, and observations by
the minister of education all point to
the need for greater attention to be
paid to developing programs of
excellence at the universities. It is not
the Council's role to describe how this
might best be done, but to provide
stimulus for the advancement of this
concept in the coming year, the
Council has included in the allocation a
specific item of $500,000 in total for
this purpose.
The Council would expect that in
the presentation of the universities'
funding requests for 1978-79 they will
describe the specific actions they have
taken to further this objective. It is the
hope of Council that the universities
will consider this to be an invitation to
include the Council and the public in
an understanding of their efforts in
this respect and accordingly to treat
the allocation as a separate fund and
report on its use in the next year's
funding requests.
STUDENT FEES
Decisions with respect to fees are
the sole prerogative of the universities.
Consequently the allocation of the
1977-78 operating grant ignores any
fee changes.
However, if the universities are to
realize the funding levels they have
requested, or even approach the levels
recommended" by the Council, they
will need to consider a substantial
increase in tuition fees to make up
indicated deficiencies in their 1977-78
operating funds.
Council believes the universities
should address themselves to the need
for a long-term policy on student fee
rates, taking into account the
desirability of annual fee reviews in
order to ensure that the financial
contribution by students represents a
reasonable proportion of the cost of
post-secondary education. In slightly
over a decade, the contribution from
student fees towards the operating
costs of British Columbia universities
has dropped from 30 per cent to less
than 10 per cent. It should also be
noted that British Columbia
universities have not raised tuition fee
rates for 10 years, that the present
levels in British Columbia are among
the lowest in Canada, and that even a
25 per cent increase would still place
them near the bottom nationally.
The foregoing comments include
the caveat that fee increases be
accompanied   by   a   highly   effective
student aid program to ensure that
individuals of limited means but ample
scholastic ability are not deprived of
the opportunity to secure a university
education.
In the course of developing its
funding allocations the Council gave
careful consideration to holding back a
portion of the operating grant to be
distributed to the universities after
some criteria had been met relating to
the purposes and effectiveness with
which funds were used.
After thorough review of this
alternative, however the Council
concluded it would be inappropriate
to take this action: (a) because of the
need to ensure that the universities
had a clear basis now on which to
make financial commitments for the
1977-78 year; and (b) because no
guidelines for distribution now exist or
could be developed within the time
available, on the basis of which such a
hold back would be distributed.
Nevertheless, the Council
anticipates that during the coming
year, and in collaboration with the
universities, such guidelines may be
formulated. These could be used in the
development of Council's operating
grant recommendation to the minister
for the year 1978-79, as well as in its
allocation deliberations in the future.
In making its comments about
future allocation criteria and
expectations regarding programs of
excellence, the Council recognizes that
the universities themselves must
determine their own courses of action
with respect to these and other
matters. At the same time the Council
hopes that, jointly with the
universities, continued progress will be
made in breaking new ground in terms
of administrative processes and
management concepts.. »
Continued from p. 1
the     President     (Research
Administration).
12. Supplemental Income.
Payment of honoraria from grant or
contract funds to full-time staff
members is permitted at the discretion
of the department head (or dean or
director) concerned. Any such
payments must be approved by the
Board of Governors and made through
University payroll.
13. Conflict of Interest Where a
member of faculty or staff is
responsible for specifying or approving
materials or services purchased by the
University, he shall not have any
financial interest, either direct or
indirect, in the transaction.
Members of faculty and staff of the
University     shall     not     engage
independently in contract work with
the University for the supply of
materials or services unless no other
source of these materials or services is
available.
In the case that a member of
faculty or staff is the sole supplier of
materials or services, any arrangements
must have the approval of the
president.
D.  POLICY ON CONTRACTS
FOR RESEARCH
AND OTHER PROJECTS
4.   Personal    Contracts.     Personal
contracts    for    research    and    other
services     negotiated    between    an
individual and an external agency and
signed by that individual will not be
accepted   for   administration   by   the
University,     nor     may     University
facilities be used for work carried out
under such contracts.
UBC Reports/March 3, 1977/3 s:!; i -als  c ! v lb ii. r>
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LAM-US    f"AIL
8902C41
ZSZ  ?zs
K AT UBC
Notices must reach Information Services, Main Mall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5 p.m. Thursday of week preceding publication of notice.
8:15 p.m.
SATURDAY,
8:15 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
3:45 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
SATURDAY,MARCH 5
VANCOUVER    INSTITUTE.    Dr.     Erich    Vogt,
vice-president, Faculty and Student Affairs, UBC,
on   First   Results from  TRIUMF.  Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
MARCH 12
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE. Prof. A. Geoffrey
Woodhead, fellow. Corpus Christi College,
Cambridge, on The Failure of an Experiment:
Athens in the Fifth Century B.C. Lecture Hall 2,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
MONDAY, MARCH 7
12:30 p.m. CANCER RESEARCH SEMINAR. Dr. Dick
Pearce, Pathology, UBC, on The Interstitial Space
in the Dermis. Library, Block B, Medical Sciences
MANAGEMENT SCIENCE SEMINAR. D. Kira,
Commerce and Business Administration, UBC, on
Applications of Stochastic Dominance to Resource
Management. Room 321, Angus Building.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. K.
Lips, Mechanical Engineering graduate student,
UBC, on Attitude Dynamics of Satellites with
Flexible Appendages. Room 1215, Civil and
Mechanical Engineering Building.
PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. B. Bressler,
Anatomy, UBC, on Studies on the Instantaneous
Elasticity of the Crossbridge in Contracting
Skeletal Muscle. Room 2449, Biological Sciences
Building.
TUESDAY, MARCH 8
12:30 p.m. BOTANY SEMINAR. Dr. James Mayo, University
of Alberta, on The Physiology of Stomata. Room
3219, Biological Sciences Building.
LECTURE ON INDIA. Prof. G. S. Bhalla,
Economics, Nehru University, New Delhi, on
Recent Surprises in India's Food Situation. Room
102, Buchanan Building.
ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Dr. G.
F. Schrack, Electrical Engineering, and Dr. T.
Goldberg, Education, UBC, on Computer Graphics
Aided Composition of Music. Room 418, Electrical
Engineering Building.
COMPUTING CENTRE SEMINAR. John
Coulthard, Computing Centre, UBC, on Use of
Magnetic Tapes. Room 209, Mechanical
Engineering Annex.
OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. Prof. Irving K.
Fox, director, Westwater Research Centre, UBC,
on The Westwater Project. Room 1465, west wing.
Biological Sciences Building.
CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. P. Legzdins,
Chemistry, UBC, on Aspects of Organometallic
Nitrosyl     Chemistry.     Room     250,     Chemistry
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9
12 noon PHARMACOLOGY    SEMINAR.    Dr.    D.    M.    J.
Quastel, Pharmacology, UBC, on Problems
Concerning Mechanisms of Transmitter Release.
Room 114, Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
12:30 p.m. ENGLISH LECTURE. Prof. Laurence Kitchin,
English, SFU, on Shakespeare and the University
Teacher. Room 102, Buchanan Building.
3:30 p.m. ASIAN RESEARCH WORKSHOP. Prof. G. S.
Bhalla, Economics, Nehru University, New Delhi,
on Food Aid, Grain Prices, and Agricultural
Development. Room 201, Mechanical Engineering
Annex.
STATISTICS WORKSHOP. Prof. Carl E. Sarndal,
Commerce and Business Administration, UBC, will
speak. Room 321, Angus Building.
4:30 p.m. ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr.
N. J. Wilimovsky, Animal Resource Ecology, UBC,
on The Tuna-Porpoise Controversy. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building.
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE LECTURE.
Andrew Busza, English, UBC, on A Reactionary
Approach to Conrad, Part II: Conrad and the
Moderns. Penthouse, Buchanan Building.
THURSDAY, MARCH 10
1:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
12:15 p.m. BIOMEDICAL COMMUNICATIONS media show.
This week's films are It's Easier Than You Think
and Creating A Supportive Environment For The
Elderly. Room B8, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre.
12:30 p.m. ASIAN STUDIES SERIES on different aspects of
Chinese culture. Prof. D. Overmeyer speaks on
Wild Horses in a Field: Taoist View of Life. Room
106, Buchanan Building.
ZOOLOGY NOON-HOUR TRAVELS. Dr. G.
Pickard, Oceanography, UBC, on Pacific Islands:
High and Low. Room 2000, Biological Sciences
Building.
CELL BIOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Richard
Landesman, University of Vermont, on Cause or
Effect: The Embryologist's Dilemma. Room 2321,
Biological Sciences Building.
ENGLISH LECTURE. Prof. Peter Buitenhuis,
chairman, English department, SFU, on E. J. Pratt
as Poet of the Sea. Room 102, Buchanan Building.
FINE ARTS LECTURE. Prof. Andree Hayum, art
department, Fordham University, on Meaning and
Function of the Isenheim Altarpiece: The Hospital
Context  Revisited. Room 102, Lasserre Building.
2:30 p.m. CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR. Pat Barry,
UBC, on Electromagnetic Resonances in Crystals
of TTF-TCNQ at Microwave Frequencies. Room
318, Hennings Building.
3:45p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS
COLLOQUIUM. Prof. Michael Mackey,
Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, on
Oscillation and Chaos in Physiological Control
Systems. Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. R. C. Jaklevic, Ford
Scientific Research Labs., Dearborne, Mich., on
Quantum Size Effects in Thin Metal Films by
Electron Tunneling. Room 201, Hennings Building.
BIOCHEMICAL SEMINAR. Dr. Beverley Green,
Botany, UBC, on The Molecular Biology of the
Chloroplast in Acetabularia and Other Organisms.
Lecture Hall 5, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre.
4:30 p.m.     BIOMEMBRANES    GROUP    SEMINAR.     Dr.
Christopher Grant, Biochemistry, University of
Western Ontario, on Glycolipids and Glycoproteins
as Recognition Sites in Lipid Bilayer Model
Membranes. Lecture Hall 1, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
8:00 p.m. SOCIAL WORK COLLOQUIUM. Prof. Ben Chud,
Social Work, UBC, on Canadian Social Workers in
Russia,  1976.  Room  A,  School  of Social  Work.
FRIDAY, MARCH 11
12:30 p.m.    GRADUATE     STUDENTS'     ASSOCIATION
presents guest speaker alderman Harry Rankin.
Committee Room, Graduate Student Centre.
COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Alan
K. Mackworth, Computer Science, UBC, on
Reading Sketch Maps. Room 326, Angus Building.
HEALTH CARE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY
SEMINAR. Dr. Harvey Haakonson and Dr. John
Bardsley, Surgeon General's Office, National
Defence Headquarters, Ottawa, on Preventive
Medicine in the Canadian Armed Forces. Room
146, Mather Building.
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. D.
Sheraton on Photolytic Oxidation of Mercaptans.
Room 206, Chemical Engineering Building.
LINGUISTICS COLLOQUIUM. Edwin
Pulleyblank, Asian Studies, UBC, on Some Issues
on the Genesis of Tone. Room 2225, Buchanan
Building.
4:30 p.m. EAST ASIA SEMINAR. Prof Jack Dull, History,
University of Washington, on The Patrimonial
Element in Early Man. Room 209, Mechanical
Engineering Annex.
4/UBC Reports/March 3, 1977

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