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UBC Reports Jul 14, 1988

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UBC Archives Serial
IJJBC
Volume 34 Number 13, July 14,1988
Entomology conference
Bug experts help nab drug smugglers
by Gavin Wilson
A gang of New Zealand drug smugglers had
no idea they'd be done in by tiny, dried remains
of insects that laced their stash.
But they hadn't counted on the superior
sleuthing skills of Trevor Crosby and other
forensic entomologists who assisted police on
the case.
Crosby, whose evidence helped convict two
smugglers, was one of about 3,500 scientists
attending the 18th International Congress of
Entomology held at UBC July 3-9.
Forensic entomology, such as Crosby's work,
was just one of hundreds of topics — ranging
from cat fleas to beekeeping to methods used by
the ancient Egyptians to keep pests out of stored
grain — on the agenda at the congress.
The congress was organized by a committee
chaired by Geoffrey Scudder, president and
secretary general of the congress and head of
UBC's zoology department.
In 1982, New Zealand police made arrests in
connection with several seizures of marijuana
worth millions of dollars. Charges of possession
were laid, but police wanted to prove the drugs
were smuggled into the country, a much more
serious offence.
Botanists at New Zealand's Department of
Scientific and Industrial Research were called in,
but made little headway until they consulted their
colleagues in entomology.
As they sifted through the marijuana, Crosby
and the other researchers discovered the
desiccated bodies of 61 insects — only one of
New Dean
of Dentistry
joins faculty
next month
by Debora Sweeney
UBC is getting a new Dean of Dentistry.
Dr. Paul Robertson joins the faculty Aug. 1,
replacing retiring Dean George Beagrie.
Dr. Robertson is currently chairman of
the department of stomatology at the
University of California, San Francisco,
School of Dentistry. He is well-known for
his research in periodontology, the study of
gum disease.
The absolutely great attraction of UBC
is its excellent research reputation," said Dr.
Robertson. The size of the faculty of
dentistry is perfect for a dean to be involved
in research."
Already, Dr. Robertson has worked to
establish collaborative research between
UBC and the University of California in the
following areas: oral lesions caused by the
long-term use of smokeless tobacco,
chewing tobacco or snuff; methods of
preventing and treating periodontal disease
with the use of a device which delivers
antibiotics and anti-inflamatory drugs to
sites in the mouth during a long period of
time; and the study of immuno-deficiency
diseases, particularly AIDS, which are first
detected in the mouth.
"In order to be competitive in research,
collaborative efforts are absolutely
essential," said Dr. Robertson.
His aim is to work closely with the
faculties of medicine and pharmaceutical
sciences continuing the efforts of his
predecessor, Dr. Beagrie.
"I have nothing but admiration for Dr.
Robertson," said Dr. Beagrie. "I believe he
will further strengthen what we have started
in developing excellent basic research into
the causes and treatment of periodontal
disease."
Before joining the University of
California, Dr. Robertson was chairman of
the department of periodontology at the
University of Connecticut.
Photo by Warren Schmidt
Richard Fall shows off the giant South American
Beetle, Titanus Giganeus at the commercial
exhibit of the International Entomology Congress.
which was normally found in New Zealand.
The insects were identified and their normal
range of distribution charted. Through a process
of elimination, the marijuana's origin was
Canada Post issued four stamps featuring
buttedlies native to Canada in conjunction with
the18th International Congress of Entomology at
UBC.
pinpointed. It had been grown in the.infamous
Golden Triangle of southeast Asia.
"Without our evidence the Crown would have
lost a smuggling case," said Crosby. "We
provided a direct link."
Research conducted by most congress
delegates is far less sensational, but the impact
on people's lives is equally important.
Some estimates put the number of insect
species on earth as high as 50 million, comprising more than 70 per cent of the world's total
animal species.
A key element of the earth's eco-system,
insects play a vital role in the pollination of plants,
nutrient cycling and soil fertility. Yet they are also
age-old foes of mankind, transmitting disease
and eating crops. The cost of insect pest damage
to agriculture and forestry in Canada alone
exceeds $100 million annually.
Entomology Congresses are held every four
years to further the study of entomology by
providing a forum for entomologists and other
scientists to meet, exchange ideas and review
research and the current state of knowledge.
The last congress held in Canada was in
Montreal in 1956. More recent congresses were
held in Washington, D.C. (1976), Kyoto (1980)
and Hamburg (1984).
After opening ceremonies at the Orpheum
Theatre, delegates turned their attention to insect
wings and flight, pesticides, the effect of insects
on the forest industry and agriculture and the'
evolution of mosquitos.
In conjunction with the congress, an
exhibition of entomological specimens and books
was held in the foyer of the Woodward Library
and a commercial exhibit was held at the War
Memorial Gym.
As well, Canada Post released new postage
stamps is to commemorate the Congress.
Women and exercise
Research dispels common beliefs
by Gavin Wilson
A UBC physician says recent research casts
doubt on the commonly held belief that women
who reach high levels of fitness risk disruption of
their menstrual cycles.
Detailed records taken over a year show that
women who trained for and ran a marathon had
no more changes in their cycles than did women
who were sedentary or who exercised moderately.
"We can say very clearly there is no evidence
marathon training causes amenorrhea (an
absence of periods)," said Dr. Jerilynn Prior, an
assistant professor of medicine and a specialist
in endocrinology.
"All the associations between amenorrhea
and exercise are simply that — associations,"
said Prior. "You don't say that anyone wearing a
suit and tie is a stockbroker just because all
stockbrokers wear suits and ties, but that's the
kind of association that has been made, and it's
erroneous."
Prior said previous studies made the
association partly because their methodologies
were flawed. In her research, funded by Health
and Welfare Canada and the Dairy Bureau of
Canada, 66 volunteers were studied. All had a
recent history of regular ovulatory cycles and
were not taking birth control pills.
Also taking part in the research project were
Arthur Burgess of radiology, Martin Schechter of
health care and epidemiology, research nurse
Yvette Vigna and research assistant Nansi
Cunningham.
Exercise can affect menstruation, Prior says,
but amenorrhea usually develops in exercising
women only if there's other factors at work, such
as weight loss, emotional stress or young age.
She believes that often amenorrhea is
blamed on exercise because of a built-in bias
against women who excel at athletics.
There's a deep-seated belief, among both
men and women, that somehow exercise just
isn't right for women. I believe there's a strong
Photo by Warren Schmidt
"Florida" by Kamloops artist Anne Vaasjo is on display at the Fine Art Gallery until Aug. 12.
culturally based bias against women who do
strenuous exercise," Prior said.
Meanwhile, volunteers are needed for
another study examining the links between
exercise, menstrual cycles and the fragile bone
disease osteoporosis.
The study seeks to discover whether
supplements such as calcium and the hormone
progesterone will help prevent bone loss in
women who run at least 24 kilometres a week
and who may have menstrual changes even if
their cycles are normal.
Prior's research indicates that bone loss
could be caused by the absence of progesterone, which is linked to the release of the mature
egg and the luteal phase (the premenstrual time
between the release of the egg and the start of
menstrual bleeding).
Women interested in taking part in the study
should contact Yvette Vigna at 875-4566 or Dr.
Prior at 875-4565.
UBC Reports
named best
in Canada
UBC Reports was named Canada's best
university or college newspaper in a recent
competition sponsored by the Canadian Council
for the Advancement of Education.
CCAE, Canada's national organization for
public relations, alumni and development
professionals in post-secondary institutions,
made the announcement at a recent conference
in Saskatoon.
UBC shares top billing with the University of
Toronto Bulletin, which has earned the number
one spot for the past three years.
UBC Reports is published bi-weekly by the
Community Relations Office and is distributed on
the campus and to government and business
leaders and the media.
The tabloid is produced by editor-in-chief Don
Whiteley, editor Howard Fluxgold and writers Jo
Moss, Debora Sweeney, Lorie Chortyk and
Gavin Wilson. bno2 ?siv~>fhifr 0#?>
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Photo by Warren Schmidt
Federal Justice Minister Ray Hnatyshyn looks over the shoulder of UBC law professor John
Hogarth during a demonstration of the computer sentencing program at the Vancouver courthouse
law library. Hnatyshyn presented the Computers and Law program with a $233,000 grant to bring
the system to all judges and lawyers in B.C. and evaluate it for potential national use.
Lithoprobe explores
ancient geology of B.C.
by Gavin Wilson
A national geophysics project based at UBC
is conducting research this summer to explain
how the terrain of British Columbia was created
over the past 180-million years.
The Lithoprobe project, the largest earth
sciences research project ever undertaken in
Canada, has already discovered what could be
the earth's deepest rift far below Lake Superior
and important new information about ore deposits
in the Canadian Shield.
Lithoprobe was set up in 1984 to explore the
lithosphere, the rigid outer shell of the earth's
crust, using seismic reflection (measuring the
"echoes" of vibrations send into the ground) and
other techniques. It is providing the first clear
images of geological structures as deep as 50
John Balfour
Urology
specialist
A pioneer in B.C. urology, Dr. John
Balfour, died May 3 in Gibsons. He was
76.
Born in Vancouver Dec. 16,1911, Dr.
Balfour returned to the city in 1946 after
completing his training and serving in the
army overseas. He worked out of
Vancouver General Hospital, and in 1951,
joined the newly created UBC Faculty of
Medicine. He was head of urology from
1951 until he retired in 1977.
It is estimated that more than half of the
province's urologists trained under Dr.
Balfour and the staff he organized.
Dr. Balfour also introduced developments in the treatment of bladder and
prostatic cancer using radiation and
surgery.
He is survived by his wife, Louise, four
daughters, one son, six grandchildren, a
sister and a brother.
A research fund has been set up in Dr.
Balfour's name, administered through the
UBC Department of Surgery. The
proceeds will be directed to resident
education, in particular to encourage
resident research and provide financial
assistance for urology residents.
kilometres below the surface.
Lithoprobe director Ronald Clowes, a UBC
geophysics professor, said this information is
vital for the exploration of buried mineral and
fossil fuel resources and for understanding the
causes of earthquakes and volcanos.
This summer, Lithoprobe researchers turn
their attention to the southern Cerdillera, the
geological term for the region of mountains that
stretches across B.C.
Most of the province was not originally part of
North America, said Clowes. It began as a series
of micro-continents formed far out in the Pacific
which then moved onto the coast one after the
other, a process which continues to this day.
Researchers hope to discover whether B.C.'s
terrain was built up of thin sheets of material
placed one on top of another, or as vertical slabs
thrust together.
Meanwhile, a recent Lithoprobe survey of
Lake Superior uncovered details of a major rift,
1,000 million years old, far below the lake bottom.
It lies buried beneath 30 kilometres of volcanic
rocks and other sediment.
"It's probably the deepest known rift in the
world," said Clowes.
It's Your's contest
winners chosen
by Lorie Chortyk
Timothy Ryan of Yew Street in Vancouver is
the grand-prize winner of a contest in It's Yours,
UBC's annual report to the community. The
report was distributed to nearly 600,000 homes
throughout B.C in May.
Ryan's name was drawn from 758 contest
entries. He wins a summer weekend getaway at
UBC for a family of five, including accommodation at Gage Residence, meals, passes to the
Nitobe and Botanical Gardens, free swimming
and tennis, and admission to UBC's world-
famous Museum of Anthropology.
It's Yours drew many enthusiastic comments
from the public.
Through this report, you made the average
person feel UBC is for everyone," wrote one
reader. Another person wrote: "I was amazed to
find out all that UBC has to offer the general
public."
Others wrote in to say that the report
demonstrated the value of UBC to the community
and to thank the university for keeping the public
informed about its activities.
One reader put it simply: "We're proud of you,
too."
Tooth decay weapon
ignored by dentists,
professor asserts
by Debora Sweeney
Dentists in B.C. are not taking advantage of a
powerful weapon against tooth decay, says Dr.
Barry McBride, head of UBC's Department of
Microbiology.
Only 30-40 of the province's 1,500 dentists
are using a service provided by UBC which
identifies individuals with a high risk of developing cavities, Dr. McBride noted. Until now the
service has been free, but soon a nominal fee will
be introduced to cover costs.
The service is aimed at knocking out a microorganism called Streptococcus mutans —
known to cause holes in teeth. While dentists
have been able to curb tooth decay during the
last 20 years, the persistent bacteria continues to
plague many Canadians.    .
"We have a procedure which could help
dentists prevent cavities. They won't have to drill
holes because the organism will be eliminated
before there are cavities," he said.
The reason people require crowns and
bridges to a large extent is because they are
infected with a decay-causing organism. If they
don't get rid of the organism, they'll have spent a
great deal of money and they'll be back in a few
years because those support structures will be
corroded away by bacteria."
The procedure involves a simple test in which
dentists send patients' saliva or plaque samples
to Dr. McBride's oral microbiology laboratory.
The samples are cultured in the lab so that the
number and type of bacteria present can be
identified. Then, dentists can supervise the
treatment of patients showing high numbers of
Streptococcus mutans.
In an effort to get more dentists interested in
using the service, McBride is launching a
campaign through the College of Dental
Surgeons. As well, he is encouraging patients to
ask their dentists why they are not using the
tests.
UBC faculty members
star on radio, television
by Lorie Chortyk
Medical professor Stephen Sacks describes
his recent appearance on NBC's Phil Donahue
Show as "exciting, but really unnerving."
Sacks appeared on the popular afternoon
show to discuss the spread of herpes in North
America.
"It was a great plug for the university," says
Sacks. "He went on and on about what a great
job UBC is doing in this area of research."
Sacks says he's done interviews with local
media since the show aired June 8, and has
been asked to do a pilot for a proposed Donahue
clone for CBC.
"I've had a lot of calls from local reporters
since the show aired. I guess it's unusual to see
a Canadian on Donahue."
Sacks says he's aiming for a spot now on the
Oprah Winfrey Show. And if anyone missed the
June 8 Donahue Show, "I think there's about a
hundred video-taped copies in my family," laughs
Sacks.
He isn't the only faculty member spending
time under the hot lights these days.
Psychologist Stanley Coren recently became
the focus of international media attention when
Nature Magazine published the results of a study
he conducted on the lifespan of left-handers.
The story was picked up by CTV's Canada AM,
Reuter's news service and was broadcast across
North America by the CBS and NBC radio
networks and NBC's Today show.
On the international scene, the ston/ was
picked up by the Australian Broacasfjng
Corporation, and plans are under way at the
BBC's World News Service in London to feature
Coren's study.
For Oceanography Department head Paul
Leblond, media interviews are a form of teaching.
"I think my relationship with reporters has
matured with experience. I communicate wfth
them better now because I'm more in tune with
the kind of information they're after."
A recent news release on Leblond's research
on the existence of sea monsters sparked
interest across North America, including articles
in Reader's Digest Magazine (international
edition), Air Canada's En Route Magazine, the
Vancouver Sun and Victoria Times Colonist, a
full-page spread in the Toronto Sun and weekly
newspapers throughout B.C.
He also appeared on CBC-TV's Switchback
show, CBC radio's Early Edition, Daybreak and
Basic Black, CKNW, CFMI, CKO's national show
Night Talk and KNUS radio in Denver, Colo.
"I get asked the same questions again and
Post-grad student
killed in accident
A traffic accident last month claimed the life
of UBC post-graduate student Ann McKenna, 23.
McKenna, who was conducting research at
TRIUMF, and husband Ross McKenna, a
physics graduate student, were cycling to
campus along 41 st Ave. when she was struck by
a bus and killed.
Funeral services were held in her native
Nova Scotia.
again, but it's always
interesting and fun
because I can add new
information each time,"
says Leblond. "I think
it's the role of the
university to go out to
the public, not just to
speak to one's peers in
the penthouse of the
ivory tower. We
shouldn't hide our light
under a bushel."
Leblond says the
attention has prompted
Coren
many letters from people who have information
about sightings.
The letters range from high school students
wanting to know more about the research to
people who claim they've seen monsters from
the 'fourth dimension.'
"It's always interesting."
Richmond student
off to Helsinki
by Gavin Wilson
A Richmond high school student competes
this month in the International Chemistry
Olympics in Helsinki, Finland, after taking part in
a program coordinated by UBC.
Chris Gunn, a recent graduate of Steveston
Senior Secondary School, has also won the
$2,500 President's Scholarship from UBC, one of
the most prestigious awards for incoming
undergraduates.
Gunn placed third in the Canadian Chemistry
Olympics to become one of the four-person
international squad.
UBC's Chemistry Department, headed by
Larry Weiler, coordinated the national competition in western Canada. For six months, the
department sent out chemistry problems to
secondary schools around the province, marking
the returned answers and collating the results.
In May, a final training session, including
laboratory preparation, was held on campus for
the province's top 25 students. Those students
then wrote a national test.
Science tours set
for next week
The UBC Centre for Continuing Education is
sponsoring morning science tours for children
aged 10-13. Ron Klassen, a high school science
teacher, will accompany the group on the tours,
which run Monday to Friday, July 18-22. The
Lynn Valley Ecology Centre, Vancouver Port
Corporation and a steel mill are among the
destinations. Cost of the tour week is $105 and
includes chartered transportation. For information
call 222-5273.
2   UBC REPORTS July 14,1988 ■•*■-« ,.\ -t1 .*•'"'
:X>-£ ;
BRITANNIA MINES:
Paradise lost studied for clues to popularity
by Lorie Chortyk
Britannia Mines was paradise for
many of its former residents and two
UBC history professors hope to
discover why.
Professors Dianne Newell and
James Huzei are leading a team of
student researchers computerizing the
personnel records of 20,000 employees who lived in the once-thriving
mining town 30 miles north of Vancouver. The data were donated to UBC
by the B.C. Museum of Mining.
Newell says the records, covering
the period 1920-1974, provide clues
about the lifestyle of company employees and their families in the isolated
coastal community.
"The study is unique because of
the volume of records the company
kept over an extended period of time,"
says Newell. "It's unusual to have this
continuity because very few mines are
owned by the same company for as
long as Britannia was."
Timms Photo Co. caught these kids having the time of their life in 1907 going for a ride on a mine train.
Life wasn't all fun and games at Britannia Mines.
These miners are ready for their shift underground in 1923.
Newell says other company records
detail where each employee lived,
what rent they paid, how much they
spent at the company store, as well as
their medical histories.
"We also can piece together what a
day in the life of an employee was like
because daily tasks are documented,"
says Newell. "The records will be a
valuable source of information for researchers in sociology, medicine,
engineering and other disciplines."
Once the largest copper producer
in the Commonwealth, Britannia
Mines employed more than 60,000
people and produced 60 million tons
of copper ore in its 70-year history.
By the time the mine closed down in
1974, the townsite had disbanded and
only a handful of workers remained.
Earlier this year, the ore concentrating
complex at the Britannia Beach site
was declared a national historic site
by the Historic Sites and Monuments
Board of Canada.
Newell has also made Britannia the
focus of oral history projects carried
out by students in her Western
Canadian history course. The interviews are kept in the Special Collections Division of the UBC library.
"It's a good combination," says
Newell. "The records give us a
statistical overview of who was in the
community and what they were doing,
and the oral histories give us the
human perspective."
Newell says living in Britannia was
less than ideal for many of the men
who worked underground.
"If you were a single man living in a
bunkhouse, you weren't part of this
family-oriented community, and in the
1930s and 40s safety conditions
underground deteriorated badly."
But many former Britannia residents remember their town with great
affection.
"When we did the oral histories, we
heard over and over again that
Britannia was the perfect place to live.
People loved the community and
many of them were upset when the
highway went through and the community opened up. Until then, the only
access to the townsite. was by water
and you weren't allowed in without
permission of the company."
Elsie Hamelin, now in her 70s and
living in Vancouver, is one of the
Britannia residents who remembers
the community as "absolute paradise."
"We had everything you could wish
for. The company built swimming
pools, a tennis court, a gymnasium
and a ball field for the residents.
Everyone knew everyone else and we
were like a family."
Hamelin was one of the last
residents to leave when the townsite
closed.
"I stayed as long as I could. Those
23 years were the happiest of my life.
It was absolutely heartbreaking to
leave."
Newell says the information from
the Britannia records, coded by
number rather than name, will be
available through the UBC library for
local historians, researchers and
, members of the public.
The ore concentrating complex is the background for oldtimers celebrating the 100th
anniversary of copper at Britannia Mines last
May. The complex was declared a national
historic site earlier this year.
People
Bewley wins
library award
The highest award of the B.C. Library
Association, the Helen Gordon Stewart
Award, has been given to Lois Bewley, of the
School of Library, Archival and Information
Studies. Bewley, a faculty member since
1969, was given the prize in recognition of
outstanding lifetime achievement in her field.
She is the former president of the B.C. Library
Association and the Canadian Library
Association and has been active in library
associations and government library
commissions.
UBC lecturer Edna Nash was recently
honored for her contributions to the field of
psychology by the North American Society of
Adlerian Psychology. She received a Certificate of Appreciation at the society's annual
conference in Seattle. Nash is a sessional
lecturer in the Counselling Psychology Department in the Faculty of Education.
The first two winners of the Science
Council of B.C. Science and Technology
Awards for Returning Students (STARS)
awards, Marilyn Borugian and Alexander Sy, will come to UBC to pursue PhDs.
The council gives STARS, worth $25,000
a year, to people in industry who want to
return to university to improve their
research skills. Borugian, a computer
systems consultant for Corporate Systems
Strategies, will work on a PhD in microbiology under the direction of Julia Levy. Sy,
a geotechnical engineer with Klohn
Leonoff Ltd., will work towards his
doctorate in civil engineering under the
supervision of R.G. Campanella.
UBC Calendar from Page 4
Nitobe Memorial Garden
Open Daily 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. May - August. Admission $1.
Free on Wednesdays.
Botanical Garden
Open Daily 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. May - August. Admission $2.
Free on Wednesdays.
Language Programs
Summer fun can be a challenge! Enjoy learning French,
Janpanese, Mandarin and Catonese with UBC Language
Programs this summer. Conversational courses in a relaxed
atmosphere help you communicate with others who share your
interests. All courses are non-credit. Three-week morning and
immersion programs in French begin August 2. Three-week
morning programs in Spanish. Japanese, Cantonese and
Mandarin begin July 25. For information call 222-5227.
Reading, Writing and Study Skills Centre
Increase your reading speed and comprehension, improve your
writing, develop better study skills, prepare for the English
Composition Test. The Centre offers 10 non-credit courses,
including Writing Improvement, Reading for Speed and
Comprehension, Study Skills and English Composition Test
workshops. During July, take advantage of the Basic Skills
program—a special opportunity to master your writing, reading
and study skills—Monday to Thursday mornings. Learn
techniques to help you speak and lead under pressure—a
second section of Thinking and Communicating on Your Feet is
available the August 5-6 weekend. For registration information
call the Reading, Writing and Study Skills Centre, Centre for
Continuing Education, 222-5284.
Stage Campus '88
Sponsored by the Theatre Department. July 27 - August 6 at
8:00 p.m. Pericles by William Shakespeare. Directed by Eric
Epstein. For reservations call 228-2678. $5. Frederic Wood
Theatre.
UBC Access—Guided Independent Study
To obtain a copy of our new 1988/89 UBC calendar of UBC
credit courses by distance education, call 228-6565 or drop by
our office, Room 324, Library Processing Building.
Department of Psychology
Individuals 18 and older are needed for a research project on
changes in memory across the adult life span. For information
call Jo Ann Miller at 228-6395.
Chinese Silk Painting Exhibition
Sponsored by Institute of Asian Research. Caroline Ching-Hua
Shen. Opening reception Saturday, July 23. Free admission.
For information call 228-2746. Auditorium, Asian Centre. 11:00
a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Traffic and Security
The Traffic and Security Department announce an increase in
visitor parking rates effective August 2. Rates for surface lots
and parkades will be 75 cents an hour, or portion thereof, to a
maximum of $5 a day. After 5:00 p.m., the evening flat rate will
be $2. Meter rates will be 75 cents an hours; 20 cents for 25
minutes. The new parkade in the SUB area is progressing on
schedule and is expected to be opened in mid-December.
Program in Comparative Literature—ISISSS
'88
August 2 - 26. The Tenth International Summer Institute for
Semiotic and Structural Studies, featuring twelve courses
(available on a graduate credit or non-credit basis) by such
distinguished scholars as Thomas A. Sebeok (Indiana). Dan
Sperber (Paris), Gayatri Spivak (Pittsburgh), John O'Neill
(York), James Clifford (Santa Cruz), Nabaneeta Dev Sen
(Calcutta), Patrizia Violi (Bologna), Pierre Maranda (Laval), and
others. Evening workshops and lecutres as well as three
wekend conferences feature such well-known speakers as
Arthur Erickson, Karl Pribram, Gregory J. Ulmer. Samual R.
Delany, Robert Davidson, Marjorie Halpin, Juhn Wada, and
others. For a copy of the ISISSS brochure and weekend
conference programs, please contact the Program in
Comparative Literature, Buchanan E162, 228-5157. From
August 1, the ISISSS Registration Desk will be open in Room
191, Chancellor Building, Vancouver School of Theology, 6090
Chancellor Boulevard.
3   UBC REPORTS July 14,1988 THURSDAY, JULY 14
Medical Grand Rounds
Oxygen Delivery & Consumption in Critical Illness. Dr. J.
Russel, ICU, St. Paul's hospital. For information call Kathy
Blackwood at 228-7737. Room G279, Acute Care Unit, Health
Sciences Centre. 12:00 noon.
Centre for Continuing Education Lecture and
Tour
Sculpture: Bronze Age. Jack Harman, sculptor  $25; $22
member Museum of Anthropology. For information call 222-
5254. Conference Room, Carr Hall, Centre for Continuing
Education. 7:30 - 9:00 p.m.
Summer Film '88
Moonstruck. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
FRIDAY, JULY 15
Beer Garden
Sponsored by the Graduate Student Society. For information
call 228-3203. Garden Room, Grad Centre. 4:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Summer Film '88
Moonstruck. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
SATURDAY, JULY 16
Centre for Continuing Education Lecture and
Tour
Sculpture: Bronze Age. Jack Harman, sculptor. $25; $22
member Museum of Anthropology. For information call 222-
5254. Harman Sculpture Foundry, 10:00 a.m. -12:30 p.m.;
Teleglobe Canada 12:30 - 3:30 p.m.
Summer Film '88
D.O.A. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre, Student
Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
SUNDAY, JULY 17
Summer Rim '88
D.O.A. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre, Student
Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
MONDAY, JULY 18
Public Seminar
Present and Future Health of Older Adults. Dr. Lois Verbrugge,
Institute of Gerontology, University of Michigan. For
Information call 228-4822. Room 253, Mather Building. 9:00
a.m.
Seminar
Discount Rate Policy Under Alternative Operating Regimes.
Douglas K. Pearce, Professor of Economics and Finance,North
Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina. For
information call 228-8475. For paper, call 224-8503.
Economics Conference Room, Buchanan Tower. 4:00 - 5:30
p.m.
Music Videos
Girl Groups; Ready Steady Go (Beatles, Moody Blues, Beach
Boys). For information call 228-3203. Garden Room, Grad
Centre. 6:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, JULY 19
Public Seminar
The Route from Morbidity to Mortality: Disability in Late Life.
Dr. Lois Verbrugge, Institute of Gerontology, University of
Michigan. For information call 228-4822. SFU Downtown
Education Centre, 549 Howe Street. 4:30 p.m.
Summer Evening Concert
Hans-Karl Piltz, viola d'amour; Alexandra Browning, soprano;
Robert Jordan, guitar; Vivian Waters and Milton Niederhoffer,
violins; Steven Wilkes, viola; James Hill, cello and Gerald Van
Wyck, harpsichord. For information call 228-3113. Recital
Hall, Music Building. 8:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 20
Sale of Surplus Audio-Visual and Other
Equipment
Department Sale. Sponsored by Surplus Equipment Recycling
Facility. For information call 228-2813. 2352 Health Sciences
Mall, Task Force Building. 12:00 -3:00 p.m.
Jazz & Blues Night
DJ John Fossum. For information call 228-3203. Garden
Room, Grad Centre. 5:30 p.m.
Bridge
Beginners welcome. For information call 228-3203. Garden
Room, Grad Centre. 6:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, JULY 21
Medical Grand Rounds
Advances in Hypertension. Dr. J. Wright, Internal Medicine,
Health Sciences Centre Hospital. For information call Kathy
Blackwood at 228-7737. Room G279, Acute Care Unit, Health
Sciences Centre Hospital. 12:00 noon.
UBC Reports is published every second
Thursday by UBC Community Relations
6328 Memorial Road, Vancouver, B.C.
V6T 1W5, Telephone 228-3131
Editor-in-chief: Don Whiteley
Editor: Howard Fluxgold
Contributors: Lorie Chortyk, Jo Moss,
Debora Sweeney, Gavin Wilson.
4   UBC REPORTS July 14,1988
Garibaldi at UBC
This photograph of 19th century Italian patriot Giuseppi Garibaldi is part of a UBC archives collection
recently catalogued for use by researchers. The photo and the rest of a unique collection of Garibaldi
letters, manuscripts and memorabilia originally belonged to the Rev. Hugh Haweis, an English admirer
and contemporary of the Italian hero. His son, Lionel Haweis, joined the staff of UBC library in 1918.
The collection was donated to the archives by Renee Chipman, his daughter.
Calendar Deadlines
For events in the period Aug. 7 to Sept. 10, notices must be submitted on proper Calendar forms no later than 4
p.m. on Monday, July 25 to the Community Relations Office, 6328 Memorial Road, Room 207, Old Administration Building. For more information, call 228-3131.
Summer Film '88
Hope and Glory. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
FRIDAY, JULY 22
Sale of Surplus Audio-Visual and Other
Equipment
Public Sale. Sponsored by Surprlus Equipment Recycling
Facility. For information call 228-2813. 2352 Health Sciences
Mall, Task Force Building. 12:00 -3:00 p.m.   '
Beer Garden
Sponsored by the Graduate Student Society. For information
call 228-3203. Garden Room, Grad Centre. 4:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Summer Film '88
Hope and Glory. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
Dance
Hot Tamale Twisters. For information call 228-3203. Banquet
Room, Grad Centre. 9:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, JULY 23
Summer Film '88
Down by Law. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
SUNDAY, JULY 24
Summer Film '88
Down by Law. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
MONDAY, JULY 25
Music Videos
That Was Rock (Berry, Gaye, Supremes, Stones); Hail Hail
Rock 'n' Roll (Chuck Berry). For information call 228-3203.
Garden Room, Grad Centre. 6:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, JULY 26
Summer Evening Concert
Erica Northcott, soprano; Michael Strutt, guitar. For information
call 228-3113. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8:00 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 27
Jazz & Blues Night
DJ John Fossum. For information call 228-3203. Garden
Room, Grad Centre. 5:30 p.m.
Bridge
Beginners welcome. For information call 228-3203. Garden
Room, Grad Centre. 6:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, JULY 28
Medical Grand Rounds
Tobacco Advertising Strategies. Dr. R. Pollay, Faculty of
Commerce. For information call Kathy Blackwood at 228-7737.
Room G279, Acute Care Unit, Health Sciences Centre Hospital.
12:00 noon.
Summer Film '88
Good Morning Vietnam. For information call 228-3697. SUB
Theatre, Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
FRIDAY, JULY 29
Beer Garden
Sponsored by the Graduate Student Society. For information
call 228-3203. Garden Room, Grad Centre. 4:30 - 7:30 p.m.
Summer Film '88
Good Morning Vietnam. For information call 228-3697. SUB
Theatre, Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
SATURDAY, JULY 30
Summer Film '88
Empire of the Sun. For information call 228-3697. SUB
Theatre, Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
SUNDAY, JULY 31
Summer Film '88
Empire of the Sun. For information call 228-3697. SUB
Theatre, Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
TUESDAY, AUGUST 2
Summer Evening Concert
Rena Sharon, piano; John Loban, violin; Geoffrey Michael,
viola and Paula Kiffner, cello. For information call 228-3113.
Recital Hall, Music Building. 8:00 p.m.
THURSDAY, AUGUST 4
Summer Film '88
Bikwi Blues. For information call 228-3697. SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
FRIDAY, AUGUST 5
Summer Film '88
Biloxi Blues. For information call 228-3697   SUB Theatre,
Student Union Building. 7:30 - 9:45 p.m.
The Semiotics of Representation
A Conference in Association with ISISS '88. Opening lecture
by Karl Pribram, Stanford. Registration in Room 191,
Chancellor Building, 6:30 p.m. For information call Lorraine
Weir at 228-2365 or 228-5157. Chapel of the Epiphany,
Vancouver School of Theology. 8:00 p.m.
SATURDAY, AUGUST 6
The Semiotics of Representation
A Conference in Association with ISISS '88. Lectures by
Thomas A. Sebeok (Indiana), Dan Sperber (Paris), Gregory J.
Ulmer (Florida), Tilottama Rajan (Wisconsin), Arthur Erickson,
Patrizia Violi (Bologna), Pierre Maranda (laval), Nabaneeta Dev
Sen (Calcutta), Mava-Jo Powell (UBC), Barbara Godard (York).
For information call Lorraine Weir at 228-2365 or 228-5157.
Chapel of the Epiphany, Vancouver School of Theology. 9:00
a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
NOTICES
Free Guided Campus Tours
Bring your friends, visitors, community, school or civic group to
UBC for a walking tour of the campus. Drop-ins welcome every
Monday through Friday at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m.; 3 p.m. weekdays
and weekend times available by reservation only. Groups will
have the opportunity to see and learn about everything from the
unique Sedgewick underground library to the Rose Garden and
more. Tours commence at SUB and last approximately 2 hours
in the morning and 1 1/2 hours in the afternoon. To book, call
the Community Relations Office at 228-3131
Neville Scarfe Children's Garden
Be sure to visit the Neville Scarfe Children's Garden located
west of the Education Building. There is no charge to use the
garden and it is open all year long. Families interested in
planting, weeding and watering in the garden should contact
Jo-Anne Naslund at 434-1081 or 228-3767.
Special Issue on Africa and the French
Caribbean
Contemporary French Civilization is pleased to announce the
preparation for 1989 of a major special issue exclusively
devoted to Francophone Africa (North Africa and Black Africa)
and the Caribbean. Articles in English or in French, 15-20
typed pages long, must be submitted by March 1st, 1989, on
any contemporary culture-civilization topic involving a country
or a region of Africa, Madagascar or the Caribbean (including
Haiti). For other Francophone countries, please check with the
guest-editor beforehand. Contributions should be of high
quality in socio-cultural, socio-political, artistic fields, etc.,
showing an original approach to some aspect of the cultural
complex of African, Malagasy or Caribbean society of the past
20-25 years. For information call Dr. Claude Bouygues, African
Literatures, French Department at 228-2879.
Job Link
Sponsored by the Alma Mater Society. Student run service
linking UBC students with employers. We offer a prescreening
and referral service. Our goal is to match employers wfth
qualified students quickly and efficiently. Research positions
welcome. For information call 228-JOBS. Room 100B, SUB.
Gotf Lessons
Get into the swing of things this spring with Golf Lessons.
Community Sport Services is once again offering Golf Lessons
at the basic or intermediate level. Tuition waivers not
acceptable. For information call 228-3688.
Copying in the Libraries?
Save time and money with a UBC Library copy card. $5 cards
sold in most libraries; $10, $20 or higher cards in Copy Service,
Main or Woodward. Cash/Cheque/Departmental Requisition.
For information call 228-2854.
Fitness Appraisal
Physical Education & Recreation, through the John M.
Buchanan Fitness and Research Centre, is administering a
physical fitness assessment program to students, faculty, staff
and the general public. Approx. 1 hour. $25, students $20.
For information call 228-4356.
Language Exchange Program
Exchanging Languages on a One-to-One Basis. For
information call 228-5021. International House. Office Hours
9:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.
Walter Gage Toastmasters
Public speaking and leadership meeting, Wednesdays, 7:30-
9:30 p.m. Guests are welcome to attend, ask questions, and
participate. For information call Geoff Lowe at 261-7065.
Room 215, SUB.
M.Y. Williams Geological Museum
Open Monday - Friday, 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m.. The Collectors
Shop is open Wednesdays 1:30-4:30 p.m. or by appointment.
For information call 228-5586.
Continued on Page 3

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