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UBC Reports Oct 1, 1970

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 REPORTS
VOLUME SIXTEEN, NUMBER SEVENTEEN
OCTOBER   1,   1970,  VANCOUVER   8,  B.C.
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OtLvJIxOt. VsLU II LSI, SHOWN AT RIGHT SPEAKING
TO STUDENTS, IS AN INDIAN WRITER AND ARTIST WHO GAVE UP A TRIP TO
EUROPE THIS PAST SUMMER TO COME TO UBC TO TAKE PART IN A SUMMER
SESSION COURSE IN CROSS-CULTURAL EDUCATION DESIGNED TO
FAMILIARIZE TEACHERS AND WOULD-BE TEACHERS WITH INDIAN
CULTURE AND HISTORY. THE COURSE IS BUT ONE EXAMPLE OF AN
INCREASING EMPHASIS AT UBC ON STUDIES DEALING WITH NATIVE
INDIANS. UBC'S EFFORTS IN THIS FIELD ARE DETAILED IN AN ARTICLE BY
ROSEMARY NEERING BEGINNING ON PAGE TWO. PHOTO BY MEREDITH
SMITH, UBC PHOTO DEPARTMENT.
ROBIN MATHEWS,
SHOWN BELOW SPEAKING TO A
UBC AUDIENCE RECENTLY, IS ONE OF TWO CARLETON UNIVERSITY
PROFESSORS WHO HAVE GAINED NATIONAL PROMINENCE AS A RESULT OF
THEIR CLAIMS THAT CANADA IS COMMITTING CULTURAL GENOCIDE BY
ALLOWING UNLIMITED IMMIGRATION OF FOREIGN (AND ESPECIALLY
AMERICAN) UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS INTO CANADA. WHILE VISITING
VANCOUVER RECENTLY, MR. MATHEWS AND HIS COLLEAGUE, DR. JAMES
STEELE, APPEARED ON AN OPEN LINE RADIO SHOW AND TOOK PART IN A
UBC MEETING TO DISCUSS THE "DE-CANADIANIZATION" OF THIS
COUNTRY'S UNIVERSITIES WITH SEVERAL UBC PROFESSORS. FOR A
SUMMARY OF THE PROS AND CONS OF THE DISPUTE, TURN TO PAGE SIX.
PHOTO BY DAVID MARGERISON, UBC PHOTO DEPARTMENT. Dr. Art More, acting director of UBC's new Indian Education Research and Resource Center (see box on Page
Four), and Summer Session students listen intently to native Indians on a North Vancouver reserve. Dr. More
and other UBC educators are expanding efforts to improve the abilities of B.C. teachers to meet the needs of
Indian students in their classrooms. In the article beginning below Rosemary Neering details this and other
UBC efforts to learn more about the culture of native Indians. Photo by Kim Gravelle.
Indians and Education -
UBC Opens New Avenues
By Rosemary Neering
"Sell out or drop out."
The speaker is an articulate young Indian. His
name is Bill Wilson; he is one of the few Indians in
B.C. with a university degree. He is angry, a little
bitter, still optimistic. He is describing the choices the
educational system gives the Indian child.
He can sell out — accept the white culture, the
white language, the white goals in school. Or he can
drop out — physically as soon as he's old enough,
mentally as soon as he wants — from this white man's
game called education.
An isolated voice from one angry Indian? An
unfair indictment of a perfectly adequate educational
system?
Don't kid yourself. It's increasingly agreed among
educators and those who study education that
frequently the North American school system serves
only the children of those people who designed it, the
white middle-class majority. And it's especially hard
on the poor, the isolated and the culturally different.
The Canadian Indian qualifies, often on all three
counts.
Central to the problem are the cultural differences
between white and Indian. A recent examination of
the basic features of both cultures suggests that in
almost all respects they are different.
The differences show up strongly when a young
Indian child enters school. He comes from a home
where silence is valued to a school where
loquaciousness is often equated with intelligence. He
comes from a home where deep thought is valued
above quick judgements to a school where children
are encouraged to be first with the answer, to race
against time to complete assignments. He comes from
a home where the language is Indian or non-standard
English to a classroom where he is expected to speak
acceptable English. And he comes from a home where
literacy is not highly valued to a school where it is the
main value.
SCHOOL UNPLEASANT
Little wonder that the Hawthorn Report, a
comprehensive survey of the Canadian Indian, printed
in 1967 and edited by UBC's Professor of
Anthropology, Dr. Harry Hawthorn, had this to say
about the Indian child's first venture into education:
"School for some of them is unpleasant,
frightening and painful. For these and for some
others it is not so much adaptive as maladaptive.
They have little reason to like or be interested in the
school in any way, in or out of the classroom, and it
does not provide the path to the jobs that some
expect from it. Preliminary studies indicate their (the
Indian children's) motivation to do well in school
drops during their stay there. They fail to reach their
potential as scholars. They fall behind from the
beginning and come to see themselves as failures.
Their schooling is not justified by results, and
moreover they are unhappy in it. A pattern that is
followed by a few white children is followed by
many, perhaps most, Indian children."
The     problems    of    cultural    difference    are
2/UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970
complicated by those of poverty, which often gives
the Indian child a poor physical start, and geographic
isolation, which demands the child leave his home
and enter an alien society if he wishes to continue his
education beyond elementary school.
In addition to these setbacks, the Indian child
faces the further problem of racial stereotype.
"Indians are poor learners," the stereotype says.
"They are more suited to vocational studies. They
don't care enough to do well; they lack motivation."
And if the teacher is influenced by the stereotype,
these expectations are all too likely to come true.
The results of this? Only 10 per cent of the
school-age Indian population in B.C. reach Grade 9.
Three per cent finish Grade 12. Less than one per
cent enter post-secondary education.
Contrast these with the figures for all school-age
children in B.C. Over 90 per cent of them reach
Grade 9. Fifty-five per cent finish Grade 12. Twenty
per cent continue to post-secondary education.
Listen again to the Hawthorn Report: "There is no
basis .... on which to assume any lesser degree of
potential ability on the part of either child (Indian or
white)."
The situation has become well-known over the
past few years, and a number of organizations are
trying to do something about it, among them the
Indian Affairs Department, various Indian groups and
some groups of teachers and school boards. At UBC,
four attempts are underway to improve one aspect or
another of Indian education.
STUDENT MOTION
The Senate Committee to Study the Native Indian
Situation at UBC is dealing with Indian students at
the high school and university level. The committee,
established as the result of a motion by a student
Senator last fall, brought in four recommendations
this spring. Two recommendations — that a
counselling program for native Indians be established
and that admission procedures for native Indians be
streamlined to reduce administrative hurdles to
University entrance — were passed by Senate. A third,
that an introductory program for native Indian
students be set up, was referred to a special
committee of Senate, which will look at possible
special programs that would make University work
easier for Indians without the educational
background of non-Indians. And the fourth
recommendation — that formal educational
requirements for University entrance be waived for
native Indians with other educational backgrounds —
was tabled.
The counselling program was the first off the
ground. Backed by $3,000 grants from the President's
Contingency Fund and the Leon and Thea Koerner
Foundation, the Senate committee hired three Indian
students to travel around the province this summer
talking to Indian high school students, counselling
and discussing, telling about their own experiences at
University, and encouraging young Indian students to
continue their education.
The three, Mechelle Pierre, a third-year Education
student at UBC; Roberta Willie, who finished
second-year Arts last year; and Edward Moodie, a
Vancouver City College student, were not tied to a
program laid down by the committee. Instead, they
travelled around the province at their own speed,
visiting what reserves they could.
"One of the main problems that Indians seem to .,
have in entering university is that they don't know
much about it," says Mike Kew, an assistant professor
of anthropology and adviser to the Senate committee.
"It's difficult for them to learn to cope with the
bureaucracy. The committee thought it would try a
counselling program, and who better qualified to
counsel than Indian students who have been through
the process?
"The  counsellors  can come to members of the ,
committee for advice if they want it," he says. "But
we felt the counsellors should have a fairly free hand
in feeling their way into a new field job."
SUMMER DESCRIBED
Miss Pierre describes the summer: "We try to talk
to each other as friends. I go to a reserve and say,
'Let's have a party or something.' I don't want them
to think, 'Here she comes; she thinks she knows
everything.' If there's a problem and I don't know the
answer, we'll work it out together.
"A lot of the kids wish they could have someone
to  talk   to   about   university   —   not   Indian  Affairs •
counsellors or anyone  like that, but someone their
own age, who's been through it. I talk to anyone who V?
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wants   to   talk   —   young   kids,   older   kids,   adults,
anyone."
Adds Miss Willie: "It helps if the Indian students
know that someone really cares what they do with
their lives. They're afraid to come to a university on
their own; we can talk to them about the problems
they'll face.
INTEREST LOST
"Their main complaint is still that they're being
channelled into vocational-commercial programs.
Indian Affairs and school counsellors think they
know what's best for all Indian kids just because
they've worked with a few of them."
What the counsellors found over the summer was
»that in many cases they were too late, that by the
time an Indian student reaches university age, he has
already lost all interest in school, and has frequently
dropped out before obtaining the formal
qualifications necessary for university entrance.
UBC's Faculty of Education is tackling this end of
the Indian education problem.
Members of the faculty are trying to train teachers
to work with Indian children and to provide the
teachers with materials that emphasize the Indian
heritage and culture.
Dr.Art More, an assistant professor of Education
at UBC, was born on an Indian reserve in B.C., and
has always felt close to the problems of Indian
children. "About two years ago," he recalls, "A group
"of the Education faculty was talking about the fact
that   Indian   children  were  not  succeeding   by any
criterion you want to use, and the fact that we were
not preparing teachers to teach Indian classes."
The group decided to do something about the
situation. That something began with a course for the
teachers of Indian children, given for two weeks in
the summer of 1969, and practice teaching sessions
with Indian children last winter. This summer a
cross-cultural education course designed by Dr. More
was given for credit; it is being offered as a regular
session course this fall. The aims of the course are to
familiarize teachers and would-be teachers with
Indian cultures and history and to point out the
particular problems that Indian children encounter in
the school system.
"What I hope will happen," says Dr. More, "is not
just a knowledge but a real feeling that when Indian
children come to the classroom, they are bringing a
great opportunity for the class. The really important
thing is that the teachers honestly feel that it is a
privilege for the class and the teacher to have Indian
children in the class, and that they are aware of the
tremendous contributions Indians can make to the
classroom."
SHARE CULTURE
Dr. More invited Indian high school and college
students, Indian education committee members
(similar to school board members), Indian teachers
and Indian spokesmen to address the class, which
registered 72 people this summer, including six Indian
teachers. Among the speakers was George Clutesi,
Indian writer and artist. He talks about his reasons for
agreeing to spend two weeks helping to teach the
course:
"I received an offer, just about the time I got the
request to teach at UBC, to go on a tour to Europe. I
had been so involved with my work here in British
Columbia that I didn't even think of going to Europe
when I had this chance to come to UBC and be an
actual part of a program like this. I think in Europe I
would be just a curio. They want to see an Indian
with a feather on his head. I think we're beyond that
stage now; we have a problem here and we must
expend all our effort to solve that problem.
"I think the main purpose of this program is to
find some means whereby the Indian child can be
reached early enough to motivate him into pursuing
education on his own. For hundreds of years we've
been forcing the child, telling him what to do, and up
till now, very, very few Indians have had the desire to
use the learning they have got that way. We've forced
them too much; we've taught them the same way you
teach the non-Indian children. And it hasn't worked,
and now I think educators are beginning to realize
this."
What Mr. Clutesi and the other speakers stressed
was that the teachers must try to share their culture
and the Indian cultures, not try to teach the Indian
the white culture. And, they said, the non-Indian
teacher must get rid of any idea that his culture is
superior to the Indian culture, and must try to get his
class to appreciate the Indian culture.
Some teachers have been trying to do this already.
Please turn to Page Four
See INDIANS
UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970/3 IN Dl ANS   Continued from Page Three
But they have been handicapped by an absence of
material on Indian history and cultures. "The history
taught in the schools is really only about half the
history of B.C.," says Dr. More. "They talk about the
two founding races, but they always forget about the
Indians. I think social studies would be far more
interesting if Indian history were included — you
could talk about the Haida and their trips to
California in their monstrous canoes, and the trading
trips of the Kwakiutls."
Dr. More's classes, and his graduate student, Mrs.
Vicki Green, have been working on the problem of
producing more materials on the Indians. Four kits of
material were sent out to 350 teachers of Indian
children and other interested people in B.C. last year.
The kits are now going all across Canada. Included in
one of the kits was a bibliography of material on
Indians, prepared by Mrs. Green.
Another group of students, directed by Education
Professor Frank Hardwick, is also preparing material
for use in classes.
POORLY PRESENTED
The Hawthorn Report makes clear the lack of such
materials: "In most (school) systems, there is no
material related to Indian culture .... Some
attempts have been made to include references to
Canadian Indians in a few provinces. Such material is
usually poorly presented and highly stereotyped. The
Indian is always portrayed as a Plains Indian with the
ubiquitous feather band. Much of the material is as
unrealistic to the Indian child in school as it is to the
non-Indian. In one province, texts include biased and
falsified accounts of encounters between Indians and
whites."
Prof. Hardwick and his assistants are attempting to
help correct this situation by preparing booklets
containing actual source material relevant to Indian
history and culture. In the summer of 1969, with the
help of the B.C. Teachers' Federation, they produced
a booklet called "To Potlatch or Not to Potlatch," an
examination through source materials of the merits of
the age-old Indian ceremony.
This summer, they completed a series of studies
focused on the Indian contribution to the exploration
and development of British Columbia.
Both groups are aware of another fact: that
eventually the Indian himself must be responsible for
the recording of his history and the teaching of his
children. It is with this aspect of Indian education
that a number of the members of UBC's Department
of Anthropology and Sociology are involved.
They are trying to get B.C. Indians involved in
recording their own history, language and culture.
Their first project, a short-term one, will see an
Indian historian from the Lower Mainland hired to
investigate and write the history of an episode in the
past of one of the Lower Mainland tribes. The Indian
will be trained at UBC in research methods, and the
eventual product of his training and investigations
will be mimeographed and distributed to Indian tribes
throughout B.C.
UBC PROJECT
The long-term project would, the anthropologists
hope, see 10 Indian ethnographers being trained in
research methods, then going back to their reserves to
collect and collate historical data. The objects of the
project are to develop literacy in the Indian
languages, to improve cultural awareness of the
Indian groups, and to collect data by which to
analyse them foundations and transformations of
Indian culture.
And by means of this project, it is hoped that
Indians will be trained to be capable of promoting
and preserving their own cultural heritage.
Dr. Pierre Maranda, associate professor of
Anthropology at UBC, discusses the projects: "I
would like to see Indians properly trained to take in
hand the interpretation of their own values and views,
not leave them as prey for foreign anthropologists.
And there are other benefits that would accrue from
a stronger cultural integration."
Dr. Maranda sees many parallels between Canadian
Indians and natives of other areas of the world. "All
these cultures must define themselves in the face of
white cultural imperialism. Some ignore the whites,
but the best way to resist is to be able to say who you
are, to say, 'Wait, this is a dialogue, not a
monologue.' "
Also involved in the Anthropology projects are
Prof. Harry Hawthorn, former head of the
Anthropology department, and editor of the
Hawthorn Report; Wilson Duff, associate professor of
Anthropology; Mike Kew; Dr. Elli Maranda, wife of
Dr. Pierre Maranda and an anthropologist in her own
right; and graduate students in Anthropology,
Suzanne Storie and Andrea Laforet.
The short-term project should be complete in
about three months; the choosing of an Indian to
undertake it is now underway. The long-term project
may begin by January; results are expected five to
eight years after launching.
Amid all of this, the question of why arises. Why
should the University help Indians get an education in
preference to helping any other group? Does the
University have any responsibility in this field at all?
Bill Wilson has an answer, and it cuts sharply into
the "ivory-tower" image of the university. "If
universities don't, who else is going to? Universities
are supposedly the center of enlightenment, yet
they're perpetuating the myth that we have equality
and everything is hunky-dorey. When will they finally
realize that anthropology isn't 18th century Indians,
that the same problems that existed then exist now?
If the university won't help us, who are we going to
get any guidance from? The public certainly isn't
going to do it. And we don't have enough money or
enough people to pressure the government. I think if
the universities don't help, then all of those so-called
concepts of justice and equality they try to imbue in
their students are just sheer hypocrisy."
Universities already give preference to a special
group (the middle-class majority) Wilson insists, by
the type of entrance requirements they have and the
fees they charge. And if they say they don't give
preference, then that's just more hypocrisy, he says.
How successful are the programs initiated so far?
George Clutesi, for one, is greatly encouraged by
them:
"The reaction from the teachers in the class has
been marvelous. We have begun to communicate. And
I think in my long struggle to be heard, this is my
very first experience where I have felt that the people
I'm talking to are willing to listen till I'm finished.
And this means so very much to the Indian. Firstly,
because this is how we teach; we make the teacher
finish what he is saying before we retaliate, before we
disagree or even before we agree. And this is the
general feeling of this program. I think it's been a
very successful program. I think it has had a very
wonderful start and I think the people who are
involved in it are very sincere."
But those involved in all the programs are also
aware that there is a long way to go. It is ironic that
Roberta Willie, one of the Senate committee
counsellors, was thinking of dropping out of
University after this summer. The reason? No one she
could talk to, no one who she felt really cared about
her or what she did at University. Plenty of people
who would listen politely, she said. But no one who
really wanted to help.
And commenting on the program for teachers, Bill
Wilson summed up what is needed in all these
programs: "I see you as a faceless mass of people I've
spoken to 100, 200, 300 times. And you've never
done anything. I'm naive enough to believe that
maybe this time you'll do something; maybe after a
couple of thousand speeches, I'll give up. Because it's
up to you to do something besides listen. If you go
away and forget all you've heard this summer, you
might as well have stayed home."
Grant Aids Indian Studies
An Indian Education Research and Resource
Center has been established at the University of
British Columbia in an effort to erase some of the
root causes of the problems Indian students
encounter in B.C. schools.
The Center is the first of its kind in Canada to
be run almost entirely by native Indians. It will be
guided by a Council consisting of 15
representatives of B.C. native Indian teachers.
There are currently 31 certified professional
Indian teachers in B.C.
Elected chairman of the Council is Mr. Alvin
McKay, a native Indian who is principal of the
Greenville Indian day school, located north of
Terrace, B.C. Mr. McKay is currently on a one-year
leave of absence to continue his studies at UBC.
Responsible for carrying out the decisions of
the Center Council will be Dr. Art More of UBC's
Faculty of Education, who has been appointed
acting director of the Center while a search is
being conducted for an Indian educator to assume
the position.
Dr. More has been largely responsible during
the past year for the negotiations which led to the
establishment of the Center.
One of the major objectives of the new Center
will be to improve the abilities of B.C. teachers to
meet the needs of Indian children in their
classrooms. Dr. More has already been responsible
for designing a cross-cultural credit course for
teachers of Indian students which seeks to improve
their knowledge of Indian students' social, cultural
and historical backgrounds. The Center will also
collect and make available up-to-date and accurate
resource materials and instructional aids related to
the education of Indian students.
Approximately 400 interested teachers in B.C.
are already on a mailing list to receive this
material, which is intended for supplementary use
in classrooms. Other interested teachers can
receive this material by writing to the new Indian
Education Research and Resources Center, Hut
012, University of British Columbia.
The Center is a cooperative project of the
native Indian teachers of B.C., the Faculty of
Education and the Center for Continuing
Education at UBC. It is being funded by the
Education Division of the Department of Indian
Affairs and Northern Development. ">
4/UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970 Jack Blaney, left, is acting head of UBC's Center for Continuing Education while Director Gordon Selman, right, is on leave of absence.
A NEW LOOK FOR EXTENSION AT UBC
There's a new look to what was the Extension
Department at UBC.
For 34 years UBC's Extension Department has
offered programs for adults in British Columbia. It
has grown to one of the largest university extension
programs in Canada, serving more than 20,000
persons annually — a figure equalling the regular
session enrolment of the University.
In July of this year the UBC Board of Governors
approved a Senate recommendation that the
Extension Department become the Center for
Continuing Education. This change marks a transition
that has been taking place in extension in the past
decade.
The University has supported extension work since
its earliest days. However, budget restrictions in 1963
forced the Department to reexamine priorities,
abandon some program areas, concentrate more
heavily on the Vancouver area, release some staff and
change the assignments of others. More encouraging
developments followed. A 1964 committee on the
Academic Goals of the University, in its report
Guideposts to Innovation, gave strong support to
continuing education as a "major responsibility of the
University." Subsequent University presidents gave
increased support to the institution's extension
function.
The position of Extension was nevertheless a
source of great concern to the Department. On top of
budget reductions and necessitated changes in the
program came increasing uncertainty about the place
of the Department in the University. Extension felt
there were a number of unresolved problems of
policy and organization hampering further
development.
In 1966 Extension submitted a brief to the
administration and the Senate requesting the
establishment of a long-range policy about the
development and organization of continuing
education on the campus. There was mixed reaction
from the Faculties and no changes in policy were
effected.
Still greatly aware of problems facing it. Extension
then recommended the creation of a Senate
Committee on Continuing Education to be
representative of various interested Faculties, Schools
and Departments on campus and to take the matter
of the overall policy and organization of continuing
education at UBC under review. A Committee was
appointed in 1968.
Dr. Ian Ross, of the Department of English, who
chaired the Committee during the second of its two
years in action, worked diligently and imaginatively
with those concerned. Dean Philip White and Dean
John McCreary, the heads of two other centers of
continuing education on campus (Commerce and
Medicine) contributed significantly to the
Committee's work.
Members were: Prof. W.M. Armstrong, Prof. Sam
Black, Miss Drina Allen, Dr. John P. Blaney, Dr. C.A.
Brockley, Mr. D.M. Brousson, MLA, Mr. F. James
Cairnie, Dr. W.C. Gibson, Dr. D.T. Kenny, Dean
Helen McCrae, Mrs. W.T. Lane, Mr. Stuart S. Lefeaux,
Mrs. MaryFrank Macfarlane, Mr. K.R. Martin, Mrs.
Margaret Neylan, Dean V.J. Okulitch, Mr. J.E.A.
Parnall, Mr. E.C. Roper, Dean M. Shaw, Dr. J.H.G.
Smith, Dr. Coolie Verner, Mr. Ken Young and Mr.
Gordon Selman, secretary.
THREE MAJOR AREAS
The Committee's report focused on three major
areas in its recommendations: 1) the place of
continuing education as a responsibility of the
University; 2) principles of budgeting; and 3) the
organization of continuing education at UBC.
General recommendations from the Committee
were:
— That "the University of British Columbia should
recognize that it has growing responsibilities in three
areas connected with continuing education" . ..
degree programs for part-time students; continuing
education for professional groups; and university-level
programs carrying no credit towards degrees dealing
with liberal and scientific studies, public affairs and
community projects;
— That the Senate strike a committee to study the
need for degree programs for part-time students;
— That the contributions of teachers to continuing
education programs be given full weight in
connection with career-recommendations in
Faculties, Departments and Schools; and
— That requirements of continuing education be
considered in the building plans for the University for
the 1970s.
With the broad goal of providing efficient
administration and coordination of programs and
services and leadership in the field, and recognizing
the effectiveness of present arrangements, the Senate
Committee recommended a two-fold form of
organization of continuing education at UBC:
through a Center for Continuing Education and
Faculty    or   School   Divisions    of   Professional
Continuing Education, such as the Health Sciences
and Commerce programs.
The new Center for Continuing Education would
administer all Extension's programs and services.
These include: degree programs currently being
offered for part-time students; non-credit programs in
humanities, science, creative arts, public affairs, urban
affairs, and social sciences; and professional
continuing education programs in Education,
Engineering, Law, Home Economics, Agriculture,
Fisheries, Forestry, Community and Regional
Planning and Social Work.
The selection of the name Center for Continuing
Education is significant. The term "Center" connotes
the more strongly integrated role for continuing
education in the University. "Continuing Education"
means that UBC as an institution is going to
emphasize more the continuing education of
graduates and education at an advanced level.
The concept of a Center also represents many of
the changes in extension programs which have
occurred in recent years. More courses are now
planned on a sequential and systematic basis than in
the past. Emphasis is currently being given to those
programs which build upon undergraduate education
and professional training. And, to a much greater
extent than before, experimental projects and
interdisciplinary courses are specially designed to
focus on urgent community problems and the unique
interests of adults.
The   Senate   Committee   also   recommended  the
creation of a policy Council  for the Center which
would   create   a   University-wide   forum   for   the
discussion of major new programs and provide advice
on   matters  which   go  beyond the concern of one
Faculty.   Extension   has  always   worked   in   direct
contact with  individual  Faculties, Departments and
Schools.
With the appearance in B.C. since 1963 of other
universities and colleges, and the growth of school
board  programs, the responsibilities of UBC in the
field of continuing education have changed. Certain
activities which  UBC Extension undertook in years
past because there was no other agency to organize
them,  no longer concern the University. Extension
has    been    concentrating    increasingly    on    more
sophisticated   kinds   of   programs   and   community
projects.
At the same time a major increase in professional-
Please turn to Page Eight
See NEW LOOK
UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970/5 FOREIGN ACADEMICS
IN CANADA -
THE DEBATE GOES ON
PROF. CYRIL BELSHAW
DR. JAMES STEELE
Two years ago a pair of teachers of English at
Carleton University in Ottawa began a campaign
designed to sensitize Canadians to the danger of allowing
foreign academics to enter Canada in unlimited numbers
to teach at Canadian universities.
Dr. James Steele and Mr. Robin Mathews have
stumped the country warning audiences that
unrestricted immigration of academics is tantamount to
committing "cultural genocide."
During a visit to Vancouver in late September,
Mathews and Steele stated their case to radio and
television audiences and took part in a discussion at UBC
on what they call the "de-Canadianization" of Canada's
universities.
What follow are excerpts, edited for clarity and
brevity, from the debate at UBC and from a discussion
on Jack Webster's open-line radio program.
Taking part with Mathews and Steele in the UBC
debate, which was part of an orientation program
sponsored by the Alma Mater Society, were Prof.
William Webber of UBC's Faculty of Medicine and a
past-president of the UBC Faculty Association; Mr. Art
Smolensky, past president of the Graduate Students'
Association and co-author of a recently released report
on the citizenship of the UBC faculty, and Prof. Cyril
Belshaw, head of UBC's Department of Anthropology
and Sociology.
JAMES STEELE: If our universities want to continue
to exist as Canadian institutions. . . they are going to
have to fight very hard for their very existence.
The core of Canadians teaching in the arts and science
faculties of Canadian universities dropped from about 75
per cent in 1961 to 49 per cent in 1968. And the rate at
which the diminishment has been taking place has been
increasing very rapidly. Fifty-two per cent of those
newly-appointed about eight years ago were
non-Canadian, 72 per cent of those appointed four or
five years ago were non-Canadian and last year 86 per
cent of new appointments were non-Canadian.
Last year the universities in Canada employed
approximately 3,087 additional faculty. The number of
persons entering the country intending to take up
employment as university professors last year was 2,398.
That means that 77 per cent of all those employed last
year were non-Canadian.
There are two terrifying things about this pattern: It
is occurring at a time when there are well-qualified
Canadians available and in response, some university
administrators have said they will reduce the number of
students being admitted to graduate studies programs. In
other words, they are saying that because of
over-production of trained personnel coming from other
countries they will curtail opportunities to Canadians to
do graduate work .... That is academic colonialism in
rather pure form.
What is needed now is legislation which will enable
our universities to strive to employ a clear two-thirds
majority of Canadians and which will make citizenship a
necessary qualification for those taking administrative
posts in the universities.
The proposals which Mathews and I are making are
ten times more tolerant than those of any other country
in the world. We must try to obtain a 2/3 majority of
Canadian faculty and 1/3 foreign.
PROF. WILLIAM WEBBER: There is a sense in
which a university is both national and provincial. But
these roles should be secondary to its primary aim,
which is to preserve the store of human knowledge, to
extend it and to transmit it.
Universities don't hire people as a mass; they hire
individuals and at a time when the individual's place in
society is being questioned, it's important that the
university should continue to  hire people individually
6/UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970
and judge them on their merits. What merits? This
depends on the individual departments.
The criteria which I would like to see applied are
those of scholastic excellence and teaching ability. As a
Canadian, if I were applying for a job I would wish to be
considered on that basis. I would neither wish to be
hired because I was or was not a Canadian nor because
of any other criterion which is extraneous to the central
purpose of the university.
I am convinced that Canadian society and Canadian
institutions are not so fragile as some of this discussion
might have led us to believe. I think there is a great deal
of latent nationalism present in Canada. My concern is
the direction which nationalism might take.
There are many positive aspects to Canadian
nationalism. One is obviously the tolerance which has
been mentioned by several people. Whatever other
countries might do, we should endeavour to be more
tolerant than we are now.
I have no concern about the ability of Canadian
students to compete effectively, given an equal
opportunity.
STUDENT CONTACT
MR. ART SMOLENSKY: There are a few results
from our recent report which bear repeating. First, when
we look at the UBC faculty as a whole, we find that
about three-quarters are Canadian citizens. That's very
good in comparison to many other universities.
But when one takes a closer look at the Faculties of
Arts and Science you find that 60 per cent of the faculty
are Canadians. And when you take a look at all the full
professors and associate professors you see quite a trend.
We used to have quite a few Canadians at these ranks
and a nice mix . . .but these aren't the people who have
the greatest amount of student contact.
At the assistant professor level, where there is a
heavier teaching load, only 50 per cent are Canadians
and we find this very disturbing.
In the period 1964 to 1969, UBC hired 11
non-Canadians for every nine Canadians. This has
happened at a time when more and more Ph.D.'s are
being turned out by Canadian universities.
(UBC Reports submitted the report prepared by Mr.
Smolensky and Alma Mater Society President Tony
Hodge to a UBC statistics expert and asked him to
comment on the methods used to arrive at the results.
(He said: "In view of the way in which the sample
was taken the only estimates of citizenship which are
appropriate are those which estimate the percentage of
Canadian citizens and the percentages of other
citizenships in the faculties and schools of the University
as a whole."
(He took issue with those parts of the report in which
attempts were made to estimate the citizenship of
professors in the Faculties of Arts and Science).
(On Page Ten of this issue, Dean of Arts Douglas
Kenny replies to statements made in the report
concerning hiring practices in the Department of
English).
PROF. CYRIL BELSHAW: I was educated in New
Zealand and England and no questions were asked at
that time as to whether I was going to take a job in
Canada. The taxpayers in those countries didn't ask that
question.
We have a duty to the international world of
scholarship. We have a debt to pay off. And we are in
the process of paying off that debt.
If you look at the names of the people who have
produced the very few, very slim readers in Canadian
sociology, if you look at the data which have been
produced about Canada, believe me, in many fields, they
have been produced by non-Canadians. In every possibly
field — the natural sciences, forestry, ecology,
commerce, anthropology, sociology, literature — many
of the people who are making some of the greatest
contributions to the understanding of Canadian society
are non-Canadians. And the Canadians on the faculty
don't necessarily link up with Canadian interests at all.
So there is no relationship, in direct terms, between
citizenship and the topic of interest.
In a certain sense I'm anti-American. I do not like
American cultural values on the whole. I do not likS
American political values. I'm proud that I can associate
myself with Canadian social values and I have chosen
these not being born to them.
One of these is a tolerance of cultural diversity. When
I came here in 1953, the University was about 30 per
cent American, 30 per cent other and 30 per cent
Canadian. So it was more of a crisis in 1953.
I want an international, cosmopolitan university.
It has been said that Canada is the only country"
which does not require some manifestation of
citizenship for permanent employment. That's not true.
There are Canadians who are presidents of universities in
the U.S. without changing their citizenship.
MR. ROBIN MATHEWS: "Who has produced the
knowledge on Canada," Prof. Belshaw asks. Prof.
Belshaw suggests, "Since we began colonial, let us go on
colonial."
The Canadian Journal of American Studies and a
number of journals of the same kind in Canada are being
polluted by American scholars who are distorting
Canadian history as I've never heard it distorted in my
life before.
Excellent Canadians are being pushed away from
medical schools because the (federal) Department of
Health and Welfare has a projection for the next 15
years of training 1,200 doctors a year and getting 1,200
cheap from abroad, a solution which discriminates
against Canadians of great potential.
Canadian students have the right to be brought to
excellence in their own educational and cultural
institutions and to take their place in those educational
and cultural institutions in terms of their own history
and their own traditions and to develop both radical and
other roots out of their own past and to make the
culture brilliant, to make it excellent. We will leave
greatness to the United States.
We must have immediately reciprocal legislation in*
immigration with the U.S. We must make U.S. academics
take two years to get landed immigrant status as they
make us and if they come in without landed immigrant
status, we must take them in on two-year visitors' visas.
After this they must go back to wherever they want
to go for two years before reapplying.
Every other country in the world has precise
immigration policies so that they can bring forward their
own excellence and let it develop and flower within the
country.
I also believe we should have a moratorium right now
on the import of all foreign academics and the import of
all foreign graduate students until we have forced the
universities to sit down together and make a national
policy on Canadian education.
Debating the de-Canadianization issue with Mathews,
and Steele on Jack Webster's open-line program were Dr.
Peter Pearse, associate professor of economics and
currently president of the UBC Faculty Association, and
Prof. Walter Young, head of the Department of Political
Science. Both Pearse and Young emphasized that they
were appearing as individual faculty members, rather
than in any official capacity.
Supporting Mathews and Steele in the debate was*
Miss Christine Krawczyk, acting vice-president of UBC's
Alma Mater Society. PROF. WILLIAM WEBBER
PROF. WALTER YOUNG
MR. ART SMOLENSKY
DR. PETER PEARSE
» DR. PETER PEARSE: I get very upset by this kind
of argument and the tactics of Mr. Mathews because I
think it's destructive to our universities. I do think his
arguments touch on a very important problem, but I
think he identifies it wrongly. The only really legitimate
objective of a great university like mine is excellence in
teaching and research, excellence in the pursuit of
knowledge and understanding. Universities have an
important role to play in fostering a community identity
and a national  identity.  But it follows that the only
•legitimate criterion in hiring faculty members is
competence in teaching and research.
Now, that competence in teaching and research
includes a familiarity with what's going on in the world
around us and with Canadian affairs, to a greater or
lesser degree. This is more important in some disciplines
such as the social sciences than it is in, say, mathematics,
physics, or pharmacy. But it is a relevant consideration
throughout the university.
* Now, I want to make two points. The first is that
familiarity with Canadian institutions and Canadian
conditions is not the same thing as Canadian citizenship.
It's less closely correlated with citizenship in the
academic world than in almost any o:her profession.
Secondly, any group of faculty or students is
enriched if it includes people with different
backgrounds, experiences and outlooks. But we do need
to ensure that our students are being exposed to enough
^professors who can talk in Canadian terms and can use
Canadian examples. If any administrator or any
department head fails to recognize the need for balance
and Canadian content, he's not doing his job properly.
But I think Mr. Mathews has charged bias against hiring
Canadians, charging that Canadians have been held in
contempt. That's a very serious charge which I believe is
quite unjustified.
DEVELOP EXCELLENCE
WEBSTER: The sole aim of you, and people who
think like you, is excellence in the quality of the
product, right?
PEARSE: That's right.
WEBSTER: And if we became, say, 100 per cent
American, or 90 per cent non-Canadian and 10 percent
Canadian, you would still find that satisfactory, as long
,as we had excellence?
PEARSE: Including a familiarity with Canadian
conditions and institutions, that's right.
MATHEWS: I reject that introduction out of hand. I
reject it at every step of the way. For Prof. Pearse to
have said that is an absolute resignation of his
responsibility to the Canadian community.
A community has the absolute responsibility — not
the choice — to develop its own excellence, in a
majority, in its cultural and educational institutions.
PROF. WALTER YOUNG: I think you
misinterpreted Prof. Pearse's statement. You ignored the
crucial point that Peter made, that, if you assume that
people teaching in our universities have a familiarity
with the Canadian scene and a commitment to the
Canadian community, then citizenship doesn't make
Jhat much difference. If you bring people from other
countries, from the United States, and they are really
birds of passage who only come here briefly, then sure,
you've got a problem.
MISS CHRISTINE KRAWCZYK: What I'm
concerned about is that I can get jobs in Canada when I
graduate and want to teach in a Canadian university. I
can't go down to the States and get a job there because
■of their immigration laws which state quite clearly that
people cannot be hired unless there isn't someone in
their own country that can do the job that they want to
hire a foreigner for. In a country of 200 million that's a
pretty tricky thing to prove.
WEBSTER: What's wrong with reciprocity,
gentlemen? What do we do to protect Canadians?
PEARSE: Many of the best Canadian products of our
universities have got jobs in the United States.
WEBSTER: Answer my question: The Americans put
up barriers to Canadian academics, true or false?
PEARSE: Not effective ones, as far as I know.
STEELE: I can explain this. The barriers are those
that are administered by the American department of
immigration. What they say is that anyone who wishes
to hold a permanent position in the U.S. must enter as a
landed immigrant. At the present time it requires 16
months to have one's application for landed immigrant
status processed. Now it's virtually impossible for a
person to get a job in a university about two years in
advance. So, in effect, this immigration rule has cut
down the flow since about 1968.
A survey has just been done by the Department of
Manpower and Immigration which sent out a
questionaire to all departmental chairmen in Canadian
universities. The chairmen are reporting that Canadians
with excellent qualifications are having a very difficult
time finding jobs, especially in these disciplines: biology,
chemistry, biochemistry, English, French, classics,
philosophy, physics and math ....
YOUNG: This whole discussion is ignoring a
fundamental point, and that is that universities are not
simple agencies. It would be nice if we could judge the
quality of a university by the citizenship of its faculty, if
we could say, "Here's a university, 100-per-cent
Canadian, therefore the best university in Canada." Not
so. This is the implication of your argument. But it's not
so.
PEARSE: Let me say this: I am very concerned about
the undue American influence in every realm of
Canadian life. I'm very disturbed about it in terms of the
ownership of our industries, for example, much more
disturbed about that, I may say, than I am about
American influence in our universities.
WEBSTER: We can always confiscate the industry
back, but we can't confiscate the minds back which have
been brainwashed by Americans.
PEARSE: But look at the situation. For example, at
UBC, according to the Smolensky-Hodge report,
three-quarters of our faculty are Canadians.
MATHEWS: But their point was that in the last five
years, 11 non-Canadians have been hired for every nine
Canadians.
YOUNG: It's a university, it's not a parochial
institution. The function of a university isn't just to
teach Canadian art to its fine-arts students or Canadian
politics to its political-science students or Canadian
economics. These things have to be done, admittedly.
But the university has a universal competence and strives
to achieve that.
CALLER: If all these experts who have been hired
from other countries cannot produce Canadian Ph.D.'s
who are good enough to hire here, then there's
something wrong with the system, surely?
MATHEWS: Brilliant point!
PEARSE: She's talking about the surface on an
iceberg there. The Canadian academic profession has for
years been exhorting governments to support the
universities more, so that we can produce an adequate
flow of Canadian Ph.D.'s and people who are capable of
taking on high academic posts. I hope the people who
are on the Mathews anti-American bandwagon will also
be supporting UBC in its desperate struggle with the
government of British Columbia.
MATHEWS: I don't mind Peter calling me an
anti-American one bit, because what he is really
describing    is   his   own   colonial-mindedness   and   his
anti-Canadian-ness.
WEBSTER: I'm sold on Mathews' and Steele's case.
The other side, Pearse and Young, sound great but they
won't give us all the facts because they don't know them
and because nobody's ever made any real surveys to
show how much our universities are being dominated by
non-Canadians. Right?
PEARSE: That's right. The Senate of the University
of British Columbia has refused to disclose information
relating to citizenship because it has been regarded as an
illegitimate criterion for hiring policies.
YOUNG: Citizenship doesn't indicate whether the
university is dominated by one particular nationality or
another. What you've got to find out is whether or not
professors who come from another country make a
serious commitment to Canadian society, and a great
many of them do.
WEBSTER: If you think that Mathews and Steele are
so wrong, shouldn't you people at UBC do something
positive to disabuse the likes of myself, who is totally
convinced that we're being taken over by American and
other foreign brains?
PEARSE: Jack, I reject that. If you want to make
that point, you've got to demonstrate to us somehow
that we're ignoring Canadian studies at UBC and you
haven't done that.
CALLER: This program today has pointed out what
a lot of us have felt for a long time: that is, that the
academic community in Canada is very immature. If you
have bouquets to throw at them, they will accept them
very graciously —
WEBSTER: Or Canada Council grants.
CALLER: But if you have criticism to throw at them,
they very quickly pass it off to some political badman
who's doing them wrong. Today I've heard people
criticizing the immigration policy of the federal
government; I've heard them criticizing the Social Credit
government of British Columbia. The whole blame for
who we have in our universities rests entirely with the
universities. The hiring is done by the university and
that's where the buck stops.
WEBSTER: A valid point, I can't disagree with him in
any way.
MATHEWS: A very valid point. For the first seven
months of our battle, Prof. Steele and I begged the
universities to address their problems in whichever way
they thought best, but to get onto the job before we had
to go political about it. And they told us we were racists,
fascists and anti-semites.
YOUNG: The man's quite right. The universities are
responsible for whom they hire. But the universities
were very suspicious of this issue when it first came up
because they maintain, and I think quite rightly, that a
university must first try to have the best people in each
field. To tell a student, "Your education is going to be
less than adequate but at least you'll be taught by
Canadian professors," is a total mockery of the whole
purpose of a university.
MATHEWS: That's a colonial position, because
you're saying we cannot produce out of our own
community, as every other country does, the best man
in the field, and also a man who understands the
Canadian experience, knows it thoroughly and can relate
it to his teaching.
WEBSTER: Jim Steele, "The Struggle for Canadian
Universities": Are you winning or losing the battle?
STEELE: It's too early to say. I'm not optimistic.
MATHEWS: At the present moment we are not
winning the battle but we are going to win. If we have
to, we will shortly be going on the barricades. We are
going to escalate this thing and if it means closing down
the universities, we will close down the universities. We
are going to have change.
UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970/7 NEW LOOK
Continued from Page Five
and technical programs offered by Extension has
taken place. This change came about as a result of
initiatives taken by the Department; increased
realization on the part of professional persons and
associations of the need for continuing education;
and the cooperation of the professional Faculties on
campus.
Currently more than 40 per cent of all courses
offered by Extension deal with professional or
technical subject matter.
A number of other factors have also been at work
in recent years to increase the demand for Extension
courses which carry credit towards a degree. With the
increasing complexity of society many individuals
feel the need for more advanced education in order to
cope successfully with vocational and other areas of
interest. Employers are requiring more advanced
qualifications. As post-secondary institutions increase
in size, there are more students in the system and
many of them, if they drop out for a period, seek to
gain credit towards degrees by part-time study. The
regional and district colleges now make it possible for
students to complete the first two years of a degree
program and increasing numbers wish to continue
their course work on a part-time basis. As in the past,
many teachers continue to work towards a degree by
this means as well.
During 1968-69 there was a 24 per cent increase in
enrolment in Extension credit courses over the
previous year and another 16 per cent increase in
1969-70. Innovations have included a May-to-July
evening credit program, established in 1967, and
in-the-field credit courses, initiated in 1968 when the
Geography of Latin America was given that summer
in Mexico. In July, 1969, three courses were given in
cooperation with Sophia University in Tokyo, Japan,
and a geography course in Andean South America in
July, 1970.
During 1969-70, 21,238 persons took part in
Extension programs; this included 3,325 persons in
part-time credit courses, 11,212 in non-credit courses
in the liberal arts and 6,701 in continuing
professional education.
Each year several hundred UBC faculty members
participate in Extension programs.
MANY ACTIVITIES
The Center's scope now embraces many activities:
Public Issues and community development - As
the principal arm of the University concerned with
relating the knowledge and expertise of University
faculty to the examination of community problems.
Extension has initiated programs directed at public
issues and community development. The function is
twofold: (1) to provide people with factual
information and (2) to help people develop the skills
to deal with community issues and problems through
participation in the process of social change.
Programs attempt to reach strategic groups in the
community, public officials, leaders in community
organizations and actively concerned citizens.
Among programs of this nature carried out in
recent years have been those dealing with
international and national issues and problems of
modern society, including housing, water and noise
pollution and overpopulation. Programs aimed at
developing skills in community leadership have
included an Indian leadership development project, a
joint program with the Union of B.C. Municipalities
for local government elected officials, a joint program
with the B.C. School Trustees Association for school
trustees, and a community self-survey project.
The latter program was a pilot project aimed at
helping British Columbia communities solve
community problems. Beginning in May; 1969, the
Extension Department and the Voluntary Association
for Health and Welfare, with the aid of a grant from
the B.C. Department of Social Welfare, conducted a
three-phase community self-survey in Penticton. It
was designed to involve as many members of the
community as possible and to stimulate their interest
in and desire to act upon community problems. A
door-to-door survey of the community was made,
study committees researched in depth areas of
concern disclosed by the survey, and a
community-wide conference was held in which
recommendations of the study committee were
considered and priorities for action established. The
8/UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970
project is looked on as a possible prototype for
citizen involvement in decision-making in small
communities.
Certificate and Diploma Programs — Working
closely with Faculties, Extension has launched several
certificate and diploma programs in the last few
years: a diploma program in adult education; a
certificate program for the education of young
children; a diploma program in engineering
administration; a criminology certificate program;
and a social work registration program.
Reading and Study Skills Center — In cooperation
with the Faculty of Education, a University Reading
and Study Skills Center was developed by Extension
in 1968 and has now served over 600 university
students and 400 non-student adults.
New Approaches to the Humanities — Over the
years courses in the humanities have become an
increasingly significant part of the Extension
non-credit program. Along with traditional courses
there has been a move toward interdisciplinary
treatment of subject matter emphasizing relationships
between academic disciplines. Courses such as Homo
Ludens: Play, Games and Game Theory, The
Possibilities of Psychic Evolution and Time: The
Strange Dimension have linked the humanities with
the sciences, social sciences and other fields and
offered imaginative new frameworks for study in the
humanities.
Recently the humanities section of the
Department has developed new programs within the
framework of two general themes: Quest for
Liberation and Explorations in the Human Potential.
Quest for Liberation is a series of
lecture-discussions and symposia aimed at offering a
better understanding of the current cultural ferment
in the West and its implications for the individual and
society. Central to the Quest series has been a
"Distinguished-Visitor-in-Community" program
supported by a grant from the Leon and Thea
Koerner Foundation. This program has brought to
Vancouver outstanding teachers and thinkers of
diverse viewpoints including: Huston Smith, Kenneth
Boulding, Abraham Kaplan, Ashley Montagu, Alan
Watts, Theodore Roszak and Philip Rieff. Coming in
October is John R. Piatt, a biophysicist and head of
the Mental Health Research Institute at the
University of Michigan.
The second theme. Explorations in the Human
Potential, focuses on human potential, its direction
and fulfillment. Programs with Buckminster Fuller,
the late Frederick S. Perls, Edward Maupin, Vincent
Giuliano and George I. Brown have examined topics
such as gestalt therapy, interpersonal communications
and coping with an over-rich information
environment, and have included workshops on
creativity and awareness, feeling, sensing and
intuition. Dr. Herbert A. Otto, a psychologist and
chairman of the National Center for Exploration of
the Human Potential, will be another in the series
Oct. 23-25.
Changes in the Province-Wide Program — One
aspect of Extension's program which has changed
most strikingly in the last decade is service to adults
outside the Greater Vancouver area. From a peak
enrolment of 6,766 in 1963-64, province-wide
programming diminished to  1,754 in 1968-69. The
decline was largely a result of the termination of
special province-wide funds and a study-discussion
program. Currently, province-wide programming is
increasing in the areas of continuing professional
education and in public and urban affairs. This year
the Center is jointly undertaking, with the UBC
Alumni Association, a project aimed at substantially
increasing the number of courses outside Greater
Vancouver areas.
The Teacher and The City — In a special Extension
project known as The Teacher and The City, eight
teachers have produced resource and methods
material for use in school programs related to
understanding the city. A grant from Central
Mortgage and Housing Corporation financed the
project, the culmination of which will be the
publication of a book later this year.
Educational-Travel Programs — Since 1965
Extension has offered a series of educational-travel
programs. The Department entered the field because
of the special contribution which it is felt the
University could make to this aspect of adult
education, including orientation programs; language
courses related to the areas to be visited; visits to
places not on the regular commercial tours; seminars
and other educational events in the countries being
visited involving local experts drawn from academic,
governmental, business, professional and artistic
circles; and on most occasions taking academic
leaders along with the tour group in order to assist
with the general understanding of what is seen and
experienced.
The program has included tours to Quebec (1965),
Mexico (1966), Japan (1968-69-70), South America
(specializing in ranching and agriculture — 1969), the
Moorish World (southern Spain and North Africa —
1969), Central America (1970) and two to Europe
(1970).
DAYTIME PROGRAM
The Daytime Program — In 1968 the Department
began a major expansion of daytime offerings in the
liberal arts. Major factors influencing the decision to
enlarge the daytime offerings were: belief that there
is a significant and growing audience including
housewives, shift workers and the retired; adult
interest in daytime programs as revealed in Extension
surveys; the availability of off-campus facilities such
as the Vancouver Public Library; and the success
experienced by the University of California with its
Berkeley daytime program.
Extension services have been offered by UBC since
the earliest days of the University. The Faculty of
Agriculture was giving courses for farmers and other
primary producers before it accepted regular full-time
students. More than 1,300 veterans of the First World
War attended vocational short courses at the
University between 1917 and 1921. A lectures service
for community organizations was organized by the
Faculty in 1918 and arranged some hundreds of
lectures each year. Almost all these activities were
curtailed in the early 1930s, however, when the
University grant was cut drastically by the
government.
In 1935 part of a Carnegie Corporation grant was
used to conduct a remarkable series of 893 lectures
attended by more than 70,000 persons. To give
permanence to this work the University created the
Department of University Extension in late April,
1936.
The Extension Department has had four directors
since that time. Mr. Robert England (1936-37), Dr.
Gordon Shrum (1937-53), Dr. John Friesen
(1953-66) and Mr. Gordon Selman (1966 to present).
In the coming year the Center aims to help
establish a full, part-time degree program for adults.
Vancouver is probably the only city of its size on this
continent where such a program is not available. More
programs will be placed off-campus in places where
people live and work and programs which deal with
urgent community problems (housing, poverty, etc.)
are also on the agenda. Effort will be made to expand
and improve continuing education services to
professional groups, and develop on-going research
and development activities.
The Center for Continuing Education has moved
from the Extension quarters in huts on the East Mall
to a wing of the newly acquired residence halls of St.
Mark's College on the northeast corner of the
campus. Service departments — audio-visual and
photography — remain at the former Extension
location. SPECIAL PROGRAMS
THE UNIVERSITY AND ITS TEACHERS: ALONG THE
CRITICAL PATH - Tuesdays, Oct. 13, 8 p.m., UBC (6
sessions). A lecture-discussion series with outstanding teachers
on the UBC Faculty. Offered in conjunction with the Alumni
Association.
LeDAIN REPORT ON THE NON-MEDICAL USE OF DRUGS
— Friday, Sept. 25 and Saturday, Sept, 26. Opportunity to
discuss the report with members of the Commission.
ENVIRONMENTAL    MANAGEMENT    -    A    BRITISH
COLUMBIA PRIORITY - Monday, Oct 26 and Tuesday, Oct.
27, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Bayshore Inn. The first of a series of
programs on Environmental Management. Topics will be Conflict
« in Resource Development and Bases of Resource Management.
SPECIAL RADIO SERIES: PRINT-ON-AIR - Sundays, Sept.
13, 10:15 p.m., on CBC Radio (12). Produced by the CBC in
cooperation with the Center for Continuing Education, this new
series will be concerned with emerging thought, changing ideas
and new forms of expression.
OCEANOGRAPHY: THE MOTIONS OF THE OCEANS -
Thursdays, Oct. 8, 8 p.m., UBC (6).
INTRODUCTION    TO   THE    STUDY   OF    EDUCATION   -
Thursdays, Oct. 1, 1:30 p.m., UBC (5). The first in a new series
of experiential programs in the professions.
ACTUALIZING     HUMAN     POTENTIALITIES:     NEW
, DISCOVERIES AND FINDINGS - Friday, Oct. 23, 8:30 p.m.,
UBC. A lecture-discussion with Dr. Herbert Otto, psychologist,
educator and Chairman, The National Center for The
Exploration of Human Potential, La Jolla, California, The First
Fall Event in the ongoing series Explorations in the Human
Potential.
A TRAINING AND EXPERIMENTAL WEEKEND IN
METHODS DESIGNED TO ACTUALIZE HUMAN
POTENTIAL - Saturday, Oct. 24, 9 a.m, to 10 p.m., Sunday,
Oct. 25, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Vancouver Airport Inn. An intensive
weekend of training through experiencing with Dr. Herbert A.
Otto.
DR. JOHN R. PLATT: WHAT WE MUST DO - Friday, Oct. 9,
t 8:30 p.m., Saturday, Oct. 10, 9:30 a.m. — noon, UBC. The 11th
Event in the Quest for Liberation series. Dr. Piatt is Research
Biophysicist  and   Associate   Director  of the  Mental   Health
Research Institute at the University of Michigan.
STRATEGIES FOR SURVIVAL: COPING IN A WORLD OF
CHANGE - Thursdays, Oct. 1, 8 p.m., UBC (8).
THE LEGACY OF FRITZ PERLS - Friday, Nov. 13,7:30 p.m.,
Saturday, Nov. 14, 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m., UBC. A short weekend
of film, lectures and a symposium with Guest Speakers.
A MATTER OF CHOICE: OPTIONS FOR WOMEN - Tuesdays,
Oct. 6, 9:30 a.m., UBC. Six lecture-discussions on choices in
life-style for women. Three optional psychological test sessions.
Offered in conjunction with the UBC Alumni Association.
THE CHINA PRESENCE - Wednesdays, Oct. 7, 8 p,rn., UBC,
and Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 12 p.ro. to 1 pira, Vancouver Public
Library. The first event in a new series. The China Program.
AGING
FACING CHANGE WITH  THE OLDER PERSON - Details
available from the Center, 228-2181.
ANTHROPOLOGY AND SOCIOLOGY
AN OVERVIEW OF SOCIAL CHANGE - Thursdays, Oct. 8, 8
p.m„UBC (9 sessions).
ANTHROPOLOGY: VOYEURISTIC, VANDALISTIC, VALID?
- Wednesdays, Oct. 7, 8 p.m., UBC (10). An introduction to
anthropology — it's development, current direction, and its
< validity as an academic discipline
INTRODUCTION TO THE ETHNOLOGY OF B.C. - Fridays,
Sept. 18,9:30 a.m., Vancouver Centennial Museum (6).
ORIGIN   AND  EVOLUTION OF HUISAN CULTURE AND
SOCIETY - Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 8 p.m.. Maritime Museum (10).
POWER,   POLITICS   AND   PEOPLE:   SOCIOLOGY   OF   C.
WRIGHT MILLS - Tuesdays, Oct 6, 8 p.m., UBC (8),.
WOMEN IN A CHANGING WORLD - Wednesdays, Sept. 30,8
p.m., UBC (8).
THE YOUTH CULTURE IN ANGLO-AMERICA - Wednesdays,
Sept. 30, 8 p.m., UBC (8).
ARCHAEOLOGY
, ARCHAEOLOGY    OF    THE    ANCIENT    NEAR    EAST    -
Wednesdays, Sept. 16, 7 p.m., UBC (27).
FAMOUS CITIES OF THE EAST - Sundays, Oct. 4, 8 p.m..
Centennial Museum (10).
ASTRONOMY
THE EXPLORATION OF THE UNIVERSE - Mondays, Sept.
28, 8 p.m., H.R. MacMillan Planetarium (10). A group reading
and discussion program.
CLASSICAL STUDIES
THE AGE OF ALEXANDER - Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 8 p.m., UBC
(8). Also offered daytime Thursdays.
CONTEMPORAR Y THOUGHT
CONTEMPORARY THOUGHT - Thursdays, Oct. 15, 8 p.m.,
' Vancouver Public Library (6). Also offered daytime Tuesdays.
CREATIVE WRITING
INTRODUCTORY    CREATIVE    WRITING   WORKSHOP   -
Mondays, Oct. 5, 8 p.m., UBC (10). And a separate section
Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 8-9 p.m., UBC.
ADVANCED CREATIVE WRITING WORKSHOP -
Wednesdays, Oct. 7, 8 p.m., UBC (10).
EDUCA TIONAL TRA VEL PROGRAMS
AND IN-THE-FIELD COURSES
FISHERIES OF JAPAN - March 1971
JAPAN EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL PROGRAM - May 1971
CLASSICAL GREECE - June 1971
CHINA EDUCATIONAL TRAVEL PROGRAM - Summer 1971
ARCHAEOLOGY    OF    THE    ANCIENT    NEAR    EAST    -
July-August 1971 - Tunisia
SHAKESPEARE - July-August 1971 - England
THE DA YTIME PROGRAM
THE CHINA PRESENCE - Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 12-1 p.m.,
Vancouver Public Library (8). The first event in a new series,
The China Program.
A MATTER OF CHOICE: OPTIONS FOR WOMEN - Tuesdays,
Oct. 6, 9:30 a.m., UBC. Six lecture-discussions on choices in
life-styles for women. Three optional psychological test sessions.
INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF EDUCATION -
Thursdays, Oct. 1, 1:30-3:30 p.m., UBC (5)
INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY - Thursdays, Oct. 8,
10 a.m., UBC (10)
CULTURE AND PERSONALITY - Thursdays, Oct. 8, 1:30
p.m., UBC (10)
INTRODUCTION TO ARCHAEOLOGY - Wednesdays, Oct, 7,
1:30 p.m., UBC (10)
» INTRODUCTION TO PSYCHOLOGY - Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 1:30
p.m., UBC (10)
INTRODUCTION  TO SOCIOLOGY - Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 10
a.m., UBC (10)
THE SOCIOLOGY OF MINORITY GROUPS - Wednesdays,
Oct. 7, 10 a.m., UBC (10)
THE NEW AWARENESS: CANADIAN POETRY - Mondays,
Oct. 5, 1:30 p.m., Kitsilano Public Library (5)
INDIVIDUAL    EXPRESSION    IN    INTERIOR    DESIGN    -
Mondays, Sept. 28, 1:30 p.m., Vancouver Public Library (20)
THEORY AND PRACTICE OF HATHA YOGA - Tuesdays and
Thursdays, Oct. 13, 1:30 p.m., Kitsilano Public Library (10)
CRITICAL READING - Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 10 a.m., Kitsilano
Public Library (9)
LANDSCAPING THE URBAN HOME - Tuesdays, Sept. 22, 10
a.m., Vancouver Public Library (7)
CONTEMPORARY   THOUGHT -  Tuesdays, Sept.  29,   1:30
p.m., Hycroft (6)
RELIGION AND THE SURVIVAL OF MAN - Tuesdays, Oct.
13, 2 p.m., Vancouver Public Library (5)
DAY IN COURT - Tuesdays, Sept. 22, 10 a.m.. West Vancouver
Community Center (8)
COMMUNICATING WITH CHILDREN - Wednesdays, Oct. 7,
9:45 a.m., Vancouver Public Library (7)
EXPLORATIONS IN MATURITY: A DISCUSSION COURSE -
Wednesdays,   Oct.   14,   1:30   p.m..   New  Westminster  Public
Library (6)
BUDDHIST MEDITATION: PRACTICE AND PHILOSOPHY -
Wednesdays, Sept. 30, 10 a.m., Hycroft (8)
THE INTERNATIONAL SCENE - Wednesdays, Oct. 7, 1:30
p.m., Vancouver Public Library (8)
THE AGE OF ALEXANDER - Thursdays, Oct. 15, 1:30 p.m.,
Vancouver Public Library (8)
LAW AND SOCIETY - Thursdays, Oct. 8, 10 a.m., Vancouver
Public Library (6)
EFFECTIVE STUDY - Saturdays, Nov. 7, 10 a.m., Vancouver
Public Library (4)
WORKSHOP   ON   MARRIAGE   -   Thursday,   Oct.   22   in
Vancouver. With Dr. Herbert Otto, consultant on pre-marital and
marriage counselling, author, teacher.
Center
More Than
150 Programs
More than 150 evening and daytime
courses for adults in the Greater Vancouver
area are being offered by UBC's Center for
Continuing Education in its autumn
program beginning in late September and
early October.
Twenty-seven classes will be held at
off-campus locations, including the
Vancouver Public Library, Kitsilano
Library, University Women's Club, West
Vancouver Community Center, New
Westminster Public Library, the Centennial
Museum, Maritime Museum, the H.R.
MacMillan Planetarium and in North
Vancouver and Richmond.
Humanities, arts and science programs
are listed on this page.
Continuing professional education
programs being offered by the Center this
autumn include courses in the fields of
education, engineering, law, forestry, social
work, agriculture, fisheries and
criminology. A brochure with details of
Center programs is available by telephoning
the Center at 228-2181.
EDUCATIONAL SERVICES
READING IMPROVEMENT COURSES - Several sections begin
the week of Oct. 5(10 sessions each)
WRITING   IMPROVEMENT   PROGRAM   -   Several   sections
begin the week of Oct. 5 (10 sessions each)
SPECIAL ART HISTORY SEMINAR - May-June 1971 - Italy
JAPANESE LITERATURE IN TRANSLATION - July-August
— Japan
INTERMEDIATE PAINTING - July 1971 - England
ART HISTORY - August 1971 - France and England
HISTORIAL AND GEOGRAPHICAL FIELD STUDIES - July
1971 - England
ECONOMICS
INTERMEDIATE ECONOMIC ANALYSIS - Thursdays, Sept.
17,7 p.m., UBC (27)
PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS - Mondays, Sept. 14, 7 p.m.,
UBC (27)
ENGLISH
INTENSIVE ENGLISH COURSES FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS
- For details contact the Center, 228-2181
FINE ARTS
THE  ARTS OF CHINA:   CHINESE PAINTING - Mondays,
Sept. 21, 8 p.m., UBC (8)
THE LIVELY ARTS IN VANCOUVER - Wednesdays, Sept. 23,
8 p.m.. Various locations (8)
THE PHOTOGRAHPHER'S EYE: CREATIVE
PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP I - INTRODUCTORY -
Tuesdays, Sept. 29, 8 p.m., UBC (10)
THE PHOTOGRAPHER'S EYE: CREATIVE PHOTOGRAPHY
WORKSHOP II - ADVANCED - Wednesdays, Sept. 30, 8 p.m.,
UBC (10)
THE    CITY    THROUGH    YOUR    CAMERA:    ADVANCED
PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP - Saturdays, Sept. 12, 9 a.m.,
Vancouver General Hospital (24)
EXPERIMENTS WITH THE PROJECTED IMAGE - Saturdays,
Oct. 3, 10 a.m., UBC (3)
OMNIBUS OF THE ARTS II: DISCOVERING THE MUSE -
Weekends, Sept. 11/12, 10 a.m. (6) A participatory studio in the
arts.
TAPESTRY AND CREATIVE WALL HANGINGS WORKSHOP
- Tuesdays, Sept. 29, 7 p.m., UBC (10)
HISTORY OF ORIENTAL ART - Wednesdays, Sept.  16, 7
p.m., UBC (27)
HISTORY OF MODERN ART - Tuesdays, Sept. 15, 7 p.m.,
UBC (27)
HISTORY OF ART - Thursdays, Sept. 17, 7 p.m., UBC (27)
DRAWING FOR ARCHITECTURAL STUDENTS - Tuesdays,
Oct. 20, 8 p.m., UBC (18)
GEOGRAPHY
GEOGRAPHY OF BUSINESS LOCATIONS - Mondays, Oct. 5,
8 p.m., UBC (10)
INTRODUCTION TO HUMAN GEOGRAPHY - Thursdays,
Sept. 17,7 p.m., UBC (27)
HISTORY
ARCHITECTS OF ILLUSION: LEADERS AND IDEAS AFTER
WORLD WAR II - Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 8 p.m., UBC (8)
SELECTIVE PERCEPTIONS: CANADIAN AND AMERCIAN
CONTRADICTIONS - Mondays, Oct. 5. 8 p.m., UBC (8) A
comparative analysis of the problems and forces at work in both
countries, and the approaches each country must take in
handling these problems.
THE     MUSLIM     CONTRIBUTION     TO    WESTERN
CIVILIZATION - Mondays, Oct 5, 8 p.m., UBC (10)
MODERN CHINESE HISTORY - Tuesdays, Sept. 15, 7 p.m.,
UBC (26)
HISTORY OF AFRICA - Mondays, Sept. 14, 7 p.m., UBC (27)
HUMAN DEVELOPMENT
ZEST-TO-LIVE - EXERCISE AND HUMAN PERFORMANCE
- Wednesdays, Oct. 7, 8 p.m., UBC (8)
INTRODUCTION TO THE THEORY AND PRACTICE OF
HATHA YOGA - Fridays, Oct. 16, 8 p.m., UBC (8). Also
offered daytime Tuesdays.
HUMAN RELATIONS
LABORATORY IN INTERPERSONAL COMMUNICATIONS:
A GESTALT APPROACH TO LEARNING - Tuesdays, Oct. 13,
7:30 p.m., UBC (8)
EXISTENTIAL AWARENESS WORKSHOP - Sundays, Oct. 4,
9:30 a.m., UBC (7)
UNDERSTANDING "DIFFERENT' PEOPLE - A program for
persons whose work brings them into contact with people whose
culture is different from their own. Details: 228-2181.
INTERIOR DESIGN
INTRODUCTION TO INTERIOR DESIGN - Thursdays, Oct. 1,
Sa.m.,UBC(10)
LANGUAGES
AN    ADVANCED   COURSE    IN   STUDIES    IN    FRENCH
LANGUAGE AND STYLE - Wednesdays, Sept. 16, 7 p.m.,
UBC (26)
JAPANESE - BASIC - Basic I, Monday, Oct. 5, Basic II,
Thursday, Oct. 8,7:30 p.m., UBC (22)
SPANISH - FIRST YEAR - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Sept. 15,
7 p.m., UBC (85)
SPANISH - SECOND YEAR - Tuesdays and Thursdays, Sept.
15,7 p.m., UBC (55)
LINGUISTICS
GENERAL LINGUISTICS: PART I - Mondays, Sept. 14, 7
p.m., UBC (27)
GENERAL LINGUISTICS: PART II - Wednesdays, Sept. 16, 7
p.m., UBC (27)
LITERATURE
PHILOSOPHY OF MODERN LITERATURE: EPICENTRES OF
CONTEMPORARY CONSCIOUSNESS - PART I - Thursdays,
Oct. 8,8 p.m., UBC (9)
UNREALITY    IN     LITERATURE:    THE    MAGICAL
THRESHOLD - Wednesdays, Oct. 7, 8 p.m., UBC (10)
CANADIAN LITERATURE - Wednesdays, Sept. 16, 7 p.m.,
UBC (27)
CONTEMPORARY LITERATURE - Mondays, Sept. 14, 7
p.m., UBC (27)
MUSIC
GREAT   CONCERTOS    -    A    LECTURE    PERFORMANCE
SERIES   —   In   conjunction   with   the   Vancouver Symphony
Orchestra.
WORKSHOP IN CHORAL LITERATURE AND HISTORY -
Mondays, Sept. 28, 8 p.m., UBC (10)
EARLY MUSIC AND INSTRUMENTS - Thursdays, Oct. 1, 8
p.m., UBC (10)
UNDERSTANDING ROCK AND FOLK-ROCK - Tuesdays,
Oct. 13, 8 p.m., UBC (10)
INTERMEDIATE RECORDER FLUTE - Tuesdays, Sept. 15,8
p.m., UBC (10)
NUTRITION
CHANGING FOOD HABITS - A CANADIAN CHALLENGE -
Thursdays, Oct. 22, 8 p.m., UBC (6)
PHILOSOPHY
INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY - Mondays, Sept. 14, 7
p.m., UBC (27)
SOCIAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY - Thursdays, Sept.
17, 7 p.m., UBC (27)
LOGIC AND SCIENTIFIC REASONING - Wednesdays, Sept.
16, 7 p.m., UBC (27)
PSYCHOLOGY
INTRODUCTORY PSYCHOLOGY - Tuesdays, Oct. 6, 8 p.m.,
UBC (10)
THE WORLD OF ADOLESCENTS - Thursdays, Oct. 8, 8 p.m.,
UBC (7)
PUBLIC AFFAIRS
ZIONISM - Mondays, Oct. 5, 8 p.m., UBC (8)
THE INTERNATIONAL SCENE - UBC - Thursdays, Oct. 8, 8
p.m., UBC (8)
THE INTERNATIONAL SCENE - RICHMOND - Mondays,
Oct. 5, 8 p.m., Richmond Secondary School (8)
RELIGIOUS STUDIES
MYSTICISM: ANCIENT AND MODERN - Fridays, Oct. 2, 8
p.m., Vancouver Public Library (8)
WORLD'S MAJOR RELIGIONS - Tuesdays, Sept. 15, 7 p.m.,
UBC (27)
THEATER
BEHIND   THE   SCENES:   THE  BARD AND NON-BARD -
Mondays,   Oct.   19,   UBC   (4).   A   Theater-lecture   series   in
conjunction with The Playhouse Theater Company.
UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970/9 DEAN OF ARTS STATEMENT
In the following statement, UBC's Dean of Arts,
Dr. Douglas Kenny, comments on a section of a
recently issued report on the citizenship of UBC's
faculty dealing with the hiring practices of UBC's
Department of English.
The University of British Columbia has never
recognized citizenship as a qualification for
employment, nor has it maintained a registry of the
citizenship or national origin of its faculty. In the
present period of increasing concern for national
values in Canada, some voices are calling for revision
of this policy and others are making such extreme
demands as "tenure for Canadians only." Uninformed
charges are being made against the University and
against various departments for alleged indifference
to Canadian values and discrimination against
Canadians in hiring practices.
In particular, the Department of English has been
singled out in more than one public statement for its
alleged biases in this regard. In observance of
University policy Professor Robert Jordan, the Head
of the Department, has withheld public comment up
to this time, since he was unwilling to draw special
attention to the citizenship of members of his
Department, deeming it irrelevant to their academic
qualifications. Since the report by Art Smolensky and
Tony Hodge has publicized an account of English
Department practices which was in conflict with my
own understanding, I have looked further into the
matter and now wish to set the record straight.
Messrs. Smolensky and Hodge refer to "the alleged
hiring for 1970-71 of eight American professors and
only two Canadians in the Department of English."
The fact is that the English Department appointed for
1970-71 one British, one New Zealander, five
Americans and eight Canadians. These persons were
all    appointed    either    to    one-year    or    two-year
contracts, and all have outstanding qualifications. The
Department of English made unusual efforts to
attract qualified Canadians to its ranks. It advertised
vacancies only in Canadian and British journals.
Professor Jordan journeyed across Canada to visit
graduate schools and interview graduate students
completing their work and seeking teaching positions.
The first two offers made by the English Department
were to Canadians and they were declined. In the
course of the year's recruitment activities it became
apparent that many of the most highly qualified
persons from Eastern Canada were not interested in
moving to British Columbia. Many wished to remain
in the East or accept offers in other countries,
including the United States. Although the English
Department maintained very high standards of
quality in assessing applicants for positions it did give
special consideration to Canadian applicants for
positions and will continue to do so.
In filling positions at the M.A. level the
Department found that it could observe a policy to
hire only Canadian M.A.'s and make no sacrifice in
quality. This the Department did and consequently
for the first time in recent history, it has appointed
only Canadian M.A.'s. If after performing a year's
teaching duties at UBC these persons return to their
graduate studies and complete their training they
might very well prove a source of future Canadian
staff for the Department.
It should be remembered that many Canadian
university teachers are employed in other countries.
The Department of English is undertaking this year to
track down such persons and, depending upon their
qualifications and the Department's needs, attempt to
interest them in British Columbia. Insofar as this kind
of activity can be carried on in consistency with
maintaining high standards of qualification the
University will clearly benefit.
UBC NEWS IIM BRIEF
The first in a series of half-hour television
programs entitled "UBC Now" went on the air
September 15.
The series, which is being produced by UBC's
Information Services Department, aided by a grant
from the Alumni Association, aims to show life at
UBC in all its facets.
It can be seen on Tuesdays at 7:30 p.m. on
Channel 10, available to subscribers to the service
offered by Vancouver Cablevision and affiliates.
Mr. Michael Tindall, producer of the series, invites
viewers to write and express their interests and
preferences in the content and presentation of the
series. Letters should be sent to Information Services,
Main Mall North Administration Building, UBC,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
UBC's 1970-71 registration stands at 20,829
students, just 19 short of a predicted enrolment of
20,848. Present undergraduate enrolment is 18,503.
Additional enrolment in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies, where 2,326 students have already been
admitted, could increase enrolment by an additional
200-300 students.
* * *
A joint faculty-student committee has decided not
to press for a standardized, campus-wide course and
teacher evaluation survey.
The committee has decided that its basic aim
should be to coordinate the existing evaluations and
promote such studies in areas where they do not now
exist, notably the Faculty of Arts.
UBC's Board of Governors has approved a
recommendation confirming Dr. Douglas T. Kenny as
dean of the Faculty of Arts.
Dean Kenny has been a member of the UBC
faculty since 1950 and was named head of the
psychology department at UBC in 1965. He resigned
as head in 1969 to become associate dean of arts.
Dr. Kenny became acting dean following the
appointment of the then dean of arts. Prof. John
Young, as chairman of the federal government's
Prices and Incomes Commission in Ottawa. Prof.
Young resigned as dean in April of this year to
continue his assignment in Ottawa for an additional
year.
HHH Volume 16, No. 17 - Oct. 1,
IIIJI* 1970. Published by the
IIIIII University of British Columbia
^aw amw ^aw ancj distributed free. J.A.
REPORTS Banharr1i Editor. Kim Gravelle,
Production Supervisor. Letters to the Editor
should be addressed to Information Services,
Main Mall North Administration Building, UBC,
Vancouver 8, B.C.
AN IMPORTANT
NOTE TO
OUR READERS
UBC wants to ensure that you will receive
your copy of UBC Reports in the months
ahead.
You can help us to keep our mailing lists
accurate by doing the following:
1. Check the mailing label on the front page
of this issue.
2. If the label is incorrectly addressed, return
the label, together with a note of your new
address to Mailing Lists, UBC Reports, Cecil
Green Park, 6251 N.W. Marine Drive,
Vancouver 8, B.C. (If you're receiving more
than one copy of UBC Reports, please return
the labels from all copies. We'll see you get only
one copy.)
The appropriate changes can be made to our
mailing lists only if you return the mailing label
(or labels).
The editors of UBC Reports look forward to
hearing from readers who have comments to
make on articles or have suggestions for
material which they would like to see in the
paper.
HUNGRY,
THIRSTY
CAMPUS
UBC's students, faculty and staff are a hungry, thirsty
lot.
Last year they ate and drank more than $2.2 million
dollars' worth of food purchased through campus food
outlets and in residence dining halls. The cost to the
University of purchasing the food was just over $1
million.
The largest single food expenditure was nearly
$300,000 for meat and not far behind at $238,863.29
was the cost of various beverages — coffee, tea, milk and ^
soft drinks — to wash it all down. (Milk and milk
products, you'll be pleased to know, were the biggest
favorites, ringing up sales of more than $178,300.
The vegetables to add to meat dishes and the fresh
fruit for dessert cost almost $110,000 and when food
patrons weren't eating meat they consumed fish and
chicken valued at just over $91,000.
Other major campus food  items were bread worth
nearly $63,000, eggs costing more than  $31,000 and %
doughnuts valued at just over $16,250.
The total cost of food purchases to UBC is shown in
the table at bottom on the page opposite and the names
of suppliers and the amounts paid to them are contained
in the annual financial statements issued by the
University in accordance with the Public Bodies
Financial Information Act, passed by the provincial
government in 1961.
The Financial Statements, which include the
consolidated statement of fund transactions reproduced *
at the top of the page opposite, include the salaries paid
to all faculty, staff and student assistants as well as the
names of all commercial suppliers to the University and
the amounts paid to them in excess of $500.
The statements are available at the UBC Bookstore
for $3 per copy plus tax.
The fund transactions statement opposite shows that
$44,868,554 - more than  half of UBC's income for
operating and  capital  purposes — was in the form of -
provincial  government grants.  However, the provincial
government recovers a major share of this from Ottawa.
Other major sources of income were grants for
sponsored and assisted research totalling $11,138,650,
student fees amounting to $10,441,390 and gifts, grants
and bequests totalling $7,647,452.
Nearly half of UBC's total expenditure —
$37,956,253 — was classified as "Academic" and
included more than $23,600,000 in salaries to teaching
staff and almost $1,800,000 to student assistants for
teaching duties and laboratory supervision.
Other major UBC expenditures were for research —
$11,027,951 — and for land, buildings and equipment —
$10,297,033.
In addition to salaries paid to students for services
rendered,   UBC also  made fellowship,  scholarship and
bursary   awards   and    prizes   totalling   $5,236,806   to
students.   (These latter awards are not included in the,
table at top opposite.)
UBC's Ancillary Services generated more than
$6,500,000 in revenue in the last fiscal year as shown in
the table at bottom opposite.
Four of the services — the Bookstore, Campus and
Residence Food Services and Housing Services — broke
even, in keeping with University policy of operating such
services on a self-supporting basis.
The University Health Service Hospital showed a
deficit of $5,595, which was met out of UBC's general
revenues.
The University Farm at Oyster River on Vancouver
Island showed a small profit of $791. This profit reverts
to UBC's general revenues and offsets past deficits in
farm operations. »
10/UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970 UBC's CONSOLIDATED STATEMENT OF  FUND TRANSACTIONS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1970
Income
Operating and Capital Grants — Canada
<- Health Sciences Center
Triumf Project
— British Columbia
Health Sciences Center
Student Fees     	
Services      	
Endowment Income     	
Sponsored or Assisted Research      	
Gifts, Grants and Bequests      	
Miscellaneous	
Total Income
Expenditure
Academic	
Library   	
Sponsored or Assisted Research      	
Administration      	
Student Services	
Plant Maintenance, including Renovations
and Alterations, $2,278,982     	
Fellowships, Scholarships and Bursaries	
General Expenses      	
Land, Building and Equipment	
Total Expenditure
Ancillary Enterprises (Net)
Excess of Income over Expenditure
for the year ended March 31, 1970
Net Additions to Fund Balances
Reclassification of Funds
Fund Balances at April 1, 1969
Fund Balances at March 31, 1970
as per Statement of Financial Condition
OPERATING FUNDS
Endowment
and
Student Loan
Capital
Total
General
Specific
of all
Purposes
Purposes
Total
Funds
Funds
Funds
$
$
$
$
$
$
-
-
-
-
788,625
788,625
-
-
-
-
2,343,500
2,343,500
38,868,554
-
38,868,554
-
6,000,000
135,079
44,868,554
135,079
10,441,390
-
10,441,390
-
-
10,441,390
1,523,814
718,524
2,242,338
-
-
2,242,338
-
1,256,888
1,256,888
-
-
1,256,888
-
11,138,650
11,138,650
-
-
11,138,650
-
2,423,100
2,423,100
1,504,959
3,719,393
7,647,452
679,264
43,811
723,075
-
157,292
880,367
$51,513,022
$15,580,973
$67,093,995
$  1,504,959
$13,143,889
$81,742,843
$36,300,462
$  1,655,791
$37,956,253
$
$
$37,956,253
4,048,030
12,947
4,060,977
-
-
4,060,977
(          78,563 )
11,106,514
11,027,951
-
-
11,027,951
1,904,034
7,331
1,911,365
-
19,764
1,931,129
804,036
386,673
1,190,709
-
-
1,190,709
7,433,450
64,760
7,498,210
-
-
7,498,210
828,742
1,401,525
2,230,267
-
-
2,230,267
152,655
128
152,783
1,385
67,016
221,184
-
603,907
$15,239,576
603,907
$66,632,422
-
9,693,126
$ 9,779,906
10,297,033
$51,392,846
$          1,385
$76,413,713
4,804
-
4,804
"
'
4,804
$51,397,650
$15,239,576
$66,637,226
$          1,385
$ 9,779,906
$76,418,517
$      115,372
$
$
$
-
341,397
1,503,574
3,363,983
-
(            51,969)
51,969
-
114,648
6,168,057
16,491,423
4,905,055
$     230,020
$ 6,457,485
$18,046,966
$ 8,269,038
STATEMENT OF UBC's ANCILLARY  ENTERPRISE OPERATIONS
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31, 1970
Income
Sales	
Rentals and Meal Passes	
Hospital Revenue      	
Expenditure
Cost of Bookstore Supplies and Food Purchases
Salaries and Wages	
Fringe Benefits (Including Board Allowance)    .
Dietary Service     	
Utilities      	
Electricity Rate Adjustment (
Other Operating	
Development of Facilities	
Debt Repayment, Including Interest      ....
Net Operating Margin for Year
Less Prior Year's Inventory Adjustment
Reserved for Expansion
Excess of Income over Expenditure
'for the Year Ended March 31, 1970
University
Total
Campus
Residence
Housing
Health Service
Farm
all
Bookstore
Food Services
Food Services
Services
Hospital
Oyster River
Sources
$ 2,133,167
$  1,062,187
2,312
$      122,976
1,036,597
$
$
47,633
1,853,974
$
145,724
$
145,301
1,933
$
$
3,511,264
2,894,816
145,724
$ 2,133,167
$  1,064,499
$  1,159,573
1,901,607
$
145,724
$
147,234
6,551,804
$  1/736,310
$     413,040
$     608,898
$
$
$
$
2,758,248
245,756
415,169
388,729
523,829
110,642
58,182
1,742,307
12,463
28,876
26,598
12,735
4,471
17,801
4,467
89,610
17,801
5,357
20,838
17,382
178,971
4,846
5,253
232,647
6,566 )
(          12,979  )
(          16,660 )
(
106,330 )
-
-
(
142,535 )
88,995
105,988
52,038
190,969
20,636
13,559
78,541
530,090
20,636
-
93,567
$  1,064,499
82,588
$  1,159,573
$
1,052,797
1,873,607
-
-
$
1,228,952
$ 2,082,315
$
151,319
$
146,443
6,477,756
$       50,852
$
$
$
28,000
($
5,595 )
$
791
$
74,048
71,347
S
$
-
-
-
$
71,347
($       20,495 )
$
28,000
($
5,595 )
$
791
2,701
(         20,495 )
-
-
28,000
-
-
7,505
$
S
$
$
-
($
5.595 )
$
791
($
4.804 )
UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970/11 AA^m^ UBC ALUMNI   j~ j~~"
contact
Dr. Willson H. Coates (left picture) accepts cup of tea at July reunion of class of 1920, while (right picture) Judge
A.H.J. Swencisky (left), Mrs. Ada Smith Lintelman (center) and Mrs. Coates (right) chat. Vlad photo.
HEALTH SCIENCES, FORESTRY
Information Campaign Launched
A modern university is much like an iceberg: only
one-tenth of it is ever visible to the public at any one
time.
UBC is no exception. Try as it might, the
University cannot convey to the public the full range
and complexity of its work. The UBC Alumni
°iSsociaton has long been impressed with one
particular aspect of UBC's work: the way in which
the University serves the province of B.C.
One of the many responsibilities of a modern
university is to serve the community in which it
exists, to help improve economic, social and
environmental conditions of life, and UBC meets this
responsibility. The Alumni Associaton would like
alumni and members of the public to know more
about it.
Consequently, the Association, with the
co-operation of the University, is launching an
information campaign for 1970 aimed at spreading
the message of how UBC serves the province of B.C.
The information campaign, initiated by Alumni
President Barrie Lindsay and the Alumni Board of
Management, will be directed primarily at telling the
story of the work underway in the areas of health
sciences and forestry, but will touch on the work of
other areas as well.
"We're impressed with the work being done by the
health sciences and forestry faculty members," said
Jack Stathers, executive director of the Alumni
Association. "These people are doing something of
real benefit to the people of B.C., and we want
people to know more about it. In fact, the University
as a whole is doing an impressive job of helping to
improve social and economic conditions in this
province."
The information campaign will be beamed at both
alumni and the general public, and will involve several
approaches. Articles on health sciences and forestry
will appear in the alumni magazine, the Chronicle.
(The first article entitled "Forestry's Quiet
Revolution," appears in the current Chronicle.)
Features on faculty projects will appear on future
"Contact" pages in UBC Reports.
News features on specific research, teaching or
community service projects will be dispatched to
newspapers throughout the province. In addition, the
12/UBC Reports/Oct. 1, 1970
message will be carried to meetings of alumni
branches throughout B.C. and California by means of
a slide show and speakers. UBC President Walter Gage
will address the California meetings.
An effort will also be made to convey information
to key decision-makers in the province. A series of
FYI (for your information) bulletins will be
distributed to all members of the B.C. Legislature,
municipal councillors, school trustees and other
education officials in B.C.
While dealing mainly with Health Sciences and
Forestry, the FYI bulletins will also discuss work
underway in other areas aimed at solving community
problems (eg., pollution). Last year a series of
bulletins on university finance was distributed to
MLAs.
Other means of spreading the message are also
being considered. It is hoped, as well, that the
information campaign will be continued in 1971,
with the work of different faculties being focused on.
VOLUNTEERS WANTED
If you're an alumnus and you're interested in
promoting academic excellence at UBC, then the
Alumni Association has a job for you! Serving as a
member of the alumni awards and scholarship
committee.
The function of the awards and scholarship
committee is to examine, on a continuing basis, the
Alumni Association's extensive program of
scholarships, bursaries, and awards. The committee
makes recommendations to the Alumni Board of
Management on changes in the scholarship program.
It also has the responsibility of recommending to the
Board names of individuals to be honored by the
Association with the Alumni Award of Merit and the
Honorary Life Membership. The first committee
meeting this fall is expected to be held in early
October.
If you're interested in serving on this committee
contact Mrs. Barbara Vitols, program director, UBC
Alumni Association, Cecil Green Park, 6251 N.W.
Marine Drive, UBC (phone 228-3313).
October 23&24
Alumni Co-sponsor
Extension Programs
The UBC Alumni Association and the UBC Center
for Continuing Education are co-sponsoring two
lecture-discussion programs this fall with alumni in
mind.
The first is a daytime program, "A Matter of
Choice: Options for Women," intended to enable
participants to examine ways of changing their life
styles. Topics include: approaches to creative living,
return to education, work and careers, the new
"career" volunteer and the practical considerations
for combining these with home responsibilities. The
program is being offered on six Tuesdays, beginning
Oct. 6, from 9:30-11:30 a.m. at Cecil Green Park, for
a fee of $15.
The second is an evening program entitled, "The
University and Its Teachers: Along The Critical
Path." It is designed to give alumni an opportunity
for dialogue with outstanding UBC teachers, winners
of the Master Teacher Award or Certificates of Merit
in teaching. The program is being offered on six
Tuesdays, beginnning Oct. 13, at Cecil Green Park,
6251 N.W. Marine Drive, UBC. The fee is $9 single or
$15 husband and wife.
UBC president Walter Gage will introduce the
lecture-discussion series and the program will be
hosted by members of the Alumni Association Board
of Management. Refreshments will be served.
The following are the lectures offered: Oct. 13 —
"The University and Its Teachers," Dr. Walter Young,
head, Department of Political Science; Oct. 20 — "On
Man, Play and Art," Mr. Sam Black, professor of art.
Faculty of Education; Oct. 27 — "The Student Builds
His Syntopicon: A Teaching Strategy," Dr. CJ.
Brauner, professor of philosophy. Faculty of
Education; Nov. 3 — "The University and the New
Music: Updating the Critical Ear," Mr. Cortland
Hultberg, associate professor. Department of Music;
Nov. 10 — "Let's Have Less Teaching and More
Learning Within the Applied Sciences," Dr. C. Ronald
Hazell, associate professor of mechanical engineering.
Faculty of Applied Science; Nov. 17 — "On Man
Understanding the Universe," Dr. Michael Ovenden,
professor of astronomy. Department of Geophysics.
Further information may be obtained by
contacting the Center for Continuing Education,
228-2181.
YAC/yac/n. (f. Tibetan gyac) a long-haired,
lumpy, bleary-eyed, snorting, wild ox-like
creature found only on the northwestern slopes
of Point Grey in British Columbia. Both males
and females are noted for their friendliness.
Lives off malt brew and a small animal called
the Hot Dog.
This uncommon herd gathers twice weekly at
Cecil Green Park - Thursdays (October 8 to
November 26) from 7 to 11 p.m. and Fridays
(to December 4) from 4 p.m. to midnight. If
you are a UBC graduate or a student in your
graduating year you are invited to join the
Young Alumni Club. For information phone
228-3313.

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