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UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Reports Dec 12, 1975

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UBC REPORTS
SPECIAL EDITION
Statement by President Kenny
In light of the present circumstances, I think it is important for
everyone to remember that all segments of the University community
make important contributions to our
common enterprise of providing the
best possible education for our
students.
It is the University's objective
to reach a satisfactory settlement
with AUCE as soon as possible. I
sincerely hope the negotiations can
be successfully concluded. A considerable number of items have
already been agreed upon, and the
University will of course stand by
these agreements.
Our negotiators have indicated
to the union that we are prepared to
sit down at any time and reach
agreement with them on a coherent
proposal which will deal equitably
with the remaining issues. I look
forward to this happening in the
very near future.
Eight issues remain unresolved
Although the key issue of salaries
and the number of pay grades remains
to be settled, considerable progress
has been made by negotiators for the
University and tne Association of University and College Employees on other
points of contention.
Many issues were resolved before
the start of the one-week AUCE strike,
leaving only 16 (apart from salaries)
that were outlined in a union brief to
the UBC Board of Governors on Thursday, Dec. 4.
And in the past week, agreement
has been reached on half of those 16.
All of the eight still to be settled are
cost items, direct or indirect.
Settled since Dec. 4 were the
following issues:
• Pay for student assistants;
• Day care;
• Overtime;
• Pay for work on statutory holidays;
• The contracting-out of work;
• Leave of absence;
• Meal periods and relief periods;
• Shift-work     scheduling     provisions.
Here are the issues still unresolved, with the union and University
positions on them:
1. Staff Rooms and Facilities
The union agrees that staff rooms
and facilities that serve food and
beverages will be expected to pay their
own way, but wants any deficits that
do occur to be absorbed by the University.
The University's position is that
any such deficits should be the
responsibility of those incurring them.
The University points out that its
cafeterias and snack bars providing
food service to students are not subsidized.
There are many staff rooms used
by AUCE peisonnel, of varying size
and offering a varied range of service.
Some provide only coffee or tea but
others include the sale of doughnuts,
soup, sandwiches, etc.
The union says it is willing to
forgo its demand on deficits, provided
the University recognizes the principle
of paternity leave.
2. Paternity Leave
The union, in its Dec. 4 brief,
proposes that:
"Leave of absence for two weeks
with no loss of pay shall be granted for
paternity leave. All employees returning
from paternity leave shall return to
their former positions. Seniority shall
accrue and there shall be no loss of
benefits during paternity leave. Upon
request, an additional leave of absence
without pay for two weeks shall be
granted."
The University contends that the
AUCE-UBC contract already provides
for a much-better-than-average vacation
entitlement, and suggests that any
father-to-be who needs to be at home
while his wife is giving birth can
arrange to take part of his vacation
then. The University is prepared to
rearrange vacation schedules to meet
such a request.
3. Extended Vacation Benefits
AUCE members employed by UBC
Please turn to Page Two
See ISSUES
Administration replies to union brief
The University administration is in
close touch with its negotiating team
and fully supports them in their attempts to conclude a new agreement
with Local 1 of the Association of
University and College Employees.
This assurance was included in a
brief presented to AUCE on Tuesday,
in response to a brief presented by the
union earlier the same day. Union
representatives had expressed concern
that their position was not being
communicated clearly to the administration by the UEC negotiators.
The University brief comments on
"the union's surprising statement" that
"the University has in no way convinced
us that the cost of our demand is a
problem."
The prospective cost of any wage
settlement is "a matter of considerable
concern to the University," the UBC
brief says, because it "would affect the
University's ability to meet its continuing obligation to provide higher
education for the people of the province
and continued security for all University
employees."
The University's difficulties have
been increased by the fact that "we
could not and can not predict next
year's operating grant from the provincial government," the UBC brief went
on.
Nonetheless, it said, the University
was prepared to stand by its October
offer of a 19-per-cent wage increase in
two steps effective Oct. 1, 1975, and
Jan. 1, 1976.
Since that offer was made, it said,
the federal government has announced
its wage and price guidelines, and the
provincial Department of Labour has
indicated that those guidelines will
apply to UBC. Furthermore, the provincial    minister    of    education    has
announced that universities may have a
15-per-cent ceiling imposed on increases in their operating grants for
the next fiscal year.
In spite of these limitations, the
University said, it felt obligated to
stand by its October offer, provided
that the 19-per-cent raise was approved
by the federal Anti-Inflation Review
Board or by some other tribunal that
may be set up or legislation enacted to
decide such matters.
It noted, however, that for the
University to pay the 19 per cent it had
offered AUCE "will entail serious constraints in other areas."
The University rejected the union's
assumption,   indicated   in   the   AUCE
Please turn to Page Two
See BRIEF ISSUES
Continued from Page One
now receive three weeks' annual vacation after one year of service, four
weeks after five years, and five weeks
after eight years.
A survey conducted by the provincial Department of Labour shows that
most workers in B.C. receive much
less than this in vacations. More than
60 per cent have to wait three years or
longer to get three weeks, most wait 10
years to get four weeks, and most wait
20 or more years to get a five-week
annual vacation.
AUCE wants four weeks during the
fifth year, five weeks during the seventh
year. Starting in their eighth year,
AUCE says, employees should receive
one additional day of annual vacation
with pay for each additional year of
service.
The union also proposes that:
"For computation of vacation entitlement, employees shall be deemed
to be in their second calendar year on
Jan. 1 if they have had service immediately preceding that date."
This would mean that any person
starting work any time during 1975, up
to and including Dec. 31, 1975, would
receive a vacation of three weeks in
1976.
The union also wants additional
vacation time for any working days that
fall between Boxing Day and New
Year's Day. "Employees who work
during this period shall be entitled to
an equivalent number of days to be
added to their annual vacation entitlement for the following year," says the
AUCE proposal.
The University contends that the
vacation package is already generous
and offers a great deal of flexibility
during the work year. The University
has, however, offered to increase vacations beyond five weeks for employees
with 15 years or more of service. This
would be done on the one-day-for-one-
year principle sought by AUCE, but
starting after 15 years instead of after
7.
4. Time Off for Union Meetings
The union wants all members to
be granted a two-hour lunch break on
the second Thursday of each month to
attend union meetings.
The University already provides
these extended lunch breaks every
second month and contends that even
this allowance is a rarity in union
contracts. The University, however,
says it would seriously consider
granting the two-hour break for extraordinary meetings that might be called
by AUCE, in addition to those held
bi-monthly.
5. Shift-Work Differentials
The University now pays a differential of 25 cents an hour for those
working on evening shift and 44 cents
an hour for those working the overnight
shift.
In the current negotiations, AUCE
asked originally for a differential of $1
an hour, for both evening and overnight workers, but has since reduced
this demand to 60 cents an hour.
The University has offered to increase the evening differential to 33
cents an hour and the overnight differential to 50 cents. The Department of
Labour survey shows that most B.C.
evening-shift      workers      receive      a
BRIEF
Continued from Page One
brief, that structuring of job classifications was not a legitimate concern of
the University.
The University, the brief said, "has
the responsibility to carry on its operations with fiscal responsibility and as
effectively as possible. In order to do
this a realistic and workable job classification system is essential."
UBC negotiators have discussed
this matter with AUCE representatives
more than 30 times since November,
1974, the brief says, and are willing to
continue discussions aimed at remedying any possible inequities in the
present system.
Classification cannot be separated
from the question of wages, the University said; the two are inextricably
tied together.
The union's reclassification plan
in itself would involve a wage increase
of about 10.5 per cent, the UBC brief
said. In addition the union has asked
for an increase of 10 per cent, or a
minimum of $100 a month, on the new
salary scales resulting from its proposed restructuring of the classification system.
The union's total demand therefore
represents a wage increase of 23.8 per
cent, the University brief said.
The UBC representatives, after
presenting the brief to the AUCE
negotiators, put forward the University's criticisms of the seven-step
classification plan proposed by the
union, and a clarification of the University's alternative nine-point system.
They then asked the union to
reconsider the offer made by UBC last
Saturday, which provided for the nine-
level restructuring and a 7-per-cent or
$70-a-month increase retroactive to
Oct. 1, with a further increase on Jan.
1 to bring the totals to 10 per cent or
$100 a month.
The union negotiators rejected this
offer. However, they indicated that
they might be willing to take back to
their membership the University's
earlier proposal, originally made on
Oct. 3 and resubmitted Dec. 2, a proposal which had been twice rejected by
the union.
The University's negotiating committee asked for clarification from the
union of the relationship between the
University's earlier wage proposal and
the remaining non-wage items. The
union indicated they did not wish to
discuss the other issues.
University representatives then indicated they were available at any time
if the union wished to contact them for
further discussions.
premium of less than 30 cents an hour,
and an even larger proportion of overnight workers receive a differential of
less than 50 cents an hour.
6. Overtime for Shift Workers
The basic disagreement here is
over where to add the differential
should a shift worker work overtime.
The University has agreed to pay
double time for all overtime (it now
pays time-and-a-half for two hours,
and then double time) and contends
that a shift-worker on overtime should
receive twice the hourly day rate for the
job, with the differential of either 33
cents or 50 cents an hour added after
this calculation.
AUCE wants the differential added
first, and then the total hourly pay
doubled in the case of overtime.
Under the union proposal, an overnight worker on a job for which the
standard rate is, say, $5 an hour would
receive $11.20 an hour for all overtime -
the day rate plus differential, doubled.
Under the UBC proposal, that
person would receive $10.50 an hour -
double the day rate, plus the 50-cent-
an-hour differential.
The University contends that
AUCE, in effect, wants a premium on a
premium, claiming that the "inconvenience differential" is an hourly differential that should not be altered
according to the number of hours
worked.
7. Expanded Sick-Leave Provisions
AUCE members at UBC now
receive three weeks' sick leave a year,
based on 1.25 working days for each
month of service, at full pay. This is
cumulative up to 152 days of full-pay
sick leave.
AUCE wants the following entitlement on sick leave:
One week at full pay for any
employee with less than three months
of service, including probationary and
temporary employees;
Four weeks at full pay, plus 12
weeks at 75 per cent pay, plus 10
weeks at 60 per cent pay for any
employee with three months of service
but less than one year of service;
Twelve weeks at full pay, plus four
weeks at 75 per cent, plus 10 weeks at
60 per cent for any employee with one
year of service but less than five years.
For employees with five years of
service or more, AUCE wants 26 weeks
of full-pay sick leave.
The University contends that sick
leave benefits now in force are better
than those received by most employees
in B.C., but says it is prepared to
study alternative plans in detail, with
an undertaking to begin such a study
within 30 days of contract-signing and
to complete it within 90 days.
8. Time Off for Moving
AUCE wants one day off with full
pay for any employee changing his or
her place of residence, for the purpose
of moving the household.
The University contends that such
a request is valid only when an employee is transferred by an employer to
a different city. What the two proposals mean in dollars
JOB CLASSIFICATION
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Planning office gets new head
Dr. William Tetlow has been named
director of UBC's Office of Institutional
Analysis and P anning, formerly the
Office of Academic Planning.
The appointment of Dr. Tetlow,
former associate director of the academic planning office, was approved
by the UBC Board of Governors on
Dec. 2.
Prof. Michael Shaw, UBC's vice-
president of University development,
said the appointment and change of
name for the former Office of Academic
Planning are part of a reorganization of
institutional functions announced in
September.
The functions of the Office of
Institutional Planning and Analysis
have been co-ordinated with the president's office, under Prof. Shaw's direction.
Prof. Shaw said the change of
name reflects the office's primary func
tion of gathering appropriate statistical
information about UBC for the benefit
of the University community in relation
to policy-making.
He said the functions of the office
would be integrated with other developmental functions to provide analytical support to the administration, the
Senate budget committee and the Board
of Governors.
The emphasis will be on fiscal
analysis, information systems, and
compilation of information on the University's short- and long-term needs for
new academic buildings and other
facilities. Another task will be providing
data required by the Universities
Council.
Turn-of-the-century shocker at UBC
The play that shocked the audiences of 1900 will be presented next
week at UBC with a fresh look.
Henrik Ibsen's A Doll's House has
been chosen by director Mary Kathleen
Ziems as her M.F.A. thesis production.
The issues which Ibsen aroused in A
Doll's House are still unresolved today,
and  this  production   tries  to   provide
some new answers to the problems of
marriage.
The play will run from Wednesday,
Dec. 17, to Saturday, Dec. 20 in the
Dorothy Somerset Studio with Camille
Mitchell as Nora and Douglas Mc-
Callum as her husband Torvald. Tickets
are available in Room 207, Frederic
Wood Theatre, or call 228-2678. THIS WEEK
AT UBC
FRIDAY, DEC. 12
1:00 p.m.        OPHTHALMOLOGY RESEARCH MEETING.     Dr. T.E. Ogden,  Department of Physiology, University of Southern California, speaks on The
Electroretinogram   following   Peripheral   Retinal   Ablation   in   Diabetic
Patients and Normal Monkeys. 2550 Willow Street.
SUNDAY, DEC. 14
3:15 p.m.       ICE   HOCKEY.    UBC   Jayvees   versus
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
the   University   of   Portland.
MONDAY, DEC. 15
10:30 a.m. FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES thesis presentation. Mr. Atul-
chandra Gokhale will be examined on Wetwood in Black Cottonwood:
The Effects of Microaerobic Conditions on the Development of Decay
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Forestry. Room 241, General
Services Administration Building. Faculty and graduate students
welcome.
8:00 p.m. IMMUNOLOGY SEMINAR PROGRAM. Dr. Rod Langman, research
associate, Jonas Salk Institute, La Jolla, Calif., on A New Concept of
Immune Regulation. Salon D, Faculty Club.
TUESDAY, DEC. 16
10:00 a.m. FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES thesis presentation. Mr. Donald
Alper will be examined on From Rule to Ruin: The Conservative Party
of British Columbia, 1928-1954 for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in
Political Science. Conference room, General Services Administration
Building.  Faculty and graduate students welcome.
3:30 p.m. FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES thesis presentation. Mr. Peter
Morrod will be examined on Protein Chemistry of Acetylcholinesterase
for the Doctor of Philosophy degree in Chemistry. Room 225,
Chemistry Building.  Faculty and graduate students welcome.
4:00 p.m. BIOCHEMICAL DISCUSSION GROUP. Dr. Rod Langman, Salk Institute, La Jolla, Calif., on Biochemical Approaches to Cellular Interactions in the Immune System. Lecture Hall 5, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre.
9:30 p.m. UBC PUBLIC AFFAIRS, presented by the Centre for Continuing
Education. This week's program is on The Trident Submarine - An
Escalation of the Arms Race? Host Gerald Savory and guests Dr.
Michael Wallace, of UBC's political science department; Prof. Mary
Kaufman, Hampshire College, Mass.; and Robert Aldridge, an author
and defence policy critic.    Channel 10, Vancouver Cablevision.
THURSDAY, DEC. 18
2:30 p.m. FACULTY OF COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Policy
Analysis Seminar. Dr. T.R. Robinson, assistant deputy minister,
policy research and long-range planning department, Canada Health
and Welfare, on a General Framework for Evaluation of Social Security
Policy.    Penthouse, Henry Angus Building.
9:30 p.m. BEYOND THE MEMORY OF MAN, a series of half-hour television
programs presented by the Centre for Continuing Education. This
week's program, the last in the fall term, is on Cologne as a medieval
city by Dr. Edward Mornin of UBC's German department. Channel 10,
Vancouver Cablevision.
FRIDAY, DEC. 19
8:30 p.m. BASKETBALL. UBC versus a Dogwood Senior A team. War Memorial
Gymnasium.
SATURDAY, DEC. 20
8:30 p.m.        BASKETBALL.    UBC versus a Dogwood Senior A team. War Memorial
Gymnasium.
Monday deadline
for briefs to Board
Monday is the deadline for submission of briefs for the special open
meeting of UBC's Board of Governors
on Jan. 15.
The open meeting will be held in
the Board and Senate Room of the
Main Mall North Administration
Building from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m.
Thirty copies of each brief, which
should be as concise as possible,
should be sent to Mrs. Nina Robinson,
clerk to the Board of Governors, in the
president's office. Each person submitting a brief may speak to it for five
minutes at the Jan. 15 meeting.
Tickets for admission can be reserved by calling Mrs. Sheila Stevenson
in the president's office,  Local  2127.
The giant sequoia tree in front of
UBC's Main Library will be all lit up
for Christmas tonight.
The tree, nearly 100 feet in height,
will be decorated with almost 1,500
colored lights in 17 strings.
This year, however, the 35-bulb
star that normally tops the tree will be
absent.
Physical Plant area supervisor Bob
Black said the star will be absent
because the California redwood is still
growing and it's feared the star will
damage the tree's growing tip.
After all the bulbs have been
screwed in, the strings of lights are
hauled up by sash cords and fixed in
place by Physical Plant workmen who
climb up the branches of the tree.
Santa comes to International
House on Sunday, Dec. 14 to join
UBC's students and their families at
the Christmas party to be held from 2
to 5 p.m. All students, their families
and their children are welcome.
Habitat theme
for TV series
Human settlements and the results
of urbanization is the theme for the
spring term of "UBC Public Affairs," a
half-hour television series presented by
the Centre for Continuing Education on
Channel 10, Vancouver Cablevision.
The series focusses on current
international and national public
issues. The theme for the fall term
programs, the last of which will be
seen Dec. 16 at 9:30 p.m., has been
The New Economic Order. Gerald
Savory from Continuing Education
hosts the programs.
The spring series will begin Thursday, Jan. 22 at 10 p.m. and will run
every second Thursday until the beginning of April.

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