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UBC Reports Oct 25, 1978

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 SPECIAL C0LLLC1 iW<4
Four named
to top
UBC posts
UBC's Board of Governors has ap
proved the appointments of three new
department heads and a director of
the  School  of Rehabilitation  Medi
The new head of the Department of
Linguistics in the Faculty of Arts is
Prof. Frank W. Heny, a Rhodesian-
born expert on African languages who
is currently head of the Department of
General Linguistics at the University
of Groningen in Holland. He will take
up his post at UBC on July 1, 1979.
The other appointments, all in the
Faculty of Medicine, are:
• Dr. Victor Gomel as head of the
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology ;
• Dr. Peter R. Grantham, a Vancouver physician, who becomes head
of the recently created Department of
Family Practice; and
• Prof. Tali I. Conine, of the Indiana School of Medicine at Indiana
University in Indianapolis, as director
of the School of Rehabilitation
Medicine.
Prof. Heny, the new head of
linguistics, was educated in England,
where he received his bachelor's
degree in philosophy from the University of Leeds, and the United States,
where he was awarded the degree of
Doctor of Philosophy in linguistics by
the University of California at Los
Angeles. He also holds a postgraduate
certificate in education from the
University of London.
Before joining the University of
Groningen in 1976, Prof. Heny taught
and did research at the Universities of
California and Massachusetts and was
a visiting professor at universities in
Belgium and Holland. He has done
extensive research on African
languages and in the field of semantics, the scientific study of the meanings, and the development of meanings, of words.
Dr. Victor Gomel, who took up his
appointment as head of Obstetrics
and Gynaecology on Sept. 1, received
degrees in science' and medicine at the
University of Istanbul in Turkey,
where he was born. He came to
Canada in 1958 and has been a
member of the UBC medical school
since 1967.
Dr. Gomel has an international
reputation for microsurgery for female
infertility.
Dr. Peter Grantham, new head of
the recently created family practice
department in Medicine, received
degrees in arts and medicine from
UBC, and has been a practising family
physician in Vancouver since 1959. He
will take up his appointment on Nov.
1.
Dr. Grantham has been associated
with UBC's medical school since 1974
as a clinical instructor and assistant
professor. His special interests lie in
the fields of sports medicine and nutrition. He is also a well known rugby
player who has competed internationally for Canada.
The new department, which is supported by an annual grant of $40,000
from the Pacific Command of the
Royal Canadian Legion, will place
emphasis on training doctors for family practice, especially in rural areas.
Prof. Tali Conine, who will take up
her appointment as head of UBC's
School of Rehabilitation Medicine on
July 1, 1979, has been associated with
Indiana University's school of
medicine since 1966, where she has
served as co-ordinator of the graduate
physical therapy program, head of
graduate allied health sciences education and professor of physical therapy.
She has also served abroad as director of rehabilitation services at Pahlavi
Please torn to Page 2
See APPOINTMENTS
fit
Volume 24, Number 15. Oct. 25, 1978. Published by Information Services, University of
B.C., 2075 Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. VST 1W5, 228-3Ul. Jim Banham and
Judith Walker, editors. ISSN 0497-2929. J
rts
9
a
a
PS
6
UBC's University Singers, shown performing at Oct. 10
memorial service for the late Dr. Walter Gage, will get a
trophy and cash prize of $1,000 for placing first in the
mixed voices category of a national choral competition
sponsored by the Canadian  Broadcasting Corporation.
The UBC singers, who have been under the direction of
associate professor of music James Fankhauser for the past
two years, were the unanimous choice of the judges in the
contest. The group is now under the direction of associate
professor of music James Schell, shown conducting above.
Conference Centre has a good year
1978 was a very good year for UBC's
Conference Centre.
The centre, which utilizes campus
residences and academic facilities for
summertime meetings, made
$256,000 in 1978 - $70,000 more
than was expected — and $53,600
more than last year.
Housing director Michael Davis said
a net contribution of $185,000 had
been anticipated from 1978 Conference Centre operations, "but we increased revenue by $30,000 and
reduced costs by $40,000 through
more efficient use of labor."
Bed nights in campus residences
during the 1978 conference season
totalled 63,000, up from 61,000 in
1977 but still short of the record
68,000 bed nights in 1976, when the
UN Habitat Conference used campus
facilities. That year, the Conference
Centre made $305,000.
Revenue from the operation of the
Conference Centre is used to subsidize
the housing budget and keep down
the rents paid by students living in
campus residences during the winter
session.
"This year, it is our intention to use
the unexpected surplus for residence
improvements," Mr. Davis said.
"Three residence areas are bringing
forth lists of items they would like
money spent on — things like reading
lamps and increased shelving and
storage space. Each area will get
$20,000 and the remaining $10,000
will be spent on housekeeping equipment •id an increased marketing effort for our conference operation."
The largest single conference held
at UBC in 1978 was the American
Society for Engineering Education,
which registered 1,600 delegates. Next
came the Commonwealth Universities
Conference in late August with 600
delegates.
Mr. Davis said the number of
Japanese school children who come to
UBC in the summer for English -
language training was cut by one-
third this year owing to a strike that
affected Northwest Orient Airlines.
He said he expected another increase in 1979 convention business
based on bookings already made.
The biggest conferences booked to
date are the Canadian Federation of
Biological Societies, with about 1,000
delegates, and the International
Federation of Women's Field Hockey
Associations, with about 850
delegates. Other meetings include the
1979   convention   of  the   B.C.   New
Democratic Party, the annual conference of the Canadian Children and
Youth Drama Association, a national
conference on high energy physics and
nuclear structure, and meetings of the
Congress of the Americanists, the
B.C. Government Employees Union,
the Chemical Institute of Canada, the
Canadian Association of Physicists,
the Canadian Museum Association
and the B.C. Recreation Association.
Mr. Davis said the housing office is
hoping the new UBC Aquatic Centre
will be "a big plus" in attracting conferences to the campus. "The two
pools, in combination with tennis
courts, the nearby golf course and
other sports facilities form a recreation
complex which is a big selling factor
downtown hotels can't offer," he said.
Building site poses problem
UBC and the provincial government are continuing to have problems
deciding on a site for a Public Service
Building to house a new fire hall and a
detachment of the RCMP.
A site for the new building has been
under discussion since 1970, when
UBC's Board of Governors allocated
five acres at the corner of Wesbrook
Mall and 16th Avenue for the building.
In September of this year the provincial government proposed that a
parcel of land in Acadia Camp
bounded by Agronomy Road, Pearkes
Road and Fairview Road be designated as a site for the building.
UBC feels, however, that this site is
unsuitable because of the proximity of
day care facilities, the potential inconvenience to Acadia Camp residents
that would be caused by the noise and
other activities associated with the fire
hall and police station, and the fact
that the main point of entry to nearby
Wesbrook Mall by vehicles leaving the
building would be close to a busy corner.
The question of a site for a new
public service building is becoming
more urgent because a new fire truck
equipped with a 100-foot aerial ladder
is now on order. The new truck can't
be accommodated in the existing fire
hall on the West Mall.
At its meeting on Oct. 3, UBC's
Board of Governors approved a motion authorizing the administration to
advise the provincial government that
UBC could not accede to the request
to approve the Acadia Camp site. The
same motion authorized the administration to continue negotiations
designed to reach agreement on a site
for the building.
ayjMWi«#^ia«»
^^P^^fHI UBC reports
page 2
Dean George S. Beagrie
APPOINTMENTS
Continued from Page 1
University in Iran and as chief advisor
of the World Health Organization to
the government of Japan for the
rehabilitation of the handicapped.
Prof. Conine is a graduate of New
York University, where she was awarded the degrees of Bachelor of Science
in physical therapy and Master of Arts
in administration, and Indiana
University, where she received the
degree of Doctor of Health Sciences.
Earlier this year, UBC's Board of
Governors approved the appointment
of Prof. L. Martin Wedepohl as dean
of UBC's Faculty of Applied Science,
effective July 1, 1979.
Prof. Wedepohl, who is currently
completing his final year of a five-year
term as dean of engineering at the
University of Manitoba, was head of
the engineering department at the
University of Manchester's Institute of
Science and Technology, where he
taught from 1964 to 1974.
The new dean of UBC's Faculty of
Dentistry, Dr. George S. Beagrie, took
up his post on July 1 after 10 years as
head of the division of clinical sciences
in the University of Toronto's dental
school. He was also chairman of the
graduate department of dentistry at
Toronto from 1974 on.
A native of Scotland, Dr. Beagrie
studied dentistry in Edinburgh and
received his doctorate from the
University of Edinburgh in 1966.
He has served as president of the
Royal College of Dentists of Canada
and the International Association of
Dental Research.
The new director of UBC's School
of Physical Education and Recreation
mm
Dr. W. Robert Morford
is Dr. W. Robert Morford, who headed UBC's 1956 graduating class for the
degree of Bachelor of Physical Education. He also holds a master's degree
from UBC and in 1963 received the
Doctor of Education degree in education psychology from the University of
California at Berkeley.
From 1971 until his UBC appointment, Dr. Morford was director of the
School of Physical and Health Education at the University of Washington
in Seattle.
Two new department heads took up
their appointments on July 1.
Prof. Ben Moyls, a UBC faculty
member since 1947, became head of
the Department of Mathematics.
He was awarded the Governor-
General's gold medal when he
graduated from UBC in 1940 with the
degree of Bachelor of Arts. He also
holds a master's degree from UBC and
was awarded his Ph.D. by Harvard in
1947. He is considered one of UBC's
finest teachers and in 1974 shared the
Master Teacher Award.
Prof. Philip G. Hill, the new head
of the Department of Mechanical
Engineering in the Faculty of Applied
Science, is a native of Vancouver who
studied engineering at Queen's
University, where he received the
degree of Bachelor of Science in 1953.
He also studied at the University of
Birmingham, in England, and
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, where he received his Ph.D. in
1958.
An expert in the field of power
generation, Prof. Hill heads a team of
UBC scientists who are doing research
in the field of nuclear-reactor safety
and disposal of wastes from power-
producing nuclear reactors.
UBC commerce faculty see
UBC students go to polls on Jan. 16
Students will go to the polls Jan. 16
to elect two members of the Board of
Governors and 17 members of Senate,
the two main governing bodies of the
University.
Election dates as well as a series of
rules and procedures for running the
elections were approved by UBC's
Senate at its meeting on Oct. 11.
Nominations for the Board and
Senate positions close on Dec. 20.
Students unable to vote on Jan. 16 will
be able to vote in an advance poll
from 5 to 7 p.m. on Jan. 15.
The regulations approved bv Senate
bar students from voting by proxy and
require them to present their AMS
card to polling station attendants as
proof of identity. The results of the
elections will not be announced until
at least 48 hours after the close of
balloting and won't be considered official until released in writing by
Registrar   J.E.A.    Parnall,    who    is
responsible for the conduct of all elections to the Board and Senate.
Students in UBC's Faculty of Arts
will be able to major in two subjects in
future instead of just one.
A Faculty of Arts proposal to institute a double major program was
approved at the Oct. 11 meeting of
Senate on the recommendation of its
curriculum committee.
At present, students entering their
third year in arts are required to enter
either a single major program requiring a measure of specialization or an
honors program requiring intensive
work in one subject or field.
Senate was told that "students are
constantly asking about a double major" program. The new course will
have more academic content than the
existing single major program and
would "make an excellent background
for students preparing to teach in high
schools."
What does business expect of
business schools and their graduates?
Thirty-eight senior business, labor
and government leaders from B.C.
and Eastern Canada will have a
chance to air their views, indeed even
influence the direction of study programs, beginning this fall in UBC's
Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration.
The purpose of the advisory council, which will hold its first meeting at
UBC on Nov. 7, is to brief the commerce faculty on how better to serve
the changing needs of organizations
and management.
Formed through the efforts of commerce dean Peter Lusztig, and with
the encouragement of President
Douglas Kenny, the group is unusual
in that it has representatives of labor
and government among its members.
Senator Ed Lawson of the Teamsters
and J.J. Munro of the International
Woodworkers of America represent
labor, while deputy federal transport
minister Sylvain Cloutier will bring
government's point of view to the
council.
Dean Lusztig points out that more
and more commerce graduates are going to work for not-for-profit
organizations, making it natural to
have labor and government voices on
such a council.
"Governments at all levels, unions,
hospitals — even universities — are
now looking for the skills which were
once thought to be only of interest to
business," says Dean Lusztig.
"And such employers are offering
attractive career paths to the graduate
who may be looking for a chance to
apply his or her knowledge in a direction which holds strong personal interest for a student."
UBC's Dean's Advisory Council,
which reads like a partial list of who's
who in Canadian business circles, includes the following representatives
from Western Canada: W.L. Sauder,
president of Sauder Industries Ltd.,
Vancouver; R.G. Bentall, president of
Dominion Construction Ltd., Vancouver; D.G. McConachie, director,
Lupton Agencies Ltd., Kelowna;
Trevor Pilley, president, Bank of
British Columbia; Edwin C. Phillips,
president, Westcoast Transmission
Co. Ltd.; P.J.G. Bentley, president,
Canadian Forest Products, Vancouver; J.W. Poole, president, Daon
Development Corp.; R.T. Eyton,
president, Pacific Western Airlines;
J.B. Buchanan, president, B.C.
Packers Ltd., Richmond; T.G. Rust,
president, Crown Zellerbach Canada
Ltd., Vancouver; Gerald M.
McGavin, president, Yorkshire Trust,
Vancouver; and George L. O'Leary,
president, Scott Paper Ltd., Vancouver.
The council will meet twice a year
and is expected to provide UBC's commerce faculty with support, advice
and criticism if necessary, about its
programs and courses.
"It will bring the experience of a lot
of eminent individuals to our doorstep," says Dean Lusztig. "We expect
that they will give us some useful
counsel not only about our undergraduate and regular graduate programs, but also about our non-credit
offerings which reached some 9,000
No swords will be beaten into
plowshares as a direct result of the
United Nations special session on
disarmament, but the talks accomplished more than the pessimists
expected, says W. Harriet Critchley of
UBC's Institute of International Relations.
Dr. Critchley was a member of the
Canadian delegation to the
149-nation conference at the UN last
spring. A specialist in strategic
studies, she was one of five academics
acting in an advisory capacity to the
delegation.
Although she said it was really too
early yet to tell what effects the talks
will have, she was in no doubt that
they made a positive, if modest, contribution to world disarmament.
The special session had three major
goals: to get agreement on a roster of
issues for future arms control negotiations; to set some long-term disarmament goals and determine long-term
strategy; and to work out ways of improving the international machinery
to deliberate and negotiate and make
it more representative.
"No one expected that any arms
would be smashed as a result of this
session," said Dr. Critchley. "We were
there primarily to prepare a list, not
negotiate, and that's what we did."
However, Dr. Critchley said that
the effect of the resulting document
remains to be seen. "If it acts as an impetus for future negotiations, then it
will have been a success."
The basis for the talks was a document prepared by representatives of
55 nations who worked for a year
before the session to draw up a list of
issues for discussion. After six weeks of
talks, and a very inauspicious beginning, the session wound up with a
final document outlining areas for
negotiation on which all countries
could agree.
But  it was  touch  and go in  the
Pessimism be<
beginning, said Dr. Critchley. "For
the first four weeks it looked as if we
were getting nowhere. There was a lot
of pessimism that we would never
reach agreement. It wasn't until the
last week when working committees
went into session around the clock that
progress really began to be made."
Whether or not the formal agreement itself contributes to disarmament, Dr. Critchley said the actual
process of drawing it up would prove
valuable to delegates to future arms
talks.
"It was a very good education for
nations which had not previously been
involved in arms negotiations," she
said. "Many of the delegates went
away with a more sophisticated appreciation that can only help them
play a more effective role in future.
It's easy to collect rhetorical brownie
points by making sweeping statements
about disarmament, but when it
comes to the actual negotiations, it
isn't that simple.
"It would be hard to find a Canadian who would disagree that disarmament and peace are important for
the whole world, but all nations are
not the same. In some countries, other
priorities — like food, or freedom —
are more important and sometimes
even antithetical to peace. But you
don't know that until you talk to
them. If nothing else, the session vindicated the merit of the UN as an international forum."
Dr. Critchley said the non-aligned
states had had a great effect on the
preparatory document, emphasizing
nuclear control and disarmament.
"Canada is also concerned about
nuclear issues, but we wanted to talk
about  conventional  arms  and  arms UBC reports
pageS
ks views of business leaders
Dean Peter Lusztig
students last year, and with the part-
time evening MBA program.
"There has been criticism from
some spokesmen in industry that
universities are not fulfilling the needs
of the industrial community," Dean
Lusztig observes. "This council is an
indication that universities are concerned with what employers want. We
see it playing a valuable role in reacting to and in criticizing our plans and
directions. It will also give us a chance
to tell our story as well.
"Above all, it will give the faculty
and students a continuing liaison with
industry which should ensure that the
quality of our graduates and our
research programs are relevant to the
changing needs of employers."
Dean Lusztig's view of the ideal
commerce graduate is "one who leaves
the university with both a well-
rounded education and some sought-
after technical skills.
"Critics of schools of management
or administrative studies seldom agree
on what they want," he says. "The
pendulum seems to swing back and
forth between a demand for highly
specialized graduates and those with a
broader education.
"I think one of the reasons we've
been successful at UBC with our graduates is because we also have other
strong departments and faculties on
campus, such as, for example, computer science, economics and psychology. Our better undergraduates take
30 to 40 per cent of their course load
outside of commerce.
"Students oriented toward administration leave UBC with a pretty good
idea of what's going on in the world
and have developed the capacity for
critical analysis. Their educational
background, including some emphasis
on arts or science, also qualifies them
for generalist roles that business, labor
and government organizations are
favoring today."
A graduate of UBC, Dean Lusztig,
48, obtained his MBA at the University of Western Ontario and did graduate work at Stanford where he received his Ph.D. in 1965. He has been
on the UBC faculty since 1957 and was
named dean of the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration a
year ago.
:omes optimism
transfers as well. Of the $400 billion
the world spends on military items
each year, 80 per cent is spent for conventional military purposes.
"It became evident during the session that a lot of people were saying:
'Your armaments are dangerous to
world peace, therefore you should
disarm, but our armaments are
necessary for our security and self
defence; they are not as dangerous to
world peace and therefore should not
be included in the deliberations.'
"We don't have that many people in
Canada that we can afford to erect
barriers, with government mistrusting
academics and vice versa," Dr.
Critchley said. "We haven't that great
pool of expertise and it behooves us to
use all the resources we have. That's
why I was so pleased to see the government invite academics. We all took it
very seriously and looked upon it as an
opportunity to contribute our expertise and perspective."
The Canadian policy on disarmament which resulted from the collaboration is one of suffocation of the
arms race by slowing the technologically-induced momentum of arms
research and production. At the
special session, Prime Minister
Trudeau outlined four specific steps
this country would like to see taken: a
comprehensive nuclear test ban; a ban
on flight testing of strategic delivery
vehicles; a ban on the production of
fissionable materials for weapons purposes, and greater efforts to find ways
of decreasing defence budgets.
Dr. Cntchley said that although this
and other concepts require further examination and discussion, the special
session showed what can be accomplished in a world-wide delibera
tion on extremely sensitive and complex issues.
Dr. Critchley numbered herself
among the novices at the session. "It
was an educational experience for
me," she said. "I've studied this, and
taught it, but never actually had an
opportunity to witness the process
before."
She said she spent most of her time
as an observer of the working committee on nuclear war proliferation. Her
working day began about 8:30 a.m.
with a reading of material from the
previous day's meetings, followed on
alternate days by a meeting of the entire Canadian delegation to pool information and discuss strategy. Then
delegates adjourned to their small
working groups. "Depending on what
the committee was doing, it could be
10 or 11 at night before we broke for
supper," she said.
Dr. Critchley said she found the experience fascinating, "especially
watching politics at work and seeing
how agreements are reached. It isn't
what comes out in the formal speeches
and documents, but what happens in
the corridors and meeting rooms. I
knew that, of course, but I had never
actually witnessed it."
She said the Canadian government
took the session very seriously. "A lot
of time was spent preparing for it
(Canada was one of the 55 countries
involved in drafting the preparatory
document), and an impressive team
was assembled."
She was also pleased that the
government had included academics
in policy-making decisions. Prior to
the special session. Dr. Critchley and
eight other academics were called in
by the federal department of external
affairs to advise on the Canadian position on disarmament. The invitation
to join the delegation in New York was
a result of the success of this consulta-
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UBC football coach Frank Smith adopts characteristic hands-on-knees
pose as he watches action from sidelines at Thunderbird Stadium.
'Birds meet University of Alberta Golden Bears at 2 p.m. Saturday
(Oct. 28) at the UBC stadium in final game of the regular schedule.
Victory for the 'Birds would give them first place and home field advantage in the single-game final of the Western Intercollegiate Football
League on Nov. 4.
New booklet being distributed
All UBC faculty and staff will soon
be receiving a copy of Information
UBC, a 66-page booklet that provides
an introduction to the University's
three primary functions — teaching,
research and public service.
UBC's president, Dr. Douglas
Kenny, said the decision to prepare a
publication resulted from suggestions
by graduates, faculty, visitors and
friends of the University who have
been impressed with the wide range of
campus activities.
"In addition to describing how the
University's curriculum is continuously changing and recent innovations in
teaching programs, the publication
focuses on the work of faculty
members and students in the important areas of research and community
service," the president said.
"It's important that not only outsiders, but also faculty and staff get a
chance to read the booklet," the president said. "It provides a glimpse into
the total University effort which many
people do not have a chance to get.
"No single publication," he added,"can hope to describe exhaustively the variety of work and services that
make UBC a year-round centre of
day-and-night activity. Information
UBC is designed to be representative
of campus effort and to remind the
reader that UBC is committed to high
standards of teaching, research and
community service."
The publication will be distributed
off campus to high schools, government officials and a variety of B.C.
organizations.
Bad News 'Birds play in Japan
The Bad News Birds - UBC's
women's ice hockey team — left Vancouver Sunday (Oct. 22) to take part
in an invitational hockey tournament
with three Japanese women's teams.
The Thunderettes will spend 13
days in Japan, with all expenses paid
by the Japanese department store
Isetan, which is sponsoring the tournament. The Japanese firm is trying to
develop interest and increase participation in its employee hockey teams.
"We're completely in the dark as to
what to expect from the women's
teams over there," said Jim McMillan,
coach of the UBC team. "The style of
hockey is much the same, but we may
have the edge on skating."
"The women have been training
very hard and they're very excited
about the trip," said Marilyn Pomfret,
director of women's athletics. "It's a
once-in-a-lifetime   opportunity.
Women's teams — in fact, even men's
teams — just don't get expenses-paid
trips. It's an inspiration to the hockey
players, and also to those in other
sports, and it's an indication that
women's sports have reached a new
level of interest."
The UBC women's hockey team was
started last year, and plays in the
Lower Mainland Women's Ice Hockey
League under Canadian Amateur
Hockey Association rules adapted for
women's hockey.
Members of the team are: Diane
Abbott, Kathleen Bentley Corbett,
Elaine Bernard, Barbara Bradbury,
Donna Buna, Brenda Donas, Diane
Howe, Kim Hudson, Heather Lacey,
Darcy Lazzarine, Yvonne Magnusson,
Betty March, Carol Nissila, Anne
Stevens, Christine Tenisci, Louise
Tenisci, Lorie Turner and manager
Adrianne Szasz. alendar
,m?;&®mmm
UBC CALENDAR DEADLINES
Events of the week of
Nov. 5-U Deadline is 5 p.m. Oct. 26
Nov. 12-18 Deadline is 5 p.m. Nov. 2
Nov. 19-25 Deadline is 5 p.m. Nov. 9
Send notices to Information Services, Main Mall North Administration
Building, Campus. Further information is available at 228-3131.
THE VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
SATURDAY, OCT. 28
Hon. Samuel Freedman, chief justice of Manitoba, on Challenges to
the Rule of Law.
SATURDAY, NOV. 4
Prof. Allen Gates, chairman. Music Department of Clark College, and
Mrs. Yoko Gates, on Japanese Music, Traditional and Modern.
Both lectures in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources
Centre at 8:15 p.m.
SUNDAY, OCT. 29
3:00 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY presents a Survey
of Northwest Coast Indian Baskets by Andrea Laforet,
extension curator, B.C. Provincial Museum. Museum of
Anthropology, 6393 Northwest Marine Dr.
7:00 p.m. SUBFILMS. Sorcerer, starring Roy Scheider. Admission
$1.00 with Library/AMS card. SUB Theatre.
8:00 p.m. HEWITT BOSTOCK MEMORIAL FUND Concert by
the Pro Arte String Quartet. Music of Schoenberg and
Ravel. Recital Hall, Music Building.
MONDAY, OCT. 30
9:30 a.m. URBAN LAND ECONOMICS RESEARCH
SEMINAR. Prcf. Peter Chinloy, Economics, UBC, on
Self-Selection and Demand for Housing. Penthouse,
Angus Building.
12 noon DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY LECTURE. Dr.
William B. Seaman, professor and chairman, Department of Radiology, College of Physicians and Surgeons of
Columbia University, New York, on Unusual Diseases of
the Colon: Colitis Cystica Profunda, etc. Film Library,
Heather Pavilion X-Ray Department, VGH.
12:30 p.m. BURGESS/LANE MEMORIAL LECTURE. Drs.
Jorgen Randers and Lars Lonnstedt, resource policy
group, Oslo, Norway, on Transition Strategies for the
Scandinavian Forest Sector. Room 166, MacMillan.
12:40 p.m.    Dr. Dennis Selder, San Diego State University, on Belief
Systems. Room 211, War Memorial Gymnasium.
2:30 p.m.   CHEMISTRY SEMINAR.   Prof.   R.S.   Ramakrishna,
head, Department of Chemistry, University of Sri Lanka,
Colombo,    on    Oxometal    Ions:    Co-ordination    and
Analysis. Room 225, Chemistry Building.
3:30 p.m.   COMPUTING CENTRE LECTURE. First in a series
of six lectures on Basic FMT by Tina Duke, Computing
Centre, UBC, Room 447, Computer Sciences Bldg.
COMPUTING CENTRE LECTURE. First in a series
of six lectures on Advanced MTS Commands and Files
by Tony Buckland, Computing Centre, UBC. Room 443,
Computer Sciences Building.
3:45 p.m.   MANAGEMENT   SCIENCE   SEMINAR.   Prof.   R.
Restrepo, Mathematics, UBC, on Careers and Hierarchies in a Closed Model for Employment. Room 328,
Angus Building.
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Dr. F.
Campbell, A.E.C.B., Ottawa, on Search and Recovery
of the COSMOS 954 Debris. Room 1215, Civil and
Mechanical Engineering Building.
4:00 p.m. ASTRONOMY SEMINAR. Dr. G.A.H. Walker,
Geophysics and Astronomy, UBC, on The Nature of Interstellar Grains. Room 318, Hennings Building.
BIOCHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Pierre Talbot, Bio
chemistry, UBC, on Fibronectins. Lecture Hall 3, IRC.
TUESDAY, OCT. 31
12:30 p.m.   COMPARATIVE   LITERATURE   LECTURE.   Dr.
Anna Foldes, Budapest, on Contemporary Hungarian
Writers. Room 2225, Buchanan Building.
CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS. Third in a
series of four Habitat lectures with the general title A
Tale of Four Cities: Strategic Urbanization in Europe's
Leading Industrialized Countries, by Dr. Harry
Anthony, School of Environmental Design, California
State Polytechnic University, Pomona, and currently 1978
scholar-in-residence at the UBC Centre for Human Settlements. Today's lecture is Stockholm: Revitalizing Its
Downtown Function and Form. Room 102, Lasserre.
BOTANY SEMINAR. Fisher Scientific Co. Ltd. sponsors the film 28 Grams of Prevention. Room 3219,
Biological Sciences Building.
TUESDAY, OCT. 31 (Continued)
1:30 p.m.   ELECTRICAL    ENGINEERING    SEMINAR.    Dt.
T.W. Calvert, SFU, on Engineering in Studies of
Human Performance. Room 402, Electrical Engineering
Building.
3:30 p.m. OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. M. LeBlanc,
Oceanography and Zoology, UBC, on The Effects of
Heavy Metals on Phytoplankton. Room 1465, Biological
Sciences Building.
4:00 p.m. DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY LECTURE. Dr.
William B. Seaman on Dermato-Radiologic Syndrome:
Upper G.I. Tract, Pharynx, Esophagus, and Stomach;
Small Bowel and Colon. Film Library, Heather Pavilion,
VGH.
CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION. First
of five lecture-discussions on An Introduction to the
Psychology of Aging by Dr. Gloria Gutman, Psychology,
UBC. Room D308, Shaughnessy Hospital. Call 228-2181,
local 270, for further information.
4:30 p.m. MATHEMATICS EDUCATION COLLOQUIUM.
Dr. Hassler Whitney, Institute of Advanced Study,
Princeton, N.J., on Children and School Mathematics.
Room 201, Scarfe Building.
CHEMISTRY RESEARCH CONFERENCE. C.
Moser, Centre Europeen De Calcul Atomique et
Moleculaire, Orsay, France, on Scientific Program of
CECAM in 1979. Room 250, Chemistry Building.
6:00 p.m. GENETICS SEMINAR. C. McNichoI and G. Moore on
The Role of Histone HI in Chromatin. Room 5460,
Biological Sciences Building.
7:00 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY.Mini film series
with general title What is Anthropology? A Visual
View. Three films in the field of archeology will be
shown: Early Stone Tools, To Know the Hurons and
On the Track of the Bog People. Admission $2; $1 for
members, students and seniors. 6393 Northwest Marine
Drive.
8:00'p.m. LA TRAGICOMEDIA DE CALISTO Y MELIBEA
(La Celestina) presented by El Circulo and Hispanic and
Italian Studies. Metro Theatre, 1370 Southwest Marine
Drive. There will also be a performance on Wednesday,
Nov. 1 at 8 p.m..
8:30 p.m. UBC PUBLIC AFFAIRS presented by the Centre for
Continuing Education. Guest speaker is Dr. John
Chapman, Geography, UBC, on Exporting British Columbia's Water Resources? Host, Gerald Savory. Channel 10, Vancouver Cablevision.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 1
12 noon        CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION. Dr.
Michael Ovenden, Geophysics and Astronomy, UBC, on
Modern Myths. Robson Square Theatre, corner of Robson and Hornby Sts. in downtown Vancouver.
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Alexander
Jakubovic, Kinsmen Laboratory of Neurological Research, Psychiatry, UBC, on Narcotic Analgesics: Effect
on Testicular Metabolism. Room 114, Block C, Medical
Sciences Building.
DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY LECTURE. Dr.
William B. Seaman on Problems in C.T. Scanning of
the Pancreas. Film Library, Heather Pavilion, VGH.
12:30 p.m. NOON-HOUR CONCERT. Yossi Peleg, violin; and
Judith Peleg, piano, perform Music of Tartini, Ravel
and Schumann. Recital Hall, Music Building.
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES SEMINAR. Dr.
R.E. Cousell, professor of pharmacology and medicinal
chemistry, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann
Arbor, on Azasterols in the Regulation of Cholesterol
and Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis. Lecture ftall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
12:35 p.m.   WOMEN STUDENTS' OFFICE FREESEE film series
with general title Romantic Versus Classic Art. Today's
film is Jean-August Dominique Ingres. Admission free.
Student Union Building Theatre.
1:00 p.m.   DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE SEMINAR. Dr. L.
Kirby, Department of Pathology, Children's Hospital, on
Cu*™ Uptake and Meakes Disease. Seminar Room, Centre for Developmental Medicine, 811 W. 10th Ave.
3:30 p.m.   CHEMICAL    ENGINEERING   SEMINAR.    D.
Sheraton on Quantum Yields in the Photolytic Oxidation of Methyl Mercaptan, Dimethyl Sulphide, and
DMDS.   (Photochemical  Aerosol   Production.)   Room
206, Chemical Engineering Building.
ECONOMICS SEMINAR. Phil Neher on Democratic
and Autocratic Cake Eating. Room 351, Brock Hall.
4:30 p.m.    ANIMAL  RESOURCE   ECOLOGY SEMINAR.   Dr.
D.W.   Schindler,   project   leader,   Experimental   Limnology, Freshwater Institute, Winnipeg, on Whole Lake
Experiments  to  Test   Lake   Management  Strategies.
Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
FINAL ORAL EXAMINATIONS FOR THE
DEGREES OF DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY AND
DOCTOR OF EDUCATION
Listed below are scheduled final oral examinations for the degrees of
Doctor of Philosophy and Doctor of Education at the University. Unless
otherwise noted, all examinations are held in the Faculty of Graduate
Studies Examination Room on the second floor of the General Services
Administration Building. Members of the University community are
encouraged to attend the examinations, provided they do not arrive
after the examination has commenced.
Friday, Oct. 27, 3:30 p.m., Room 225, Chemistry Building: ROBERT
H.  MORRIS,  Chemistry; Sulfoxide Complexes of Rhodium and
Iridium, Including their Potential Use as Asymmetric Hydrogena-
tion Catalysts.
Monday, Oct. 30, 3:30 p.m., Room 225, Chemistry Building: PHILIP
WATSON, Chemistry; The Structures of Clean Rhodium Surfaces
Studied by Low-Energy Electron Diffraction.
Tuesday,  Oct.  31,   10:00 a.m.:  LAMBERT  LOH,   Microbiology;
Multiple Interactions Between Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV)
and Mouse Lymphoid Cells m Vitro.
Wednesday, Nov. 8, 9:30 a.m.: SANDRA LYNN BUCKINGHAM,
Zoology; Functional Responses and Feeding Strategies of Fresh-
Water Filter-Feeding Zooplankton.
REMEMBRANCE DAY
Members of the University community are asked to note that UBC will
be closed on Monday, Nov. 13, in observance of Remembrance Day,
which this year falls on the Saturday preceding the closure. The
University's traditional Remembrance Day ceremony will, however,
take place on Saturday, Nov. 11, in the War Memorial Gymnasium at
10:45 a.m. The Main Library and all branch libraries will be closed
Monday, Nov. 13. On Remembrance Day, Nov. 11, all libraries will be
closed except the Law Library which will be open from 9 a.m. to 5
p.m.
TELEPHONE REPAIR SERVICE
University telephone users are asked to call 228-2101 between 8:00 a.m.
and 4:30 p.m. Monday through Friday if they experience problems
with campus phones. B.C. Telephone repairmen are located on the
campus and will respond more quickly than would be the case if users
dialed 114, the trouble number listed in the B.C. Tel directory. B.C.
Tel will repair emergency telephones only outside the above hours.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 1 (Continued)
4:30 p.m. ZOOLOGY/PHYSIOLOGY SEMINAR with Dr.
Norbert Heisler, Max-Planck Institute for Experimental
Medicine, Gottingen, Germany. Room 2449, Biological
Sciences Building.
6:30 p.m. DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY LECTURE in conjunction with the B.C. Radiological Society. Dr. William B.
Seaman on Current Concepts in Diseases of the
Esophagus. Holiday Inn.
8:00 p.m. E.S. WOODWARD ECONOMICS LECTURE. Dr.
Victor Fuchs, professor of economics and medicine, Stanford University, with the first of two lectures on
Economics, Health, and Post-Industrial Society. Room
102, Buchanan Building.
THURSDAY, NOV. 2
9:00 a.m. MEDICAL GRAND ROUNDS. Dr. HJ. Burhenne,
professor and head. Department of Radiology, VGH, on
What the Internist Should Know About G.I.
Radiology. Lecture Hall B, Faculty of Medicine
Building, 700 W. 10th Ave.
10:30 a.m. MARKETING WORKSHOP SEMINAR. Dr. James
D. Forbes, Commerce, UBC, on A Comparative Study of
Auto Parts Pricing: U.S. vs. Canadian Experience.
Penthouse, Angus Building.
12:10 p.m. CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION.
Fourth in a series of five talks with the general title Men
Talk About Feminism. David Hart, lawyer, on Living
With Equality: Who Wears the Pants? Women's
Resources Centre, 1144 Robson St. Information
228-2181, local 218.
12:30 p.m. WOMEN'S STUDIES LECTURE. Dr. Anna Foldes,
editor of a Hungarian women's journal, Budapest, on
The Status of Women in Eastern Europe. Room 205,
Buchanan Building.
E.S. WOODWARD ECONOMICS LECTURE. Dr.
Victor Fuchs with the second of two lectures on
Economics, Health, and Post-Industrial Society. Room
102, Buchanan Building.
UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE, conducted by
Martin Berinbaum, performs Music of Wagner, Govan-
nini, Rodger, Strauss and Dahl. Recital Hall, Music.
2:30 p.m. CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR. Jerry Torrance,
IBM, San Jose, on Overview of Organic Metals and Insulators. Room 318, Hennings Building.
3:30 p.m. APPLIED MATHEMATICS SEMINAR. Prof. James
M. Varah, Computer Sciences, UBC, on Stability
Restrictions on Second Order, Three Level Finite Difference Schemes for Parabolic Equations. Room 203,
Mathematics Building.
4:00 p.m. DIAGNOSTIC RADIOLOGY LECTURE. Dr.
William B. Seaman on Normal Variants and Other Examples of Non-Disease of the G.I. Tract. Film Library,
Heather Pavilion, VGH.
PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM. PC. W. Davies, King's Col
lege, London, on Order and Disorder in the Universe.
Room 201, Hennings Building.
7:00 p.m. SUBFILMS. Slap Shot starring Paul Newman. Subfilms
are shown at 7 p.m. Thursday and Sunday and at 7 and 9
p.m. Friday and Saturday. Admission $1 with
Library/AMS card. Student Union Building Theatre.
7:30 p.m.   CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION. First
lecture-discussion in a series of six with the general title
New Approaches to Lifestyle Change. Dr. John Milsum
speaks on Health and Wholeness. Room G53 and G55,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. $35; enrolment limited. Information 228-2181. local 218.
8:00 p.m. CENTRE FOR CONTINUING EDUCATION
presents Dr. Gay Luce, psychologist, in a lecture-
discussion on Life Changes: Aging and Youth. Lecture
Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. $4;
students $3. Information 228-2181, local 261.
UNIVERSITY WIND ENSEMBLE, conducted by
Martin Berinbaum, performs Music of Wagner, Govan-
nini, Rodgers, Strauss and Dahl. Recital Hall, Music.
FRIDAY, NOV. 3
9:00 a.m. SCIENCE SPECTRUM on Energy and the Environment opens with keynote address by Dr. E. Linn Draper,
director of the Nuclear Reactor Laboratory at the University of Texas, who speaks on Global Energy Perspectives.
Keynote address only in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. All other sessions of Science
Spectrum will be held in the Neville Scarfe Building for
education. Continues on Saturday, Nov. 4, from 9 a.m.
For registration and program information, call Robert
Carlisle, 228-5056.
PEDIATRICS GRAND ROUNDS. Dr. Margaret
Johnston and Dr. J.A. Carruthers, Medicine, UBC, on
Zinc and the Skin in Infancy and Childhood. Lecture
Hall A, VGH.
12:30 p.m. UNIVERSITY CHAMBER SINGERS, directed by
Cortland Hultberg, perform Music of Debussy. Recital
Hall, Music Building.
1:00 p.m. MEDICAL GENETICS SEMINAR. Dr. H.F. Stich on
Environmental Carcinogenesis: Overview. 4th floor
conference room, Health Centre for Children, 715 W.
12th Ave.
3:30 p.m. SOIL SCIENCE SEMINAR. Dr. R.M. Strang, Plant
Science and Forestry, UBC, on Research and Rangeland
Resources in British Columbia. Room 154, MacMillan.
COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM with Dr.
Michael Fischer, Computer Science, University of
Washington, Seattle. Room 301, Computer Sciences.
LINGUISTICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr. Edward Matte,
French, UBC, on Nasalization in Gallo-Romance.
Room 2225, Buchanan Building.
7:30 p.m. ICE HOCKEY. UBC Thunderbirds open their open
season against the University of Calgary. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre.
8:00 p.m. UKRAINIAN STUDIES SEMINAR. Dr. John-Paul
Himka, University of Alberta, on Western Ukraine on
the Eve of the First Emigration. Room 157, Law
Building.
UNIVERSITY CHAMBER SINGERS, directed by
Cortland Hultberg, perform Music of Debussy. Recital
Hall, Music Building.
8:30 p.m. BASKETBALL. UBC Thunderbirds vs. UBC Alumni.
War Memorial Gymnasium.
SATURDAY, NOV. 4
7:30 p.m. ICE HOCKEY. UBC Thunderbirds vs. the University of
Calgary. Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre.
8:30 p.m. BASKETBALL. UBC Thunderbirds vs. Dogwood Senior
A team. War Memorial Gymnasium.

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