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UBC Reports Nov 3, 1976

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Array SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
Initiatives on women get response
UBC cleans and other
administrators have responded to the
initiatives taken in February by
President Douglas Kenny to improve
conditions for women throughout the
University community.
Here's what has happened to date:
• The salaries of 29 women faculty
members have been adjusted to give
them parity with their male
counterparts.
This was done on the
recommendation of a president's ad
hoc committee on salary differentials
for faculty men and women,
co-chaired by Prof. Margaret Prang,
head of the History department, and
Dr. James Richards, of the
Department of Food Science. Its
recommendations were acted on by
UBC's Board of Governors in July.
• The deans of UBC's 12 faculties
have responded to a memo from
President Kenny requesting
information on a variety of matters
affecting women.
He asked about special programs of
advice on opportunities for graduate
work, assistance for women graduates
in obtaining employment, and the
incidence of women in the fields of
study of each faculty and how this is
taken into account in admissions and
hiring policy.
• UBC's Office of Student Services,
which provides academic, career and
personal counselling for students, has
produced a booklet in which women
graduates from faculties with mainly
male enrolment describe their
experiences as students and in the
professional world.
Student Services is also continuing
its program of high school counselling
which emphasizes the possibility of
study and careers in areas traditionally
considered closed to women.
• The four major unions on campus
have agreed to participate in
UBC-union study committees on the
employment of women in
non-academic positions.
The unions which have agreed to
participate are the Association of
University and College Employees, the
Registered Nurses Association of B.C.,
the Canadian Union of Public
Employees and the Office and
Technical Employees Union.
Each committee, to be made up of
UBC and union representatives, will
identify and investigate policies and
practices that affect the participation
of women in the work of the
University, including those which may
be seen to discriminate against women.
The committees have been asked to
Please turn to Page Two
see INITIATIVES
reports
Vol. 22, No. 38, Nov. 3, 1976. Published by Information Services, University of B.C., 2075
Wesbrook Mall, Vancouver, B.C. V6T 1W5. Judith Walker, editor. ISSN 0497-2929.
Display of North American Indian
artifacts from the National Museum in
Ottawa, on loan to UBC's Museum of
Anthropology until Dec. 31, is
enhanced by tape recordings that can
be heard in both English and French
over telephones. Anthropology
student Daphne Hlopffgarten found a
comfortable spot to listen under an
antler-and-feather headdress of the
Eastern Sioux.
Wilderness
park choice
of UEL forum
All or most of the 1,750
undeveloped  acres  of  the University
Endowment     Lands     should    be
preserved as a wilderness park.
And there should be no further
expansion of the UBC campus beyond
its present boundaries into the
undeveloped portion of the lands.
These were the two main
recommendations that emerged from a
public forum held at UBC last
Wednesday (Oct. 27) under the
sponsorship of the UEL Special
Planning Project established by the
provincial government in July.
The UEL study team is developing
recommendations for integrated land
use and planning that will assist the
provincial government in making
decisions for the future use of the
lands.
Last Wednesday's public forum,
attended by about 500 people, opened
with a slide presentation by members
of the study team, who reviewed the
data collected and described various
features of the lands.
Those attending the forum were
then divided into 20 study groups
which met for an hour to consider
seven questions raised by the study
team.
Each study group was asked for
opinions on such matters as whether
the remaining lands should be
preserved in their present wilderness
state or developed for community
recreation purposes, UBC development
and future relationship to the UEL,
and the future administration and
political status of the lands.
The chairman of each of the study
groups gave a two-minute summary
report of the discussions.
The    majority    of    the    chairmen
Please turn to Page Three
See LANDS INITIATIVES
Continued from Page One
report to the University administration
on any discriminatory practices so that
policies may be amended or
redeveloped.
The committees have also been
asked to identify policies and practices
which tend to support the equality of
treatment of women in their
relationship with the University for
development of a UBC policy
statement.
Prof. Erich Vogt, UBC's
vice-president for faculty and student
affairs, said he was pleased with the
positive way in which deans and other
administrative heads had responded to
President Kenny's initiatives.
He added: "However, it would be
overly optimistic for anyone to expect
that many of the problems in this area
can be corrected overnight.
"I am very hopeful that the steps
taken by the president's office will be
fruitful and make a contribution to
improving conditions for women,
whether they be faculty, students or
employees of the University."
Prof. Vogt said the memos from the
deans are currently being reviewed by
the president's office.
"It is certainly our intention to
move quickly to implement
suggestions made by the deans in
response to the president's memo and
to correct any problems brought to
light by the UBC-union committees,"
he said^
The Student Services booklet,
entitled Tinker, Tailor, Soldier,
Sailor..., was produced over the
summer by Cheryl Brown, one of the
counsellors in the office.
Five thousand copies of the booklet
were distributed to all B.C. secondary
schools, where they have been very
well received, said Dick Shirran,
director of Student Services.
"The purpose of the publication,"
Ms. Brown told UBC Reports, "is to
develop an awareness among women
of the career opportunities that exist
for them. We couldn't include
graduates from every faculty and
school in the University, so we settled
on   those   in  which  women  last year
constituted   less  than   one-quarter   of
the total enrolment."
Women graduates of five faculties
and one school — Applied Science,
Commerce and Business
Administration, Dentistry, Forestry,
Medicine and Architecture — tell of
their  experiences   as students and  in
Cheryl Brown
SUDDEN DEATH
The UBC Thunderbirds football
team will meet the University of
Saskatchewan Saturday (Nov. 6) in a
sudden-death final for the
championship of the Western Canadian
Intercollegiate Athletic Union. Game
time is 1 p.m. at Thunderbird
Stadium.
the music box
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 10
12:30 p.m.     NOON-HOUR CONCERT.  Bruce Clausen, guitar, and Cathy Cernauskas,
flute,  play  Music of Giuliani, Castelnuovo-Tedesco and  Loeillet. Recital
Hall, Music Building.
FRIDAY, NOV. 12
12:30 p.m.     LECTURE-RECITAL.  Clement   Ezegbe on   Nigerian Music.  Recital   Hall,
Music Building.
SATURDAY, NOV. 13
8:00 p.m. CONCERT with guest artists Judith Forst, mezzo-soprano, and Harold
Brown, piano. Music of Handel, Vaughan Williams and Grieg. Recital Hall,
Music Building.
business and industry in the 31-page
booklet.
The essays by each graduate are
followed by short statements by UBC
deans or senior faculty members and
senior personnel in business and
industry about opportunities for
women in each career area.
Ms. Brown said the students chosen
to write a 500-word essay about their
careers were all "very agreeable about
co-operating in the project."
She said her experiences as a
counsellor at UBC led her to believe
that many women lack basic
information about careers. "The
booklet is designed to clear up a lot of
misinformation that students have
picked up," she said.
She cited a recent discussion with a
woman student who displayed many
skills that would be useful in
engineering. "She was taken aback
when I suggested she consider a career
in engineering," Ms. Brown said,
"because she was under the impression
that an engineer was someone who
tinkered with cars. She thought her
friends would laugh at her for taking
up engineering and that she'd have a
hard time getting a job."
Ms. Brown said putting the booklet
together was an education for her. "I
got an insight into many occupations
in talking to the women who
contributed to the booklet. I think it
made me a better counsellor."
Another recent Student Services
innovation is a series of 35 cassette
tapes made by faculty members on
career opportunities in a variety of
fields, including transportation,
pharmacy, urban land economics,
audiology and speech science,
engineering physics, industrial
relations and finance.
Student Services has set up a special
listening room where students can hear
the tapes.
Correction
In the Oct. 20 edition of UBC
Reports, we incorrectly reported
the wording of a motion passed
at the Oct. 13 meeting of
Senate.
One of five motions related
to examination policies provides
for December and April
examinations for alt courses
designed for first- and
second-year students unless
exemption is granted by the
relevant "dean and department
head," for sound academic
reason.
The UBC Reports article
incorrectly used the phrase
"dean or department head."
2/UBC Reports/Nov. 3, 1976 Crane noise
levels will
be reduced
UBC's Crane Library for the blind
has received a bequest and a grant
which will be used to purchase special
recording booths to reduce the many
acoustic problems that plague the
library in Brock Hall.
A bequest of $2,000 has been made
to the library under the will of the late
John H. Crane, the brother of Charles
Crane, after whom the library is
named. John Crane died on Feb. 2 this
year.
A grant of $2,000 has been made to
the library by the Hamber Foundation
of Vancouver.
Paul Thiele, head of the Crane
Library, said the soundproof recording
booths to be purchased with the funds
would help to overcome noise
problems encountered during the
recording of textbooks and other
materials for the use of blind students
at UBC and elsewhere.
He said the chief sources of noise
are low-flying aircraft and signals from
the UBC Ham Radio Club, which
occupies quarters in the same building.
He said John Crane was a long-time
friend of the Crane Library. He visited
the facility annually and made other
financial gifts to the library during his
lifetime.
Charles Crane was deaf and blind
from the age of nine months. He
nevertheless learned to read and talk
and collected the world's largest
private library of Braille volumes.
Dr. David Robitaille and Dr. Ted Aoki
Two at UBC aid assessments
Two members of UBC's Faculty of
Education are playing a major role in a
province-wide learning assessment
program that will have a significant
impact on elementary and secondary
school curricula and indicate
directions for teacher education and
professional development.
Dr. David Robitaille, a mathematics
specialist, and Dr. Ted Aoki, a social
studies specialist, are currently pilot
testing examinations that will be
administered on a province-wide basis
in the spring of 1977 to more than
100,000 students in Grades 4, 8, and
12.
When the kinks have been ironed
out of the tests, they will be sent to
LANDS
Continued from Page One
reported that those attending the
forum wanted the lands left in their
wilderness state. Some groups favored
minimal development (picnic tables
and rest room facilities) while others
recommended playing fields and other
recreational facilities on the periphery
of the lands.
About two-thirds of the chairmen
reported opposition to the expansion
of the UBC campus onto the lands.
Many groups felt UBC should provide
for greater building density on the
campus or construct new buildings
above campus parking lots.
One group leader said the
proximity of the undeveloped lands to
the campus, "with its cultural and
recreational facilities, the Botanical
Garden and other things, make the
complex of the park and the campus a
much larger total entity than Stanley
Park in size and range of possibilities."
A member of the UEL study team
told UBC Reports that another public
forum was planned in late November
when the team would reveal its
recommendations for the future use of
the lands.
Meanwhile, UBC's ad hoc
Committee on the Future of the
University Endowment Lands,
established by President Douglas
Kenny, is continuing its work on a
report that will serve as the basis for a
submission to the UEL project team.
The committee has been asked to
report to President Kenny by Nov. 15.
Friday (Nov. 5) is the last day for the
submission of briefs to the UBC
committee, which is chaired by Dean
Peter Larkin, of the Faculty of
Graduate Studies.
Briefs should be sent to the
Graduate Studies office in the General
Services Administration Building on
campus.
the provincial Department of
Education for distribution to teachers
throughout the province.
When students have completed the
tests, scoring and other data
compilation will be carried out by B.C.
Research, an applied research
organization that has its headquarters
on the UBC campus.
The data will then be analyzed by
the two Faculty of Education
specialists to determine the
knowledge, skills and attitudes of the
elementary and secondary school
students.
Dr. Robitaille said the mathematics
test would be concerned with
numeracy — the mathematical equivalent of literacy. "We want to know if
the existing curriculum equips
students to handle basic mathematical
concepts and enables them to solve
various kinds of problems."
Dr. Aoki said student knowledge
and performance in the social studies
field would be the focus of the test he
is preparing. "We also want to know
how students view the world they live
in."
Both teams are also conducting
review panels in various B.C. locations
to hear the views of teachers, students,
school trustees and parents on the
existing mathematics and social studies
curricula.
The information resulting from the
assessments will be used by the
Department of Education to develop
curricula at the provincial and local
levels, indicate directions for teacher
education and professional
development, raise questions for
educational research and indicate
priorities for allocation  of  resources.
UBC Reports/Nov. 3, 1976/3 NEXT WEEK AT UBC
Notices must reach InformationServices, Main Mall North Admin. Bldg.,by mail,by 5p.m.Thursday of week preceding publication of notice.
LOST AND FOUND. The campus Lost and Found is located in
Room 208, Student Union Building. Hours are 11 :30 a.m.-1:30
p.m. and 3:00-4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday.
SKATE UBC WINTER SESSION. Commences Saturday, Nov.
20, 1976. Group lessons in basic ice skating, elementary figure
skating, advanced free style, ice dancing, and power skating.
Children and adults put into groups according to skill. Ten-week
session. For further information, call 228-5995, Monday,
Tuesday or Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.
MONDAY, NOV. 8
12:30 p.m. ENGLISH LECTURE. Prof. Balachandra Rajan,
University of Western Ontario, on Milton and
Eliot: A Poetic Acknowledgement. Room 102,
Buchanan Building.
CANCER RESEARCH SEMINAR. Lan Lo, Cancer
Research Centre, UBC, on The Effect of Reducing
Agents on Chemical Mutagenesis. Library, Cancer
Research Centre, Block B, Medical Sciences
Building.
2:00 p.m. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. K. T. Tang, Pacific
Lutheran University, on Inelastic and Reactive
Atom-Molecule Collisions. Room 225, Chemistry
Building.
3:30 p.m. METALLURGY SEMINAR. R. D. Page, Atomic
Energy of Canada Ltd., Ont., on Canadian Heavy
Water Power Reactor Fuel. Room 308, Metallurgy
Building.
3:45 p.m. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. Prof.
L. C. Woods, University of Oxford, England, on
The Art of Physical and Mathematical Modelling.
Room 1215, Civil and Mechanical Engineering
Building.
4:30 p.m. CANCER CONTROL AGENCY SEMINAR. Dr. H.
K. B. Silver, Medicine, UBC, and Cancer Control
Agency, on Multimodality Therapy of Malignant
Melanoma. 2nd floor conference room. Cancer
Control Agency of B.C., 2656 Heather St.
ZOOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. David Smith, Zoology,
UBC, on Frog Lungs and Such. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building.
8:00p.m. FREDERIC WOOD THEATRE PRODUCTION.
The Boys From Syracuse, by Rodgers and Hart,
directed by John Brockington, Theatre, UBC,
continues until Nov. 13. Ticket information:
228-2678. Frederic Wood Theatre.
TUESDAY, NOV. 9
12 noon CANADIAN     CITIZENSHIP     REGISTRATION.
Eligible persons may file applications on campus
for Canadian citizenship through the Secretary of
State's department from noon to 8 p.m. Call
666-3971 or 253-4391 for more information.
International House.
12:30 p.m. BOTANY SEMINAR. Dr. F. J. R. Taylor, Botany,
UBC, on The Origin of the Eukaryotes:
Speculations and Evidence. Room 3219, Biological
Sciences Building.
3:30 p.m. ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM. Dr. P. G. Stanwood,
English, UBC, on Literature and Opera from
Maeterlinck to Auden. Lounge, 5th floor,
Buchanan Tower.
OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. Bill Large,
Oceanography, UBC, on Turbulent Energy
Dissipation in the Atlantic Equatorial
Undercurrent. Room 1465, Biological Sciences
Buildina.
4:30 p.m. CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. Dan Dill, Boston
University, on Effects of Target Orientation on
Photoeleetron Angular Distribution. Room 250,
Chemistry Building.
8:00p.m.    ARCHITECTURE     LECTURE DISCUSSION.
Ronald     J.     Thom,     architect,     Toronto,    on
.   Re-thinking My Architecture: Some Considerations
of the Changing Role of the Architect in Society.
Room 100. Buchanan Building.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 10
12:30 p.m. FINE ARTS LECTURE. Mary Tregear, Ashmolean
Museum, Oxford, England, on Recent
Archaeological Discoveries. Room 102, Lasserre
Building.  ^	
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr. Patrick J. M.
MacLeod, Medical Genetics, UBC, on Recent
Developments in Prenatal Diagnosis. Room 221,
Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
SIGMA XI SEMINAR. Dr. C. S. Holling, Animal
Resource Ecology and Zoology, UBC, on Ecology
and Detente: Canadian Ecology and International
Scientific Politics. Salons A and B, Faculty Club.
2:30 p.m. APPLIED MATHEMATICS SEMINAR. Prof. L. C.
Woods, University of Oxford, England, on Some
General Principles in Physical and Mathematical
Modelling. Room 203, Mathematics Building.
3:30 p.m. CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. S. A.
El-Temtamy, Cairo, Egypt, on Models of Wakes in
Three-Phase Fluidized Beds. Room 206, Chemical
Engineering Building.
4:00 p.m. GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY SEMINAR.
Dr. Ron Clowes, Geophysics and Astronomy, UBC,
on Marine Deep Seismic Soundings off Canada's
West Coast: A Status Report. Room 260,
Geophysics Building.
4:30 p.m. HISTORY COLLOQUIUM. Margaret Andrews,
History, UBC, on Attitudes in Canadian Women's
History, 1945-1975. Penthouse, Buchanan
Building.
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr.
J. H. Myers, Animal Resource Ecology and Plant
Science, UBC, on Biological Control Introductions
as Grandiose Field Experiments: Adaptions of the
Cinnabar Moth to New Surroundings. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building.
THURSDAY. NOV. 11
REMEMBRANCE Day. University closed. All
campus libraries closed except Law Library, which
will be open from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
10:45 a.m. REMEMBRANCE DAY SERVICE. Various
organizations will participate in this annual service
presided over by Rev. Henri C. Taudin-Chabot.
Speaker at the ceremony will be J. Harvey Lynes,
of the Sir Arthur Pearson Association of War
Blinded in Canada. War Memorial Gymnasium.
1:00 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY LECTURE.
Northwest coast artist and craftsman Roy Hanuse,
of the Owikeeno tribe, talks about his work.
Museum of Anthropology. Open 12 noon to 5:00
p.m.
9:00 p.m. BEYOND THE MEMORY OF MAN. Dr. D. Pincus,
Fine Arts, UBC, on Venice and the Relics of St.
Mark. Channel 10, Vancouver Cablevision.
Annual meeting of the CANADIAN SOCIETY ON
GERONTOLOGY opens today in Vancouver and
continues until Nov. 13. Call Dr. Gloria Gutman,
Psychology, 228-41 56, for details.
FRIDAY, NOV. 12
9:00 a.m. PEDIATRICS GRAND ROUNDS. Dr. David S.
Lirenman, Dr. James E. Carter, Dr. Betty J. Wood,
UBC, on Bones, Kidneys and Vitamin D. Lecture
Room B, Heather Pavilion, VGH.
12:30 p.m. KOERNER LECTURE and inaugural event of the
UBC MEDIEVAL WORKSHOP. Dr. Patrick J.
Geary, Princeton University, on Relics and
Pilgrimages in Popular Religion: History or
Anthropology? Room 102, Buchanan Building.
The Medieval Workshop continues Friday
afternoon and all day Saturday, Nov. 13.
Registration and program details are available from
Dr. D. C. Carr, Hispanic and Italian Studies,
228-4054, or Dr. R. W. Unger, History, 228-5162.
3:30 p.m. COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. Prof.
Lance J. Hoffman, University of California, on
Security and Privacy in Computer Systems. Room
326, Angus Building.
FINANCE WORKSHOP. John Cox, Stanford
University, Palo Alto, Calif., on Pricing of
Contingent Claims. Room 325, Angus Building.
SATURDAY, NOV. 13
8:15 p.m. VANCOUVER INSTITUTE LECTURE. Hon. Mr.
Justice W. G. Morrow, Appeal Court, Alberta, on
Law in the North. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre.
4/UBC Reports/Nov. 3, 1976

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