UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Reports Sep 21, 1989

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubcreports-1.0117960.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubcreports-1.0117960.json
JSON-LD: ubcreports-1.0117960-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubcreports-1.0117960-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubcreports-1.0117960-rdf.json
Turtle: ubcreports-1.0117960-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubcreports-1.0117960-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubcreports-1.0117960-source.json
Full Text
ubcreports-1.0117960-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubcreports-1.0117960.ris

Full Text

 UBCdiscovery
may eliminate
diabetics' need
for insulin shot
BY CONNIE FTLLETTI
UBC scientists have discovered an insulin-like substance
which may replace insulin and revolutionize the way diabetics are treated.
Vanadium, a simple, inorganic trace element found throughout the environment, can mimic the effects of insulin or enhance the effect ofthe small amounts of insulin present in
diabetics.
There are approximately one million diabetics in Canada, at least half of
them depend on insulin treatment.
John McNeill, Dean of Pharmaceutical Sciences at UBC, and post-doctoral fellow Dr. Sasanka Ramanadham,
along with Dr. Roger Brownsey and
Dr. Ray Pedersen of UBC's Faculty of-
Medicine and scientists at the University of Montpellier, France, have just
released their most recent studies on
vanadyl in the American Journal of
Physiology. A form of vanadium, vanadyl returned diabetic rats to a normal
state.
"This could mean that a diabetic
would never have to take insulin ever
again. At the very least, it would reduce
the amount they would have to take,"
said McNeill.
' 'Vanadium, in one form or another,
can be a substitute for insulin and could
ies," he stated.
The importance of vanadium in determining the amount of insulin a diabetic receives should not be downplayed.
McNeill explained that too much
insulin causes low blood sugar and
possibly death. Too little insulin leads
to high blood sugar which may produce a variety of serious secondary
effects including kidney disease, heart
problems and cataracts. Vanadyl proved
effective in eliminating these secondary effects present in the rats tested.
McNeill projects that human testing of vanadium is ' 'probably a few
years away."
The research team is continuing its
exploration of how vanadium produces
insulin-like effects and is searching for
other forms of the substance which
may prove even more effective than
vanadyl. \
Their work is being sponsored by
the Canadian Diabetic Association and
by a private contribution from the Agnes
and Alfred Woods Research Fund.
McNeill will present the latest study
on vanadium to an international conference on the cardiac complications of
diabetes in Tokyo next month.
Groups oppose
housing plan
By PAULA MARTIN
A plan by the UBC Real Estate Corpr>
ration to develop market housing on university-owned land has come under criticism from resident and student groups.
The plan calls for Hampton Place,
UBCREC's first project, lo be built on 28
INSIDE
HONORARY DEGREE:
Hungary has givsn an honorary degree to Forestry ■'.'
.- Professor AntaJ Kozak.
; Page 3.
ACCIDENT PRONE: Left
banders are more accident -
pronethan right banders UBC
Psychology Professor
Stanley Coren has found.
Page 6.
GALIANO STUDIED: A
battle over land use on Gali-
ano Island is being studied   '
by Commerce Professor
Kenneth MacCrimmon.
! 7.
QUOTED: "Governmental
wish lists do not result in
discoveries." Nobel Laureate John Polanyl.
acres of campus land at Wesbrook Mall
and West 16th Avenue. It is estimated
that the 790 units of rental and owned
low-rises, townhomes and apartments will
eventually add about 1,600 residents to
the area.
Hampton Place will generate about $3
million in annual income for the university, said UBCREC President Mark
Betteridge. He added that the income will
ensure stable long-term funding for UBC's
capital and endowment programs.
But a spokesman for the West Point
Grey Residents Association says members of her group feel that residents in the
area weren't consulted about the project
"There were a lot of people taken
back by the fact that UBC was going
ahead and doing this without public input," said Cynthia Foreman.
Foreman said although the community - and its parking, traffic, schools and
recreational facilities — will be affected
by the new housing development, quality
of life is not the main issue.
'' I think people are more up in arms
because there was no input," she said,
adding her group would like public hearings on the development.
"The university has followed all of
the legal requirements and more as the
owner of the land," Betteridge said, noting there is no requirement for public
healingS       See GROUPS on Page 2
The University of British Columbi.
Vancouver. British Columbia
Volume 35. Number 16
September 21. 1989
Friendship Celebration Photo *»MaM Sm^
Japanese Prime Minister Toshiki Kaifu strikes die bell at die Pacific Bed Tower near the Asian Centre to celebrate friendship
between Canada and Japan. Kaifu was on a two-day visit to Vancouver.
More students from China
enroled despite Tiananmen
By GAVIN WILSON
Students from the People's Republic
of China are continuing to arrive at UBC
despite predictions their numbers would
dwindle after the massacre at Tiananmen
Square.
According to figures released by International House, about 250 Chinese
students are currently enroled at UBC, up
from 197 students in October of last year
and from 138 in Oct., 1987.
As well, an unknown number of visiting scholars have also arrived. There
were about 100 at UBC last year.
Both students and scholars are receiving permission to leave China despite
increased-security checks and widespread
defections by Chinese nationals living
abroad, including, it is believed, most
students and scholars at UBC at the time
ofthe Beijing massacre.
"I'm quite surprised," saidlrisThomson, acting director of International
House. "I thought we would see a reduction this year just as everyone else did."
' "The assumption that everyone made
was that their numbers would drop off.
But it appears that China has not taken
any steps to restrict students from coming
here," she said.
And the number of Chinese students
could still grow, Thomson added. Students continue to arrive on campus, even
though classes have already started. Nearly
all of UBC's Chinese students are in
graduate studies.
The exact number of visiting scholars
is more difficult to pin down. Invited by
individual departments, "it's impossible
       See CHINESE on Page 2
75th Anniversary
planning in high gear
Faculty, staff and students are gearing
up for the launch of the 75th Anniversary
year in January.
The Alma Mater Society has formed a
working committee, chaired by Eric
Ommundsen, to involve students on the
various 75th Anniversary organizing
committees. Student initiated anniversary activities ranging from kick-off festivities in January to year-long competitions featuring '75' as a central theme are
planned. The Alma Mater Society committee will also facilitate effective communications of 75th Anniversary news
and information to student societies, clubs,
groups and individuals.
Planning for the three major 75th
Anniversary events - Open House in March,
Summer Festival May through August,
and 75th Anniveisary/Homecorning Week
September 27 to October 3, is well under
way.
Jim Richards, Dean of Agricultural
Sciences and Chairman of Open House,
1990, said that all twelve faculties have
appointed Open House Chairs and that
faculty representatives were briefed on
See PLANNING on Page 2
itfW
SSiS
^m»P:^s»ii'>.'C
a^ UBCREPORTS   Sept 21,1969       2
Photo by Media Services
Michael Penny of Parking and Security Services checks one of UBC's new
digital parking meters widt l£D readout that can be hooked up to the new handheld ticket writing system. All meters on campus will be replaced with die digital
meters.
Education network
to meet in Paris
An international information network
on higher education - the Trans Regional
Academic Mobility and Credential Evaluation (TRACE) - will hold its constitutive
assembly in Paris on Oct. 26 and 27.
TRACE has been developed by a
group of experts representing several
national and international organizations
concerned with studies abroad and the
evaluation of foreign academic and pro
fessional credentials.
The information network will provide
access to standardized data on systems
and institutions of higher education, on
study programs, credentials, diplomas and
degrees worldwide.
The Association of Univerisities and
Colleges of Canada is a founding member of TRACE.
Planning for 75th in high gear
Continued from Page 1
Sept. 11. The deadline for Open House
project proposals is September 29,1989.
Norm Watt, Director of Extra-Sessional Studies and chairman of the special
events committee, has recruited a talented group of volunteers who will be
producing an array of unique summer
events including a UBC RECYCLING
FAIR, The President's annual croquet
tournament, Children's Theatre, specialized campus tours and much more.
Ron Longstaffe, Vice-President ofthe
Alumni Association and Chairman of the
75th Anniversary/Homecoming Week,
has worked with Deborah Apps of the
Alumni Association to recruit fourteen
working committees for the planning and
implementation of the birthday week.
Currently, plans include a commemorative edition of the UBC Chronicle, an
expanded Homecoming Parade, a Great
Trek/Arts 20 Relay, Alumni reunions,
and a black tie Gala Great Trekker Dinner.
Bill Webber, Dean of Medicine and
Chairman ofthe 75th Anniversary Campus Projects Committee, has invited faculty members to submit 75th Anniversary project proposals by Sept. 22, 1989.
Dean Webber's Committee will consult with faculty and the campus commu
nity in identifying and initiating 75th
Anniversary projects.
The campus community is encouraged to make use ofthe UBC 75th Anniversary logo on all printed materials. Photo
mechanical transfers ofthe logo are available through Media Services, and UBC
business stationery may be ordered with
the 75th Anniversary logo in place of the
crest.
The 75th Anniversary Souvenir Merchandise Committee, chaired by the Don
Donovan, Merchandise Manager of the
Bookstore, has developed approximately
15 souvenir items.
Chinese are 'duty-bound' to return
Continued from Page 1
to keep track of them," Thomson said.
Samuel Chanson, an associate professor in Computer Science, said that recent
events in China had no effect on the
arrivals of 10 new graduate students and
three visiting scholars in his department.
' 'Yes, I was a bit surprised,'' he said.
' 'I expected no more than half of them to
make it."
Bom Thomson and Chanson said they
have heard reports that Chinese officials
responsible for granting exit visas are
sympathetic to the student-led democracy movement.
A statement released Aug. 28 by the
Chinese Embassy in Ottawa has reaffirmed Beijing's policy of sending students and scholars abroad. It also said
government-sponsored students and
scholars are "duty-bound" to return home
to work for their country when they
complete their studies.
There were 1,214 Chinese students in
B.C. on June 4, and the cases of those who
have applied to stay are now being assessed by Canadian immigration authorities. It is thought that the majority of these
students have applied for permanent residence status in Canada.
# On July 1, 15 Chinese students at
UBC resigned from the Communist Party
of China. In a letter to the Chinese consulate dated to coincide with the anniversary of the party's founding, they said
they could no longer remain party members after the June massacre and the subsequent purges, arrests and propaganda
campaign.
Meanwhile, Raymond Chan, an engi
neering rjrojea team nianagCT at TRIUMF,
has been invited to take part in an international organization dedicated to bringing
democracy to China Chan is the leader of
the Vancouver Society in Support of the
Democratic Movement, which was established shortly after the June 4 massacre.
The meeting has been called to set up
a global body known as the Democratic
Chinese Front, which Chan said will operate
as a political party in exile.
Attending the meeting in Paris on
Sept. 22 are Chinese dissidents, including
several prominent former members of the
Chinese Communist Party, who support
the democracy movement and who fled
the country in the wake of the clampdown.
One of only three people from Canada
invited to attend, Hong Kong-bom Chan
will sit as an observer.
When he returns his local organization will hold a demonstration and 24-
hour fast to coincide with China's National Day starting at 3 p.m., Sept. 30, at
the corner of Main and Terminal.
Teaching in China
creates dilemma
Last June, as the bloody events in
Tiananmen Square unfolded before a
horrified world, Samuel Chanson vowed
he would not return to China as long as it
was ruled by tyrants.
But now, the UBC computer scientist
is not so sure. Would his return be seen as
a tacit approval of the government, or
would his presence aid the intellectuals
who led the democracy movement?
It is a dilemma that is faced by dozens
of faculty members at UBC and thousands of experts and academics around
the world in the confusing aftermath of
the June 4 massacre.
Chanson spent three weeks in May at
universities in Beijing on a United Nations Development Program project, teaching a course on computer communications and advising on research projects.
After the massacre he said: "I feel like
I've been used by the Chinese government. They don't respect or value their
own education system or their own intellectuals. I don't want to go back there
until that has changed."
But now, Chinese academics and students seem to enjoy as unexpected freedom to travel abroad and continue their
studies, and this has given Chanson pause
for thought. In the meantime, the UNDP
has resumed the computer project.
"Not going back is a way of offering
symbolic support for the students and
intellectuals. But on the other hand, if I
were invited by an individual university,
I'm sure they would have considered this.
"It would be a dilemma. I think I'd
have to take every case individually."
Groups consulted,
Gellatly says
Continued from Page 1
Bruce Gellatly, UBC's Vice-President of Administration and Finance, added
that appropriate groups were consulted
throughout the planning stages, including the University Endowment Lands
Ratepayers' Association.
The issue was also considered at an
open meeting of UBC's Board of Governors in the spring of 1988 and impact
studies were made available to the Greater
Vancouver Regional District, he said.
' 'This has not been developed overnight," Gellatly said. "This development has been going on since 1982."
Vanessa Geary, External Affairs
Coordinator for the Alma Mater Society,
said students have their own concerns
about Hampton Place.
"The biggest problem with it as far as
students are concerned is that it does
nothing to address housing problems."
Gellatly said that Hampton Place will
help UBC address those needs.
"We are looking to this project to
make student housing possible, because
it will provide us with capital funds which
we otherwise couldn't get and which will
keep the cost of student housing at affordable rates," he said.
"Clearly it's a legacy for the university which over the next 100 years will
generate an annual cash flow which will
provide UBC with funds for both capital
and endowment purposes."
UBCREC was incorporated by the
university in 1988 as a private company
to carry out real estate developments.
The corporation's Hampton Place
public information trailer at Wesbrook
Mall and West 16th Avenue was damaged by fire on Sept. 12. The blaze is
under investigation by the Fire Commissioner's arson investigator.
Phoco by Media Services
Pat Downey, University EndowmentLands AssistantFirechief, holds debris inside die UBC Real Estate Corp. information trailer
which was damaged by fire earlier this month.
I UBCREPORTS   Sept 21,1989       3
Hungary honors Forestry professor
By JO MOSS
Hungary has bestowed an honorary
degree on UBC Forestry Professor Antal
Kozak and in doing so extended an official olive branch to more than 200
exiled faculty and students who fled
after the short-lived Hungarian revolution 33 years ago.
Kozak received his honorary doctorate from the state-controlled Sopron
University of Forestry and Wood Science, a 180-year old university which
in its time was considered one ofthe
leading forestry schools in Europe.
The degree was awarded in association with a national science congress in Budapest, Aug. 21-26.
He was part of a group which represented almost an entire university that
defected from Hungary and came to
Canada to join the Forestry Faculty at
UBC.
To Kozak, his honorary degree is
the government's way of saying all is
forgiven.
' "They had to reach out to the Sopron group in some way and this was
how they chose to do it," Kozak explained.
In 1956, Kozak was 20 and a third-
year forestry student at the university
when Hungarians rose up against the
Communist government that had been
in power since World War II. He and
other students organized truck convoys to ship supplies of medicine, food,
clothes and blood from Austria to resistance fighters in Budapest, 200 kilometres away.
Kozak escorted one of the last shipments into the beleaguered capital, where
the truck was fired upon several times as
it reached the city.
Two days later, on Nov. 4, after 12
days of fighting, the uprising was quelled
by Soviet troops and an exodus of Sopron
students and faculty slipped over Ihe border
to Austria
"We were scared," said Kozak, adding that most Hungarians knew from the
outset the revolution had little chance of
success. "It was like a mosquito fighting
an elephant."
Hungarians had hoped the western
world would side with their cause, but the
Suez Canal crisis diverted global attention from the small Soviet satellite country to matters of more pressing economic
concern.
Once it was realized almost the entire
Sopron school had escaped to Austria, the
group contacted twenty countries around
the world asking for asylum. Canada's
offer seemed the most suitable and in
19S7, Kozak was one of 200 students and
14 faculty who arrived at UBC to establish the Sopron Division of Forestry.
They fully expected to return to their
homeland within a year or two, but it was
almost ten years before the Hungarian
government declared an amnesty for exiled
nationals. Even then, Kozak says, many
people believed they would be jailed if
they returned.
He graduated with his BSF from UBC
in 1959, and went on to complete a masters and PhD before joining the faculty as
apart-time lecturer in 1963. Colleagues
Photo by Media Services
Forestry Professor Antal Kozak shows off honorary degree awarded by Sopron University in Hungary. He received die silver
medal from die Hungarian national research institute for his contributions to forestry research.
Laszlo Adamovich, Oscar Sziklai and
Laszlo Paszner are also members of the
Sopron group. Kozak is now Associate
Dean of Forestry and Professor of Forest
Resources Management.
One of Kozak's research topics over
the last 25 years has been to investigate
better ways of predicting the quantity and
quality of commercial lumber available
in standing trees. He has developed
mathematical modelling techniques which
can calculate precise diameters and volumes of the logs to be processed from 33
B.C. tree species.
Kozak has just finished refining the
technique for use by the provincial government and developed supporting software programs.
"It's a brand-new technique that's
simpler and faster than others and will
have a wide application," he said.
One of the first countries to benefit
from his research, outside of Canada,
may be Hungary.
Kozak has visited frequently over the
last two decades to see his parents. But his
first official invitation to return home was
when Sopron university asked him to
lecture and undertake research last
year.
The move towards reconciliation
by awarding an honorary degree to a
Sopron group member was a moment
of triumph for the Sopron community
in Canada, still a closely-knit group
with a strong national identity and
patriotic ties.
In addition to the degree, Kozal^
was awarded a medal from the national forestry research institute in
recognition of his contributions to
forest research in Hungary.
United Way goal
set at $195,000,
up 20per cent
By CONNIE F1LLETTI
The goal set for this year's UBC United
Way employee campaign is $195,000, up
20 per cent over last year.
John McNeill, Dean of Pharmaceutical Sciences and chairman ofthe campus
campaign (which kicks off Oct. 1) is
optimistic about meeting that goal.
"We feel that with the kind of campaign we're mounting, people at UBC
will support it. We're trying to personalize the fund raising drive by getting away
from a mail campaign and recruiting more
people to canvass," McNeill said.
Last year, the number of UBC full-
time faculty and staff who contributed to
the campaign jumped to 19percentfrom
13 per cent in 1987. McNeill hopes participation will increase to 25 per cent in
1989.
McNeill is also encouraging each
faculty, department and non-academic
unit on campus to have a representative
canvassing their colleagues.
"It's so easy for people to participate,
both as volunteers and donors, in the
United Way. The option of payroll deduction allows you to give straight from
your paycheque, and you can designate
which organization sponsored by the
United Way you would like your contribution to go to or not to go to. It has to be
one ofthe most flexible and painless ways
of giving," McNeill said.
Increased student participation is also
anticipated this year for the first time in
the 59 year history of UBC's United Way
employee campaign. Students will raise
funds through several special events including sales, contests and by exploiting
interfaculty rivalries.
McNeill, who steps down as chairman after this year's campaign, has received much personal satisfaction from
his involvement with UBC's campaign.
"As a university, we already contribute to the community by training individuals who will enrich the quality of life
Letters to the Editor
Thanks for weekend
for us all. Our campus wide participation
in the United Way employee campaign
furthers our contribution to the community," said McNeill.
Training sessions for canvassers are
available. For more details and information on how to volunteer for this year's
campus campaign, contact Deb Shuna-
mon at 228-3034.
Editor,
As recent winners of the "It's Yours"
contest, we wish to thank you for a most
enjoyable weekend.
We especially enjoyed the quality of
food and friendly staff in the Subway
Cafeteria
It was an opportune time for our son,
Richard, to gain some exposure to UBC
as he plans to attend university in two
years time.
Please extend our thanks to the many
departments involved in planning our
special weekend.
With thanks,
The Tones Family
David, Cathy and Richard
The Studio Package
Women's Studies conference
set for September at UBC
UBC's first major Women's Studies
conference should raise the profile of
feminist research on campus and help
with the push for a degree program in this
area says conference organizer Valerie
Raoul, chair ofthe Faculty of Arts Women's
Studies Committee.
The conference, Gender and the Construction of Culture and Knowledge, is
being held at the Woodward IRC building Sept. 22-24.
Raoul, a professor in the French Department, says UBC is a notable exception when it comes to Women's Studies
because it is the only major Canadian university that doesn't offer a degree option
in this field.
' 'We would like to see a degree program at UBC," Raoul said. "We'd also
like to see a centre to coordinate research
on women which is taking place on
campus."
The conference will bring together
feminist scholars and researchers from
across Canada and the United States,
including 35 scholars from UBC.
The keynote speaker will be feminist
psychologist Alexandra Kaplan from
Boston's Wellesley College, who will
speak on new perspectives on women's
psychological development.
The program will address feminist
issues in art, literature, social policy, anthropology, theology, education and science.
' "The particular interest of this conference is that it is asking the basic question
— what is the influence of gender in both
the type of research which is undertaken
and the type of results that are produced?'"
Raoul said.
Here's an opportunity to capture the
thoughts and ideas of prominent guests
and educators who visit the UBC campus.
Use our television studio to record a thirty-minute"
interview with your visiting scholar or guest lecturer.
Designed for one-on-one interviews, the Studio Package
makes it convenient, affordable and accessible,  rhe price
includes titles, credits and rehearsal time. It's a low cost way
to utilize television and build your own videotape library.
For more information call:
The Production Unit at Media Services, 228-5036 ^•SjUC-.WHLJI ..:««!»■■
UBCREPORTS   Sept 21.1989       4
September 24
October 7
MONDAY, SEPT. 25  j
Centre for Cont Ed.
Lecture/Recital
The Spanish Guitar - Michael Strutt, Lecturer,
UBC. $13.00. For information call 222-5254.
Conference Room, Carr Hail. 8:00 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar
Examples of New Non-Classical Similarity
Reduction. Dr. Peter Clarkson, Dept of Mathematics, U. of Exeter, England. Math 229.3:45
p.m.
Multicultural Liaison Office -
Free Public Forum
Multiculturalism in Canada;Meeting the Challenge. Dr. Jcirm Sarrriiel, Acting Director, Race
Relations, Dept. of Secretary of State; Dr.
Elliot fepper, Carleton University; Dr. Jean
Laponce, UBC. For information call 228-5339/
222-5238. Robson Square Media Centre
Theatre. 7-9 p.m.
Biochemistry and Pharmaceutical
Sciences Seminar
Characterization of the defect In renal phosphate transport in X-linked hyrxohosphaterntc
Ricketts. Dr. H.S. Tenenhouse, Department
of Pediatrics and Biology, McGill University.
For information call 228-5925. Copp Building
2010.3:45 p.m
Mechanical Engineering Seminar
Computational Fluid Dynamics. Dr. Martha
Salcudean, Head, Mech. Eng. For further
iriformatJon can 228-4350. CEME 1204.3:30
pm
tf^^^t m- TUJJJJ»
Plwlo by Media Services
Children play at the new daycare centre on campus, which openedits doors this month. Some parents were surprised to find that
programs are already fully booked
CALENDAR DEADLINES
__...——_—_ ~^TZ—L      For events in the period Oct. 8 to Oct, 21 notices must be submitted on proper Calendar forms no later than noon on Wednes-
TUESDAY, SEPT. 26  1     day.Gct.27tortheCdrnmuznity RelationsOjfice,6328MemriitfRd:;Rd<m207,OMAdmihisfrationB
ititm^mmntmm^^^^i^i^mnm^     information call 228-3131. Notices exceeding 35 words may be edited.
Statistics Seminar
The Problem of Bandwidth Selection in Kernel Density Estimation. Dr. Jean Meloche,
UBC. For information call 228-3167. Ponderosa Annex C, Room 102.4:00 p.m.
Geography Colloquium
The Beaver Wars Revisited - a reinterpreta-
tion of trade and warfare in Eastern Canada
before 1653. Prof. Conrad Heidenreich,
Geography, York University Room 200,
Geography Bktg. 3:30 p.m.
Botany Seminar
Application of biotechnology to reforestation.
Dr. Ben Sutton, B.C. Research. For information call 228-2133. Bio Science Bldg. Room
2000.1230 p.m.
Lectures in Modern Chemistry
Seminars
Looking at Orbrtats in the Laboratory - Chemical Appfcattons of Electron Momentum Spectroscopy. Dr. Chris Brion, Chemistry, UBC.
For more information call 228-3266. Chemistry Bldg Rm. B250. Refreshments at 12:40.
Lecture at MX) p.m..
WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 27
Grad Scholarships Day
NatkxiaOTtoviTicial/UBC Graduate and Post-
IJBC Reports is the faculty and staff
newspaper of the University of
British Columbia. It is published
every second Thursday by the UBC
Community Relations Office, 6328
Memorial Rd, Vancouver, B.C„ V6T
1W5. Telephone 228-3131.
Advertising inquiries: 228-4775.
Do-ector: Margaret Nevin
Editor-in-Chief: Don Whiteley
Editor: Howard FluxgoW
Contributors: Connie Filletti,
Patda Martin, Jo Moss,
and Gavin Wilson.
doctoral Awards. Speakers from the National
and Provincial Granting Agencies and the
Faculty of Grad. Studies. Contact GSS or call
228-0745. Grad Stds. Centre Ballroom. 9:00
a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Forestry Seminar Series
How to use research services, liase with
industry and transfer technology. Dr. Richard
Spratley. Dir Research Services and Dr. James
Murray, Dir. Industrial Uaison. For information
call 228-3544. MacMillan 166.12:30 -1:25
p.m.
Faculty Club 30th Anniversary
Reception for Past and Present Boards of
Directors. Main Dining Room,6-7 p.m. Semi
Formal Gala Dinner (reservations required),
Main Ballroom, 7 p.m. For information / reservations call 228-3291.
Music Noon-Hour Series
Charles Foreman, piano. Tickets $2.00 at the
door. For information caH 228-3113. Music's
Recital Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Grad Student Society
Female Grad Student Support Network. Discussion of Sexual Harassment Issues with
Margaretha Hoek, Asst. to Dir. Women Students. Graduate Centre Garden Room. 12:30
p.m.
Arts Faculty Panel Discussion
A joint presentation by the Theatre and English depts. Hogarth, Stravinsky, Auden and
Hockney, about the forthcoming Vancouver
Opera production of The Rake's Progress,
with Richard Bevis (Engl.), Robert Gardner
(Thtr) and Alison Green (Van Opera).
Committee On Lectures - French
Litterature et anthropologic au XVI le siecle
with Professor Louis Van Delft, U. of Paris,
Nanterre. For information phone 228-4004.
Buchanan D244.12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, SEPT. 28
Faculty Club Annual
General Meeting
For information call 228-2708, Salons A,B
and C. 8:00 p.m.
Office for Women Students
Time Management Serrmar.Ray Edney, Wmn
Students' Off. Free Admission. For information call 228-2415. Room 223 (Women Students' Lounge) Brock Hall. 12:30-2:20 p.m.
Psychiatry Academic Lecture
Corticotropin Releasing Hormone and the
Etiology of Depression. Dr. Jane Garland,
Resident V, Psych UBC. University Hospital,
UBC Site. 8:00 - 9:00 am.
and the Role of Specific Therapy. Drs. B.
Fahkry, M. Bond and D. Lirenman, Peds.
UBC/BCCH. For further information call 875-
2117. G.F. Strong Rehab. Centre Auditorium.
9:00 am.
Grad Student Society Events
In the Fireside Lounge ofthe Grad Centre:
2nd Annual Darts Tournament. 7:30 p.m.
Jazz Duo with Peter Huron. 8:30 p.m. -12:30
am. Everyone welcome. For information call
228-3203.
FRIDAY, SEPT. 29    |
Concert
Classical Wind Ensemble of the Essen Folk-
wang College of Music. Admission free. For
information call 228-3113. Music Bldg. Recital Hall. 8:00 p.m.
Chemical Engineering Seminar
Two-Phase Anaerobic Fermentation of Two
Industrial Wastewaters. Robert Stephenson,
Grad student Chem Eng. For information call
228-3238. Rm. 206 - Chem. Eng. Bldg. 3:30
p.m.
Faculty Club Seafood Festival
Reservations - 228-3803. Main Dining Room.
5:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar
Towards a complete genetic and physical
map of C. elegans. Dr. Shiv Prasad, Med.
Gen., UBC. For information call 228-5311.
Room D308, University Hospital, Shaugnessy
Site. 2:15 p.m.
Pediatrics Case
Management Rounds
Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome - Pathogenesis
MONDAY, OCT. 2    j
Applied Mathematics Seminar
A Singularity Dynamics Picture of Solitary
Wave Interactions. Dr. P.P. Goldstein, Nuclear Theory, Dept. Inst. Nuclear Studies,
Warsaw, Poland.Room 229, Math BWg. 3:45
p.m.
Germanic Studies Lecture
To Be A Woman Writer in Finland with Finnish
author Marta Tikkanen. Bu B-31912:30 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar
Profile Fitting Techniques for Astronomical
Photometry: Theory and Applications. Dr. Peter
Stetson, Dom. Astrophysical Observatory,
Victoria For further information call H. Richer,
228-4314 or 228-2267. Geophysics and Astronomy, Room 260. Coffee from 3:30 p.m.
Lecture at 4:00.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar
Integrating C.A.DiWith Machining Process
Control and Control of Bandsaw Snaking.
Grad students Allan Spence and Bruce
Lehmann, respectively. CEME 1202 3:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT. 3
Oceanography Seminar
Nitrogen Cycling in Shallow Environments.
Dr. Yves Collos, Centre de Recherche en
Eoologie Marine et Aquaculture de I'Houmeau,
France. For further information call Dr. John
Fyfe, 228-3278. BioScience 1465.3:30 p.m.
Classics Club Lecture
What is Epigraphy? Prof. C.P. Jones, Dept of
Classics, U. of Toronto. Buchanan Penthouse.
7:30 p.m.
Faculty Women's Club
First General Meeting for 1989/90 Academic
year. History of Cecil Green Park House and
Signup for Interest Groups. Mrs. Sherwood
Lett and Mrs. Jo Robinson. All women faculty
and faculty wives welcome. (Additional signup Oct. 2 from 7-8 p.m.) Cecil Green Park
House. 9:30 am.
Geography Colloquium
Regional Impacts of Global Climate Change.
Prof. G. Thomas, Geog. UBC. Room 200,
Geog Bldg. 3:30 p.m.
Faculty Club Seminar
Wines Session No.3. Wines of France-Bur-
gundy/Chablis. Darrep Berezowski. Newcomers welcome. For pre-seminar supper reservations call 228-3803. Seminar information
call 228-4693. Faculty Club Music Room.
7:00 - 9:00 p.m.
Statistics Seminar
Testing for Overdispersion with respect to
Exponential Family Models. Dr. Charmaine
Dean, Dept. of Math and Stats. SFU. For
information call 228-2234. Ponderosa Annex
C, Room 102.4:00 p.m.
Botany Seminar
PhenylpropanoW conjugates in plant cell cultures. Dr. Brian Ellis, Head, Plant Science,
UBC. For information call 228-2133. BioS-
ciences 2000.12:30 p.m.
Civil Engineering and
Geophysics Seminar
Dec. 7, ©88 Armenia Earthquake Briefing - 60
min. videotape produced by Earthquake
Engineering Research Institute with footage
of the disaster and a briefing by the U.S.
investigation team. Discussion folllows. For
more information call 228-5406. IRC #5 3:30
p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 4 |
Music Noon-Hour Series
Clement Marquis, guitar. Tickets $2.00 at the
door. For information call 228-3113. Music
Bldg. Recital Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Geophysics Seminar
Role of Atmospheric Feedbacks in Amplifying Greenhouse Gas Forcing of Climate
Change. Dr. G.A. McBean, Atmospheric
Science Programme, Geography, UBC. For
further information call Doug Oldenburg, 228-
5406/2267. Coffee from 3:45 p.m. Geophysics and Astronomy Bldg., Room 260.4:00
p.m.
Creative Writing Lecture
Canadian author W.P. Kinsella reads from his
new collection, The Miss Hobbema Pageant.
For information call 228-3058/2712. Freddie
Wood Theatre, 12:30 p.m.
Classics/President's Lecture
Greek Drama and The Exposure of Children.
Prof. C.P. Jones, Classics Dept U. of Toronto.
For information caH 228-2889. Buchanan BWg.
A-102,12:30 p.m.
Regent College - Special Lecture
What Do You Do When? Contemporary
Mennonite Christians in the Soviet Union. Dr.
John B. Toews, Prof. Church History, Regent
College. For information call 224-3245. Main
floor Auditorium, Regent College. 11:00-12:00
noon
THURSDAY, OCT. 5   |
Biotechnology Lab and Gairdner
Foundation Seminar
T cell receptor diversity and selection in vivo.
Dr. Mark Davis, Assoc. Investigator, Howard
Hughes Medical Institute. For information call
228-5433. IRC Lecture Hall #5.4:00 p.m.
See CALENDAR oh Page 5
y^'ij.i THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Annual Report of the
Multicultural Liaison
Office, 1988-89
The Multicultural Liaison Office was established in July 1988.
Its Director reports to the Vice-
President Academic. In initiating the office, a prime objective
was to seek out ways in which
the University could reach out
to those sectors of the community who have traditionally experienced the institution as inaccessible and insensitive to
their needs. If we were to be
truly committed to the achievement of excellence in teaching,
research and service, it seemed
important that we draw on as
wide a range of community resources as possible.
Such contact would also sensitize us to the newer needs of a
multicultural society and stimulate appropriate responses toward an improved societal integration of all population segments. A new institutional attitude may lead us to take proactive stances on crucial issues
facing a multi-ethnic university.
To aspire in this direction, this
office focused on the following
areas:
1. Establishing contact with
different sectors of the community.
2. Identifying faculty research
and teaching interests pertinent
to ethnic relations. New community-faculty liaison could emanate from these efforts.
3. Contacting major funding
agencies to identify priorities and
areas of mutual interest.
1. Contact with Community
As one approach toward
community outreach and achieving our goal to stimulate public
discussion on issues related to
ethnic relations in our society,
the Multicultural Liaison Office
plans a series of public education fora to be held in the Fall of
I989. Themes for the first three
sessions are:
Sept. 25,1989 Intergroup
Relations in a Multi-Ethnic State
Oct. 24,1989 Effec
tive Teaching and Parenting in
a Multicultural Society
Nov. 14,1989 The Role of
the Media in Race Relations
The aim of these sessions is
to seek out authoritative sources
to address the concerns of a
multicultural society. To ensure
collaborative planning of these
sessions, the Multicultural Liaison Office established an Ad-
Hoc Consultative Committee of
some 30 individuals reflecting a
range of involvement with ethnic relations. Members were
drawn from both the wider community as well as the faculty.
The meetings also served to
inform the community representatives of the directions currently
being pursued at UBC and to
call for recommendations in
areas where we might more appropriately address community
needs.
Throughout the year, contacts were developed through:
i) our initiative;
ii) responding to invitations
to address meetings;
iii) membership in community-related bodies, such as the
Race Relations Advisory Committee to the Vancouver School
Board;
iv) through requests for media presentations.
Among these were:
Association of Multicultural
Societies (AMSSA) "Minority
Participation in the Workplace",
Robson Media Centre, October
15,1988.
CKVU, an hour-long call-in
radio program on Immigration,
January 6,1989.
Knowledge Network, televised interview on "The Ethnic
Community: Persistence and
Change", April 3,1989.
Canadian Association of Physicians with an interest in South
Asia. Address on "South Asians
in the Canadian Mosaic", Vancouver, May 13, 1989.
National Ecumenical Chaplains Conference, "Fragmentation and Pluralism: Developing
Strategies for the Campus
Ministry in the 90's", University
of Victoria. Address on "Issues
for Campus ministries in a mul-
ticultural-multifaith university
community", University of Victoria, May 27,1989.
Attendance at community-
sponsored cultural events, often in conjunction with locally-
based Consulates has provided
a valuable source of contact
with people from different backgrounds in the city.
Adaptation to the changing
character of a campus and a
society requires the willing participation of many key players.
Existing structures and practices need to be analysed and
plans developed for improving
future direction.
The type of changes preferred
are those which would be carefully considered and integrated
into existing units and practices
wherever possible.
Much of the first year's development of the office was spent
contacting individual faculty
members with a profile in the
ethno-cultural areas, some department heads, Deans and
Program Directors, the Registrar, and the Director of the
Museum of Anthropology. Most
persons consulted were supportive.
Given the fact that the MLO is
a one-person operation with a
divergent range of expectations
and demands, not all faculty
who have something to contribute have been contacted. This
process will be ongoing.
Collaborative beginnings were
established especially with the
Centre for Continuing Education, the Women Students'
Centre, Research Administration, and some faculty members in the Asian Studies Department as well as in the Anthropology and Sociology Department.
2. Faculty-Student Liaison
Discussions with the President of the Alma Mater
Society, the Ombudsperson,
and a range of students who
have shown leadership in one
form or another have been
valuable in identifying both the
positive as well as the tension
producing areas of student life
on campus.
Together with the support
of the Vice-President, Student
Services, we plan an informal
seminar to pursue these
issues further and identify
areas requiring action.
3. Contact with Funding
Agencies. We established
good contacts with both the regional office of the Secretary of
State as well as the Ottawa
office. In conjunction with the
Office of Research Administration and the Faculty of Arts'
Ethnic Studies Committee, we
invited the Senior Research
Officer of the regional Secretary
of State's Office to address interested faculty on available research funding. Some 30 individuals attended a lunch time
meeting.
4. Faculty-Community
Linkages.
There have been several requests from the community for
academic support in programming for their needs. Among
these:
i. Vancouver School Board
member on the Race Relations
Advisory Committee sought cooperation of the Faculty of Education in discussions regarding
the updating of credentials for
new Canadians with teaching
qualifications acquired in other
countries.
ii. A member of the Vancouver City Council's multicultural
health promotion sector initiated
contact through our office with
the Faculty of Medicine.
iii. Several community
centres have sought assistance
for improvement of their program planning to meet the recreational needs of inner city and
multicultural populations.
iv. Immigrant Services Society sought host families for refugees and new immigrants.
v. The Ismaili Community,
Education Committee, sought
direction from our office for ways
to assist their community members in learning about the structure of educational institutions
in B.C. so that their members
can make informed choices for
their children.
From the national office of the
Secretary of State, the Assistant Under Secretary of State,
Education Support, Stewart
Goodings, has contacted our
office to discuss a proposal to
host an invitational meeting of
universities involved in multicultural and race relations initiatives.
The Under-Secretary of State
(Multiculturalism) invited our participation in a session of the
World Congress of Comparative Education, on Race Relations. (June 1989).
Teaching and Research-related Activities
I have taught a graduate
course "Educational Policy in
Culturally Plural Societies:
Comparative Perspectives" in
the Department of Social and
Educational Studies and supervised individual reading courses
and graduate student programs
at the M.A. and Ph.D. levels.
An international conference
on intercultural education is being
planned for 1989/90. Application for funding has been submitted.
Research and Participation
in academic conferences has
been on-going. Among these:
a. International Sociological
Association: Amsterdam, December 1988.
b. Canadian Association for
the Foundations of Education:
Quebec City, June 1988.
c. World Congress of Comparative Education: Montreal,
June 1988.
Dr. Kogila Adam-Moodley
Director, Multicultural Liaison.
June, 1989 THE      UNIVERSITY     OF     BRITISH      COLUMBIA
19 15-1990
ANNIVERSARY
Report of the Vice-President
Administration and Finance
1988-89
The audited financial statements are a
public document. Copies of the University's
audited financial statements have been provided to each University Department and the
University Library. For those interested in
more information than provided in these highlights, please refer to the copy in your department.
Table 1 describes the activities in each
of five of the seven separate funds involved
in the financial reporting of UBC during the
1988-89 fiscal year. Excluded are the Student Loan Fund and Endowment Principal
Fund. The concept of fund accounting organizes transactions so that revenues and
their related expenses are accounted for in
separate funds in accordance with objectives specified by donors, limitations and restrictions imposed by sources outside the
University, and determinations made by the
Board of Governors.
GENERAL PURPOSE
OPERATING FUND
The revenue and expenses used in the
general operations of the University are accounted for in this fund. The University ended
the 1988-89 fiscal year with a surplus of $.3
million after provision for an inter-fund transfer of $1.7 million and appropriations for the
year of $2.8 million. There was an increase
in operating income over 1987-88 of $16
million resulting primarily from increases in
Provincial grants of $11 million, student fee
credit course revenue of $2.9 million and non
credit course revenue of $1.9 million. Total
expenses at $249.1 million were up $18.7
million with $14 million of the increase attributable to salaries and benefits.
SPECIFIC PURPOSES FUND
The revenues and expenditures for projects stipulated by donors and income earned
on the Endowment Principal Fund are included in this fund. Trust fund revenue was
$21.9 million and Endowment Fund investment income was $10 million for a total of
$31.9 million. With expenses of $36 million
and a $2.6 million interfund transfer, the year-
end balance was $20 million, $6.7 million
lower than last year. Total expenses increased by $9.1 million, with $4.5 million of
the increase attributable to salaries and benefits, $1.5 million attributable to furniture and
equipment and $2.2 million attributable to
renovations and alterations. Of the $3.7 million increase in furniture and equipment and
renovations and alterations, $2.8 million is
attributable to the Biotechnology Centre which
was funded from the Centres for Excellence.
The 1988-89 endowment fund income of $10
million represents a return on investments of
approximately 8.7%.
SPONSORED RESEARCH
FUND
This fund includes amounts specifically
identified for research grants and contracts
or related activities as provided by government granting agencies, research institutes
and other public and private agencies. Revenue increased from $71.5 million in 1987-88
to $80.1 million this year. The $8.6 million
increase is accounted for by increases in
Social Sciences and Humanities Research
Council grants of $1.1 million, other departments of the Government of Canada grants
of $1.2 million, Province of British Columbia
Health Care Research Foundation grants of
$2.2 million and other less significant variations. Schedule 5 to the Financial Statements provides additional details.
ANCILLARY ENTERPRISES
FUND
Ancillary enterprises provide goods and
services to the University community and are
expected to operate on a break-even basis.
Total income for the ancillary enterprises was
$55.4 million, an increase of 9.5% over 1987/
88. Included are the Bookstore, Food Services, Student Housing and Conferences,
Oyster River Farm, Parking Services, Health
Sciences Parkade, Tennis Centre, Athletics
and Sport Services, UBC Press, Media Services and the Educational Measurement Research Group. In 1988-89 the administrative
charge of 1% of sales and services generated $544,000 of revenue to the General
Purpose Operating Fund. This charge will
increase to 1.5% in 1989-90. The charge
partially covers the cost of university services not specifically billed to the ancillary
enterprises such as Purchasing, Personnel
Services, Financial Services, Occupational
Health and Safety and Security.
CAPITAL FUND
The capital fund consists of gifts, grants,
interest and authorized capital borrowing
received for the purpose of acquiring capital
assets including those pertaining to ancillary
enterprises. Capital fund revenue increased
by $19.7 million. This increase Is due to an
additional $10 million received from the Province of British Columbia for construction of
the Chemistry/Physics building and a matching grant of $6 million from the Provincial
government for the major fund-raising campaign. Building contract expense increased
by $19.9 million as a result of an increase in
the number of ongoing capital projects. $21.3
million of the revenues and expenses are
offsetting amounts which relate to servicing
the debt on long-term debenture funding for
completed buildings and other past capital
projects financed by the Provincial government.
COMBINED FUNDS
Table 1 shows the total revenue and expenses of all five funds by object of revenue
and expenses. Total revenue for all funds
was $473.9 million, up $49.5 million from last
year. Total salaries and benefits were $282.9
million, an increase of $23.4 million.
Table 2 shows the source and distribution of
General Purpose Operating funds over the
past five years.
Table 3 shows a comparison of the Total
General Purpose Operating Expenses by
object of expense for the five years 1984-85
to 1988-89.
Table 4 shows the change in total Sponsored Research funding since 1984-85.
Table 5 shows the source and distribution of
Sponsored Research funds.
GENERAL
The University of British Columbia will
be celebrating its 75th anniversary in 1990.
In order to properly mark this occasion events
will be scheduled for the entire year. The 3
main events will be Open House in early
March, Summer Festival in May through
August and Homecoming in late September.
Planning and organizing for the Anniversary
began in early 1989. The University launched
its major campaign "A World of Opportunity"
in March 1989. The campaign goal is to
raise $132 million including $66 million of
B.C. Government matching funds. This is
the largest university fund raising campaign
in Canadian history. The campaign has been
very successful and submissions for government matching funds are ahead of schedule;
the total submission for 1989-90 of $12 million has already been submitted. The campaign funds will provide the facilities, scholarships, endowed chairs and equipment required for academic distinction.
The planning phase for the new Student
Information System was completed during
the 1988-89 fiscal year. The current project
is to re-develop the existing batch student
records and financial accounting systems.
The first phase is scheduled to be completed
by June 1990. The planning phase of the
Human Resources System was completed
in 1988-89. Package selection will be completed in the fall of 1989. Purchasing is
researching various Material Management
Systems which will satisfy the university's
requirements for a new purchasing system,
a fixed assets component and an acceptable
interface with the Financial Records System.
Plant Operations is working on a new Maintenance Management System to replace the
old Work-In-Process system.
During the past year the office of Campus Planning & Development was created to
give formal recognition to the importance of
planning and project development for many
new facilities which will be built in the next
five to ten years.  Construction has started
on the following projects: the David Lam
Asian Garden Centre, the Children's Day
Care Centre, the Child Study Centre, an
addition to the Museum of Anthropology and
the Cecil Green Park House Upgrade. Design work is proceeding on four projects associated with the five year capital plan and
the UBC Campaign. These are the David
Lam Management Research Centre ($6.9
million), first phase of the Student Services
Centre ($3.5 million), Main Library addition
and renovation project ($24 million) and a
University Services Building ($10.5 million).
Planning for numerous other projects is also
underway, specifically the Advanced Materials Building ($17.1 million), Centre for Integrated Computer Systems Research (15.1
million), Forestry Sciences Centre ($40 million), Visual and Performing Arts Facilities
Centre ($32 million) and the Student Recreation Facilities project ($9.5 million). The new
Parkade situated at the north end of campus
beside Gage Towers was completed in December 1988. The Acadia Park Phase 3
development of 77 units for family housing
was completed in June 1989. The Chemistry/Physics building will be completed in
September 1989.
The two university fund raising foundations have continued to serve as a mechanism for the transfer of substantial gifts to the
university. During fiscal year 1988/89 the
UBC Foundation received $3.8 million and
the American Foundation $.2 million (US) in
donations. The UBC Real Estate Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of the university, appointed a President in August 1988
and began active consideration of various
projects during the fall including provision for
market housing on campus. Hampton Place,
the UBC Real Estate Corporation's first development project will be a low density mixture of rental and owned townhomes and
apartments situated on campus at the corner
of Wesbrook Mall and 16th Avenue. Construction is scheduled to begin in September, 1989. The principal objective of the
Corporation is to take responsible and pragmatic steps to make good use of the
University's vacant land to improve UBC's
long-term capital and endowment programs
which, in turn, help contribute to a stronger
financial base for education in British Columbia.
In the late spring of 1988 the university
acquired the Department of Fisheries and
Oceans laboratory on the west side of campus. The building is now occupied by the
Food Sciences Department and the International North Pacific Fisheries Commission.
The university and TRIUMF entered an agreement to provide a long term lease to Nordion
International Inc. on the TRIUMF site. Nordion intends to construct a 3 storey addition
to the existing facility to house equipment
and laboratories to produce marketable
medical diagnostic products based on nuclear technology. The university has also
leased an 8 acre site to Forintek Canada
Corporation to construct a new facility for
forestry research. The lease is fully prepaid
and yields the university $4 million which is
intended for selected capital projects. TABLE 1
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN UNAPPROPRIATED FUND BALANCES
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1989
(thousands of dollars)
General Purpose
Specific
Sponsored
Ancillary
Operating
Purposes
Research
Enterprises
Capital
1989
Totals
1988
Revenue and other additions:
Government grants & contracts
Government of Canada
$
$    3,628
$  51,327
$
$
$   54,955
$   50,599
Province of British Columbia
Base operating
194,106
-
-
-
-
194,106
183,301
Designated
2768
5,515
434
-
-
8,717
9,800
Other
-
6,742
8,391
-
47,576
62,709
42,278
Municipalities
-
1
15
-
-
16
36
Other governments
-
116
111
-
-
227
355
Foreign governments
-
770
1,878
-
-
2,648
1,988
Student fees
49,018
294
-
1,098
-
50,410
45,402
Bequests, donations and non government grants
-
4,810
17,760
-
2,834
25,404
21,017
Sales and services
944
-
231
53,771
-
54,946
50,398
Income from investments
3,362
10,067
-
511
1,030
14,970
14,522
Loans
Expenses & other deductions:
-
-
-
-
4,818
4,818
4,780
250,198
31,943
80,147
55,380
56,258
473,926
424,476
Salaries  - Academic
105,398
8,136
13,793
-
-
127,327
116,083
- Student services
5,994
3,530
8,284
-
-
17,808
15,918
-Staff
70,756
182,148
6,510
18,176
17,629
39,706
13,758
13,758
955
109,608
102,031
955
254,743
234,032
Benefits
23,104
1,083
2,634
1,296
5
28,122
25,424
Travel, field trips, moving
4,252
2,130
5,027
-
115
11,524
10,089
Library acquisitions
5,693
481
363
-
-
6,537
5,995
Operational supplies and expenses
19,810
928
16,322
6,210
5,417
48,687
42,560
Furniture and equipment
5,016
3,773
7,066
1,102
1,241
18,198
19,709
Utilities
8,163
184
831
1,410
214
10,802
10,593
Renovations and alterations
659
2,260
138
1,642
2,209
6,908
8,250
Scholarships, fellowships & bursaries
3,973
4,099
609
-
-
8,681
7,942
Professional fees
2,645
2,669
1,690
-
3,016
10,020
6,853
Cost of goods sold
-
-
-
21,219
-
21,219
17,451
Debt servicing
-
-
-
6,455
21,267
27,722
26,207
Building contracts
-
-
-
-
22,969
22,969
3,110
Internal cost recoveries
1,943
214
1,185
544
-
-
-
External cost recoveries
Transfers & appropriations:
(4,447)
-
-
-
-
(4,447)
(3,695)
249,073
35,997
75,571
53,636
57,408
471,685
414,520
Expended from prior years' appropriations
3,381
1,272
8,976
13,629
10,882
Interfund transfers
(1,708)
(2,626)
650
(545)
1,389
(2,840)
(5,871)
Appropriations for the year
Net Increase (decrease) during the year
(2,752)
-   ■
-
(2,680)
(9,586)
(15,018)
(13,629)
(1,079)
(2,626)
650
(1,953)
779
(4,229)
(8,618)
46
(6,680)
5,226
(209)
(371)
(1,988)
1,338
Unappropriated Fund balance, beginning of year
Unappropriated Fund Balance, end of year
223
26,630
17,365
239
2,462
46,919
45,581
$       269
$ 19,950
$ 22,591
$          30
$    2,091
$ 44,931
$  46,919
TABLE 3
SUMMARY COMPARISONS OF TOTAL GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING EXPENSES
1984-85 TO 1988-89
SALARY AND BENEFITS
Staff         Total
Travel &
Field Trips
Library     Supplies &
Acquisitions   Expenses
Utilities
Furniture
Equipment &
Alterations
Total
Academic
Student
Service
Benefits
Sub
Total
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%                 %
%
%
%
1988
89
42.3
2.4
28.4
73.1
9.3
82.4
1.7
2.3                 8.0
3.3
2.3
100.0
1987
88
42.2
2.4
29.2
73.8
9.2
83.0
1.6
2.3                 7.9
3.5
1.7
100.0
1986
87
42.8
2.5
28.5
73.8
9.0
82.8
1.4
2.4                 7.9
3.7
1.8
100.0
1985
86
43.7
2.5
28.4
74.6
9.1
83.7
1.1
2.3                 5.2
4.3
3.4
100.0
1984
85
44.0
2.3
29.1
75.4
9.1
84.5
1.1
1.9                 5.7
4.1
2.7
100.0
TABLE 4
TOTAL SPONSORED
RESEARCH FUNDING
(thousands of dollars )
1988-89
1987-88
1986-87
1985-86
1984-85
Amount
I 80,147
71,511
65,280
59,619
63,096
TABLE 2
SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OFTHE GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING FUND
FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31,1985 TO 1989
1989
1988
1987
1986
1985
%
%
%
%
%
Source
Province of B.C. - Grants
78.7
79.4
80.0
79.7
81.2
Student Fees - Credit
15.2
14.9
15.4
15.3
14.1
Student Fees - Non-Credit
4.2
3.7
3.0
3.2
2.9
Other
Distribution By Function
1.9
2.0
1.6
1.8
1.8
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Academic and Associated Academic Services
72.6
72.5
72.1
73.2
72.9
Library
7.2
7.3
7.5
7.3
7.5
Student Awards and Services
2.6
2.7
2.6
2.6
3.0
Administration
5.8
5.6
5.3
4.3
4.2
General
1.1
1.0
1.2
0.7
0.7
Plant
11.2
11.4
11.8
12.3
12.2
Overhead Recovered on Research
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.5)
(0.4)
(0.5)
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
TABLE 5
SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH FUND
FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31,1985 TO 1989
1989        1988        1987        1986
Source
Government of Canada
Province of British Columbia
Other governments and agencies
Total governments
Individuals, business, foundations
Other
Distribution
Salaries and benefits
Travel and field trips
Operational supplies and expenses
Furniture and equipment
Other
%
64.1
11.0
2.5
%
67.7
8.5
1.7
%
68.9
7.9
2.5
%
62.6
9.2
2.8
1985
69.6
7.7
2.2
77.6
22.2
0.2
77.9
21.8
0.3
79.3
20.5
0.2
74.6
24.9
0.5
79.5
20.1
0.4
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
56.0
6.7
21.6
9.4
6.3
55.6
6.5
21.6
11.3
5.0
58.2
6.3
20.4
10.1
5.0
100.00  100.00  100.0
56.7
6.1
18.1
13.1
6.0
100.0
56.6
5.9
17.7
13.7
6.1
100.0 1984/85
Graph A
Total Academic Salaries* as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1984/85 to 1988/89
1985/86
1986/87
1987/88
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers.
•Academic Salaries comprises Academic ranks and other instructional staff
and student service appointments.
Excludes early termination agreements.
Percent
Graph B
Non-Academic Salaries as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1984/85 to 1988/89
J5 "
---»•--   Alta
 B       Sask
 » —    Man
■ ^__
^^^
--<
■
 ■—    UWO
 °—    Tor
^                ""\
r                            	
f——
 ^	
■~—^__
\
-.,,	
—t—
—a
~—-^=———=--- 11
2/ "
               -   —f            	
77 '
1988/89       1984/85
1985/86
1986/87
1987/88
1988/89
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers.
Excludes early termination agreements.
Percent
1984/85
Graph C
Total Salaries and Benefits as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1984/85 to 1988/89
1985/86
1986/87
1987/88
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers.
Excludes early termination agreements.
Percent
Graph D
Non-Salary Expenditures as a Percent of Total
General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1984/85 to 1988/89
1988/89       1984/85
1985/86
1986/87
Source: Canadian Association of University Business Officers.
1987/88
1988/89
Percent
70
60
50
40
30
20
10
66.56
12.24
zMA-
7.81
3.45
1984/85
Graph E
Percent Distribution of General Purpose Operating Expenditures
1984/85 to 1988/89
66.81
12.38
,10.01
=ft
7.77
3.53
66.12
11.85
iSM.
9.08
3.39
1985/86
1986/87
65.81
65.52
<.    Faculties
*
11.58
11.36
Plant
NOTE ON GRAPHS
The percent shown for each expenditure category is calculated
by dividing the gross expenditures
assigned to that category by the
total net expenditures for the University after cost recoveries have
been removed. The result is that
the sum of the percentages assigned to the category will exceed
100%. This is consistent with the
annual reports provided to the
Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO).
1Q.17 —B   Academic Services
9.28
9.38
3.82
4.14
Other
Continuing Education
1987/88
1988/89
Academic Service includes Computing Centre, Academic Services, Library.
Faculties inlcudes ETA and retroactive salary increases.
Other includes student aid, student services, administration, general and other.
Continuing Education comprises CCE and non-credit programs.
Plant
Note: Expenditures are net of carry-forward.
Graphs A and B depict the relative position of UBC as compared to other universities for academic and non academic salaries as a percentage of General
Purpose Operating Expenditures.
Graphs C and D depict the relative position of UBC as compared to other universities for total salaries and benefits and non-salary expenditures as a percentage of General Purpose Operating expenditures.
Graph E depicts the percentage distribution of General Purpose Operating
expenditures for faculties and administrative units. 5.WSJ. JiT,*^?^ .»M-J
UBCREPORTS   Sept 21,1989       5
September 24-
October 7
Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting
Professor Lecture/Recital.
Richard Goode, piano. For information call
228-3113. Recital Hall, Music. 12:30 p.m.
Forestry- Leslie L. Schaffer
Lectureship
Sustainable Development in Forestry: An
Ecological Perspective. Bryant N. Richards,
Forestry and Sol Science Consultant Wester
Lea', Black Mountain and Hon. Fellow, Dept.
of Ecosystem Management U. of New England, Armidale, NSW, Australia. For information call 228-2507. MacMillan 166.12:30 -
1:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 6      |
Faculty Club Seafood Festival
For further information call 228-3803. Main
Dining Room. 5:30 - 8:00 p.m.
Music UBC Contemporary Players
Stephen Chatman and Geoffrey Michaels,
directors. Admission is free.For information
call 228-3113. Music bldg. Recital Hall. 1230
p.m.
Chemical Engineering Seminar
A Mathematical Model of Fluid and Macro-
molecular Exchange in Tissues. Mr. David
Taylor, Grad student Chem. Eng., UBC. For
information call 228-3238. Chem. Eng. bldg.
Room 206.3:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar
Genetics of metachromatic leukodystrophy.
Dr. Lome Clarke, Clinical Genetics Unit Grace
Hospital. For information, call 228-5311. University Hospital, Shaughnessy Site, Room
D308.2:t5p.m.
Faculty Club Octoberfest
For information call 228-4693. Faculty Club
Ballroom. 7:00 p.m.
Grad Student Society
Poetry Sweatshop: participants must write a
poem on a given vvord in a limited time period.
Prizes awarded. Grad Centre Garden Room,
5:30 p.m.
NOTICES
Homecoming Highlights
Parade - Thurs. Sept 28. Starts at I p.m. from
B-lot and winds down Main Mall. (Marshalling
at 12:30p.m.) All faculties, clubs and members of the UBC community welcome. Information -JohannaWickie, 228-4403. Great
Trekker Dinner - Black tie, $35/person. This
year's GT Award winner is Dr. R. Osborne.
Dinner Tneme is UBC Sports. SUB Ballroom,
630 for 7:00 p.m. Information -Lomell Ridley,
228-3313. Sat Sept 30 - Blue & Gold Classic
Football Game: UBC vs. U. of Manitoba at
Thunderbird Stadium.Half-time show celebrates UBC's 74th Birthday. Information -
228-2531. Sat. Sept. 30 - Arts '20 Relay -
Teams of 8 run the 10.6 km route of the Great
Trek from VGH to UBC. Starting time: 9:00
am. Awards ceremony: 11:00 a.m. Information-228-6000. Mon. Oct 2-Meet Tne Brass
- Meet the Board of Governors, President's
Office and Deans in an informal social setting.
SUB Rm. 212,430 p.m. Information - Andrew
Hicks,228-3961. Tues. Oct3-JustDesserts
- Undergrads honour Faculty and Staff. Buffet
of desserts prepared by the Faculty Womens'
Club. Cedl Green Park, 7:00 p.m. Information
-228-3313.
Language Programs & Services
All Programs Start Week of September 24,
1989
French in Action, the highly successful French
televison program on KCTS 9 Saturday mornings, will serve as the basis for a multi-media
French language program offered on Tuesday nights, Thursday afternoons and Saturday mornings.
French conversation classes at the intermediate and advanced levels will be offered on
Thursday evenings.
Beginner Spanish, Japanese, Mandarin and
Cantonese classes will be offered on Tuesday nights and Saturday mornings. Elementary and advanced levels in all languages will
be offered on Thursday nights.
Also offered are Business Japanese and
Teaching Languages to Adult classes.
For more information, call Language Programs and Services, Centre for Continuing
Education. 222-5227
UBC Library Copy Card Sale
September 25-30. 10% off. $5.00 Cards sold
in most libraries; $10.00, $20.00 or higher
cards in Copy Service, Main or Woodward.
CasrVcheque/departrnental requisition. 228-
2254. Copy Service Office. Main Library.
Grad Student Society
Series of 8 Ballroom Dance Lessons from
Mon. Sept 25. Students, $25. Non-students,
$35. Everyone welcome. For information call
228-3203. Grad Centre Ballroom, 7:30 p.m.
Dal Grauer Memorial Lectures
Dr. Zara Steiner, Lecturer and Fellow in History, Cambridge University, England. Tuesday Sept 26 -The British Road to War, 1938-
39. Buchanan A-104.12:30 p.m.; Munich
Revisited, 1938-39. Buchanan Penthouse.
330 p.m.
Thurs. Sept. 28 - Britain and The Origins of
WW I: Is There a Revisionist Case?. Bu A-
104,1230 p.m.; The Foreign Office and The
Coming of World War I. Bu Penthouse, 330
p.m. For further information call 228-5675.
Grad Faculty Christian Forum
Lectures/Discussions on Science and Technology. Dr. John PoKnghome, Pres. Queen's
College,Cambridge. Sept 26-AScientist's
Approach to Religion. IRC #2.430. Sept 27
- Prayer in a Scientific Age. School of Theology Chapel. 11:30. Sept. 28 -Order and
Disorder and the Idea of Creation. IRC #6.
4:30. For information call 228-3112.
Office for Women Students
Mature Students Support Group.
Drop in Tuesdays from Sept. 26 to Nov.28.
Freeadmission.. Room223(WomenStudents' Lounge). 12:30 -1:30 p.m. Enquiries:
228-2415.
Microbiology Wednesday Seminars
Sept. 27 - T cell Tolerance. Dr. H.-S Teh,
Microbiol., UBC. Oct. 4 .
Salmonella as an intracellular parasite. Dr. B.
Finlay, Biotech Lab, UBC. Both seminars in
Wesbrook 201,12:30 -130.
THE   VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Sat. Sept. 30
Mrs. Thatcher's Britain:
An Outsider's View. Dr.
Zara Steiner, College
Lecturer and Fellow in
History, New Hall,
Cambridge.
Sat! Oct. 7
Sacred Cities. M. J.M. Le Clezio, Novelist and
essayist, Nice, France.
All lectures at 8:15 p.m. in IRC #2
Chemistry -1989/90 Dow Lecturer
Dr. Howard Morris, Head, Dept. of Biochemistry, Imperial College, London, UK. Mon.
Oct. 2 - Biopolymer Characterization by Advanced Spectrometric Methods. Room D
225, Chem. Bldg. 2:30. Tues. Oct. 3 - Structure Elucidation of Bioactive Substances at
Nano- and Pico- Mole Levels. Rm. B250,
Chem. Bldg. Refreshments from 12:40 p.m.
Lecture at l:00 p.m. For information call 228-
3266.
Cecil H.& Ida Green
Visiting Professorships
Tues. Oct 3 - French Seminar. M. Jean-Marie
Le Clezio. Novelist and Essayist Nice France.
Le Mythe Et La Litterature: I'aventure de
Lautreamortt Bu Penthouse. 330 p.m. Infor
mation - 228-5675. Thurs. Oct. 5 - Richard
Goode, Piano Reoitalist, New York. Recital
and Lecture: Beethoven and Schubert Music
Bldg. Recital Hall. 12:30 p.m.; M. Le Clezio -
L'Ecrivain Dans Le Miroir. Buchanan Penthouse. 330 p.m. Information -228- 5675. Sat
Oct 7 - Richard Goode in Concert Beethoven
and Schubert. Adults, $12, Seniors and students, $7. Ticketmaster: 280-3311. Old
Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
Faculty Club Sunday
German Brunches
Starting Sunday Oct 8 and continuing through
the end of November. Main Dining Room.
11:00 -130 p.m. For information call 228-
3803.
First Nations Studies Calendar
Currently being revised for 1989/90. Please
submit changes, revisions or new initiatives
by Oct 2 to Madeleine Maclvor, First Nations
House of Learning, 6365 Biological Sciences
Rd. or call 222-8940.
Office for Women Students
Workshop ,
Assertiveness for Women - an introduction to
basic communication skills. Participants will
be given the opportunity to learn more effective methods of expressing themselves and
their needs in a wide range of social settings
- from classroom to relationships. A free, three
session workshop, Tuesdays, Oct. 10,17
and 24th. Registration required. Enquiries-
228-2415.
Evening ESL Courses
Four courses offered: Writing & Grammar,
TOEFL Reparation Conversation Ski, Speech:
Fluency & Pronunciation. Fee $190. Oct 2-
Nov. Z29/88 or Oct3- Nov. 23/89 Courses run
twice a week for 8 weeks. For information call
222-5208.
Badminton Club
Faculty, Staff and Grad Student Badminton
Club meets Thursdays, 830 -1030 p.m., and
Fridays 6:30 - 8:30 p.m. in Gym A of the
Robert Osborne Sports Centre. Fees $15.00
per year wfth UBC-Rec card. For information
call Bernard 228-4025 or 731 -9966.
Agricurl
Late afternoon curling at its best. Experienced curlers and those wishing to team are
welcome. At Thunderbird, Tuesdays, starting
Oct. 17, 5:15 - 7:15. Two terms, $80. For
information call Paul Willing, 228-3560 or
Alex Finlayson, 738-7698 (eve.)
Psychiatry Study
Subjects (adults age 30 and above) are needed
for a personality questionnaire study being
conducted at the UBC Dept. of Psychiatry.
Participants will receive $15 and a personality
assessment. For more information, or to
volunteer, please call 228-7895.
Counselling Psychology Study
Directed towards helping people overcome
shyness or social anxiety problems. Participants will listen to an audiotape for three
sittings of approximately 45 minutes each. All
enquiries will remain strictly confidential. Volunteers please telephone Tess Hodge at
926-5045.
Reading, Writing and Study   .
Skills Centre
Communication Courses this Fall - Writing
Business Letters and Memos; Writing Proposals for Decision Makers; User-Friendly
Writing; The Writer's Craft; Media Interview
Techniques; The-Artful Business of Freelance
Writing; 7 Steps To A Successful Presentation. For registration or information, call 222-
5245.
Sexual Harassment Office
UBC's policy and procedures are now in
place to deal with instances of sexual harassment. Two advisors are available to discuss
questions and concerns on the subject. They
are prepared to help any member of the UBC
community who is being sexually harassed to
find a satisfactory resolution. Phone Marga-
retha Hoek and Jon Shapiro at 228-6353.
Fine Arts Gallery - Exhibition
Installation work by Ron Hueber. Basement
Main Library. Tues. - Fri. 10a.m. - 5 p.m., Sat
noon - 5 p.m. Until Oct 7. Contact Fine Arts
Gallery, 228-2759.
Friends of the Garden
Wednesday Walks: An introduction to the
Botanical Garden. Meetat the Gatehouse.
Admission: Free. Tour: Free. Spend your
lunch hour at the Botanical Garden. For
information call 228-4208. 1 p.m.
Statistical Consulting and Research
Laboratory.
SCARL is operated by the Department of
Statistics to provide statistical advice to faculty
and graduate students working on research
problems. For information call 228-4037.
Forms for appointments available in Room
210, Ponderosa Annex C.
Volunteering
To find an interesting and challenging volunteer job, get in touch with volunteer connections, the on-campus information and referral
service supported by the AMS. Student interviewers are trained to help UBC students,
staff and faculty find volunteer jobs in their
area of interest. For an appointment to explore the available volunteer options, contact:
Volunteer Connections, Student Counselling
and Resources Centre, Brock Hall 200 or call
228-3811.
Walter Gage Toastmasters
Wednesday. Public Speaking Club Meeting.
Speeches and tabletopics. Guests are welcome. For information cal Sulan at 597-8754,
SUB 7:30 p.m.
International House
Language Exchange Program
Free service to match up people who want to
exchange their language for another. At
present many Japanese and Mandarin speakers wish to exchange their languages for
English. For information call 228-5021 and
ask for Yukiko Yoshida.    „
International House
Language Bank Program
Free translation/interpretation Services offered
by International students and community in
general. For information call Teresa Uyeno at
228-5021.
Department of Psychology Study
Adolescents and Their Parents Needed. We
are conducting a study on the opinions of
teenage girls and their parents on important
issues which come up in the course of family
life. We need 13-19 year old girls and one
or both of their parents who could volunteer 1
to11\2 hours of their lime to participate in this
study. For further information, please call Lori
Taylor at 733-0711.
Lung Disease Subjects Wanted
We are seeking interstitial lung disease subjects in order to study the effect of this dfeorder
on response to submaximal exercise. For
further information call Frank Chung at 228-
7708, School of Rehab. Medicine.
Parenting Project
Couples with children between the ages of 5
and 12 are wanted for a project studying
parenting. Participation involves the mother
and father discussing common childrearing
problems and completing questionnaires
concerning several aspects of family life.
Participation will take about one hour. Evening appointnients can be arranged. Interpretation of the questionnaires is available on
request For information please contact Dr. C.
Johnston, Clinical Psychology, UBC at 228-
6771.
Teaching Kids to Share
Mothers with 2 children between 21/2 and 6
years of age are invited to participate in a free
parent-education program being evaluated in
the Departmert of Psychology at UBC. The 5
session program offers child development
information and positive parenting strategies
designed to help parents guide their children
in the development of sharing and cooperative play skills. For further information call
Georgia Tiedemann at the Sharing Project
228-6771.
Fitness Appraisal
Physical Education and Recreation, through
the John M. Buchanan Fitness and Research
Centre, is administering a physical fitness
assessment program to students, faculty, staff
and the general public. Approximately 1 hour,
students $25, all others $30. For information
call 228-4356.
Surplus Equipment Recycling
Facility
All surplus items. For information call 228-
2813. Every Wednesday, noon-3 p.m. Task
Force Bldg. 2352 Health Sciences Mall.
Neville Scarfe Children's Garden
Visit the Neville Scarfe Children's Garden
located west of the Education Building. Open
all year - free. Families interested in planting
weeding* and watering in the garden contact
Jo-Anne Naslund at 434-1081 or 228-3767.
Nitobe Memorial Garden
Open daily from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Until Sept
30. Admission $1.25. Free on Wednesdays.
Botanical Garden
Open daily from 10 am. to 6p.m. Sept 1 -30.
Admission $2.50. Free on Wednesdays.
UBC REPORTS
ADVERTISING
DEADLINES
EDITION
DEADLINE 4 p.m.
Oct5
Sept. 25
Oct. 19
Oct. 10 (noon)
Nov. 2
Oct. 23
Nov. 16
Nov. 6
Nov. 30
Nov. 20
Dec. 14
Dec. 4
Jan. 11
Jan. 3 (noon)
For more information, or to
place an ad phone 228-4775.
^g-. j3£aSyl^
^^^t^^^Mim.
--,■ -.J-CT.-.I M. ,«~. a-- .- .
'?■'&'■<:■ UBCREPORTS   Sept 21,1989       6
Photo by Media Services
Frank Oberle (left), Minister of State for Forestry, and Dave Parker, B.C. Minister of Forests, inspect the all-wood frame
of a new $30-mWion forest industry research building on die East Mad. It is one oftwo new buddings which will be the home
of Forintek Canada Corp. 's Western Laboratory. A smaller budding will house offices for die Forest Engineering Research
Institute (FERIC). Both buildings will demonstrate die advantages of wood for non-residential construction.
New software program
GENI an aid to creativity
By JO MOSS
A GENI software package may have
helped Beethoven be more creative. But
it probably wouldn't have made any difference to Mozart.
GENI (for GENerating Ideas) is a new
computer program which uses a variety
of mind-expanding techniques to stimulate creativity. It helps the user see all the
dimensions of a problem and find an
innovative resolution.
The program probably would not have
helped Mozart who, history tells us, was
inspired to write whole pieces at a single
sitting. But it may have helped Beethoven
who kept elaborate notes as he sought
variations on a musical theme.
Seeking new thematic variations is
one characteristic of creativity, says
Commerce Professor Kenneth MacCrimmon who developed GENI with former
PhD student Chris Wagner. Others are:
joining two or more disparate concepts,
recognizing and using an analogy, and
combining elements of a problem in different ways.
Given those characteristics, it's easy
to see why creative problem-solving is as
applicable to business as it is to music.
"The person who can see all the
ramifications of a situation and come up
with other possibilities has an advantage
in any sphere of life," he said.
MacCrimmon, a decision theorist, has
worked on creativity theories and methods for more than a dozen years. He and
Wagner developed GENI three years ago
in response to the boom of gadgets and
techniques, each claiming to help people
in business be more creative.
The problem with many of these procedures, MacCrimmon says, is that few,
if any, of their claims have been tested.
And each technique, by its nature, is
limited in application.
"There are lots of possible ways to
capture creativity, not just one concept,"
explained MacCrimmon, who uses GENI
to teach creative problem-solving in his
classes. He set out to incorporate as many
of these concepts as possible in one software program.
GENI works on an ordinary desktop
computer. The user enters the details of a
problem and is prompted to work through
a comprehensive set of procedures that
are designed to spark ideas beyond the
obvious.
Some people balk when GENI asks
them to connect fragments of poetry to
their problem, but the program won't
proceed to the next step unless it receives
at least three ideas.
' 'In this way, computer techniques
can help to discourage laziness in thinking," MacCrimmon explained.
Other procedures are more orthodox,
exploring steps to the user's goal in a
more logical and methodical way.
' 'We pop up random elements of the
scenario forcing people to deal with
combinations they haven't thought of,"
MacCrimmon said, and ideas that are
entered in one part of the program are
incorporated into the process and fed
back to the user in another part of the
program.
GENI can help a user with a problem-
whether it's how to deal with steroids in
sports or run a more efficient donut franchise-find literally thousands of possible
solutions.
MacCrimmon maintains GENI is a
useful tool in guiding normal thought
processes.
"Computers can be supplemental to
the way people process information and
assist people whose thinking is rigid," he
said.
In preliminary testing with students,
GENI has proved to be very effective,
MacCrimmon said. Its only dismaying
feature is that it seems to give more help
to people who are more creative.
An early version of GENI generated
interest when it was presented at a 1986
NATO conference in Portugal, but MacCrimmon says the program needs further
extensive tests before it's ready for general use or commercial application.
Photo by Media Services
Macebearer John Dennison leads the Chancellor's Party to the annual Fall
Ceremony on Sept 7 to welcome new students to campus. Canadian Nobel Laureate
John Polanyi joined President David Strangway, Chancellor Leslie Peterson and
AMS President Michael Lee in greeting students. Major entrance scholarships were
also presented
Left banders
more prone
to accidents,
Coren finds
By GAVIN WILSON
Left-handed people are far more accident-prone than right-handed people, a
study by UBC Psychology Professor
Stanley Coren has found.
In an article published in the current
issue of the American Journal of Public
Health, Coren says southpaws are 89 per
cent more likely to suffer a serious accident than people who are right handed.
Left handers are not clumsier, he said,
but they are forced to battle their natural
tendencies in a world designed for right-
handed people - at home, in the workplace
and on the road.
The results of the study, and Coren's
earlier research, have convinced him of
the seriousness of the public health hazard he has identified.
"I think there's a real safety issue
involved in this," he said.
Coren's findings are based on questionnaires given to 1,896 students at UBC
over four years. The students were asked
whether they had suffered any serious
accidents in the past two years. The answers given by right-handed students
were compared to those who were left-
handed.
The results showed that left handers
were 85 per cent more likely to have an
accident while driving, 54 per cent more
accident-prone using tools, 49 per cent
more likely to have a mishap at home, 25
per cent more likely to suffer a work-
related accident and 20 per cent more apt
to have an accident while playing sports.
At the greatest risk of all, Coren found,
was a left-handed male behind the wheel
of a car. Men, left or right handed, are
more likely than women to be involved in
accidents of any kind, he said.
Coren
The high rate
of vehicle accidents is partly
explained by the
physiological
tendency among
left-handed
people to raise
their right hand
and lower their left
when startled.
Right-handers do
the opposite. Behind a steering wheel,
this automatic reflex can send left-handed
drivers swerving into oncoming traffic.
Coren hopes that one day findings
such as these will be used to help prevent
highway accidents, perhaps by altering
traffic patterns. He also believes business
and industry could learn from his research to improve safety in the workplace.
For example, industrial accident forms
could routinely inquire about the handedness of victims.
In earlier studies ofthe life spans of
baseball players, Coren and fellow researchers discovered that right-handed
athletes far outlived their left-handed
counterparts. There was little difference
in their mortality rates before the age of
33, but after that left-handed ball players
were one to two per cent mere likely to die
in any given year than right handers.
Coren said other studies show that 13
per cent of the general population is left
handed at the age of 20 years, but at age 50
this number dwindles to five per cent and
at age 80, to just one per cent. Further
study ruled out the possibility that people
switched over to their right hand with age
or that societal pressures had forced people
to adopt right-handedness against their
will.
PERSONAL
COMPUTING
PRODUCTION
CENTRE
Room 209F, Computer Sciences Building
SELF-SERVE
PRINTING
for the UBC
community
U£3
UNrvEisrnr
COMTUTINC
■UVKEl
/
Use an Apple Macintosh
or an IBM PC-compatible
and print to a LaserWriter
open Monday to Friday, 8:30 — 4:30
pay by cash, cheque, or departmental
requisition
phone 228-3050
PRICES
$6 per hour
(minimum charge $130)
plus 25c per page
UBC faculty, staff and students only — identification required UBCREPORTS   Sept 21,1989       7
People
Alden awarded gold medal
Alden
Metals and Materials
Engineering Professor
Thomas Alden has won
the 1990 Champion H.
Mathewson Gold Medal,
one of the most prestigious prizes in the world
for metallurgical science.
The award is given by
the Minerals, Metals and
Materials Society (TMS),
a member society of the
American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical and '
Petroleum Engineers, the principal professional
society for the North American metallurgical industry.
It is awarded to the author of a paper or papers
published in Metallurgical Transactions, considered to be the most notable contribution to metallurgical science for that year. The journal is a joint
publication of TMS and the American Society for
Metals.
Alden is being recognized for his contributions to the scientific understanding of ductility,
the special property of metals that allows them to
be rolled into sheet or drawn into wire. His
theoretical and experimental studies are conducted
primarily on iron and copper.
Alden, who joined UBC in 1967, has an AB in
economics from Amherst College, in Amherst, Mass.
and a MS and PhD in in physical metallurgy from the
Massachusetts Institute of Technology, in Cambridge, Mass.
Hewill receive the prize at the 119th Annual
Meeting of TMS in Anaheim, Ca., in February 1990.
Alan Artibise, director ofthe School of Community and Regional Planning, has been invited to serve
on the board of governors ofthe Institute for the
Study of International Cities (Canada).
The international think tank undertakes a variety
of research on all aspects of international cities.
UBC Commerce student Stephen O'Keefe, 21,
was one of 44 students across Canada named as winners of the 1989 Terry Fox Humanitarian Award.
The award is given annually to students for community service and excellence in academics, athletics
and extracurricular activities. They receive scholarships of $4,000 a year until they graduate. O'Keefe,
who is hearing impaired, is active in charitable
ventures, is a member ofthe university field hockey
team and also competes in track and field.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Dean John McNeill has been
appointed to a new provincial pharmacare advisory
committee by Health Minister Peter Dueck.
The committee will advise Dueck on issues concerning pharmacare services,
in addition to seeking solutions to problems identified
with the program.
McNeill
Nursing Professor Sally Thorne was awarded
the 1989 Oncology Nursing Society/Adria Excellence in Writing Award in Nursing Research at the
society's 14th annual congress held recently in San
Francisco, Ca.
Thome is on the board of directors ofthe International Council on Women's Health Issues and a
member ofthe Advisory Board of Oxfam Global
Health Project in Canada. She is the author of numerous publications on oncology-the study of tumors-
and oncology nursing.
The largest professional oncology association in
the world, the Oncology Nursing Society is an
American organization of more than 15,000
registered nurses dedicated to excellence in
patient care, teaching, research and community education in the field of oncology.
Civil Engineering
Professor Donald
Mavinic has been reelected to the Board
of Directors of the
Canadian Society for
Civil Engineering.
He will serve as
chairman ofthe Environmental Engineering Division for
a second two-year
term.
The fastest-growing division within the
CSCE, the Environmental Engineering division acts as an advisory body to federal and
provincial governments on environmental
issues such as water quality and protection of
water supply.
The CSCE is a professional body of about
6,000 members of which about 1,400 are
associated with environmental engineering.
Mavinic
Decision-making theory
Galiano drama is studied
By JO MOSS
A real-life drama unfolding on Galiano Island is being closely monitored by
a UBC Commerce professor who wants
to design better ways for people to make
communal decisions.
Kenneth MacCrimmon, a researcher
in decision theory and creative problem
solving, is testing some key bargaining
and decision-making principles against
actual events as island residents and a
major logging company try to decide on
the future of a major parcel of land.
The island's carefully preserved rural
character and its long isolation from outside influences make it an ideal test case
to study, MacCrimmon said.
Since January this year, he has been
documenting each group's actions and
the consequences, and interviewing people
to find out how and why they reached
their decisions. He hopes the study will
allow tests of existing theories of collective decision making as well as suggest
ideas for new theory development.
Finding better methods of arbitration
and resolution is becoming more important as society is increasingly faced with
critical issues of common global concern,
he added.
A secondary result will be a list of do's
and don't's which could guide other B.C.
communities through an efficient process to reach the best possible solution to a
communal problem.
Key players in the Galiano Island
scenario are MacMillan Bloedel and about
800 permanent island residents. The
company owns 3,100 hectares, a little
more than half of the total land area,
which it has logged since the early 1950s.
But with logging becoming increasingly
uneconomical it is investigating other
options and has hired a Vancouver-based
development company to evaluate its
holdings.
Meanwhile, island residents are concerned about how future development of
that land will affect their chosen lifestyle.
While no formal proposal has been made,
potential plans include residential and
resort development—options which, if
carried out, could have a big impact on the
island's unique identity.
MacCrimmon says the situation on
Galiano exemplifies what happens to many
people who must make a decision.
' 'People often limit themselves to two
choices, A or B. But can we take the good
elements of A and B to provide a third
option, C?" MacCrimmon explained.
"It's surprising how people get locked in
early to a particular alternative."
In addition, people generally don't
take the time to investigate a problem
thoroughly, he said. They try to find
solutions when they often don't have a
clear picture ofthe problem.
When two or more parties lock horns
in trying to resolve a common issue, the
decision-making process becomes even
more complicated. "People are thinking
of their own corners and not the middle
area where the two corners overlap,"
MacCrimmon said.
Kenneth MacCrimmon
Earlier this year, a Forest and Land
Use Council was formed to allow all
parties involved in the Galiano land dispute to meet on a regular basis and exchange ideas. Such forums have great
potential as an arena for resolving conflict
between business and communities,
MacCrimmon said.
New physics chair
named for Warren
The announcement this month of a
new chair in nuclear physics at UBC was
clouded by the sudden death of its namesake, former TRIUMF Director John
Warren.
At the opening of the new Chemistry-
Physics building on Sept. 7, President
David Strangway announced that
TRIUMF had made a leadership pledge
of $425,000 over five years for the establishment of the new Warren Chair in
Nuclear Physics.
"By a tragic coincidence, John Warren died this morning in England following a heart attack," Strangway said.
Warren joined UBC's Physics Department in 1947 to oversee construction
of the Van De Graaff generator building.
He went on to become one of the founders of TRIUMF and its first director. In
1983, his accomplishments were recognized when the university presented him
with an honorary degree. Warren was 74
at the time of his death.
' 'It seems painfully appropriate that
one of UBC's finest physicists should be
remembered today at the opening of this
fine new building," Strangway said. "Ffe
was held in such esteem that his name was
the obvious one for this endowed chair.''
Said TRIUMF Director Eric Vogt:
' 'The Warren Chair will perpetuate the
name of an outstanding scientist who for
40 years brought some of the newest and
freshest science ideas in the world to
UBC."
Berkowitz & Associates
Statistics and Mathematics Consulting
•research design
•sampling
•data analysis
•forecasting
Jonathan Berkowitz, Ph.D.
4160 Staulo Crescent, Vancouver, B.C., V6N 3S2
Office: (604) 263-1508     Home: (604) 263-5394
COPYING IN THE LIBRARIES?
LIBRARY CMlliiiliiilll
SEPT 25-30
10% OFF
$5 cards for sale in most libraries
$10, $20 cards in Main and Woodward
CLASSIFIED
Classified advertising can be purchased from Media Services. Phone
228-4775. Ads placed by faculty and staff cost $6 per insertion for 35
words. Other are charged $7. Monday, Sept.25 at 4 p.m. is the deadline
for the next issue of UBC Reports which appears on Thursday, Oct. 5.
Deadline for the Oct. 19 issue is noon Oct. 10. All ads must be paid in
advance in cash, by cheque or internal requisition.
For Rent
FOR RENT: Three bedroom secluded
Saltspring Island cottage on a private
cove. New architect designed home has
fully equipped kitchen, two bathrooms
and sleeps 6 comfortably. Available by
week or month. Phone 416-483-8175.
For Sale
For Sale: This space in UBC Reports
classified section. This ad costs faculty
and staff $6 per insertion. Others pay $7.
Phone 228-4775 for more information or
to place an ad.
Notices
PERSONS OF CHINESE ORIGIN: If
you are at least 18 years old and have
lived in Canada for more than one year,
we ask you to share your experiences
with us by participating in a study on the
changes of perceptions, and values of
Chinese immigrants and Chinese-Canadians. This will give you a better understanding of yourself as a person and as a
member of your community. Project
supervised by Dept. of Counselling Psychology, UBC. Please contact Natacha
at 430-3657 after 6 p.m.
Services
COLOR PHOTOCOPIES: Available on
campus. Special UBC Rates. Call 228-
4775. UBC REPORTS   Sept 21,1989       8
Official Opening
President David Strangway addresses a crowd of about 300 at the opening ofthe new Chemistry-Physics building earlier this month.
Photo bv Media Servic
Polanyi decries funding constraints
By GAVIN WILSON
Nobel Prize-winning Canadian scientist John Polanyi says government funding agencies should stop placing so much
emphasis on the social and economic
goals of university research and give scientists the freedom they need to make
important discoveries.
During a visit to UBC Polanyi said
there is an increasing tendency for government funds to be tied to research aimed
at reaching specific applications, but that
this will not lead to good science.
"For the government to choose its
science that way is like choosing a package because of its wrapping and not its
contents," the University of Toronto
chemistry professor said.' 'But that kind
of thinking will result in wasted funds.
Governmental wish lists do not result in
discoveries."
Polanyi made the remarks in an interview with UBC Reports following a Sept
8 symposium held to mark the opening of
the new Chemistry-Physics building.
Polanyi, who was awarded the Nobel
prize in 1986, was one of three Nobel
laureates who lectured on their work at
the symposium, the others being Herbert
Brown and Arthur Schawlow. Geraldine
Kenney-Wallace, chairman ofthe Science Council of Canada and a UBC graduate, chaired the symposium held at Hebb
Theatre. Another Nobel laureate scheduled to appear, Georg Bednorz, was forced
to cancel due to illness. Speaking in his
place was UBC Physics Professor Jess
Brewer.
Polanyi said the importance of science to the future of Canada is widely
John Polanyi
recognized, but that government policies
are in danger of treating universities as
extensions of industrial laboratories, with
an increasing tendency to orient research
toward short-term applications.
"Prime Minister Mulroney recently
deplored the 'quarterly report' mentality
of Canadian industry," he said. "This
mentality can be even more damaging
when applied to the universities."
Polanyi compared this approach to
drilling for oil wells in a field next to
existing wells. You can expect to find
something, but there will be rapidly diminishing returns.
"Universities exist for the more difficult sort of research activity - finding out
where the logic of science allows discoveries to be made, where the possibilities
lie."
Government programs are more inclined to produce research guidelines aimed
at achieving specific economic or social
benefits, and then trying to determine
which discoveries scientists need to make.
"What's lacking in programs such as
the Centres of Excellence is a sufficient
commitment to pursuing fundamental
research that can lead to a breakthrough in
understanding," Polanyi said. "They fail
to stress sufficiently the scientific criteria,
which are of overriding importance. Major
advances never come about under the
guidance of central authorities. They flow
from the imagination of the scientists
who are deeply enmeshed in the problem."
Market-oriented research can be done
most effectively closer to the market, and
university research should remain free to
uncover nature's secrets where nature allows. The two should be in close commu
nication.
"But industry is not responding to the
challenge," he added. "There is a disinclination in industry to take risks with
advanced technology. It will take time to
change those attitudes.
"Unfortunately, we don't have limitless time if we are to gain a foothold in the
rapidly-moving global marketplace - a
marketplace for ideas and for devices."
Chemistrv-Physics building opened
Era of construction begins
By GAVIN WILSON
UBC ushered in a new era of construction on campus with the dedication of the
Chemistry-Physics building Sept. 7.
The $ 16.4-million building, funded
entirely by the provincial government, is
the first in a series of new facilities slated
for construction in the next few years.
With 55,000 square feet of functional
space that will house 100 researchers
from the two science departments, the
building was hailed at an official ceremony as a major commitment to mui-
tidisciplinary research and graduate student support.
President David Strangway, Chancellor Leslie Peterson and others speaking at the opening ceremonies thanked
Minister of Advanced Education Stan
Hagen, who was also present, for his
support for the project.
"We expect to invite you back for
ribbon-cutting ceremonies on several other
buildings," Strangway said to Hagen,
noting that Victoria has committed full
funding to three more buildings and partial funding to four others that will be
built as part of the UBC Campaign.
About 300 people looked on as the
building was opened, including Nobel
Prize laureates Herbert Brown, Arthur
Schlawlow and John Polanyi.
Planning for the new building began
nearly a decade ago, but construction did
not go ahead until Hagen announced
approval of funding two years ago. It is
the first major academic building to go
up on campus since the era of restraint.
"The building we are dedicating today is an important element in helping us
to implement our strategic plan and to
further the reintegration of the sciences,''
Strangway said.
Hagen said the new building is part of
the government's commitment to building a scientific and technical base for the
B.C. economy, training highly-skilled
workers for the emerging technologies of
the next century and providing better
facilities for today's students.
"This new building can only add to
UBC's growing reputation as a world
class university," he said. "This is a
commitment that transcends bricks and
mortar."
Acting Dean of Science David Dolphin pointed out that science faculty
members conduct one-third of all funded
research at UBC, have won eight ofthe 23
Steacie Prizes awarded in Canada and are
associated with half of the university's
spin-off companies. Their students, which
include one of every three enroled at
UBC, are ranked among the best in North
America.

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubcreports.1-0117960/manifest

Comment

Related Items