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UBC Publications

UBC Reports Feb 8, 1978

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 reports
Volume 24, No 3. Feb 8, 1978  Published by Information Services, University ot BC , 2075 Wesbrook Mall.
Vancouver' BC   Vbt 1WS   228- il 31   Jim Banham ancl Judith Walker, editors   ISSN 0497-2921)
And a-one, and a-two... Martin Berinbaum, director of the band program in
UBCs music department and himself a renowned trumpeter, readies the UBC
Wind Symphony for their tour in March to California. The band will perform at
the College Band Directors National Conference and in San Francisco.
Rental, room-and-board rates rise
The Board of Governors has approved increases in rental and
room-and-board rates for students
living in single and family housing
on the UBC campus.
The new single-student rates,
which are effective May 1, provide
for room-rate increases ranging
from 5.5 to 8.9 per cent for accommodation in Place Vanier and
Totem Park Residences. The meal
rate in Vanier and Totem Park will
increase from $3.03 to $3.33 a day,
an increase of 9.9 per cent.
Room rates in the high-rise
towers of the Walter Gage
Residence, where room only is provided, will increase by 9 per cent.
There will be a similar increase in
the rate for low-rise accommodation at the Gage residence.
Despite the increases, UBC housing director Michael Davis said he
expects that UBC will maintain its
position of offering the lowest
residence rates among western
Canadian universities and the second lowest in all Canada.
Rental rates in Acadia Park family housing will be increased 11 per
cent from Sept. 1 for accommodation in a high-rise apartment
building, adjacent townhouses and
in row housing on President's Row
Rental    rates    in    Acadia    Camp,
which is largely converted army
huts, will increase 7 per cent, effective Sept. 1.
Mr. Davis said the 1978-79
budgets and 16 other recommendations affecting residence
finances had been discussed and
approved at meetings of residence
associations in all campus units
and by a joint residence committee
made up of representatives of
campus residences and food services.
9MOAI 00UECTT0N*
Students to sit
as observers
on Board
Two student members of UBC's
Board of Governors have been
barred from voting on Board
business until their status as Board
members has been clarified
The status of the two student
Board members — graduate student Basil Peters and Arts student
Paul Sandhu — was one of the first
items of business on the agenda of
the Board when it held its first
meeting of 1978 Tuesday.
Mr. Peters told the Board that he
thought it wise for him not to vote
on Board resolutions If he did,
decisions of the Board might be
challenged on the ground that the
status of the student members was
not clear, he said
The two students will sit as
observers at Board meetings until
their status is cleared up
Board chairman George Morfitt
said the status of the student
members was unclear as the result
of allegations that there were
voting irregularities on Jan. 18
when students cast ballots for two
student Board members and five
senators at large.
The allegations of voting irregularities in the Jan. 18 election
have been referred to the Senate
committee on the implementation
of the Universities Act. Senate is
required by the Universities Act
to "make and publish" all rules
for elections to University governing bodies.
The earliest the committee
could report would be Feb 15,
when Senate holds its regular
monthly meeting.
"Save energy" posters could win money
Prizes totalling $800 are offered
to UBC students in a contest for
posters to be used in a campus program to save energy
Any student registered for the
1977-78 winter session is eligible to
enter the contest, which involves
submission of a finished poster
that could be used in UBC's
energy-conservation campaign.
First prize in the contest is $300.
Two second prizes of $200 each
are also offered and there will be
three $100 awards to third-prize
winners. All prize-winning entries
become the property of the University for use in its drive to save
energy.
Prof.    Sam    Black,    of   the   art
education division of the Faculty
of Education, will chair a five-
member panel of judges, which
will include three students to be
named by the Alma Mater Society
The fifth member of the committee will represent Physical Plant.
Deadline for entries is March 1.
Application forms and rules
covering entries are available in
the following campus locations:
Bookstore, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, Student
Union Building, Main and
Sedgewick libraries, Department
of Fine Arts (Room 403, Lasserre
Building), and Information Services (second floor, Main Mall
North Administration Building). FOOD SERVICES
A new look, a new taste, a new
By Judith Walker
It may well be that sometime in
this new year a quiet revolution
will happen in the SUB cafeteria.
Slowly but steadily you'll notice
the changes. A carvery where meat
will be cut fresh as you order it. A
potagerie serving hot, hearty meals
in a bowl with different types of
bread. Tortieres on the menu along
with quiche and other pastry
delights. A few plants hanging
throughout to soften the corners.
Where did you say this was happening? SUB cafeteria?
New blood brings new enthusiasm, and the new director of
Food Services (since mid-
September '77) certainly has the
enthusiasm. "All it will take is a bit
of imagination and hard work,"
says Christine Samson as this
reporter expresses doubts about
brightening up SUB But she's not
starry-eyed and naive. Ms. Samson
brings with her to UBC a range of
experience in university food services across Canada. And she's supported by a group of experienced
food service managers and
employees.
After obtaining her Bachelor of
Science in Home Economics from
Acadia University in Nova Scotia
and a diploma in dietetics from
Alberta, she began gathering experience in food services at the
University of Alberta, followed by
a stint at the University of Victoria
where she ended up as head of
food services. She came to UBC
from McGill University where she
was director of food services.
With 12 years of experience
under her belt, she knows the problems and frustrations of university
food services. She knows that
things will not happen as quickly
as she would like them to.
"We have to work slowly. It's
not just me sitting on this chair in
my office dreaming up things," she
says. To introduce new items on
the menu means training people to
make new things Introducing
souvlaki, a Greek dish, or quiche is
not quite as simple as making the
standard hamburgers, grilled
cheese or fish and chips.
Since September, though, Ms.
Samson    has    introduced    some
2/UBC Reports/Feb. 8, 1978
Christine Samson
changes, such as the salad bar in
the SUB cafeteria, which have
received immediate positive
response from staff and students
Hanging plants made their appearance in December. In the
residences, students now have the
choice of two hot entrees instead
of just one. (Ironically, this brought
a few complaints because it increased the length of lineups at
meal time as people took time to
make their choices!) And each of
the residences now have food committees made up of five residence
students who meet with Ms.
Samson and the residence dietitian
to exchange complaints and suggestions.
She plans an ice-cream bar in the
summer months for SUB, a burger
bar shortly, healthier desserts using
local fruit — in short,a food fair.
For the Ponderosa cafeteria, the second largest eating area on campus, she'll try offering hot and cold
sandwiches on different breads,
ethnic meals — Greek, Chinese,
Italian, and so on — with a different meal each day, a soup and
salad bar, and a fruit and cheese
stand. And, she insists, these
changes shouldn't boost food services costs. "It's just different
menu items."
She hopes to rename the Old
Auditorium cafeteria where daily
Chinese food draws a large crowd
— the "Rice Skillet" is a possible
name that's being bandied about
right now — and do some interior
decoration there.
"We don't expect all our ideas to
work. We've had good response
from the salad bar and that's been
encouraging. I think that souvlaki
should be a big hit, but I may be
dead wrong."
The campus food service has to
be responsive to the likes and
dislikes of the people it serves
otherwise it loses money. Food
Services receives no money out of
the provincial government grant to
UBC. It must generate enough
revenue during the year to pay for
food, labor, furniture, dishes and
cutlery, and the mortgage
payments on the cafeteria space in
Totem Park residence and the Student Union Building. Those costs
are in the order of $4.5 million a
year It can't afford not to be
responsive.
It has to offer a choice of food
to its customers. That choice may
not always be what Christine
Samson thinks is nutritious Some
will still insist on french fries and
gravy for lunch. "But we can't tell
people what to eat. If you're a
company which is subsidizing a
hot meal at lunch for your
employees, then you don't have to
offer   a   choice.   We're   not   subsi- director with lots of ideas
dized to do that. We're a non-profit
organization."
Getting people to eat what's
good for them, however, is not
nearly the problem today that it
was 10 years ago. "People are
much more aware of what they eat
now," she says. She'd like to offer
the choice of hamburgers on whole
wheat buns and that may boost the
cost a little "But I hope that
students would pay five or ten
cents more for something that's
good for them "
One of the battles that a university food services director faces
which is not so easily won,
however, is that time-honored expectation that residence food or
cafeteria food has to be unpalatable, or at best, mediocre.
If that really were the case, then
the catering service that Food Services offers for weddings and conventions, especially in the summer,
would get practically no business
at all. Yet the catering end of Food
Services    does    bring    in    extra
revenue in the summer which helps
to keep down the cost of food in
the winter session.
Ms. Samson doesn't expect to
change students' attitudes totally
toward Food Services. There will
always be complaints, she says,
because "all people are experts on
food. It's an easy target for
criticism. As students they're not
going to criticize their chemistry
professor very much.
"But you can really get at the
food. Because you've been eating
for V number of years before you
get here."
She may not change attitudes,
but the new decor and menu ideas
certainly indicate that the new
Food Services director is willing to
try.
NEXT WEEK AT UBC
Continued from page four
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15 (CONTINUED)
8:00 p.m. SENATE   MEETING.   Interested   members   of   the   University
c ornmunity welcome. Tickets available from Frances Medley,
22e-29Sl      Board    and    Senate    Room,    Old    Administration
Building.
THURSDAY, FEB. 16
9:00 a.m. MEDICAL GRAND ROUNDS. Dr  W   Bowie, Medicine, VGH;
Or   KC.II    Suen,  Microbiology,  VGH,  and  Dr.  Linda Aubke,
( ase presentation, on Diphtheria. Lecture Hall B, Vancouver
General  Hospital.
12:15 p.m. BEHAVIORAL SCIENCE SEMINAR. Dr  M   Beiser, Psychiatry,
UBC, on Mental Health Assessments  —   Problems of Cross-
Cultural Studies. Children's Hospital, 250 W   59th Ave
12:30 p.m. LAW  LECTURE.  Prof   Shimon  Shetreet on The  Israel  Legal
System — An Overview. Main lecture hall, Curtis Building.
FACULTY COMPOSERS CONCERT features Music of Berry,
Chapped, Chatman, Douglas, Szentkiralyi and Wilson. Recital
hall, Musk  Building.
PHARMACEUTICAL SCIENCES SEMINAR. Dr Brian Pate,
Pharmaceutical Chemistry, UBC, on Trace-Element Concentration Patterns in Individual Human Hairs — Their Origin
and Significance. Room 3b5, Cunningham Building
FINE ARTS LECTURE. Gerard Le Coat, Section Histoire de
lArt, Universite de Montreal, on The Metaphor of 'Life as
Voyage' in Watteau's Enseigne de gersaint. Room 102, Lasserre
Building
1:00 p.m. UBC COMMITTEE ON MEDIEVAL STUDIES CONFERENCE on
Rhetoric in the Trivium. Continues until 10 30 p.m. Faculty
Club further information from Dr. Janos Bak, History, local
SI 81
2:30 p.m. CONDENSED MATTER SEMINAR. Hans Morawitz,  IBM, San
lose, on Librons in Organic Conductors. Room 318, Hennings
Building
3:45 p.m. APPLIED MATH AND STATISTICS COLLOQUIUM. Dr   L D
Sto-ie, D H Wagner Associates, Pennsylvania, on Optimal
Search Plans for Moving Targets. Room 2449, Biological
Sc tenc es Building
4:00 p.m. PHYSICS COLLOQUIUM, F   Kaellne, Physics   UBC, on Atomic
Physics with Synchrotron Radiation. Room 201, Hennings
Building
6:30 p.m. WESBROOK  MEMORIAL ALUMNI  LECTURESHIP DINNER.
Sir Walter Perry, vice-chancellor, Open University of Great
Britain, on Teaching and Learning at a Distance. Dinner at 7:30
|) m 11< kets, at $10 each, from UBC Alumni Assoc iation, local
iii i
8:00p.m. GEOLOGICAL   SCIENCES   SEMINAR.   Dr    I    Corliss,   Depart
menl of Oc eanography, Oregon State University, Corvallis, on
Deep Ocean Thermal Springs on the Galapagos Rift. Bayshore
Inn.   ItiOl  W. Georgia
ALUMNI CONCERT with David Gibson, organ, Denella Sing,
Marina   Ching,   Angela   Schiwy,   piano;   Bonnie   Louie,   violin;
Diane   fox,   mezzo-soprano;   and  Robert   Sheffield,  clarinet.
Recital  Hall. Music  Building   Free
FRIDAY, FEB. 17
9:00a.m. UBC   ALUMNI   ASSOCIATION   CONFERENCE   on   Distance
Education. Sir Walter Perry, vice-chancellor of Great Britain's
Open University speaks on Educational Objectives and Problems in Distance Education — An International Perspective at
the morning session   Afternoon session on Technical and Production Aspects of Distance Education begins at 1 00 p in   Information  and  reservations  from   UBC  Alumni  Association,
local 331 i
PEDIATRICS   GRAND   ROUNDS.   Tibor   Heim.   professor   of
Pediatrics   and   Developmental   Biology,   Hospital   for   Sick
Children,  Toronto, on Calorigenesis and Lipid Metabolism in
the Newborn Infant. Lecture Hall B, Heather Pavilion, VGH
10:00 a.m. MEDIEVAL ASSOCIATION OF THE  PACIFIC  CONFERENCE.
Today's sessions include papers on medieval government,
religion ancl education. Program and further information
available from Dr lanos Bak, History, local 5181 Conference
continues on Saturday. MacPhee Conference Centre, Angus
Building
1:00 p.m. GENETICS SEMINAR. Dr  Basil Ho-Yuen and Dr   Betty Poland
on Endocrine Profile in High Risk Pregnancy. Confereni e
Room, fourth floor, Health Centre for Children, 855 W 10th
Ave
3:30 p.m. GEOLOGICAL    SCIENCES    SEMINAR.    Dr      |      Corliss,
Oceanography, Oregon State University, Corvallis, on
Hydrothermal Chemistry of Sediment Mound Deposits of the
Galapagos Rift. Room i iO-A, Geological Sciences Building
CHEMICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. L S Wilkins on
Stratified Solar Pond. Room 20b, Chemical f ngineenng
Building
LINGUISTICS COLLOQUIUM. Bob Levme, Prcmncial
Museum, Victoria, on Focus and Relation in Kwakwala. Room
2225, Buchanan Building
COMPUTER SCIENCE COLLOQUIUM. John Seely Brown,
Bolt Beranek & Newman, Cambridge, Mass , on Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Diagnosing What's in A Child's
Head. Room  101, Computer Sciences Building
8:00 p.m. CENTRE   FOR   CONTINUING   EDUCATION   presents   David
Spangler, writer, educator and philosopher, in a lecture/discussion on The 'New Age': Personal and Planetary Opportunities. Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre  Admission, $4; students, 5> i
SATURDAY, FEB. 18
9:00 a.m. MEDIEVAL ASSOCIATION OF THE PACIFIC CONFERENCE.
TodayS sessions include papers on medieval art historv,
literature, government, religion and the use ot computers in
medieval studies Program and further information from Dr
lanos Bak, History, local SI81   Lasserre Building
10:00 a.m. CENTRE   FOR   CONTINUING   EDUCATION   presents   David
Spangler in a one-day workshop on The 'New Age' Vision. Lecture Hall 1, Woodward Instruc tion a I Resources Centre Admission. $20, students, $1 S For information, call 228-2181, local
2b1.
12 noon CANADA    WEST    UNIVERSITY   WRESTLING    CHAMPION
SHIPS.   Round   one   competition   continues   until   2 00   pm
Round two competition from 2:30 to 4:10 p m. Round three
competition to decide winners will take place from 5.00 to
7.00 p m   War Memorial Gymnasium.
2:00 p.m. SOCCER.    UBC    Thunderbirds    vs     Lldorados      Thunderbird
Stadium
UBC Reports/Feb. 8, 1978/3 NEXT WEEK AT UBC
Notices must reach Information Services. Main Mall North Admin. Bldg., by mail, by 5 p m   Thursday of week preceding publication of notice
VANCOUVER INSTITUTE
Saturday, Feb. 11
Hon    J V    Clyne,   former  chairman,   MacMillan   Bloedel   Ltd ,   and   former
Justice, Supreme Court of B C , on The Constitution of Canada — Summing
Up.
Saturday, Feb. 18
Pat Carney, president, Gemini North Ltd , on The Space Age Classroom —
Satellite Tele-Education.
Both  lectures  are  at  8:15  pm    in   Lecture   Hall   2,  Woodward   Instructional
Resourc es Centre
SUNDAY, FEB. 12
3:00 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY. A program of Chinese lion
dances will be presented to come ide with the lunar New Year,
the Year of the Horse   b (9 5 N W   Marine Dr
MONDAY, FEB. 13
9:30 a.m. COMPUTING CENTRE LECTURE, first in a series of six lee
tures on BASIC FMT (a Textprocessing Package) by Tina Duke
Room 447, Computer Sciences Building
12 noon PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr   J.P. Harwood, Department
of Health, Education, and Welfare, National Institute of
Health, Bethesda, Md , on Receptor Regulation and Target
Cell Responses: Studies in the Ovarian Luteal Cell. Room 114,
Block C, Medical Sciences Building
12:30 p.m. RELIGIOUS STUDIES LECTURE. Rt   Rev   Dr  J AT   Robinson,
Dean of Chapel, Trinity College, Cambridge, on Theological
Honesty in the Seventies. Room 104, Buchanan Building
CANCER    RESEARCH    SEMINAR.    Urs    Kuhnlein,    Cancer
Research,  UBC,  on  Diet and Cancer of the Colon.  Library,
Block B, Medical Sciences Building
ARCHITECTURE   LECTURE,   twart   Wetherill,   Architecture,
UBC, on Acoustics of the Orpheum, Vancouver. Room 102,
Lasserre Building
3:30 p.m. HISTORY   LECTURE.   Prof    Stanley   Ryerson,   Universite   du
Quebec a Montreal, on History and the Social Sciences. Penthouse, Buchanan Building
3:45 p.m. MANAGEMENT SCIENCE SEMINAR with Prof  Mike Harrison,
Stanford University, Calif Room 112, Angus Building
MECHANICAL ENGINEERING SEMINAR. H Mozaffari,
graduate student, Mechanical Engineering, UBC, on Analysis
of a Coolant Accident in the CANDU Reactor by Method of
Characteristics. Room 1215, Civil and Mechanical Engineering
Building
TUESDAY, FEB. 14
ANATOMY SEMINAR. Dr. Abraham B   tastwood, Department
of Neurology, Columbia University, on Reversible Segregation
of Thick and Thin Filaments in a Crustacean Striated Muscle.
Room 300Q, Block B, Medical Sciences Building.
10:30 a.m. MARKETING    RESEARCH    SEMINAR.     Prof     Charles     B
Weinberg,   Stanford   University,   Calif.,   on   ARTS-PLAN:   A
Model Based System for Use in Planning a Performing Arts
Series. Penthouse, Angus Building
12:30 p.m. NOON-HOUR    CONCERT    SERIES,    co-sponsored    by    the
Department of Music and International House, features a
variety of student vocal and instrumental performances. Upper Lounge, International House.
CURRENT AFFAIRS LECTURE. Prof Stanley Ryerson, Universite du Quebec a Montreal, on Canada and Quebec. Room
102, Buchanan Building.
EDUCATION RESEARCH COLLOQUIUM. Dr Pat AH in.
Education, UBC, on Some Methodological Issues in Piagetian
Assessment. Room 1020, Scarfe Building
BOTANY SEMINAR. Elizabeth Wells, Botany, UBC, on
Biosystematic Studies of Heuchera (Saxifragaceae). Room
3219, Biological Sciences Building
1:30 p.m. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING  SEMINAR. RW   Bonner, chair
man, B C Hydro, on The Forecasting of Energy Needs. Room
402, Electrical Engineering Building.
3:30 p.m. OCEANOGRAPHY SEMINAR. Dr.  John Allen, Oregon State
University, Corvallis, Ore , on Coastal Trapped Waves at Low
Latitudes. Room 1465, Biological Sciences Building.
ENGLISH COLLOQUIUM. An informal panel will discuss Approaches to the Criticism of Canadian Literature. Lounge, fifth
floor, Buchanan Tower.
4:00 p.m. HEALTH CARE AND EPIDEMIOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr   Nancy
Kleiber, Anthropology and Sociology, UBC, on Allocating
Responsibility for Health Care Between Providers and Consumers. Room 146, Mather Building
4:30 p.m. BIOCHEMICAL    SEMINAR.     Dr      David     B      Roberts
Biochemistry, University of Oxford, England, on The Genetics
Biochemistry and Control of the Major Proteins of Drosophik
Larval Serum. Lecture Hall 1, Woodward Instructiona
Resources Centre.
CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr. DP Chong, Chemistry, UBC, or
Perturbation Corrections to Koopmans Theorem. Room 250
Chemistry Building.
7:30 p.m. MUSEUM OF ANTHROPOLOGY. The third in a series of free
ethnographic films is Bushmen of the Kalahari. 6393 N.W
Marine Dr
8:00 p.m. LAW LECTURE. Prof  Shimon Shetreet, Law, Hebrew Universi
ty ot  Jerusalem, on The Administration of Justice: Practical j
and Value Problems. Main lecture hall, Curtis Building.
AN     EVENING    OF    CHAMBER    MUSIC.    Student    Small
E nsembles fen Winds and Keyboard will perform. Recital Hall,
Music Building.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15
12 noon
12:30 p.m.
12:35 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
4:00 p.m.
4:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
8:00 p.m.
COMPUTING CENTRE LECTURE. Second in a series of six lectures on BASIC FMT (a Textprocessing Package) by Tina Duke
Room 447, Computer Sciences Building
DEVELOPMENTAL MEDICINE SEMINAR. Dr R Pedersbn,
Physiology. UBC, on Effect of GIP on the Endocrine Pancreas.
Seminar Room, 2nd floor. Centre for Developmental
Medicine, 811 W   10th Ave
PHARMACOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr C E Dower, Pharmacology,
UBC on Optimal Electrocardiography. Room 114, Block C,
Medical Sciences Building
PROGRAM IN SLAVONIC AREA STUDIES. Prof Jan Vanous,
fconomics, UBC, on USSR — Forthcoming Economic Recession.   Room 104, Buchanan Building
CHRISTIAN COALITION film series and discussions titled
How Should We Then Live? The sixth in this series is The Scientific Age. Room 100, Scarfe Building, This will be repeated at
7:00 pm. in Room 207, Student Union Building
HABITAT HAPPENINGS '78, a Wednesday noon-hour film
series I his week's films are on Regional Planning. Upper
Lounge, International House
NOON-HOUR CONCERT. Ronald de Kant, clarinet; Eugene
Wilson, cello; and Robert Rogers, piano, perform Music of
Wilson. Recital Hall, Music Building,
FREESEE FILM SERIES presents America - A Personal History
oi the United States with Alistair Cooke Thirteenth in this
series is The More Abundant Life. Auditorium, Student Union
Building   rree
CHEMISTRY SEMINAR. Dr, K A R Mitchell, Chemistry, UBC,
on Structural Surface Chemistry with LEED. Room 225,
Chemistry Building
STATISTICS WORKSHOP. Dr J Koziol, Mathematics, UBC,
on Assessing Human Lifetime Carcinogenic Risk from Animal
Bioassay Experiments. Room 412, Angus Building.
GEOPHYSICS AND ASTRONOMY SEMINAR. Prof Jim
Savage, United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park, Calif.,
on A Critical Look at Earthquake Prediction. Room 260,
Geophysic s and Astronomy Building.
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY SEMINAR. Dr J.L. Gallagher,
Marine Institute, University of Georgia, on Role of Detritus in
Tidal Marshes. Room 2449, Biological Sciences Building.
COMPARATIVE LITERATURE LECTURE. Dr Marian Coope,
Hispanic and Italian Studies, UBC, on The Nouveau Roman
and the Contemporary Spanish Novel. Penthouse, Buchanan |
Building j
BEHAVIOR AND GENETICS SEMINAR. Dr J Smith, Animal!
Resource f cology, UBC, on Behavioral Genetics in Wild Bird'
Populations. Room 5460, Biological Sciences Building.
CUSO DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION PROGRAM. Part four of
a seven-part series called Dialogues on Development is Tan-;
zania: The Problems of Developing a Self-Reliant Economy'
with Wayne Mullins Blue Room, Arts One Building. Admission, $2 50 for the series
CENTRE FOR HUMAN SETTLEMENTS is showing the PBS-TV
series NOVA on large screen TV projection in Room B-80,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre. This week's program is on Zaire's Mbuti Pygmies
Continued inside
4/UBC Reports/Feb. 8, 1978

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