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UBC Reports Sep 19, 1996

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Array THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
T TBC REPORTS
Meeting Of Minds
Charles Ker photo
Second-year students Shannon Price, left, from the School of Human Kinetics, and Shannon Deacon, from the
Faculty of Arts, take a break between classes and two libraries. The remaining humanities and social sciences
collections, government publications and the Data Library are scheduled to be transferred to the Walter C.
Koerner Library from the Main Library over the Christmas break. Renovations to Sedgewick Library are slated
for completion by late October.
Green
named
Trekker
Community activist Jim Green is this
year's recipient of the Great Trekker
Award, given by the students of UBC to a
graduate who has achieved eminence in
his or her field of endeavor.
Winners are cited for their worthy contributions to the community, their keen
interest in UBC and outstanding service
to UBC students.
Green — who has worked as an instructor at Vancouver Community College, a taxi driver, a dock worker and a
union or
ganizer—
is best
known
for his
work on
behalf of
the poor
in Vancouver's
Downtown
Eastside.
Born in
Alabama
in   1943,
Green
the son of an army sergeant and a florist.
Green became active in the civil rights
movement and moved to Canada in 1968
at the height of the Vietnam War. He
became a Canadian citizen in 1973.
Green studied anthropology at UBC,
See TREKKER Page 4
Few students carry
condoms, study says
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
Despite numerous national and international campaigns promoting safe sex
and warning of the risk of HIV infection,
very few university students actually carry
condoms with them when they head out
for a night on the town, a recent UBC
study shows.
The study is one of two condom-related studies conducted by Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration
marketing professors Gerald Com and
Charles Weinberg with doctoral student
Darren Dahl. A second study found that
embarrassment plays a significant role in
influencing students' buying habits for
condoms, a product referred to as a "desirable unmentionable" by marketers.
The condom carrying study found that
of 346 students surveyed while waiting to
get into the Pit Pub on campus, fewer
than 10 per cent of men, and no women,
had condoms with them.
"We asked students to show us their
condoms and found that very few were
actually carrying them. This differs significantly from what students indicated
in the self-reported written survey," says
Weinberg.
In the written survey of 376 UBC students, about one-third said they would be
very or somewhat likely to take a condom
with them if they were going to a bar.
Previous research relying on self-reports to assess condom carrying has also
shown reported carrying rates ranging
from 22 per cent to 51 per cent for males,
and seven per cent to 51 per cent for
females.
"This discrepancy between actual and
self-reported condom carrying suggests a
danger in over-reliance on self-report
measurements." the UBC study states.
"The low carrying rate to a bar where
meeting potential sex partners is a real
possibility is worrisome and underscores
the risky behaviour of this population."
The study also draws attention to the
differences between male and female attitudes toward carrying condoms and
suggests there is a need for a more
gender-specific approach to encourage
condom carrying.
In the second study, Dahl, Gorn, and
Weinberg investigated the embarrassment
associated with the purchase of condoms
by looking at frequency of purchase and
the number of condoms purchased on
each occasion.
The researchers found that, of people
who had experience in buying condoms,
66 per cent of males and 59 per cent of
females experienced at least some embar-
See CONDOMS Page 2
Choi building hosts
first conference on Asia
The mounting political and economic
might of Asia comes under the collective scrutiny of prominent scholars from
Asia and North America next month at
the inaugural conference of the C.K.
Choi Building for the Institute of Asian
Research (IAR).
Institute Director Terry McGee says
that by the year 2000, Asia (comprising
the East Asian states of Japan, the two
Koreas, China and Taiwan, the South
Asian continent and Southeast Asia)
will support almost three billion people
and generate about a third ofthe globe's
gross national product. McGee adds that
Asia's emergence in the new world order
is fueling intense debate about the role
of Asian values and the need to establish
cultural understanding and respect between Western countries and Asia.
'This gathering promises to be a milestone in the reassessment of Asia's role in
the emerging global system," says McGee.
Harvard University Prof. Tu Weiming, a
renowned international scholar on Confucian thought, delivers the keynote address
for the two-day conference running Oct. 8-
9. Prof. Weiming, director of the Harvard-
Yenching Institute, will speak on Confucian ethics as a spiritual resource for the
emerging global community.
See ASIA Page 2
Loo Look
Inside
Offbeat: Do toilets in the C.K. Choi Building hold promise for Singapore?
Professor Profile 5
Not just the students are new to UBC
Teaching Trust	
17
Forum: Prof. Lee Gass on how we fail our students
Screen Siren
20
Prof. Peggy Thompson puts words in other people's mouths and wins awards 2 UBC Reports.- September 19, 1996
Letters
Discrimination
policy does
make grade
Editor:
In his letter to UBC Reports
of Sept. 5, 1996, Dr. Campbell
Clark argues that UBC's Policy
on Discrimination and Harassment fails "to abide by the
commonly held precepts of
justice in the Canadian judicial
systems." I disagree.
Dr. Clark says that UBC's
policy does not recognize
respondents as innocent until
proven guilty, and furthermore, that the policy is not
concerned with matters of
proof. Dr. Clark is wrong on
both counts.
UBC's policy conforms both
to Canadian human rights
statutes, in particular the
British Columbia Human
Rights Act, and to normative
practices in Canadian law. The
policy ensures the rights of
respondents to natural justice:
that is, the rights to be heard,
and then, to be judged innocent or guilty by unbiased
parties. Specifically, the policy
directs a three-person panel to
recommend "whether on the
LETTERS POLICY
UBC Reports welcomes letters to the editor on topics relevant to the
university community. Letters must be signed and include an address
and phone number for verification. Please limit letters, which may be
edited for length, style and clarity, to 300 words. Deadline is 10 days
before publication date. Submit letters in person or by mail to the UBC
Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C.,
V6T 1Z1, by fax to 822-2684 or by e-mail to janet.ansell@ubc.ca.
balance of probabilities, and
with the onus of proof being on
the complainant, there has
been a violation of the policy"
(paragraph 32). The balance of
probabilities is the common
standard of proof in noncriminal cases.
Dr. Clark also complains
that the policy does not
recognize "mutual consent
between two adults as the
underlying premise for normal
sexual relationships." Again,
he is wrong. UBC's policy is
not concerned with sexual
relationships between consenting adults where there is no
conflict of interest. Rather, the
policy addresses sexual
relationships in which one
party exercises professional
power over the other. UBC's
Policy on Conflict of Interest
requires individuals who
engage in intimate relationships with those in subordinate positions to disclose such
relationships to their administrative heads to ensure that
those in subordinate positions
may be supervised fairly and
evaluated accurately.
Sharon E. Kahn, PhD
Associate vice-president,
Equity
UBC's traffic
culture—it's
yours
Editor:
This is to inform the UBC
driving community of ongoing
enhancements to traffic flow
and convenience in the heart
of campus.
As many drivers know, two
years ago Campus Planning &
Development (C-P&D) put a
stop to cars illegally speeding
along East Mall. They made it
legal. Then, it put in
crosswalks so that pedestrians
would feel perfectly safe,, and
also installed thousands of
dollars worth of tiny nubbles
and brightly-painted speed
bumps along the road.
Fortunately, however, the
nubbles-and-bumps actually
heighten driving enjoyment. At
50 km/h they create a pleasant tlngly sensation on the
back of one's thighs. Alternatively, as many drivers already
do, you can enjoy swerving
back and forth so as to miss
the bumps altogether. Incidentally, I use 50 km/h merely as
a nice round figure. On East
Mall no speed limit at all is
enforced.
As for other areas of central
campus, C-P&D has installed
yellow plastic posts to create
the impression that cars and
Please Recycle
trucks can't just roar around
at will in "pedestrian zones."
Look more closely, however,
and you will notice that none
of these "barriers" is ever
complete. So like the nubbles-
and-bumps, the posts are
mainly there for comic effect.
Also, if you wish to drive
from East Mall to Student
Union Boulevard, don't miss
the new short-cut provided for
your convenience. Behind
Main Library, veer sharply east
across the "pedestrian zone"
that leads past the north end
ofthe SUB. UBC has installed
a nice ramp over the curb so
that you don't hurt your tires.
The only problem you'll run
into is all those cars and
trucks allowed to park anywhere they like along the
SUB's north and west sides.
Although you will encounter
hundreds of pedestrians along
this route, that's no problem if
you have mastered the swerving manoeuvre I described
earlier.
Anyway, now that university
planners have shown in so
many practical ways that "it's
yours." it's up to drivers to
nurture UBC's traffic culture
as creatively as possible. This
is a place where research is
valued, so feel free to experiment. And finally, please share
your research results with
CP&D.
Dennis Danielson
Professor, Dept. of English
It Brings Out llie Best
In All Of Ik
United Mtey
ol ihe Lower Mainland
Condom
Continued from Page 1
rassment when making a condom purchase and that people
were most embarrassed in front
of the cashier (49 per cent of
males and 52 per cent of females).
Also, single people and people
in relationships appear to be
equally embarrassed about purchasing condoms.
The result of this embarrassment is that students tend to
buy condoms less often and when
they do. they buy smaller package sizes," says Weinberg.
The study also showed that
students who experience the highest levels of embarrassment purchase condoms less frequently,
have purchased condoms less
recently, and are slightly more
likely to purchase condoms from
a vending machine than from
drugstores, supermarkets, or
other retail outlets.
Asia
Continued from Page 1
Other speakers and topics
appearing under the conference
banner. The Empowerment of
Asia: Research and Policy Priorities for the 21st Century, include: Economics Prof. Kwame
Jomo, University of Malaya. 'The
Southeast Asian Economic Miracle": Prof. Edward Seidensticker.
Columbia University, "Is Japan
Becoming a Normal Country?";
UBC Prof. Alexander Woodside,
'The Empowerment of Asia and
the Weakness of Global Theory":
Paul Evans. Director at the University of Toronto-York University Joint Centre for Asia Pacific
Studies, 'The Age ofthe Pacific:
Why Growth and Democratization are Not Enough."
The conference is preceded
on Monday, Oct. 7 by the official
opening ofthe IAR's new home in
the C.K. Choi Building on West
Mall. An opening ceremony beginning at 2:30 p.m. kicks off a
week-long Open House featuring cultural, academic and technological presentations.
Free daily concerts and cultural performances are planned
from 1 p.m.-2 p.m. Daily lunch
menus and cultural performances throughout Asia Week will
highlight different countries.
Graduate students will show how
new technology is applied to research in the institute's Asia
Multimedia Resource Centre.
Apart from its conference
rooms and offices for visiting
scholars, the building houses
the institute's five centres: the
Centre for Chinese Research, (he
Centre for India and South Asia
Research, the Centre for Japanese Research, the Centre for
Korean Research and the Centre
for Southeast Asia Research.
Winner ofthe 1996 Building
Owners and Managers Association's Earth Award, the C.K. Choi
Building features recycled bricks
and structural beams as well as
composting toilets.
Tours of the building will be
conducted by Campus Planning
and Development daily at 10 a.m.
and 2:30 p.m. For more information on Asia Week call 822-2468.
President Emeritus
Douglas T. Kenny
There will be a Memorial Reception held in memory of
President Emeritus Douglas T. Kenny on
Tuesday, October 8,1996, 4:30 to 6:00 p.m.
in the Great Hall ofthe First Nations Long House,
1985 West Mall
All are welcome
Wax
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Histology
Services
Providing
Plastic and Wax sections for the research community
George Spurr     RT, RLAT(R)
Kevin Gibbon
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UBCREPORTS
UBC Reports is published twice monthly (monthly in
December, June, July and August) for the entire university
community by the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251
Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1. It is
distributed on campus to most campus buildings and to
Vancouver's West Side in the Sunday Courier newspaper.
UBC Reports can be found on the World Wide Web at
http://www.ubc.ca under News, Events and Attractions.
Managing Editor: Paula Martin (paula.martin@ubc.ca)
Editor/Production: Janet Ansell (janet.ansell@ubc.ca)
Contributors: Connie Bagshaw (connie.bagshaw@ubc.ca),
Stephen Forgacs (Stephen.forgacs@ubc.ca)
Charles Ker (charles.ker@ubc.ca),
Gavin Wilson (gavin.wilson@ubc.ca).
Editorial and advertising enquiries: (604) 822-3131 (phone),
(604) 822-2684 (fax).
UBC Reports welcomes the submission of letters and
opinion pieces. Opinions and advertising published in UBC
Reports do not necessarily reflect official university policy,
Material may be reprinted in whole or in part with
appropriate credit to UBC Reports. UBC Reports ■ September 19, 1996 3
Women Students' Office
celebrates long tradition
by Connie Bagshaw
Staff writer
In 1921, Agnes McPhail took her seat
as the first woman elected to Parliament
and Mary Bollert became UBC's first Adviser of Women.
It's 75 years later, and one ofthe oldest
student services established at the university is celebrating its long tradition of
serving the needs of women students and
welcoming them
to the campus
community.
The office,
known today as
the Women Students' Office
(WSO), has undergone name
changes since its
inception, and the
scope of its responsibilities has
grown dramatically. But one
thing remains the
same: its commitment to creating a safe and equitable
environment for all women at UBC.
Originally limited to counselling women
students, the WSO now offers individual
advocacy, feminist counselling, the
Mentoring Program for Women of Colour,
the Safer Campus Workshops, the
Clothesline Project and practicum and
volunteer placements.
In 1975, which was International Women's Year, only 24 per cent of the total
undergraduate student body at UBC was
female.
Today, more than half of UBC's undergraduate students and graduate students
enrolled in master's programs are women.
Women also comprise approximately 50
per cent ofthe enrolment in the faculties
of medicine, science and pharmaceutical
sciences.
Also celebrating milestones this year
are the Women's Studies Program, established 25 years ago, and the Centre for
Research in Women's Studies and Gender Relations, marking its fifth birthday.
Announced with  little fanfare as a
Susan Point artwork
three-paragraph item in the Sept. 7, 1971
issue of UBC Reports, women's studies
began as a 20-lecture series, funded by a
federal government grant. Called, The
Canadian Woman: Our Story, the non-
credit, interdisciplinary series featured
students, UBC faculty and community
experts delivering lectures followed by
small group discussions. The fee for the
complete series was $2.
Exactly 20 years later, UBC students
could earn a BA majoring in Women's
Studies.
The creation ofthe
Centre for Research
in Women's Studies
and Gender Relations was front page
news in UBC Reports
on July 18, 1991.
Under the direction of Veronica
Strong-Boag, the
centre strives to
strengthen and increase scholarship in
the areas of women's
studies and gender relations, promotes
interdisciplinary research in graduate
education and serves as a community
resource.
To celebrate its fifth anniversary, the
centre will host a one-day conference
focusing on the special concerns of children around the world, particularly female children.
Stephen Lewis, the deputy director of
external relations for UNICEF, will deliver the keynote address titled Our
World's Children: The Meaning of Gender
on Fri. Oct. 18 at 7:30 p.m. in the George
Curtis Building, Room 101, Faculty of
Law. The public is invited to attend. For
more information, call 822-9171.
Festivities are also being planned by
the WSO and Women's Studies Program
during UBC's Homecoming Week, Oct.
17 - 20. A limited edition of t-shirts, coffee
mugs and book bags featuring Coast
Salish artist Susan Point's Free Spirit are
currently on sale at the UBC Bookstore to
commemorate the anniversaries. Call the
WSO at 822-2415 for details.
Offbeat
by staff writers
The C.K. Choi Building's composting toilets would give Singapore
citizens fits.
A two-month toilet training drive has been launched in Singapore in an
effort to turn the population into "A Gracious Society." Those who fail to flush
a public lavatory after use are fined $145 for a first offence, $485 for a
second no-flush and as much as $970 for failing to flush three or more times.
Of all the many environmental features ofthe C.K. Choi Building, the
Swedish-designed/U.S.-made Clivus Multrum composting toilet has attracted
the most attention. It looks remarkably like a normal toilet except that,
without water, it's flushless. So, those who get used to it run the risk of
forgetting to flush elsewhere.
During the last six months, visitors have left the following comments
about their encounter with the Clivus Multrum.
Engineer: I came just to see your toilet. I've heard so much about it.
Professor: What you have here is an inside outhouse.
Architect: I didn't feel flush.
Custodian: The urinals, at least, should have water for flushing.
Professor: Don't drop your wallet in there; your dough will become fertilizer.
Professor: The toilet doesn't allow you to sit and read the papers. It is too
drafty.
Professor: I was underwhelmed.
(Courtesy: Asia Pacific Report)
Clinton Hussey photo
Mother Nature is exacting a cost from the Museum of Anthropology's unique
outdoor collection of free-standing totem poles.
Deteriorating totems
to be saved by funds
by Gavin Wilson
Staff writer
Weathering and natural decay have
taken a toll on the Totem Village on the
grounds ofthe Museum of Anthropology,
but the museum hopes to save these cultural treasures by raising funds to repair
and enhance them.
In 1993, the museum commissioned
an engineering consultant and a wood
scientist to examine the two Haida houses
and the 10 poles that make up the village.
They found signs of rot, insect infestation
and decay, and said the structures would
likely not survive an earthquake.
Widely regarded as the finest collection of
outdoor sculptures of its kind in the world,
the village features work by Northwest Coast
First Nations artists such as Bill Reid, Doug
Cranmer, Norman Tait, Walter Harris, Jim
Hart and the late Mungo Martin.
More than a million visitors have seen
the houses and poles since they were
installed in 1961.
Reid conceived the Totem Village as a
gathering place for the celebration of the
achievements of First Nations people. Many
ceremonies, carving workshops, and public and educational programs have been
held there. The village has also been an
inspiration to other First Nations artists.
A campaign to raise $600,000 to repair
and enhance the village has begun with a
$125,000 gift from the Royal Bank.
The donation includes commissioning a
welcome figure by Musqueam artist Susan
Point and a new frontal pole by Haida artist
Don Yeomans. The new poles will be erected
in March 1997 as part of Royal Bank's
celebration of its 100th anniversary in B.C.
Point is one of B.C.'s foremost First
Nations artists and her work can be found
in private and corporate collections in
more than 20 countries. Yeomans is a
prominent Haida artist who has worked
with Reid on several projects including the
sculpture. The Spirit of Haida Gwaii.
The original frontal poles on the Haida
houses were carved by Reid and are too
fragile to remain outdoors. They will be
brought into the museum where they will be
on permanent display, adding to the museum's comprehensive collection of Reid art.
The village's eight free-standing poles show
the coast's range of artistic styles. To prevent
further deterioration and damage from seismic shock each will be treated and remounted.
The Haida houses will also be repaired.
Their roof beams will be replaced by beams
pressure-treated to resist fungus and rot.
Improved landscaping, outdoor lighting
and new paths will improve access, particularly for persons with disabilities.
Matching funds from UBC's President's
Fund will go to a new First Nations Studies
Endowment at UBC, to enhance the teaching of First Nations issues and eventually
enable students to pursue a degree major
in First Nations Studies.
Federal conference
held east and west
The experience of other countries may
hold the key to problems within Canadian federalism, say organizers of a conference co-hosted by UBC.
The university is one of two sites for a
conference on federalist states that is being funded by the Dept. of Foreign Affairs.
It will be held Sept. 30-Oct. 3.
Called Identities, Involvement, Living
Together in Federal States: International
Aspects of Federalism, the conference
opens Sept. 30-Oct. 1 at Laval University
in Quebec City before moving to UBC.
It will bring together scholars and
others from Europe, Canada and the
United States to look at issues such as
history and identity, self-determination,
regional alienation, national identity in
multicultural societies, and ethnic and
class differences.
"Unlike other recent conferences that
focused on special issues in Canadian
federalism, this will take a broader approach," said David Elkins, a political
science professor and organizer of the
UBC sessions of the conference.
Some of the speakers at UBC include
Guy Laforest, a Laval political scientist
and prominent separatist, and Peter
Schmidhuber, president of Germany's
Deutsch Bank. UBC scholars taking part
include political scientists Alan Cairns,
Phil Resnick and Barbara Amiel.
The conference is open to the public
and there is no registration fee.
Elkins said he hopes students take
advantage of the opportunity to listen to
some European scholars who are seldom
heard in North America.
The UBC end of the conference opens
with a session at the First Nations Longhouse
at 1 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 2. The next day
it moves to Cecil Green Park House, with
sessions from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. 4 UBC Reports • September 19, 1996
ELECTORAL AREA A
(University Endowment Lands and University
of British Columbia including Hampton Place)
1996 GENERAL LOCAL ELECTION
NOTICE OF NOMINATION PERIOD
Public Notice is hereby given to the electors of
Electoral Area A (University Endowment Lands and
University of British Columbia including Hampton
Place) that nominations are called for the office of
Director to the Board of the Greater Vancouver
Regional District for a three year term expiring
December 1999.
Nominations for qualified candidates will be received
at the offices of the Chief Election Officer, Greater
Vancouver Regional District, 3rd floor, 4330 Kingsway,
Burnaby, B.C., during the following times:
October 1, 1996
October 2 to 4, 1996
October 7 to 10, 1996
October 11, 1996
9:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
8:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.
Candidate information packages containing the
appropriate nomination forms are available from the
Secretary's Department. The nomination documents
shall be subscribed to by the candidate and
accompanied by a written financial disclosure. Further
information may be obtained be contacting the Chief
Election Officer at 432-6283.
^W _^Greater
f* __F(
if
Vancouver
Regional
District
Paulette A. Vetleson
Chief Election Officer
September 19, 1996
A Casual Affair
Old
Grab a friend after school,
grab a bite, then come as
you are to a
FREE
CONCERT
with the
\\ V ANCOUVER
5? M PHONY
" Serglu Comfislon-, Music Director
Friday, September 20
8pm
Auditorium,   UBC
? at Rose Garden Parkade. Northwest Marine Drive
toss from Museum of Anthropology)
Conducted by Clyde Mitchell, Resident Conductor
Beethoven: Egmont Overture
Mozart: Marriage of Figaro, Overture
Cowell: Canadian Odyssey
Liszt: Les Preludes
Intermission
Price: Carnival of Venice
Shostakovich: Festive Overture
Offenbach: Tales of Hoffmann: Barcarolle
Dunn: Les Voyageurs
Grieg: Peer Gynt, In the Hall ofthe Mountain King
Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5, 4th movement
J
Wherever You Are On Your Spiritual Journey
YOU ARE WELCOME HERE!
St. Anselm's Anglican Church
Sunday Worship 8 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
Sunday School & Nursery
University Boulevard, (across from the Golf Clubhouse)
Rev. Kathleen Zang, 224-1410
Buses 10, 9 and 4 stop at our door.
,-S^   ^S
Stephen Forgacs photo
Bardic
Bequest
University Librarian Ruth
Patrick (far right) accepts a
unique, nine-volume set of
Shakespeare on behalf of
UBC from Timothy Foote
(second from left), history
editor of the Smithsonian
Magazine, who delivered the
books to campus from his
home in Washington, D.C.
Bequested to the university
by Foote's late mother,
Jessica Todhunter Foote, a
UBC graduate and actress
who appeared in Frederic
Wood's early productions
and on Broadway, the set
was printed in 1802/03 and
edited by George Steevens.
It will be added to Main
Library's Special
Collections. Also
representing UBC were
Brenda Peterson, head of
the Special Collections
Division and Fine Arts
Library, and        Tom
Shorthouse, co-ordinator of
Collections.
Museum clinics geared at
preserving home treasures
Heat, humidity, insects and
dirt are the age-old enemies in
the battle to prevent valued objects from decaying.
Now the Museum of Anthropology is holding a series of clinics and talks that will look at how
principles of preventive conservation are applied to managing
museum collections and to caring for objects in the home.
All talks and clinics in the
series, called Caring for Objects:
A Series on Prevention Conservation, are free to the public.
• MOA Conservation Clinic
Tuesday. Sept. 24 at 7 p.m.: an
overview of museum conservation methods including a tour
through the galleries and demonstrations of techniques for dealing with environmental and physical hazards to objects in the home.
• Art, Archaeology and the Analytical Laboratory. Tuesday, Oct.
8. 7:30 p.m.: lan Wainwright of
the Canadian Conservation Institute discusses how different
physical and chemical methods
are used to study objects from
museums, art galleries and archaeological sites.
• Identification Clinic. Tuesday. Oct. 22, 7 p.m.: professional
staff will help members of the
public to identify their objects
and provide conservation advice.
• Taking Care of Photographs
and Works on Paper, Tuesday,
Nov. 19, 7 p.m.
• Care of Textiles. Tuesday, Dec.
3, 7 p.m.
Call 822-5087 in advance if
you wish to bring an object to the
clinic for conservation advice.
Trekker
Continued from Page 1
receiving his master's degree in
1980.
In the 1980s he became associated with the Downtown
Eastside Residents Association
(DERA) and helped shape it into
a major force in civic affairs.
Through DERA. which he
headed for more than a decade.
Green worked to improve hous-
FACULTY OF SCIENCE
The University of British Columbia
Call for Nominations
AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN TEACHING
The University of British Columbia established Awards
for Excellence in Teaching in 1989. Awards are made by
the Faculty of Science to UBC Science faculty, lecturers
and laboratory instructors who are selected as outstanding
teachers.
We are seeking input from UBC alumni, current and
former students.
Nomination Deadlines:
First term - October 18, 1996
Second term - February 14, 1997
Nominations should be accompanied by supporting
statements and the nominator's name, address and
telephone number. Please send nominations to:
Chair, Excellence in Teaching Awards
c/o Office of the Dean of Science
Rm. 1505, 6270 University Boulevard
University of British Columbia
Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z4
FAX (604) 822-5558
ing available to low-income city
residents with projects such as
the construction of 500 new
units of housing. Green was also
the driving force behind the senior citizens housing project
known as Pendera.
In the run-up to Expo '86,
Green led opposition to the eviction of low-income hotel tenants. That year he also published the book Against theTide:
The Story of the Canadian Seamen's Union.
Since leaving DERA. Green
has been a community development coordinator for the provincial ministries of Finance and
Housing. He has been responsible for the BladeRunners project,
which provided apprenticeship
training for teenagers on welfare
in trades like carpentry during
construction of GM Place.
Earlier this year, he helped
establish Four Corners Community Savings, a bank at Main and
Hastings intended to serve low-
income people in the area who
have little or no access to regular
banking services.
As well. Green has stood for
office, running strong campaigns
for mayor ofVancouver and, in this
year's provincial election, against
Liberal leader Gordon Campbell in
Vancouver-Point Grey, a race he
lost by just 1,500 votes.
Green will receive his award
Oct. 16 in a reception in the
Student Union Building party
room at 5:30 p.m. Changing faces: new faculty
UBC Reports • September 19, 1996 5
Amidst the throng of new faces on
campus each fall are those of new faculty.
Roughly 40 per cent ofthe university's
1,830 full-time faculty members have
been appointed in the past 10 years. This
pace of faculty renewal has been made
possible through a program of early retirement in effect since 1986 and govern-
Lori Kennedy
Faculty of Science
Position: Assistant Professor, Dept. of
Earth and Ocean Sciences
Education: PhD, Geology (1996), Texas A&M
Courses taught: structural geology
Previous positions: Research Assistant,
Dept. of Geology, University of New Brunswick (1988-90): Teaching Assistant, Centre forTectonophysics. Texas A&M (1991 -
92): Research Assistant, Texas A&M
(1993-95)
Recent publication: The Role ofVeining
and Dissolution in the Formation ofFine-
Grained Mylonites: The McConnell Thrust
Teaching/Research objectives: "How
are fault zones (and at greater depths,
shear zones) developed and what controls the onset of earthquakes? My research concentrates on the evolution of
continent-scale fault zones, with emphasis placed on the physical processes
(mechanisms) responsible for their formation."
ment funding for increased enrolment
which has been in place for five years.
Fifty new faculty have been appointed
this term in 10 faculties. Since 1987,
there have been 751 new tenure track
appointments—504 men and 245 women.
Here are some of the latest faculty
appointments.
Robert Orr
Faculty of Science
Position: Professor. Dept. of Physics and
Astronomy. Warren Chair in Subatomic
Physics
Education: PhD (1972), Imperial College, University of London
Courses taught: introduction to subatomic physics, nuclear and particle physics, fundamental physics laboratory
Previous positions: Staff Physicist, CERN
(1977-81): Research Scientist, Institute
of Particle Physics (1983-95); Professor.
Dept. of Physics. University of Toronto
(1981-95)
Recent publication: Extraction of the
Gluon Density ofthe Proton at Small x
Teaching/Research objectives: "I am convinced that the connection between the
known forces—gravity, electromagnetism,
and the weak and strong nuclear forces—
is the most important question in particle
physics and probably holds the solution to
the problem of where mass comes from."
Faculty facts
■ Faculty members receive more than $120
million in research grants and contracts
annually, mainly in open competition from
outside BC
Sylvie Langlois
Faculty of Medicine
Position:   Assistant Professor, Dept. of
Medical Genetics
Education: MD, University of Sherbrooke
(1981); Speciality in Pediatrics and Molecular Genetics. UBC (1985, 1989-91)
Courses taught: clinical genetics, molecular genetics of single gene disorders
Previous positions: Director, DNA Diagnostic Laboratory. Shaughnessy Hospital (1989-present); Acting Clinical Director, Provincial Medical Genetics Programme (1994-present)
Recent publication: Linkage Analysis of
Two Canadian Families Segregating for
X-linked Spondylepiphyseal Dysplasia
Teaching/Research objectives: "I am
currently analysing the correlation between different changes in a specific gene
and the signs and symptoms of the disease (e.g. Marfan's Syndrome). I am also
engaged in family studies involving DNA
mapping of genes. These studies provide
a starting point to identifying the exact
location of the gene responsible for the
disease in the family."
■ UBC faculties: Agricultural Sciences,
Applied Science, Arts, Commerce and Business Administration, Dentistry, Education,
Forestry, Graduate Studies, Law, Medicine, Pharmacerutical Sciences, Science
Peter Darke
Faculty of Commerce and
Business Administration
Position: Assistant Professor, Marketing
Education: PhD, Experimental Social
Psychology (1993), University of Toronto
Courses taught: introduction to social
psychology, interpersonal behaviour,
psychology of social behaviour
Previous positions: Assistant Professor, Dept. of Psychology, UofT (1995-96)
Recent publication: Lucky Events and
Beliefs in Luck: Paradoxical Effects on
Confidence and Risk-Taking
Teaching/Research objectives: "Behavioural research has developed to a point at
which we can offer reasonably sophisticated
ideas about what factors are important in
detennining perceptions, judgment and
behavior. Contemporary theories appreciate that behavior is driven by a range of
motives, not always rational. My research
aims to understand how factors work together to produce rational and irrational
behaviour. Answers to this question have
the potential to significantly improve decisions that individuals make and help them
adapt to an ever changing world of choice."
Kevin McNeilly
Faculty of Arts
Position:   Assistant Professor, Dept. of
English
Education: PhD, Modern Literature in
English (1991). Queen's University
Courses taught: major authors survey,
introduction to Canadian literature, comparative literature, fictions of cultural
difference, Canadian literature and
multiculturalism
Previous positions: Teaching Assistant,
Queen's University (1989-90); Sessional
Lecturer, University of Western Ontario
(1991-92); Part-time Sessional Lecturer,
UBC (1992-94, as part of Isaak Walton
Killam Postdoctoral Fellowship); Graduate Instructor, UBC (1994): Sessional Lecturer, UBC (1994-1996)
Recent publication: Ugly Beauty: John
Zom and the Politics of Postmodern Music
Teaching/Research objectives: The polyphony that variously constitutes Canadian culture — the proliferation of stances,
positions, voices and texts emerging within
the Canadian context — offers us an
opportunity to engage in a fundamental
self-questioning and to re-think many of
our assumptions about identity and difference, about nationality and otherness,
and about culture itself."
Gail Murphy
Faculty of Science
Position: Assistant Professor. Dept. of
Computer Science
Education:   PhD,   Computer  Science
(1996), University ofWashington
Courses taught: computer evolution
Previous positions:  Research Assistant, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Alberta (1986); Software Designer,
B.C.-based MPRTeltech Ltd. (1987-93);
Research Assistant, Dept. of Computer
Science and Engineering, University of
Washington (1992-96)
Recent publication: Assisting an Experimental Re-engineering of Excel with
Reflexion Models
Teaching/Research objectives: "Software systems are sometimes referred
to as the most complex artifacts ever
created by humans. My teaching objectives include providing students with
the knowledge and skills necessary to
tackle the building of these systems.
My research interests focus on the investigation and development of tools
and techniques enabling software engineers to more cost effectively modify
and extend the usefulness of existing
systems."
Gary Relyea
School of Music
Position: Assistant Professor, Voice and
Opera
Education: Voice Performance Program,
Faculty of Music, University of Toronto
(1967-70); Opera School Program, Faculty of Music, University of Toronto
(1970-71)
Courses taught: vocal instructor. Faculty of Music, University of Toronto
(1978-95)
Previous positions: Appeared as soloist with North American symphony orchestras in Britten's War Requiem,
Handel's Messiah, Mahler's Eighth Symphony, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony
and Verdi's Requiem. Operatic roles in
Donizetti's Lucia di Lammermoor,
Britten's Noah's Flood, Mozart's Marriage of Figaro and Magic Flute and
Rossini's Barber of Seville
Teaching/Research objectives: "I will
guide young singers in developing a vocal technique which will facilitate the
expression of their unique personalities
when singing in several languages and
in different styles."
Linda Siegel
Faculty of Education
Position: Professor, Dept. of Educational
Psychology and Special Education, Dorothy
C. Lam Chair in Special Education
Education: PhD, Psychology (1966), Yale
Courses taught: developmental psychology, language development, research
methods, learning disabilities,
psychoeducational assessment
Previous positions: Assistant Professor, University of Missouri (1966-68);
Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry, McMaster
University Medical Centre (1968-84); Professor, Depts. of Instruction and Special
Education/ Applied Psychology, Ontario
Institute for Studies in Education (OISE,
1984-95); Executive Head, Graduate
Studies, OISE (1987-91)
Recent publication: Learning Disabilities and Suicide: A Causal Connection
Teaching/Research objectives: "My interests lie in the area of learning disabilities,
such as dyslexia and other learning problems. I have been studying the best way to
predict which children will have learning
disabilities so they can be provided with help
from the educational system before the problems become too severe." 6 UBC Reports • September 19, 1996
Calendar
September 22 through October 5
Sunday, Sept. 22
Green College Performing
Arts Group
International Music Night With
Colleen Subasic. Green College.
8pm. Call 822-6067.
Concert
Yiorgo & Yanni: Instrumental
Sounds From Greece. George
Yioldassis and John Mavrogeorge.
MOA, 2:30pm. Call 822-5087.
Monday, Sept. 23
Mechanical Engineering
Seminar
Finding Engineering Information
Electronically. Joy Kirchner. Library. CEME 1202,3:30-4:30pm.
Refreshments. Call 822-6671.
Exhibition
Ted Colyer Painting Exhibition.
Continues to October 14. Asian
Centre auditorium, 1 lam-5pm
daily. Call 822-0810.
Tuesday, Sept. 24
Biotechnology Lab Seminar
Cellulose Binding Domain Modulates Plant Cell Elongation. Prof.
Oded Shoseyov, Agriculture, Hebrew U. Wesbrook 201, 12:30pm.
Refreshments. Call 822-2260.
Statistics Seminar
Residuals In Generalized Linear
Models. Bent Jorgensen. Statistics. CSCI 301,6356 Agricultural
Rd., 4-5:30pm. Refreshments.
Call 822-0570.
Faculty Development
Seminar
Time Management. Merle Ace,
Commerce. David Lam basement,
Faculty Development seminar
room (use outside entrance behind Trekkers), lOam-noon. Call
822-9149.
Botany Department
Seminar
Harvesting The Sun: A Story Of
Two Gene Families. Beverly
Green, Botany. BioSciences 2000,
12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-2133.
GreenCollege
Speaker Series
Mortal Dread And Immortal Reason: Socrates On The Fear Of
Dying. Prof. PaulGooch, Philosophy, U ofToronto. Green College,
5:30pm. Reception in Graham
House 4:45-5:30pm. Call 822-
6067.
Graduate and Faculty
Christian Forum Seminar
Brave New Genes: Recent Research Results And Their Ethical
Question. Prof. John Medina,
Medicine, U of Washington.
Buchanan penthouse, 4:15pm.
Refreshments at 4pm. Call 822-
3112.
Lectures in Modern
Chemistry
Accurate Calculations Of Core-Electron Binding Energies. Prof. Delano
Chong, Chemistry. Chemistry 250
(south wing) lpm. Refreshments
12:40pm. Call 822-3266.
Conservation Clinic
Clinic On Caring For Objects In
Museum And Within The Home.
MOA, 7-8:30pm. Please call 822-
5087 in advance ifyou wish to bring
objects for conservation advice.
Reading and Lecture
A Reading From Her Works by
Barbara Frischmuth (Austrian
Writer). Introduced by Karl
Wagner, U of Vienna. Buchanan
B-321, 12:30-2pm. Call 822-
6403.
System and Network
Administrators Group
(formerly UUG)
Hennings 318, 1:30-3pm. Call 822-
5871.
Wednesday, Sept. 25
Ecology & Biodiversity
Research Seminar
Assessing Interaction Strength For
Members Of A Guild Of Marine
Mesograzers: Does One Big Gulp
Equal Many Bites? Jennifer
Ruesnick, post doctoral student.
Family/Nutritional Sciences 60.
4:30pm. Refreshments Hut B-8 coffee room, 4:10pm. Call 822-3957.
Respiratory Research
Seminar Series
Oxygen Consumption By Peripheral Tissues. Dr. Keith Walley,
Medicine. St. Paul's Hospital,
Gourlay conference room, 5-6pm.
Call 875-5653.
Asian Research /
International Relations
Brown Bag Seminar
Development In Taiwan. Hugh
Stevens, Canadian Trade Office in
Taipei. CK Choi 120, 12:30-2pm.
Call 822-2629.
Microbiology & Immunology
Seminar Series
Microbial Degradation Of High
Molecular Weight Polyaromatic
Hydrocarbons: From Pure Cultures To Reality. Margo Moore.
Biological Sciences, SFU.
Wesbrook 201, 12-lpm. Call 822-
3308.
President's Lecture
An Unprincipled Morality. Prof.
Jonathan Dancy, Philosophy. U of
Reading. Buchanan D-238,
12:30pm. Call 822-3967.
19th Century
Interdisciplinary Studies
Victorians And The Landscape.
Victorians And Their Attitude To
The Environment: Prof. Emeritus
James Winter, History; Claiming
The High Ground - Morality And
Landscape In 19th Century Britain: Prof. Rory Wallace, Emily Carr.
Green College. 8pm. Call 822-
6067.
Applied Mathematics
Colloquium
Equations Of Motions For Interacting Pulses. Prof. Shin-Ichiro Ei.
CSCI 301,3:30pm. Call 822-4584.
Surgery Grand Rounds
Lecture
Surgery For Parkinson's Disease.
Dr. Ian Turnbull, Neurosurgery.
GF Strong auditorium, 7am. Call
875-4136.
Orthopaedics Grand Rounds
Oncology. Dr. B.A. Masri,
Reconstructive Orthopaedics.
Chair. Dr. C.P. Duncan. Eye Care
Centre auditorium, 2550 Willow,
7am. Call 875-4646.
Noon Hour Concert
David Branter, soprano saxophone; Tony Sheppard, alto saxo
phone: Julia Nolan, tenor
saxophane; Colin MacDonald,
baritone saxophone. Music recital
hall. 12:30pm. $3 at the door. Call
822-5574.
Issues in Post-Secondary
Education
New Realities, New Directions, New
Institutions - The Changing Higher
Education System In British Columbia. Bernhard Sheehan. Technical U of BC. Green College.
4:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Pacific Institute for the
Mathematical Sciences
Colloquium
Statistics and Public Policy. Prof.
Emeritus Donald Ludwig, Mathematics and Zoology. Media Services room 1 12. 2:30-3:30pm.
Friday, Sept. 27
Weekly Seminar
Chaos In Bubble Column And 3-D
Fluidized Bed. Chengvu Shen,
Grad. Student. ChemEng 206.
3:30pm. Call 822-3238.
Faculty Development
Seminar
Understanding The Policies And
Protocol Of Graduate Student Supervision: University-Wide Policies
And Regulations. Graham Kelsey,
Educational Studies. David Lam
basement. Faculty Development
seminar room (use outside entrance behind Trekkers), 8-9am.
Refreshments. Call 822-9149.
Faculty Development
Seminar
Feminist Pedagogies: Praxis And
Problems. Moderator: Shauna
Butterwick, Women's Studies.
Panel Members: Yvonne Brown,
Education; Dawn Currie, Women's Studies; Marina Morrow,
Women's Studies; Becki Ross,
Women's Studies. David Lam basement. Faculty Development seminar room (use outside entrance
behind Trekkers). 3-5pm. Call 822-
9149.
Pharmaceutical Sciences
Seminar
Setting Up A Web-Server. Colin
Tilcock, 1RC#3, 12:30-1:30pm. Call
822-4645.
Occupational Hygiene
Program Seminar
Workplace Exposures And Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis: A Population-Based Case-Control Study.
Valerie McGuire, U of Washington. Koerner Lecture Theatre G-
279, 12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-
9595.
Mathematics Colloquium
The Role Of Analytical Methods In
The Recent Developments Of
Symplectic Geometry, Of 4-Dimen-
sional Topology And Of Hamiltonian
Systems. F. Lalonde, U of Quebec at
Montreal. Mathematics 104,3:40pm.
Refreshments in Math Annex 1115,
3:15pm. Call 822-2666.
Pediatrics Grand Rounds
Of Practice Pie And Clinical Clues:
Making The Science Of Crying
Relevant To The Practice Of Colic.
Dr. Ron Barr, Pediatrics and Psychiatry, McGill U. GF Strong auditorium, 9am. Call 875-2307.
Saturday, Sept. 28
The Vancouver Institute
Peacekeeping: Soldiers And Aid
Workers - Partners Apart. Major-
General Guy Tousignant, Canadian Forces Headquarters, Ottawa.
IRC#2. 8:15pm. Call 822-3131.
Monday, Sept. 30
Statistics Seminar
Reference Priors In Non-Normal
Location Problems. Carmen
Fernandez, Econometrics, Tilburg
U. CSCI 301. 6356 Agricultural
Rd., 12:30-2pm. Bringvourlunch.
Call 822-0570.
Institute of Applied
Mathematics Colloquium
The Advantages And Disadvantages Of Genetic Recombination.
Prof. SallvOtto, Zoology. CSCI 301.
3:30pm."Call 822-4584.
Tuesday, Oct. 1
Faculty Development
Seminar
How Can The "Learning Outcomes"
Approach Benefit Your Teaching?
Gary Bauslaugh, director, and Bo
Hansen, special advisor. Centre
for Curriculum and Professional
Development. David Lam basement, Faculty Development seminar room (use entrance behind
Trekkers), 3-5pm. Call 822-9149.
Botany Seminar
Development Of A "Gene Machine"
In Arabidopsis: Insertional Mutagenesis As A Tool To Study Gene
Function. Ellen Wisman, Max-
Planck Institute. BioSciences
2000, 12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-
2133.
Statistics Seminar
On Bayesian Modelling Of Fat Tails
And Skewness. Mark F.J. Steel,
Econometrics, Tilburg U. CSCI
301.4-5:30pm. Refreshments. Call
822-0570.
Biotechnology Seminar
Revolutionizing Vaccination
Through Biotechnology. Prof.
Lome A. Babiuk, Veterinary Infectious Disease Organization, Saskatchewan. Wesbrook 201,
12:30pm. Refreshments. Call Dr.
D. Kilburn at 822-4182.
Lectures in Modern
Chemistry
Structural And Mechanistic Studies Of Cellulose-Binding Domains
By Heteronuclear NMR
Spectroscopy. Prof. Lawrence
Mcintosh, Chemistry and Biochemistry. Chemistry 250, south
wing, lpm. Refreshments from
12:40pm. Call 822-3266.
Green College
Speaker Series
: Expert Witnesses At Obscenity
Trials: Dilemmas Both Dastardly
And Damning. Becki Ross, Anthropology and Sociology. Green
College,   5:30pm.   Reception  in
j Graham House 4:45-5:30pm. Call
822-6067.
Continuing Studies
Seminar Series
Book Talk - Starting A Book Club.
Angela Deery. teacher, screenplay editor, founding member of
a book club. Continues Oct. 8,
15, Nov. 5, Dec. 3. Vancouver
Public Library. Library Square,
350 W. Georgia. 7-9pm" $70. seniors $55. Call 822-1450.
Wednesday, Oct. 2
Continuing Studies
Seminar Series
Creative Writing (Square One).
Paul Belserene. writer, director
and producer. IRC room G41/
42. 7:30- 10pm. $210. Enrolment
limited. Call 822-1450.
Interdisciplinary Studies
Seminar
Finding Your Place In Interdisciplinary Studies. Ernie Hamm,
Arts One and Alan Richardson,
Philosophy. Green College, 5pm.
Call 822-6067.
Faculty Development
Seminar
How To Search The World Wide
Web: An Introduction. Larry
Campbell. Sedgewick/Koerner
Library and Kathryn Hornby,
Woodward Biomedical Library.
David Lam basement. Continuing Studies Computer lab A (use
outside entrance behind
Trekkers). 1 4pm. Call 822-9149.
Your UBC Forum 2
Transportation And Parking.
Moderator: Maria Klawe, VP, Student and Academic Services. A
series of forums designed to hear
your thoughts and address your
concerns. We want your feedback. Comeoutandjoinus.SUB
Conversation Pit. 12:30-2pm.
Call 822-6799.
Microbiology & Immunology
Seminar Series
Structure-Function Studies OfThe
Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Porin Opr
P. Anand Sukhan, Microbiology and
Immunology. Wesbrook 201, 12-
lpm. Call 822-3308.
Ecology & Biodiversity
Research Seminar
Modelling Hypotheses AboutThe
10-Year Lynx/Snowshoe Hare
Cycle. David Choquenot, Post
doctoral fellow, Zoology. Family/
Nutritional Sciences 60,4:30pm.
Refreshments Hut B-8, 4:10pm.
Call 822-3957.
Respiratory Research
Seminar Series
How Should You Treat Obstructive
Sleep Apnea In 1997? Dr. John
Fleetham. Medicine. St. Paul's Hospital. Gourlay conference room, 5-
6pm. Call 875-5653.
HUBC REPORTS
Thursday, Sept. 26        Sunday, Sept. 29
Philosophy Colloquium
A Particularist's Progress.
Jonathan Dancy, U. of Reading.
Buchanan D-202. 1-2:30pm. Call
822-3292.
Green College
Performing Arts Group
West Coast Impressions. Organized by Gina Buonaguro. Green
College. 8pm. Call 822-6067.
CALENDAR POLICY A3SP DEADLINES
The OBC Reports Calendar lists university-related of
university-sponsored events on campus and off camf
pus within the Lower Mainland.
Calendar items must be submitted on forms avail-
ablefrom the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310-6251 Cecg
Green Park Road, Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1. Phone;
822-3131. Fax: 822-2684. Please limit to 35 words.
Submissions for the Calendar's Notices section may be
limited due to space.
Deadline for the October 3 issue of UBC Reports —*
which covers the period October 6 to October 19 — is
noon, September 24. UBC Reports • September 19,1996 7
Calendar
September 22 through October 5
Orthopaedics Grand
Rounds
Knee Bracing: Functional And
Prophylaxis Update 1996. Dr.
J.P. McConkey, Athletic Injuries
and Arthroscopic Surgery. Chair,
Dr. C.P. Duncan. Eye Care Centre auditorium, 2550 Willow,
7am. Call 875-4646.
Noon Hour Concert
Les Voix Humaines. Susie
Napper, viola da gamba: Margaret
Little, viola da gamba. Music recital hall, 12:30pm. $3 at the
door. Call 822-5574.
Thursday, Oct. 3
Environmental Engineering
Seminar
Who Should Pay For Garbage?
Helen Spiegelman, Recycling Coun-
cilofBC.CEME 1215,3:30-4:30pm.
Refreshments. Call 822-3885.
Faculty Development
Seminar
Hands-On Introduction To Power
Point: A Three-Part Series. Lyle
Courtney, Geography/Faculty
Development. Continues Oct. 10
and 17. David Lam basement.
Continuing Studies Computer
Lab A (use outside entrance behind Trekkers), 9am-noon. Call
822-9149.
Philosophy Department
Colloquium
Natural Kinds And Causation. John
Collier, U of Newcastle. Buchanan
D-202, 1-2:30pm. Call 822-3292.
Science First Lecture
Series
The Fuzzy Edge Of Discovery -
Cryptozoology And Other Examples. Prof. Paul LeBlond. IRC#6,
l-2pm. Time will be available
after lecture for additional discussion. Call 822-5552.
Research Grant Briefing
Hampton Research Funds And
SSHRC Futures. Lynn Penrod,
president, SSHRC; Bernard
Bressler, VP Research; Tony Dorcey,
chair, Hampton Research Fund
Committee. Green College greathall,
1-4:30pm. Call 822-5159.
Green College &
Department of English
The Pox And The Prostitute: Opera, Disease and Social Anxieties. Michael Hutcheon and Linda
Hutcheon, U of Toronto. Green
College, 5:30pm. Call 822-6067.
Concert
UBC Symphonic Wind Ensemble.
Martin Berinbaum, director. Old
auditorium, 12:30pm. Call 822-3113.
Friday, Oct. 4
Biotechnology Lab. Seminar
Computational Studies On
Glucoamylase Structure And Selectivity. Pedro Coutinho, Chemical Engineering, Iowa State U.
Wesbrook201. 12:30pm. Refreshments. Call 822-4182.
Chemical Engineering
Weekly Seminar
Development Of An Alternative
Biofilter System For Odor Treatment. Dal Hoon Lee, graduate student. ChemEng 206, 3:30pm. Call
822-3238.
Occupational Hygiene
Program
Injury Management And Avoidance
Strategies For Heavy Industry. David
Coates, physical therapist/consultant, ErgoRisk Management Inc.
Koerner Lecture Theatre G-279,
12:30-1:30pm. Call 822-9595.
Pediatrics Grand Rounds
The Magnetic Resonance Assessment Of Cardiovascular Function.
Dr. J.G. Culham, Pediatric Radiologist BCCH. GF Strong auditorium, 9am. Call 875-2307.
Mass Spectrometer
Manufacturers Symposium
Eight International Manufacturers Will Present Their Latest Developments In Instrumentation
And Analytical Techniques With
Applications In Synthetic, Biotechnological, Environmental And Industrial Areas. SUB, 8:30am-5pm.
To register (no charge) contact
Guenter Eigendorf by Sept. 30,
822-3235, fax: 822-2847, e-mail:
eigen@chem.ubc.ca.
Concert
UBC Symphonic Wind Ensemble. Martin Berinbaum, director. Old Auditorium, 8pm. Call
822-3113.
Saturday, Oct. 5
The Vancouver Institute
Universities After A Millenium:
Whither Or Wither? Prof. Pat
Marchak, Anthropology and Sociology. IRC#2, 8:15pm. Call 822-3131.
Notices
Volleyball
Faculty, Staff and Grad Student
Volleyball Group. Every Monday
and Wednesday, Osborne Centre,
Gym A, 12:30-1:30pm. No fees.
Drop-ins and regular attendees
welcome for friendly competitive
games. Call 822-4479 or e-mail:
kdcs@unixg. ubc.ca.
Morris and Helen Belkin Art
Gallery Exhibition
August 30-Sept. 28: Recent Acquisitions. August 30-Sept. 28.: Colour Research. Tuesday - Friday:
10am-5pm: Saturday, 12-5pm.
1825 Main Mall. Call 822-2759.
Surplus Equipment
Recycling Facility
Weekly sales of furniture, computers, scientific etc. held every
Wednesday, noon-5pm. SERF,
Task Force Building, 2352 Health
Sciences Mall. Call 822-2582 for
information.
Faculty Development
Would you like to talk with an
experienced faculty member, one
on one, about your teaching concerns? Call the Centre for Faculty
Development and Instructional
Services at 822-0828 and ask for
the Teaching Support Group.
Studies in Hearing and
Communication
Senior (65 years or older) and Jun-
ior (20-30 years) volunteers
needed. Participants will attend
up to three one-hour appointments
at UBC. Experiments will examine
different aspects of hearing and
communication abilities. Honorarium for some studies. Please
call The Hearing Lab, 822-9474.
Clinical Research Support
Group
The Clinical Research Support
Group which operates under the
auspices of the Dept. of Health
Care and Epidemiology provides
methodological,  biostatistical,
SUB Art Gallery
Sept. 22-Oct. 6
Jean-Guy Dallaire
sculptor
photographs of small works in large open spaces
(also bronze works by students)
computational and analytical support for health researchers. For an
appointment please call Laurel
Slaney at 822-4530.
Garden Hours
Nitobe Memorial Garden, Botanical Garden and the Shop-in-the-
Garden are open 10am-6pm daily
(including weekends) until Oct. 13.
Call 822-9666 (gardens), 822-4529
(shop).
Guided Tours of Botanical
Garden
By Friends of the Garden. Every
Wednesday and Saturday, lpm,
until Oct. 13. Free with admission. Call 822-9666.
Parents with Babies
Have you ever wondered how babies learn to talk? Help us find out!
We are looking for parents with
babies between one and 14 months
of age to participate in language
development studies. Ifyou are interested in bringing your baby for a
one hour visit, please call Dr. Janet
Werker's Infant Studies Centre,
Department of Psychology, UBC,
822-6408 (ask for Nancy).
Herpes Zoster (Shingles)
Study
Participants required to take part
in clinical dermatology trial at Division of Dermatology, 855 West
lOAvenue. Requirements, 50years
of age and older, within 72 hours
of onset of first skin rash. Maximum 13 visits over 24 week period. Free medication and honorarium given. For further information call 875-5296.
Diabetes 1997 Conference
The Young Diabetic.
Interprofessional Continuing Education Conference will take place
Friday, April 4 and Saturday, April
5, 1997, in Vancouver, for all health
professionals interested and involved in diabetic care. For further
information call 822-2626.
Centering Pregnancy
Drop-in
The Centering Pregnancy Drop-
in, run by UBC Nursing Faculty
and students in collaboration
with West-Main Health Unit,
offers support and information
about pregnancy and birth to
women who are pregnant or contemplating pregnancy. Wednesdays, 10-1 1:30am, Acadia
Fairview Commons Block. For
information call 822-7470.
Boomerang Family
Research
The Counselling Psychology Department is looking for adults
who have returned home to live.
They and their parents are invited to participate in a study
focusing on the experience, inter-personal relations and responses to this change in the
family. Involves confidential interviews. Please call 432-1915
for more information.
UBC Zen Society
Meditation sessions will be held
each Monday (except holidays)
during term, in the Tea Gallery
of the Asian Centre from 1:30-
2:20pm. All welcome. Please be
punctual. Call 228-8955.
Science First! Seminar
Series
This is for you. A new seminar
series focusing on science in
research, in education, and in
our daily lives. Plantojoin, bring
your lunch, your curiosity and
your open mind. Ask questions
and talk to the scientists in person after the seminars. Watch
the UBC Calendar and fliers for
announcements.
Volunteer Fair
Representatives from 60 non-profit
organizations with information on
how students can volunteer. Monday, Sept. 30-Wednesday. Oct. 2,
SUB Concourse, 10am-3pm. Call
822-9268.
Scenes From Japan
Tea Break is one of the paintings by Ted Colyer that will be on display at the
Asian Centre from Sept. 23-Oct. 14. Nova Scotia-born Colyer received a BAfrom
UBC in 1967 and has also studied at the Banff School of Fine Arts, Mount Allison
University and in Japan. Colyer lived in Japan for 16 years before returning to
B.C. in 1988. Exhibitions of his work have previously appeared in galleries in
Canada, Japan and the United States. 8 UBC Reports ■• September 19, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW
FINANCIAL SERVICES—JULY 1996
THI-: UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
To: Terry Sumner, Vice-President, Administration & Finance
From: Edwin Yen. Chair, Financial Services Review Committee
Date: August 2, 1996
Subject: Financial Services Review Committee - Final Report
I am pleased to enclose the Report of Financial Service Review Committee as
requested by your office.  I hope that you will find it useful.
I am grateful to the various members of the Financial Services Department
and other members of the University Community who took the time to provide
Input into this report.  I want to also thank the other members of the Committee who spent many hours in attending meetings, listening to contributors,
reading material provided and assisting in developing and proofreading the
various stages and drafts of this report.
I. INTRODUCTION
In January of 1996, Mr. Terry Sumner. Vice-President Administration and Finance
appointed a committee to review the Financial Services Department. Committee
members were:
• Mr. Harvey Burian (Vice-Chair), Department of Human Resources. UBC
• Mr. Michael Hartwick, Director, Internal Audit, UBC
• Mr. Michael McAdam, Associate Vice-President Finance, University of Calgary
• Ms. Irene Rodway, Director of Administration. Department of Chemistry. UBC
• Ms. Ann Turner, Financial and Budget Manager, Library. UBC
• Dr. Donald Wehrung, Professor, Faculty of Commerce and Business Admin., UBC
• Dr. William Webber, Associate Vice-President Academic. UBC
• Dr. Edwin Yen (Chair). Dean, Faculty of Dentistry, UBC
The Review Committee's terms of reference included the following mandates:
l.To review the mandate, strategic plan, structure, operations, staffing and budget of
the Department.
2.To evaluate the overall level of effectiveness and accountability ofthe Department.
3.To identify the opportunities for improved service, process improvement and relationships with campus consumers and with other service departments.
Because the Committee immediately recognized that much of the function of the
Financial Services department reflected administrative policies and directions determined at much higher levels, it was decided to take a larger perspective which would
identify the role of university-wide institutional strategic planning on this department.
The Committee received a self-study document prepared by the Financial Services
Department in February, 1996. All Deans, Directors and Heads were asked to submit
their views on the operations of the Department.
The Committee met in March to identify key individuals who would be able to reflect the
concerns of specific user groups. The Committee interviewed these individuals during
the week of April 23-26. Appendix A lists all individuals interviewed, those who provided
written submissions, and other documents provided to the Committee. The Committee
was given a tour ofthe department's facilities and met with interested staff on site.
We wish to acknowledge the cooperation and assistance of Ms. Jacquie Rice, Director
of Financial Services and her staff, who provided documentation and information in a
timely and helpful manner. We also thank Christina Leung and Jennifer Brisebois for
their excellent support services.
II. OVERVIEW
The Committee became aware immediately of two overriding issues:
1. Recent efforts by the department to improve dialogue with campus and external
customers in order to improve efficiency of processing systems, correct reporting
errors and clarify budget data.
Individuals repeatedly acknowledged the many improvements in accessibility and
response from various sections of the department when assistance was needed by
campus customers. Departmental attempts to assign specific staff to specific campus
units markedly enhanced a sense of personal service and greater familiarity with the
unique needs of each customer. This improved communication and permitted the
prevention of future problems by building on the solutions preserved by this collective
experience. Indeed, the department has embarked upon a proactive training and
orientation program for all campus members utilizing financial services in an attempt
to minimize repeated problems. Financial Services has many able and dedicated staff
who are endeavouring to provide excellent service in spite of serious systems limitations.
In addition the department has embarked upon the development of elect ronic input with
initial design of electronic forms. The use of the internet has also been explored to
provide access for off campus and other non-connected users.
Nevertheless, many of the inefficiencies and frustrations stem not only from incorrect
use ofthe current inadequate computer system but from procedures and policies that
result in processing steps that are not value-added and often create additional
inefficiencies. Because ofthe large number of users ofthe financial services and the need
to maintain an infrastructure for continuous feedback in order to identify and thus
improve the human processes, much of this review will concentrate on the need to
further consult and respond to the needs of the campus customers. Above all. this
feedback infrastructure must be sufficient ly transparent to ensure a sense ol confidence
in end-users that their frustrations are being addressed. The benefit to the department
will be a better educated customer group which will be more conversant with the
subtleties ofthe current system, more patient with progress toward the much-needed
changes in the hardware and software systems, and more active participants in shaping
the systems that will that will replace them.
2. Recent efforts to procure (a) new computer system(s) in order to overcome the
inadequacy of current central hardware and software systems to provide an
accessible, integrated, accurate and current database.
Discussion with Dr. John Chase (Budget and Planning) who is chairing a group that is
defining the criteria for a new Financial Information Management System helped to
identify the need to migrate to new computer systems while attempting to link the
various legacy software programs that are used in various sectors (Human Resources,
Student Information System, Development Office. Financial Services). Mr. Gary
Barnes, Controller, described recent innovations using the World Wide Web that would
permit access to the current system from any desktop connected by modem, and
electronic forms that would reduce paperwork.
However, few of the campus end-users were even aware of the impending changes in the
central computer system and many were keen to contribute ideas to improve functions that
would benefit individual units and the central system. While an initial Request for Proposal
(RFP) has already been issued in order to identify possible vendors, the Committee recognized
the need to develop a consultation process to ensure maximum benefit to the end-users who
will also feel ownership of an improved if not perfect system.
The lack of a central strategic planning process limits the ability of the department to
improve the quality of its service and frustrates the efforts of end-users to significantly
increase efficiency of their unit functions.
These two issues serve as background to a series of more detailed concerns. These
concerns are addressed to the department as a whole while recognizing that the various
sections will treat them differently. In keeping with the perspective of this review, some
ofthe recommendations must be addressed at a higher administrative level because of
their campus-wide impact in terms of vision and policy development.
III. AREAS OF CONCERN
The Committee consolidated its review into the following areas of concern. Recommendations and background rationale are provided for each area.
A, LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUES
Leadership and Strategic Planning for Financial Information Management
1. The President should establish a University-wide Steering Committee to
develop a comprehensive strategy for financial management within the
University community at both the central and local levels. The Committee
should report directly to the Vice-President Administration and Finance.
In its many interviews with personnel within the Department of Financial Services as
well as with users of financial management information systems in both central and
local administrative units, the committee saw many symptoms which highlighted the
lack of coordination in financial strategic planning at UBC.
For example, within the Department of Financial Services the following problems were
identified:
- Over 400 projects are on a "to-do" list with little sense of priorities.
- Efforts are not necessarily being directed where users would see benefits.
- There is little sense of where financial systems planning is going within the Department.
- There is a perceived lack of consultation with the user community regarding their
needs and priorities, including lack of acknowledgment and feedback when users do
contribute
Such a committee would be responsible for balancing the requirements ofthe University's
most senior administrators (i.e. President and Vice-Presidents) who are focused more on
revenues, and the requirements of local users who are responsible for ensuring that
expenditures do not exceed revenues. This Steering Committee must have the authority to
develop the strategic plan for financial management within the University and report to the
Vice President Administration and Finance. The Steering Committee should include
representatives from senior administrators, end-users, ancillaries, and units with complicated business transactions (e.g., Medicine, Commerce, research centres). The Steering
Committee must ensure wide dissemination of the strategic plan.
To address ongoing concerns and develop a visible and important consultation process
tool, the Steering Committee should serve as one formal avenue by which input on
future directions related to management information systems can be forwarded.
2. The strategic plan must consider cosUhenefit analysesfor human processing
qffinancial data and training of client-users when prioritizing criteriajbr a
new financial information management system.
Many inefficiencies are derived from policies that drive repeated processing of paper forms
which in turn risk human errors and subsequent extra work to resolve these errors. Many
of these inefficiencies are described in the Re-engineering section and should be addressed
prior to adapting any computer systems to these human processes.
3. The strategic plan must increase integration or interconnectivity to facilitate
the coordination and even synchrony of information from current separate
systems where beneficial.
Individual end-users are frustrated by their inability to access or coordinate information
from one system to information in another system. In many respects, the systems serve
the reporting requirements of external constituencies better.
Careful consideration must be given to achieving the "best fit" for the community at-
large. Financial matters deemed to be peculiar to the needs of only some end-users
should be examined for other remedies in order to reduce the risk of a new system that
would be too complicated or sophisticated for the majority.
Organizational Structure and Process
4. All central financial service units should be aligned as a service-focused
group under the mandate ofthe Vice-President Administration and Finance.
The potential benefits of a truly integrated financial information system demand that
a coordinated approach be made at the highest levels to develop a strategy that clearly
states the mission and goals of Financial Services, outlines the priorities and implementation mechanics, and develops periodic outcomes assessments to ensure that the
financial planning and reporting needs are met for all parts of the University.
Financial service units (e.g. Financial Services, Budget and Planning and Research
Services) within separate portfolios of each ofthe Vice-Presidents and the President
have led to varying levels of interconnectivity of different financial information systems UBC Reports ■ September 19, 1996 9
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW FINANCIAL SERVICES—JULY 1996
between portfolios. Examples of how separate systems utilization has developed are as
follows:
President
VP Administration & Finance
VP External Affairs
VP Student and Academic Services
VP Research:
VP Academic & Provost
Budgeting system
Financial records system (FRS)
Human resources system (IHRIS)
Alumni donor system (ADVANCE)
Student information system (SIS)
Office  of research  services  and  industrial
liaison system (ORSIL)
Human resources system (IHRIS)
Financial records system (FRS)
Consolidation of the responsibility for these various computer systems with the Vice-
President Administration and Finance will ensure consistency in production standards
and facilitate the development of future improvements in interconnectivity.
5. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should examine the policies
currently in place relating to inter-departmental billing, and consider whether
such policies are leading to sub-optimal resource allocation and dysfunctional decision-making by departments, especially with regard to University
Computing Services.
The Review Committee noted from several submissions and interviews that the University
Computing Service group did not perform any coordinating role in the development of the
Financial Services Request for Proposal, nor does it appear to have a central mandate to assist
in standard setting, prioritization, or coordination of systems development. This was found
to be most pronounced in units where financial resources enabled those units to pursue their
own areas of interest in systems development, e.g. ancillary units. To some extent the
Committee feels this a product of current organizational structure and philosophy vis-a-vis
the role of this area. However in addition, the small role of UCS is due in no small part to
the accounting system of billing for internal services. This process of managing by
interdepartmental billing leads the "selling" and the "buying" units to focus on matters
related to budget transfers, rather than key issues related to institutional priorities and need,
and often produces within senior management an erroneous assumption that somehow
"free market" forces will lead to acceptable allocations of scarce resources. This may not be
the case, as is evidenced by the lack of a role for the University's central computing resource
in future systems development. There is no organizational structure in place to ensure the
systems and procedures developed outside of Financial Services will connect smoothly to the
central systems and procedures. As there are specialized systems with financial components
in every Vice-President's portfolio, a coordinating structure and mandate supported at that
level is necessary to achieve the necessary levels of coordination and communication.
Financing New Systems
6. The financing plan for any new systemfs) acquisition or development should be
reviewed by the Vice-President Administration and Finance to ensure adequate
resources, including appropriate contingency funding, are made available to
acquire new systems and ensure successful conversion from the old legacy
systems, and to ensure that all of the functionality and benefits expected by the
end users are delivered in a timely and effective manner. The Vice-President
should consider the need to provide central financing to effect these changes.
A financial management information system is as integral a part of a university's
infrastructure as its buildings, equipment and administrative staff. As the complexity
of a university's research, teaching, community service, and ancillary activity increases,
so does the requirement for an even more complicated and supportive financial
management information system. The financing of this system should be planned
centrally with due consideration to the need not only for initial major capital expenditures, but also for periodic maintenance and upgrading, i.e. considerable expenditures
are likely to be needed on an annual basis to keep its components up-to-date to service
internal and external constituencies.
The Review Committee has concerns about the funding of any new systems development. What will be the options explored if no suitable vendor supported financing can
be arranged? An appropriate list of funding options for a system development initiative
of this importance should include an option to advance the funds from central sources
to be repaid over time (probably at rates better than those available through vendor
financed acquisition). The method of funding will probably impact the initial cost, as well
as potentially leading to sub-optimal decision-making on the choice of systems if
adequate funding is not in place.
Finally, University's recent previous experience with the implementation of IHRIS
demonstrates the problems associated with insufficient funding. The system has never
been able to achieve its full, expected potential. As a result, local end-users are
frustrated and lacking confidence in new systems in general.
7. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should review the financial
implications of systems development recommendations on local user departments to ensure financial barriers to access and utility are minimal, and
where there are significant resource requirements that those requirements
are included in the overall financing for the systems development.
B. COMMUNICATION & CONSULTATION
8. The Steering Committee should pursue an open and wide consultation process
to assist in the development of a Request for Proposal for any new computer
systemfs) based on the strategic plan to be developed.
9. Financial Services should publicize a copy ofthe Request for Proposal for new
systems together with the strategic plan to all affected parties.
Most members ofthe campus community (including staff members of various sections
within Financial Services) interviewed by the Committee knew little or nothing about the
Request for Proposal and the possible directions of systems development. Those who
had heard ofthe initiative were less than well informed, and those who had provided
early advice on possible directions had received little feedback on the final Request for
Proposal and were unable to confirm the benefits from their contributions.
10. In the planning of new major administrative systems, such as a new Financial
Management Information System, there should be a clear understanding by all
stakeholders as to what they will receive from the new system in terms of
functionality and other benefits. There should also be a clear understanding of
the costs in terms of resources and time to fully implement the system.
The implementation of major new administrative systems at the university is not a new
phenomenon. The Integrated Human Resources Information System (IHRIS) was
implemented over the period of 1989 to 1992. Infrastructure connectivity problems
delayed widespread initial distributed access to the system. The initial availability of
time and resources was such that only Phase 1 of the project was completed.
Consequently, users outside the sponsoring units of Financial Services, Human
Resources, Budget and Planning and University Computing Services, were left with the
impression that the new system lacked the required functionality to meet their needs.
It was apparent from the interviews that many departments remain frustrated that they
have not experienced the hoped for functionality from IHRIS. Their lack of general access
to IHRIS and the perception that, without costly and time-consuming alterations, IHRIS
cannot meet their financial payroll needs, appear to have undermined their confidence
that future central administrative computing systems will ever meet their needs.
11. Financial Services should continue its practice of regular client surveys and
also develop outcomes assessment of specific financial information management tasks.
Financial Services should review its current system of communications and consultations with its various constituents, with a view to assessing the current effectiveness and
coverage of that program. This would include a review of internal communication and
information sharing as well. Standards should be established for all areas, especially
with regards to acceptable levels of pro-active consultation and appropriate feedback to
those who have provided advice/information. Financial Services should monitor the
success of its information sharing/gathering methods on a regular basis.
C. RE-ENGINEERING
12. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should ensure that all
significant work processes under his jurisdiction are examined with a view
to making improvements through business process re-engineering BEFORE
any new systems development is considered in support of those processes.
A great deal ofthe Review Committee's inputs and discussions revolved around the new
systems acquisition, and what that would mean for the Financial Services area and the
end users. Much less time was spent on the examination of existing processes, and
where improvements might be possible in the underlying processes that will be
supported by any new system. However, clearly the development of any system must
come after a thorough review of the processes to be supported by those systems.
Budgets and Reporting
13. The specifications for any replacement of the Financial Records System
(FRS) need to include the maintenance of planning data and provision for
future financial transactions in the system to support operational planning
and decision making.
Financial reporting provides information for planning, decision making, control and
reporting to governing bodies. The present financial system appears to be oriented to the
control and external reporting functions. The committee heard a significant number of
concerns about a lack of management information for planning and decision making.
A number of faculties and support units are operating significant business units
without adequate information.
14. An integrated document should be developed to show simultaneously budget
allocations and statement of expected expenditures.
By far the greatest complaint among users about the FRS was the inability to use the
information for local unit budget planning. There is a poor relationship between budget
and actual expenditures. The general incompatibility of budget to actual reports
significantly reduces the value of financial information because the spending record has
no context. Budget data reported on monthly FRS reports is often not up-to-date, shows
no audit trail of transaction details and includes inconsistencies between budget entries
and salaries paid out, which distorts the financial position of the accounts. Planned
future events cannot be included in user reports
A record of allocations should be prepared annually comparable to the present "budget".
As these are changed on an ongoing basis they should be recorded for inclusion in the
next formal record of allocations. A second set of figures should be prepared which is
a statement of expected expenditures, including both legal commitments and estimated
future expenditures. These are the working figures against which units can keep track
of their expenditures and against which they can assess variances. The allocations
portion is a top-down statement of how funds are allocated. The expected expenditures
is a bottom-up set of figures taking into account such matters as leave savings which
may be available in a given fiscal year and how the unit plans to expend them.
Streamlining Processes
15. Streamlining techniques need to be applied to the appointment process and
the payment processes, to minimize delays in financial reporting.
Financial information is not current. Printed reports from FRS and IHRIS are too far behind
for management purposes. The current batch reporting system requires a minimum of 14
days after month end for production of paper reports. Timing is a serious problem and can
be damaging for users. Delays may result from the necessity of interfacing user-developed
systems with the central system, resulting in workforce inefficiencies. There is often a
duplication of data between user and central systems, and departments are required to
reconcile the two systems. Delays may result from inefficiencies in financial processes, in
particular the appointment process, the requisition payment process and the vendor
payment process. Moving data between decision points creates delays, as much of this is
done manually with paper document flow.
16. Direct on-line data entry by departments should be developed to alleviate
transcription errors and errors arising through processing delays.
Errors originate from a variety of sources: difficulty in reading hand-written requisition
forms: typos and other errors on requisition forms; keying errors when paper requisitions are transcribed; processing staffs remoteness from the originating department;
duplicate entries and payroll charged to the wrong account because of appointment
processing delays; and expenditures charged to incorrect grant account numbers on a
temporary basis because the correct account was not yet set up at the time work on the
grant began. The need for internal requisitions to correct errors in the accounts would
be reduced by eliminating the cause of the errors where possible.
Unfortunately, current on-line services will require redesign to correct a number of problems
such as the following. There are inconsistencies in the coding of reference numbers on input.
For example, there are no reference numbers given for Telecommunications charges and
work orders, and Bookstore requisition numbers are embedded in text and are not
searchable. Reference fields are very useful, but only if they are coded consistently and are
searchable. On-line variance analysis ofbudget to actual is not available. On-line information 10 UBC Reports • September 19, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW FINANCIAL SERVICES—JULY 1996
can be weeks behind. Year-to-date totals are not available. Roll-up reports are not available
on-line, and are especially needed at year-end. There is a lack of universal on-line access for
grant/other account holders at reasonable cost.
17. Financial Services should work with Research Services to develop procedures that permit more timely set-up of grant accounts.
Delays in setting up or renewing grant accounts often lead to misleading overexpendi-
ture reporting.
18. Any new Financial Management Information System must be capable of multi-
year accounting as well asfiexible integration of information among key central
agencies ofthe University. Multi-year accounting should be flexible to support
accounting and reporting beyond fiscal- and project-year thresholds.
Any comprehensive financial management information system adopted by the University must be capable of assisting both central and local users with multi-year accounting
in which the planning period extends beyond the University's current fiscal year, with
activity accounting in which local users are able to define the nature ofthe activity under
which expenditures are being accrued (beyond standard categories of expenditures
such as personnel or travel), with consolidations of both revenues and expenditures
across the University's various fund accounts (e.g., GPOF, research funds, endowment
funds, special purpose funds) and at different levels of aggregation.
Paramount among these inadequacies were that these systems were not capable of
tracking revenues and/or expenditures across multiple budget periods other than the
University's fiscal year; they were not able to integrate data from multiple funding
sources (such as GPOF, research funds, endowment funds, special purpose funds,
capital funds, etc.); they did not allow local users flexibility in defining the nature ofthe
activities overwhich expenditures were being accrued; and they were not able to support
the preparation of reports at different levels of aggregation.
These features of a financial management information system are required if the system
is to support the needs of diverse constituencies such as units with extensive research
grants and contracts, research centres having faculty from multiple departments,
funding from multiple sources, different year-ends, specialized reporting requirements,
specialized planning requirements, and Faculties whose activities are supported by a
combination of GPOF, endowment funds, research grants, clinical operations, and
continuing studies programs, as well as ancillaries.
Now more than ever there is a need to track the costs of faculty and staff according to
their contributions to well-defined activities. Currently costs are thrown into a single
pool with little, if any, allocation to activities (especially for Centres). There is now a
greater need to cost out individual activities as some University activities emulate
activities in the private sector - e.g., student housing, Bookstore, continuing education
programs, professional degree programs, and clinical activities. The activities within a
number of departments and Faculties are becoming more similar in complexity to
ancillaries where there is a need to determine international versus domestic prices for
degree programs, market prices for continuing studies programs, and differentiated
prices for professional versus academic Masters degrees. Therefore costs have to be
differentiated to provide better services to cost sensitive programs.
19. Financial Services and Purchasing should continue to explore opportunities
to reduce the need for paper requisitions and cheques for payments to
individuals and suppliers, especially for small amounts, provided normal
internal controls and reconciliation procedures are followed.
Information provided the committee indicates that approximately 80 percent of the
invoices processed by Financial Services are for varying amounts under $500. In many
cases it would appear that the cost incurred to effect the payments using current
processes are in excess of the value ofthe transactions processed. The use of cash, credit
cards and procurement cards might serve as suitable alternative methods of payment.
20. Future development ofthe centralfinancial systems should provide a simple
self-service report generator for local users to query the central databases,
print reports, and download current data for specialized local user systems
without requiring intervention from systems staff.
Timely access to the central databases as required would reduce the need for the
redundant data maintained by local users. The system should allow users to extract on
the basis of a variety of data elements besides account number, e.g. object of expense
code, reference numbers. It should be possible to aggregate the detail at various levels,
e.g. account range, dept., faculty, grant. There should be provision for on-line variance
analysis between budget amounts and actuals at whatever level of detail is required.
Campus Standards
21. Campus-wide standards for electronic interfaces, EDI-electronic data interchange, systems security, and common tables for information such as ID
codes, department codes should be developed, possibly through UCS.
Each ofthe above could be seen as part ofthe mandate of UCS, should the Vice-Presidents
agree. The need for campus wide standards is especially crucial in light ofthe recent report
by the Advisory Committee on Information Technology (ACIT) which proposes to provide
resources to assist computer access for each faculty member and each student.
22. A policy on confidentiality and access to financial information and the
systems on which they reside should be developed.
This would be integral in designing networked systems which in turn facilitate remote
access and "need-to-know" transparency.
Access for Users
23. On-line access for grant/other account holders must be available without
expensive one-time connection costs. Universal access with appropriate
security (WWW) will assist community members in buildings without cabling
or off-campus locations.
It was apparent from review committee discussions and interviews that research needs
and financial reporting requirements are likely to grow in the future. Financial Services
must be responsive and flexible in meeting the needs of the community, agencies and
industry. Requirements may change over time so we should resist becoming locked into
an inflexible system. Report-writing to meet agency and other requirements must be
user-friendly and all templates should have the same look and feel. If a client has specific
needs that cannot be easily met in order to do business with the university then other
solutions will have to be explored.
24. On-line systems be developed for user departments to prepare and submit
requisitions, hourly payroll sheets, and net-zero budget transfers. Such
facilities should include user-friendly input screens with on-line edits to
assist in error-free data entry, automatic calculation of totals, and routing
for on-line authorization.
A great deal of redundant departmental effort goes into the preparation of paper
requisitions for submission to Financial Services and the Budget Office, where they are
re-keyed into the central financial systems. With every transcription there are delays,
increased opportunity for errors, redundant proofreading, and continual follow-up and
reconciling of systems. Long delays in paying vendors result in poor relationships with
suppliers, loss of discounts, delinquent account charges, and refusal of some small
vendors to deal with UBC at all except on a cash basis. Payroll "guestimates" and
subsequent manual adjustments could be eliminated if payroll data capture could be
completed on-line after the pay period ends.
Financial Services has been actively investigating and encouraging the development of
electronic forms for data entry, and on-line invoicing from selected suppliers. These
efforts should be continued and enhanced with interactive edit and help facilities. The
World Wide Web interface that is being tested offers promise. Difficulties to be overcome
include: departmental access to the central systems varies, and is especially difficult
from off-campus sites; need for and expense of trusted LAN's to assure security of data
in transit; handling of attachments; and possible procedural and coding errors.
25. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should convene an ad hoc
committee of students and administrative personnel to consider whether a
personal, financial account should be set up for each UBC student to handle
all of his/her financial transactions with the University while he/she is a
student.
These transactions might include (but not be limited to) the payment of tuition, student
fees, and library fines; purchases and payments at the Bookstore, Food Services, and
student housing; payments to the student for work contributed as teaching assistants,
research assistants, markers, or other forms of UBC employment; and payments to the
student as scholarships, loans, and bursaries.
26. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should convene an ad hoc
committee of UBC staff andfacuity and administrative personnel to consider
whether a personal financial account should be set up for each UBC
employee to handle all of his/her financial transactions with the University
while he/she is an employee.
This account would be an extension of the financial account currently used to record
payments and expenditures regarding salaries and benefits for each employee as well
as expenditures for parking, faculty or union dues, and charitable contributions.
Additional transactions might include (but not be limited to) purchases and payments
at the Bookstore, Food Services, or other ancillary units, and payments to the employee
received beyond normal salary such as research stipends, administrative stipends,
awards, salaries for extra-sessional teaching, and honoraria for teaching in continuing
studies programs.
There are thousands of financial accounts in a University as large and complex as UBC. but
few of them relate to the activities of a single individual. The committee heard several
interesting reasons why we should establish individual personal accounts for individual
students and UBC employees such as faculty and staff. Having a single personal account
with the University to record transactions would be a convenience to many individuals as
a record of their revenues from UBC and their expenditures to University units. Similarly,
the University as a whole would benefit from having a consolidated record of its financial
transactions with individual students and employees, especially when individuals fell behind
in meeting their financial obligations to more than a single administrative unit or when
individuals left the University with financial obligations remaining.
This recommendation may have to involve negotiation with employee unions and the
Faculty Association.
Training
27. Financial Services, in cooperation with other units where appropriate,
should develop training modules for all levels of administrative staff at the
university targeted to the specific needs of those various levels. Input from
those various levels should be sought in the development of these modules.
The modules should be delivered on a sufficiently frequent basis to ensure
that new members within the various levels are equipped with the required
knowledge to effectively perform their functions. Periodic updates to the
information/training initially delivered should be provided to the users.
28. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should initiate a study to
determine the feasibility of having a coordinated program of financial
training among all or some ofthe sponsoring units responsible for financial
management systems information/administration. This might include Financial Services, Research Services, Budget and Planning and the Development Office. The objective of this coordinated training program would be to
ensure that all areas of the university receive sufficient knowledge and/or
training to be able to carry out their major functions from a financial
management perspective.
29. Sufficient resources should be made available to the Financial Services
Department to be able to provide appropriate financial management training for all potential users ofthe centralfinancial management systems to
enable these users to perform their designated functions with respect to
financial management in their respective units.
30. To encourage users outside of Financial Services to initially and to continue to
participate in the financial training programs offered, it is suggested that
Financial Services investigate and take appropriate action on thefollowing:
advertising the training sessions in the available university publications,
holding the sessions in alternative locations and times which might be more
convenientfor the potential participants, and requiring new appointees to take
certain training sessions when they commence employment with the university.
Given the complexity and diversity ofthe financial management systems which are necessary
to service a large institution such as UBC, there is an apparent need for training in financial
matters and procedures at various levels within the university, ranging from new vice
presidents, deans, department heads dealing with fiscal management on a macro level, to
account managers and clerical stalfinvolved with maintaining accounts in departments and
units at micro levels. Based on the comments from the interviewees, the nature of the
required training varies according to the level at which the person is operating and the
amount of detailed involvement he or she has with the central systems. Senior administra- UBC Reports • September 19, 1996 11
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW FINANCIAL SERVICES—JULY 1996
tors require a high level overview of how the financial management systems operate, the
information provided by them and what they need to do as administrative managers to
function within the systems' parameters. Departmental account staff need to have more
detailed procedural and administrative training on how to input to the systems and how to
obtain the information they require from the systems. Input from the various levels of users
is required to develop appropriate training. The new Financial Management Training
program piloted last year has provided an excellent introduction to the university's policies
and procedures for all users.
There is also an apparent continuing need to provide a coordinated training function
among the various financial systems at the university. While it is somewhat unclear as
to the necessity, indeed the advisability, of attempting to provide training for individual
researchers concerning the intricacies of the university's financial systems, there is an
expressed need for all users of the systems to receive sufficient knowledge of how the
various systems are tied together to allow them to carry out their major functions with
a minimum of financial administrative interruption and annoyance.
Concern was expressed that the user community may end up bearing the cost of
providing adequate training to understand and use the university's financial management systems. Opportunity for members of the institution at all levels to receive
adequate training in the area of financial management to effectively fulfill the requirements of their positions would seem to be a worthwhile university-wide objective. There
appears to be opportunity currently provided by Financial Services for users in units
outside the sponsoring department to attend training on certain aspects ofthe financial
systems. It was noted, however, that over a period of time the number of potential
participants who avail themselves ofthe learning opportunities have tended to decrease.
IV. CONCLUSIONS
In summary, the Review Committee felt that a central infrastructure must be developed
(Steering Committee) under the jurisdiction of the Vice-President Administration and
Finance. This Steering Committee would ensure a broad-based consultation process for
developing campus-wide strategy in deterrnining leadership roles, organizational structure,
and budget and reporting relationships. These major issues would then set the directions
for more specific changes involving human processing of financial data and specific end-user
system requirements as outlined in the recommendations in the various areas of concern.
Finally, a transparent process must be pursued to finalize the proposal for a new system to
connect the various legacy systems, and to improve the services of the department. A
constant assessment of outcomes will provide a plan for quality assurance that avoids the
natural tendency for Financial Services to become the lightning rod for complaints when the
actual factors that may precipitate such complaints lie outside the department. The
development of this strategic infrastructure, together with the esprit de corps of the
department's staff and their enthusiasm to improve service, provide a tremendous potential
for effective and efficient financial services at this University.
APPENDIX A: List of Interviews and Submissions
The Financial Services Review Committee wishes to acknowledge and thank the
following individuals who took time to meet with the committee and, in some instances,
provide written submissions as well:
Mr. Victor Barwin, Chief Financial Officer, Faculty of Medicine
Dr. Daniel Birch, Vice President, Academic
Mr. Robert Boudreau, Manager-Financial Systems, Financial Services
Ms. Caroline Bruce, Administrator, Biomedical Research Centre
Mr. Ian Burgess, Assistant Controller, Financial Services
Mr. Gary Barnes, Controller, Financial Services
Mr. John Chase, Director, Budget & Planning
Ms. Jill Darling, Assistant Manager-Accounts Payable, Financial Services
Mr. Graeme Dearnley, Assistant Manager-Payroll, Financial Services
Mr. Frank Eastham, Associate Vice President, Human Resources
Dr. Michael Goldberg, Dean, Faculty of Commerce & Business Administration
Mr. Len Goossen, Accountant. Housing & Conferences
Ms. Fay Gorrill, Assistant Manager-Payroll, Financial Services
Ms. Debbie Harvie, Director, UBC Bookstore
Mr. Larry Kemp, Manager Payroll & Acting manager Accounts Payable, Financial Services
Ms. Janice Kennedy, Manager-Research & Trust Accounting, Financial Services
Ms. An Keylock, Supervisor Administration, Economics
Ms. Susan Langland, Director Faculty Affairs & Administration, Faculty of Medicine
Mr. Jack Leigh, Executive Director, Computing & Communications Pro Tern
Ms. Anna Li, Operations Manager, UBC Bookstore
Dr. Keith Mitchell, Professor, Chemistry
Ms. Karen Monot, Government Contracts Officer, Research Services
Ms. Rayleen Nash, Assistant to the Dean, Graduate Studies
Mr. Robert Reid, Manager-Financial Planning, University Computing Services
Ms. Jacquie Rice, Director, Financial Services
Ms. Mary Risebrough, Director, Housing & Conferences
Mr. Steve Ryan, Chief Accountant, Financial Services
Dr. Richard Spratley, Director, Research Services
Ms. Frances Tadman, Administrative Clerk, Financial Services
Dr. Jim Tom, Director, Telecommunications
Ms. Nancy Wiggs, Administrator, Faculty of Law
Ms. Erika Yep, Administrative Clerk, Financial Services
The Committee also wishes to acknowledge and thank the following individuals who
provided written submissions either on their own behalf or on behalf of their units:
Ms. Barbara Alivojvodic, Administrator, Faculty of Forestry
Ms. Pat Atherton, Administrator, Continuing Education in the Health Sciences
Ms. Maureen Barfoot, Administrator. Pediatrics
Ms. Bridie Byrne, Administrative Assistant. Zoology
Dr. Marion Crowhurst, Acting Head, Language Education
Ms. Maureen Douglas, Assistant to the Dean. Faculty of Science
Mr. William Dyck, Consultant
Ms. Elaine Dawne, Departmental Secretary, Anaesthesia
Ms. Joyce Friesen, Head-Collections Accounting & Budget, Library
Mr. Patrick Harrison, Administration Manager. Botany
Ms. Lotte Illichmann, Accounting Supervisor-Collections Accounting & Budget, Library
Dr. Michael Isaacson, Professor & Head, Civil Engineering
Ms. Patricia Lackie, Supervisor Administration, English
Ms.   Stephanie  Maricevic,   Departmental  Assistant-Finance  &  Administration,
Continuing Studies
Dr. Herbert Rosengarten, Professor & Head, English
The Committee was also provided with the following documents:
Organizational Charts - Financial Services
Organizational Chart - Vice President Administration & Finance
Presentation to Senate Budget Committee - April 20, 1994
Results of Customer Service Questionnaires 1993 and 1995 and Questionnaire
Financial Systems Survey - October 1994
Report to the University Audit Committee - February 1994
Description from 1995-96 Budget Report re Financial Services
Research Accounting Survey - 1994 and 1995
Accounts Payable Vendor Survey - 1993 - 1994
Report to the Committee to Review Financial Services at the University of Calgary
Self-Study of the Department of Financial Services
Financial Statements, The University of British Columbia, March 31,1995
Summary of Invoices Processed from April to January 1992/93
APPENDIX B: List of Recommendations
A. LEADERSHIP AND ORGANIZATIONAL ISSUES
Leadership and Strategic Planning for Financial Information Management
1. The President should establish a University-wide Steering Committee to develop a
comprehensive strategy for financial management within the University community
at both the central and local levels. The Committee should report directly to the Vice-
President Administration and Finance.
2. The strategic plan must consider cost:benefit analyses for human processing of
financial data and training of client-users when prioritizing criteria for a new financial
information management system.
3. The strategic plan must increase integration or interconnectivity to facilitate the
coordination and even synchrony of information from current separate systems
where beneficial.
Organizational Structure and Process
4. All central financial service units should be aligned as a service-focused group under
the mandate of the Vice-President Administration and Finance.
5. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should examine the policies currently in place relating to inter-departmental billing, and consider whether such
policies are leading to sub-optimal resource allocation and dysfunctional decisionmaking by departments, especially with regard to University Computing Services.
Financing New Systems
6. The financing plan for any new system(s) acquisition or development should be
reviewed by the Vice-President Administration and Finance to ensure adequate
resources, including appropriate contingency funding, are made available to acquire
new systems and ensure successful conversion from the old legacy systems and to
ensure that all of the functionality and benefits expected by the end users are
delivered in a timely and effective manner. The Vice-President should consider the
need to provide central financing to effect these changes.
7. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should review the financial implications of systems development recommendations on local user departments to ensure
financial barriers to access and utility are minimal, and where there are significant
resource requirements that those requirements are included in the overall financing
for the systems development.
B. COMMUNICATION & CONSULTATION
8. The Steering Committee should pursue an open and wide consultation process to
assist in the development of a Request for Proposal for any new computer system(s)
based on the strategic plan to be developed.
9. Financial Services should publicize a copy of the Request for Proposal for new
systems together with the strategic plan to all affected parties.
10. In the planning of new major administrative systems, such as a new Financial
Management Information System, there should be a clear understanding by all
stakeholders as to what they will receive from the new system in terms of
functionality and other benefits. There should also be a clear understanding ofthe
costs in terms of resources and time to fully implement the system.
11. Financial Services should continue its practice of regular client surveys and also
develop outcomes assessment of specific financial information management tasks.
C. RE-ENGINEERING
12. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should ensure that all significant
work processes under his jurisdiction are examined with a view to making
improvements through business process re-engineering BEFORE any new systems
development is considered in support of those processes.
Budgets and Reporting
13. The specifications for any replacement ofthe Financial Records System (FRS) need
to include the maintenance of planning data and provision for future financial
transactions in the system to support planning and decision making.
14. An integrated document should be developed to show simultaneously budget
allocations and statement of expected expenditures.
Streamlining Processes
15. Streamlining techniques need to be applied to the appointment process and the
payment processes, to minimize delays in financial reporting.
16. Direct on-line data entry by departments should be developed to alleviate transcription errors and errors arising through processing delays.
17. Financial Services should work with Research Services to develop procedures that
permit more timely set-up of grant accounts.
18. Any new Financial Management Information System must be capable of multi-year
accounting as well as flexible integration of information among key central agencies
of the University. Multi-year accounting should be flexible to support accounting
and reporting beyond fiscal- and project-year thresholds.
19. Financial Services and Purchasing should continue to explore opportunities to
reduce the need for paper requisitions and cheques for payments to personnel and
suppliers, especially for small amounts provided normal internal controls and 12 UBC Reports ■ September 19, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW FINANCIAL SERVICES—JULY 1996
reconciliation procedures are followed.
20. Future development of the central financial systems should provide a simple self-
service report generator for local users to query the central databases, print reports,
and download current data for specialized local user systems without requiring
intervention from systems staff.
Campus Standards
21. Campus-wide standards for electronic interfaces, EDI- electronic data interchange,
systems security, and common tables for information such as ID codes, department
codes should be developed, possibly through UCS.
22. A policy on confidentiality and access to financial information and the systems on
which they reside should be developed.
Access for Users
23. On-line access for grant/other account holders must be available without expensive one-time connection costs. Universal access with appropriate security (WWW]
will assist community members in buildings without cabling or off-campus
locations.
24. On-line systems be developed for user departments to prepare and submit
requisitions, hourly payroll sheets, and net-zero budget transfers. Such facilities
should include user-friendly input screens with on-line edits to assist in error-free
data entry, automatic calculation of totals, and routing for on-line authorization.
25. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should convene an ad hoc committee of students and administrative personnel to consider whether a personal,
financial account should be set up for each UBC student to handle all of his/her
financial transactions with the University while he/she is a student.
26. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should convene an ad hoc committee of UBC staff and faculty and administrative personnel to consider whether a
personal financial account should be set up for each UBC employee to handle all
of his/her financial transactions with the University while he/she is an employee.
Training
27. Financial Services, in cooperation with other units where appropriate, should
develop training modules for all levels of administrative staff at the university
targeted to the specific needs of those various levels. Input from those various levels
should be sought in the development of these modules. The modules should be
delivered on a sufficiently frequent basis to ensure that new members within the
various levels are equipped with the required knowledge to effectively perform their
functions. Periodic updates to the information/training initially delivered should be
provided to the users.
28. The Vice-President Administration and Finance should initiate a study to
determine the feasibility of having a coordinated program of financial training
among all or some ofthe sponsoring units responsible for financial management
systems information/administration. This might include Financial Services,
Research Services, Budget and Planning and the Development Office. The
objective of this coordinated training program would be to ensure that all areas
ofthe university receive sufficient knowledge and/or training to be able to carry
out their major functions from a financial management perspective.
29. Sufficient resources should be made available to the Financial Services Department
to be able to provide appropriate financial management training for all potential
users ofthe central financial management systems to enable these users to perform
their designated functions with respect to financial management in their respective
units.
30. To encourage users outside of Financial Services to initially and to continue to
participate in the financial training programs offered, it is suggested that Financial
Services investigate and take appropriate action on the following: advertising the
training sessions in the available university publications, holding the sessions in
alternative locations and times which might be more convenient for the potential
participants, and requiring new appointees to take certain training sessions when
they commence employment with the university.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW
COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATIONS
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
September 19, 1996
I am pleased to provide members of the university community with the Report
of the Committee to Review Computing and Communications. The Committee
has chosen to focus on the impact of the funding model mandated for C&C
rather than going into great detail on the activities of each of the units.
I am appreciative of the work undertaken by Barry McBride and the members
of the Committee and would also like to take this opportunity to thank the
user community and the C&C staff for their comments and suggestions.
Many of the issues identified in the Report were simultaneously being considered by the Advisory Committee on Information Technology (ACIT) and implementation of a number of initiatives to provide improved access to faculty,
staff and students is presently under way.
I welcome your comments.
Sincerely,
Maria M. Klawe
Vice-president,  Student and Academic Services
A. Preamble
This review stresses the role Computing and Communications (C&C) should play in
serving the research, teaching and administrative objectives of UBC. It does not limit
its assessments and recommendations to the internal operations ofthe units which
make up C&C. More particularly it establishes specific goals for the development of
information technology and makes recommendations by which C&C can successfully contribute to their achievement.
Information technology (IT) has become an integral part of the academic environment throughout Europe and North America. Initially it was largely limited to
manipulating numbers and word-processing. With extraordinary rapidity, it has
come to be used to communicate directly with colleagues, access remote knowledge
sources, and teach students both on and off campus, as well as record and transfer
administrative information. It has become a major and essential academic resource
comparable to the Library, an institution which itself uses IT extensively. Connectivity created by multifaceted IT has not only increased dramatically in the recent
past; it gives every indication of even more rapid development in the near future.
In our view the position of and the support for IT should reflect its centrality to the
University's mission.
During the last decade C&C and its predecessors have become fully cost recoverable
units; they have been ancillarized like the Book Store, Food Services and Housing. To
implement this requirement, C&C operating funds were transferred to the various
academic and administrative units which were then charged for services. The costs of
C&C services are set at a level which pays for all overhead including the recently
established infrastructure charges. They are expected to act as businesses while abiding
by rules and contracting arrangements over which they have no control, but without the
options that a small business would have. They must use central adrninistrative
services such as Human Resources, Payroll and Financial Services. Because they are
obligated to cover all their costs, C&C staff have not effectively engaged in important
activities which do not provide revenue. Advice and leadership essential to the
realization of University-wide objectives, i.e. the common good, have not been provided
to the extent that they should have been.
While a fee-for-service model is appropriate and works well in some areas, it is the
view ofthe Committee that the full cost recovery model coupled with full decentralization is inappropriate. These arrangements make it difficult if not impossible to
provide the computer-based research, teaching, and administrative tools which are
central to UBC fulfilling its mission.
B. Process followed
The Committee to Review Computing and Communications at UBC was established
by Maria Klawe, Vice President, Student and Academic Services in March, 1996. Its
members included:
• Barry McBride, Dean, Faculty of Science (Chair)
• Elliott Burnell, Professor, Department of Chemistry
• Sharon Hartung, Graduate Student, Faculty of Commerce and Business
Administration
• Ron Johnson, Vice President, Computing and Communications, University of
Washington
• Robert Kubicek, Professor, Department of History
• Gerry Miller, Executive Director, Information Service and Technology, University of Manitoba
• Richard Spencer, Registrar and Director of Student Services
• Jean Tsang, Assistant Treasurer, Financial Services
• Byron Hender, Executive Coordinator, Student and Academic Services (Secretary)
The Committee's terms of reference were:
• To review the mandates, strategic plans, structures, operations, staffing and
budgets of the four units comprising C&C, and their role in support of the
University's mission.
• To review and comment on the role of C&C and, specifically, the impact of
decentralization with respect to the University's effective and efficient utilization
of Information Technology.
• To evaluate the overall levels of responsiveness, effectiveness and accountability
of each unit.
• To identify opportunities and make recommendations for improved service.
• The Committee will take into consideration the Senate Budget Committee's
recommendations with respect to the cyclical reviews of centralized service units.
The Committee had at its disposal extensive documentation prepared by C&C and
augmented by materials submitted by others.
The UBC members ofthe Committee met on four occasions in March and April and
the full Committee met April 15-17. The Committee published a call for submissions
in UBC Reports and on the UBC Usenet group and circulated an announcement
requesting input from Deans, Heads and Directors. Twelve written submissions
were received (see Appendix 2). UBC Reports ■ September 19, 1996 13
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATIONS
The Committee interviewed 29 persons including the Vice President Student and
Academic Services, the leadership in Computing and Communications and a
number of academic and administrative users. The Committee also interviewed a
number of industry representatives from off campus. (See Appendix 3 for a list of
persons interviewed.)
C. Summary of recommendations
1. The University should re-evaluate which services within C&C should be funded
centrally and which should be charged out.
2. IT policies and standards should be developed by providers in partnership with
clients.
3. C&C should provide central support for activities that benefit the University as
a whole, including but not limited to:
- campus-wide network architecture
- electronic messaging
- common standards
- advising services
- security
- technology leadership and awareness
- newsletter
- site licences
4. The Centre for Educational Technology (CET) should have an operational
function funded by the Vice President Academic and Provost.
5. The University needs to develop a single institutional data model for administrative computing.
6. Campus-wide standards should be developed for desktop software that access
administrative data.
7. C&C and clients should jointly develop an architecture for adrninistrative computing.
8. C&C should play a leadership role in building and maintaining links between all the
computing constituencies, and facilitate resource and information sharing.
9. The institutional responsibility for IT planning should be assigned to a vice
president or associate vice president.
10. The individual with responsibility for information technology should place a high
priority on reviewing the organizational structure of C&C with the goal of establishing a structure that optimizes the chances of the University realizing its IT vision.
11. The University should make available network facilities to deliver high speed
access directly to the desk top of all faculty, staff and graduate students. Based
on current standards and commonly available technology, the Committee
recommends a minimum speed of 10 Mbps, realizing that the minimum
requirements will rise rapidly as the technology advances.
12. The University should move quickly to increase student access to network
facilities through establishment of common workstation areas, by increasing
dial in facilities and by bringing network access to the residence rooms. These
services should be provided at minimal or no cost to the students.
13 The University should start an ongoing program to bring high speed networking
capabilities to the major classrooms and laboratories in the University.
14. The University should implement a program for supplying each faculty member
with a workstation.
15. The University should integrate and manage the telecommunications infrastructure, including all intra and interbuilding cable and distribution plant, as
a single University-wide entity encompassing voice, video and data components.
16. The University should streamline the cable installation process by vesting
overall authority in one position .
17. The University should insist that C&C take advantage of every opportunity to
cannibalize and extend existing wiring facilities for campus networking.
18. New construction must follow the most recent integrated voice, video and data
communications standards. Where possible similar standards should be applied to large scale renovations.
19. In areas where no other options exist the University should use analog voice
telephone lines with low cost v32 or v42 modems as an interim step to enable access
by faculty, staff and students until they can be provided with ethernet connectivity.
20. The TELEcentre should be a service provider with its priorities dictated by the
needs of its clients and CET.
21. The PrintShop should promote document standards and provide consultation
and advice to its customers.
22. The roles and functions of Media Services and Biomedical Communications
should be re-examined to determine if there are opportunities for alignment.
23. The UBC Press should not be designated an ancillary service expected to recover
its full costs and, moreover, should be provided with a modest subsidy to
support select publication priorities.
24. As an important intellectual enterprise, the Press should more appropriately
report to the Vice President, Student & Academic Services independently of
Computing & Communications, as does the Library, or alternatively report to
the Vice President, Academic & Provost.
25. The possibility ofthe Press becoming the university press of B.C. sustained by
a consortium of provincial universities should be explored.
D. Computing and Communications units
There are four ancillary units comprising Computing and Communications:
1. Telecommunication Services provides the campus with:
• telecommunications services, including voice, data and video communications;
• design services associated with enhancement and maintenance ofthe University's cable plant which serves the needs for voice, data, and video communications;
• microcomputer and LAN design and consulting, system configuration and
administration:
• maintenance, repair and troubleshooting for computing and networking hardware and software.
The Committee heard praise from a number of people regarding the technical
expertise of the staff. This was borne out by our own discussions. The unit has
responded effectively in a technical sense to the directive to become an ancillary
unit. They have set up mechanisms and instituted fee-for-service systems that
meet the mandate of covering costs, however, there are problems in the area of
meeting clients' needs and offering needed services. Many of the staff were not
recruited into a fee-for-service system and they have had a difficult time
reconciling "bottom line" concerns with those of providing service to their
customers. The service aspect has tended to suffer. (Imposing arbitrary standards is one example; not working with clients to find the most cost effective way
of satisfying the clients' needs is another.)
2. University Computing Services (UCS) contributes to the support of the broad
computing and communication service categories of academic and administrative computing; voice, data, and video networking; printing: and publishing. All
services are in support of the distributed, decentralized and heterogeneous
computing and communications environment on campus. In particular, UCS:
• develops and provides services on the campus data network including information access services such as Interchange and Netinfo:
• develops administrative computer applications;
• provides operational and technical support for servers and computers used by
administrative applications and for servers providing Internet and e-mail
services;
• provides operational support for the campus data network and BCNet;
• provides general purpose computing services, such as UNIX accounts;
• coordinates both the campus policy on the appropriate use of information
technology and activities relating to computer and network system security.
The situation described for Telecommunication Services holds for the staff in
UCS. Technically very qualified people are struggling to develop the necessary
business acumen. The Committee also heard from a number of people that the
funding model plus an apparent deficiency in communication within C&C had led
to a morale problem. The staff did not have a good grasp ofthe overall situation
and their role in furthering the goals of IT, and in meeting the academic and
administrative needs of the University.
3. Media Services is concerned primarily with support for educational and administrative applications of communications, media, and technology, particularly
the production of electronic and printed media. The department is organized as
three service divisions: TELEcentre, PrintShop and Publications, each with
different mandates, organizations and financial arrangements.
•The TELEcentre is a rapidly evolving, state-of-the-art, production and presentation facility for electronic media. It serves to focus the burgeoning interest in
the application of electronic educational technologies (EET) to teaching and
learning and the emerging role of "new media" which includes the use of desk
or laptop multimedia computers and digital telecommunication networks.
During the past two years, the centre has been developed to accommodate the
activities and staff of the Centre for Educational Technology.
•The PrintShop is the largest division of Media Services, representing approximately 75% of the department's revenue. Services provided through this area
include high volume B/W photocopying and networked printing. University
stationery and specialty off-set printing, desktop publishing, photography and
digital colour copying and printing. The PrintShop was one of the earliest
services on campus to become a fully cost-recovered, fee-for-service ancillary.
• Publications has been developed to address the need for the technical documentation of services for customers, and to communicate computing and communications issues to a growing and increasingly diverse audience. The division is
recognized for the production and distribution of the Campus Computing &
Communications newsletter, and the creation of printed and electronic information
to help the University find and use computing and communication services. The
Publications group works with other staff to produce articles about services such
as Netinfo and Interchange, and to feature stories on new applications, developments, and technologies. Publications was among the first to take advantage ofthe
information opportunities afforded by the Internet and World Wide Web.
This is a well-run, creative unit. The fee-for-service model works well . The unit
provides good service and is meeting the needs of its customers. The newsletter
received high praise from academics and administrators.
4. UBC Press currently publishes more than 20 new titles annually, employs 16.5
people and operates on a budget in excess of $2 million. It is housed in distributed
space in the Old Auditorium. The Press views itself as a publisher of academic and
general-interest books with an emphasis on works on British Columbia. Canada
and the Pacific Rim. Its priorities are to meet highly scholarly standards and to
operate efficiently. It takes pride in its role of enhancing the status and reputation
ofthe University at home and abroad. It has worked out mutually advantageous
distribution arrangements with other presses. Careful forward planning envisages a substantial increase in the number of titles published. Submissions to the
Committee from faculty indicate that it is highly valued and that it has made
remarkable strides over the past several years in fulfilling its objectives. Further
testimony is provided by the large number of distinguished members of faculty
who have published with it. The Press is an extremely successful operation which
contributes significantly to the University's mandate as both a major research
institution and as an important resource to the Province.
Despite its importance and successes, the Press is in financial difficulty. This
difficulty stems from two developments. First, its subsidies have been sharply
reduced. The University has stopped an annual subsidy of $200,000, and
government support for publication has been sharply reduced. Meanwhile, the
Press, as an ancillary service, is expected to recover its costs. Charges under this
head involving infrastructure provided by the University have increased. The
result is that though it manages to pay for much of its costs from revenues and
services, it is facing shortfalls in meeting its expenses. At some point in the near
future it will have to move to alternative space as it is our understanding that the
Old Auditorium is scheduled for demolition. Other university presses, throughout North America commonly receive substantial subsidies to cover staff salaries
and benefits, utilities, accounting service and/or working space. Indeed, the
Review Committee saw evidence that the Press has managed to flourish in recent
years with subsidies that were less than those received by comparable entities. 14 UBC Reports • September 19,1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATIONS
The burdens imposed by ancillarization coupled with the Press's position in the
C&C envelope with other units with quite different activities has led to the
suggestion that it be reclassified. The Press deals with the fruits of research, that
is with intellectual property, and in this respect, is more akin to the Library than
the computing services. It has also been suggested that it might set up as an
entity largely independent of UBC or be the centre piece in the creation of a press
sustained by all the universities ofthe Province. [The Committee certainly was
convinced of the merits of repositioning the Press within the University's
reporting structure, but did not have the opportunity to undertake the necessary
study to determine the merits ofthe other suggestions.]
E. Objectives to be achieved
The Committee posed the question what IT services should be provided to UBC's
faculty, staff and students. It also asked itself what arrangements should be in place
between providers and users. The following answers emerged from its deliberations:
1. Every faculty and staff member should be linked to the Internet via a connection
with a minimum bandwidth of 10 Mbps. Faculty and staff should be able to
access information electronically from on and off campus.
2. Students should have:
(a) access to computing in common areas, libraries, residences, and from off
campus;
(b) access to network facilities and services;
(c) access to support services, e.g. help desk.
3. Faculty, staff and students must have the opportunity to use the latest electronic
educational technologies in support of teaching, learning and research. This will
include properly equipped classrooms, specialized facilities such as the
TELEcentre and accessibility as defined in 1 & 2 above.
4. There need to be:
(a) clearly articulated campus information technology standards to enable
planning and collaboration; and
(b) standard and consistent procedures to provide a secure computing and
network environment.
5. A cooperative partnership needs to be developed between C&C staff, faculty and
students to ensure that academic concerns are reflected in IT policies and decisions.
6. A structure is needed that responds effectively to changes in the rapidly evolving ITworld.
F. Strategic initiatives
Strategic initiatives or resources required to achieve the objectives set out in the
previous section and are elaborated below:
1. Dynamic Vice President level leadership in the information technologies.
2. Extensive plans to improve access for users..
3. Sustainable, scaleable, high performance network infrastructure.
4. Broad based inclusive advisory structure. (The Advisory Committee for Information Technology (ACIT) and the Centre for Educational Technology (CET) are a
good start and should be supported).
5. Restructure C&C to cope with the increased importance of communication/
networking and the distributed nature of computing.
6. Financial plans that support the vision, not "be" the vision.
7. Financial plans that provide for substantial central funding.
8. A centrally funded core of technical expertise to facilitate IT planning and
delivery of service.
9. Administrative computing architecture that ensures
(a) a single institutional data model;
(b) a single consistent point of access to administrative data; and,
(c) direct user access to the data for analyzing, recording and reporting.
10. Effective partnerships among IT providers and users.
11. Fostering of technological innovation and leadership in IT.
12. University funds for an information centre to coordinate development of educational
technology (currently done by the Centre for Educational Technology).
G. Recommendations
1. The University should re-evaluate which services within C8lC should be
funded centrally and which should be charged out.
Activities which are highly peripheral to the University's educational and research missions are often characterized as "ancillary" enterprises. Typically
operations such as parking, food services, and bookstore are designated as
ancillary services. Such ancillaries are often burdened with full overhead rates
and treated as businesses. For very good reasons it is extremely rare for a
university to consider campus-wide information technology units to be similar to
ancillaries, and it is nearly unprecedented to globally treat basic information
technology as ancillary to the university's educational and research missions.
Indeed in nearly all major universities, campus information technology support
and services activities are considered (like those of the libraries) as central to a
research university's mission. For this reason the wholesale designation of C&C
as an ancillary is inappropriate. Such treatment has caused significant misdirection of C&C efforts. The result has been a considerable and unfortunate
dislocation of resources and attention diverted from crucial efforts to ensure
effective campus information technology leadership, planning, support and
innovation. In addition, ancillarization has delayed the development of infrastructure and services which further the common good.
There are many places where various and suitable fee-for-service approaches are
appropriate and can help a university more efficiently use and allocate resources
to achieve its mission. However, in most cases, "fully burdened" costing is not
appropriate treatment for maintaining and evolving campus information technology resources which stand in complex and important supporting relationships to
core university goals and objectives. In sum UBC's current approach of treating
C&C as an ancillary is seriously impeding its efforts to establish itself and its
faculty, staff, and students as significant participants in the electronic communities of higher education.
The review team concluded that UBC should not treat C&C as an ancillary. UBC
should carefully consider which sorts of activities in C&C should be placed on a
fee-for-service basis (e.g., printing activities) and then selectively craft approaches for each situation. The plan should determine the appropriate level (if
any) of cost recovery in that context, consider 'pricing' philosophy, and do so in
a manner that fully appreciates the long term consequences on the overall
imposition of such charging schemes.
2. IT policies and standards should be developed by providers in partnership
with clients.
The Committee has commented on the need for institution-wide policies and
standards for information technology in a number of areas. We heard of several
instances where policies, in areas where they were clearly needed, were viewed
as arbitrary and unreasonable by people who were affected by them. One such
policy was the requirement that departmental LANs be certified as "trusted"
before they can be used to access administrative systems. Another was the refusal
to allow staff other than those employed by C&C to have access to communications closets, even when these closets were (or could have been) used by the local
department to house their equipment. Without commenting on the merits of
these particular policies, we will say that they were clearly seen by those on whom
they impacted as arbitrary and inappropriate. If C&C units are to play their
proper role in the development of institutional policies and standards they must
do so in partnership with those affected. This requires not just consultation but
the full participation of all those affected (or their representatives). Although it will
not always be possible to get the agreement of everyone involved, this should be
the goal. When agreement cannot be reached the issue should be resolved by an
appropriate policy making body.
3. C&C should provide central support for activities that benefit the University as a whole, including but not limited to:
- campus-wide network architecture
- electronic messaging
- common standards
- advising services
- security
- technology leadership and awareness
- newsletter
- site licences
Some aspects ofthe academic nature of a university involve services, facilities and
human resources such as the library that should be considered to be for the
common good. These should be funded centrally. It makes no sense to cost
recover services, such as the library, that are central to the academic community
as a whole. In the information technology area, some such services include, but
are not necessarily limited to, the following:
(a) Campus-wide network architecture: The network is the basis of modern communication. It is central to both the teaching and research aspects of the University.
(b) Electronic messaging: The sending of messages by e-mail is rapidly replacing
the use of paper because it is immediate, more efficient, cheap, and environmentally friendly. It might even be said that this service is more important than
the telephone. It is essential that every University member, be they student,
faculty or staff, have the ability to communicate via e-mail. This is an essential
central service.
(c) Common standards: In the absence of sensible standards, every individual or
department is tempted to find the easiest and/or cheapest route to attain some
goal. A problem can occur at a later date when that solution has to be incorporated
into a larger system. It makes sense that there be clearly defined, well publicized
standards pertaining to hardware, software and networking decisions. Central
efforts in this area could save millions of dollars in the long run.
(d) Advising services: There exists much expert information around the campus.
An invaluable resource is the group of staff that make up C&C. The provision
of advice on a host of matters represents a key role for this organization. The
service should include advice on: difficulties experienced with IT usage;
purchase of both software and hardware; system management; and help with
software and hardware problems. Such service when provided by a short phone
call or a brief e-mail instruction to an individual or user group should not
require billing. Site visits, training sessions and other substantial forms of
assistance will need a charging mechanism.
(e) Security: Security against unauthorized alteration or use of digital information,
damage, failure, and theft must be a major objective. Security ofthe campus
network, its equipment, programs and data is a campus-wide issue, in the same
way and for the same reasons that building security is a campus issue. A weak
link in the network jeopardizes the whole system.
(f) Technology leadership and awareness: This University has prided itself in the
past as one ofthe world leaders in information technology. Historically, much
ofthe effort was ajoint endeavor between UCS and the Department of Computer
Science. The spin-offs to the rest ofthe University were monumental. It would
be difficult to recover costs from these R&D efforts that placed UBC at the
forefront of technology. Efforts to reestablish and maintain world leadership
should be strongly encouraged and supported centrally. They are for the
common good of the campus as a whole.
(g) Newsletter: Campus Computing received rave reviews from many ofthe persons
that the Committee interviewed. This newsletter is a valuable way of informing
the UBC community about advances and uses of IT, and we recommend that
the University support it centrally.
(h) Site licences: UCS has been very successful in obtaining substantial savings
for users by arranging for site licences of software. This service should continue
as a service to the University community.
4. The Centre for Educational Technology (CET) should have an operational
function funded by the Vice President Academic and Provost.
UBC has been slow to incorporate electronic educational technologies (EET) into
its teaching and learning programs. The situation began to change in 1995 with
the awarding ofthe Innovation Fund grants. The enthusiasm, creativity and effort
generated across the full spectrum of the University's educational activities
indicated that there was widespread support for incorporating EET into our
teaching programs. It is critical that the University build on the momentum ofthe UBC Reports • September 19, 1996 15
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATIONS
last two years if it is to offer its students the benefits that the new teaching
modalities can provide. The initiative and leadership shown by CET should be
subsumed to a large extent by the Faculties. They should take ownership in
developing and adapting course material for their needs. Notwithstanding the
desirability of decentralization, there is a need for a small University-supported
activity that coordinates the use of tools, publicizes proven solutions to avoid
reinventing the wheel and helps set standards, etc. We suggest that CET should
have this central coordinating role; financial support should come from the Vice
President Academic and Provost.
5. The University needs to develop a single institutional data model for
administrative computing.
It is necessary that a single institutional data model for administrative services
be developed to support the strategy of having an efficient and effective administrative computing environment. It will ensure that common user issues such as
accessibility, and a consistent point of access to administrative data are realized
and maintained. It will also ensure that issues such as data redundancy, data
integrity and security are addressed. For example, common data elements such
as name and address should be recorded once in a common area and subsequently used as keys to access or update data in other administrative applications such as the financial information system or student records. This model will
facilitate system and application development, support user community efforts,
and will eliminate frustrations associated with inconsistent and redundant data
models while providing a framework for responding to technological change.
6. Campus-wide standards should be developed for desktop software that
access administrative data.
Standards for desktop software are required to support the strategies of having a single
consistent point of access to adrninistrative data and direct user access to the data for
analyzing, recording and reporting. Desktop software standards facilitate the transmission of information and reduce user frustration in accessing and using data. Standardization facilitates the vision and future development of a totally electronic environment. It
provides the basis for the migration towards a 'paperless' environment, as more and more
users move in a common and interoperable direction. Adoption of standards also
optimizes the use of staff resources throughout the University.
7. C&C and clients should jointly develop an architecture for administrative
computing.
A computing architecture defines the rules and standards for inter-system communication, data sharing and storage, interoperability of systems, and definition of
common elements used in different systems. Such an architecture is necessary for
administrative systems at the University, and one needs to be developed. The
development of an architecture for administrative computing systems will require the
joint collaboration of C&C personnel and the client community to ensure that the
architecture is consistent with client needs, is developed with cost efficiencies in
mind, and adequately provides support for the core IT requirement.
8. C&C should play a leadership role in building and maintaining links
between all the computing constituencies, and facilitate resource and
information sharing.
Many departments on campus would benefit from a centralized pool of technical
people to act as a resource when problems arise. Workstation Services and the
Personal Computing Support Centre both fulfilled this function a few years ago,
but were not cost recovered. C&C no longer has the mandate to perform such
"good works" for the University community. In order to obtain the optimum return
and benefit from the wide range of expertise that exists on this campus, it is
essential that there be a mechanism by which information can be shared. With
rapidly changing information technology, it is crucial that individuals who find
themselves in different departments and units have a means to access the
wisdom and knowledge of other experts on the campus. An excellent example of
such a link that has worked well is the UNIX Users Group. Technical information
has been shared at monthly meetings, and via an e-mail distribution list where
questions of a technical nature receive valuable and rapid answers from informed
sources. Employees of UCS have played a pivotal role in the establishment and
running of this valuable group. The Network Administrators group serves a
similar function. It should be recognized that an important aspect of the job of
employees of the University whose job devolves around IT (both within and
without C&C) is to make a collegial contribution to the sharing of expertise with
others, and that this is not a cost recoverable item, but rather a service to the
University as a whole.
9. The institutional responsibility for IT planning should be assigned to a vice
president or associate vice president.
Over the past decade information technology has emerged as a critical element
in the advancement and dissemination of knowledge. The impact of IT has been
felt in nearly every institutional endeavor. The Committee was frequently
reminded of the importance of and the need for the institutional establishment
and maintenance of standards for network architecture and systems including
such elements as electronic messaging which benefit the University as a whole.
Institutional leadership in the management of this rapidly changing technology
is critical and the Committee recommends that the responsibility for IT planning
should be vested in an administrative officer at the vice presidential or associate
vice presidential level. This could be the Vice President Student and Academic
Services, or the Vice President Academic and Provost. Alternatively the University
might want to appoint a Chief Information Officer who would hold a rank
equivalent to a vice president or associate vice president.
10. The individual with responsibility for information technology should
place a high priority on reviewing the organizational structure of C&C
with the goal of establishing a structure that optimizes the chances ofthe
University realizing its IT vision.
Computing and Communications have evolved from a primary focus on computing
to the point where communications capabilities are of paramount importance. The
communications infrastructure is often the limiting factor in accessing and
transferring information. This is particularly true in an older institution lacking
adequate wiring and space for cables and communications rooms. The shift from
centralized mainframe computing activities to a distributed mode further emphasizes the need for sophisticated communications infrastructure.
The organizational structure of Computing and Communications reflects the
priorities of the past and may not be optimal for the realities of today or for the
future. It is necessary that the organizational structure of C&C be reviewed with
a view to creating a model which will best meet the University's IT vision. Given
the rapidly changing nature of IT it would be wise to review the operation of C&C
at three year intervals.
11. The University should make available network facilities to deliver high
speed access directly to the desk top of all faculty, staff and graduate
students. Based on current standards and commonly available technology,
the Committee recommends a minimum speed of 10 Mbps, realizing that the
minimum requirements will rise rapidly as the technology advances.
High speed connections to the campus network infrastructure are an essential part
of the workplace. All modern network senices are built on the assumption that
such high speed access exists to the desk top. Without such connections, faculty,
staff and students are disadvantaged because they cannot reasonably access
essential network services both on the UBC campus and around the world. At this
time the networking infrastructure at UBC is at best inconsistent, and high speed
access is not available to most members ofthe campus community. The Committee
is aware of new and emerging high speed technologies including ISDN, cable
modems and satellites, however, based on current standards and commonly
available technology, the Committee recommends a minimum speed of 10 Mbps.
We realize that plans are underway for 100 megabit-per-second networks and in
the future 10 Mbps is likely to feel uncomfortably slow.
12. The University should move quickly to increase student access to network
facilities through establishment of common workstation areas, by increasing dial infacilities and by bringing network access to the residence rooms.
These services should be provided at minimal or no cost to the students.
UBC has fallen behind in providing reasonable access to campus network services and
to the Internet for students. This is demonstrated by the recent success of Netinfo. Even
such a rudimentary text-based service was highly successful, and there is clearly a
strong latent demand for network access among the student population.
Networking is a "supply push" market. Given universal access, network applications are developed by the user community, and network usage increases. In the
context of students, universal access to the network will result in the use of many
network applications in support of teaching. These will include electronic mail, list
servers, newsgroups and local Web facilities. Students will also have access to the
Internet, a learning resource which is becoming as important to teaching as the
library. Every large university is already providing or is moving in the direction of
providing universal network access to all students. UBC must do so in order to
remain competitive and credible.
13. The UniversityshouMstartanongoingprogramtobrmghighspeednetworking
capabilities to the major classrooms and laboratories in the University.
The learning infrastructure at UBC is based primarily on traditional "talk and
chalk" methodologies. Such an infrastructure is not adequate to teach new
technologies and does not allow for the use of emerging multi-media capabilities
in the teaching of traditional material.
Students have more choices in where they learn both on and off campus, and
these choices will expand with the introduction of even more sophisticated and
more powerful provincial, national and international networking and telecommunication facilities. UBC must move forward in the introduction of multimedia capabilities in the teaching environment at the University. These
capabilities will be delivered over the campus network.
In the 21st century "learning marketplace", UBC must appear to be the best
educational provider facilitated and enhanced by the use of information technologies. This is a critical issue if UBC is to to attract and retain outstanding students.
14. The University should implement a program for supplying each faculty
member with a workstation.
In order to access and use facilities delivered over the network, academic staff
must have a reasonably up-to-date workstation available to them in their place
of work. In addition faculty should be supplied with technologies that allow
them to teach in the electronic classroom.
This leverages the faculties ability to compete in the worldwide academic
electronic community, promotes economies of scale and positions UBC as a
competitive academic community.
15. The University should integrate and manage the telecommunications infrastructure, including all intra and interbuilding cable and distribution plant, as
a single University^wide entity encompassing voice, video and data components.
In order to achieve a cost effective long term approach to diverse and evolving
physical communications support structures, most institutions with a campus
setting consider and manage the basic voice, video and data communications
infrastructure as a single distribution system with common horizontal and
physical distribution, conduits, closets, and transmission mediums. Often
such infrastructure is treated, as is the practice in telephone companies, as part
of one unified overall end-to-end telecommunications system for investment,
costing and recharge purposes. Data and data network functions are typically
included with voice aspects in the basic telephone system recharge and
investment approaches of a unit like C&C. Similarly cable pulling, phone and
network connection add, change and move functions can be addressed by a
highly focused and coordinated staff. This fully integrated model parallels those
of private sector communications companies as well as other leading universities, and is seen as providing the most cost-effective long term approach to
evolving the robust, flexible, universal, cost effective physical communications
infrastructure needed by UBC. By the same token most universities have found
that the best model for building, maintaining and operating network communications infrastructure is as an end-to-end approach of providing ethernet
connectivity all the way to desktops.
16. The University should streamline the cable installation process by
vesting overall authority in one position.
Several people interviewed complained about difficulties they had encountered
in having network cables installed in existing buildings. These difficulties 16 UBC Reports • September 19, 1996
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE TO REVIEW COMPUTING AND COMMUNICATIONS
appeared to be due mainly to the fact that a number of different departments
have a role in network installation projects. These departments include C&C
(Network Systems Support and Cable Facilities Services), Campus Planning and
Development and Plant Operations. One or more of these units may use external
consultants or service providers. Although the individuals involved in each step
ofthe project were considered to be good at their jobs, they did not seem to be
able to work together effectively to define, plan and execute projects quickly and
efficiently. The cost and scope of projects can vary without the knowledge or
involvement of the client for whom the work is being done. The time taken to
complete projects can be considerable. These problems must be resolved. One
approach would be for the accountable vice president and the Vice President
Finance to agree on a single position in C&C which would be responsible for
ensuring that cable installation projects are completed in a timely and economical manner; one which reflects the available budget and the needs of the user.
The position should have the necessary authority to be able to waive standards
where appropriate, and to ensure co-operation between all the parties involved.
17. The University should insist that C&C take advantage of every opportunity to cannibalize and extend existing wiring facilities for campus
networking.
Remodeling projects vary widely but each should be creatively and flexibly
approached by UBC and C&C with the goal of cost effectively improving the
wiring infrastructure with the quick (even "quick and dirty") achievement of
universal ethernet access in the area as the driving goal. Given the poor state
of wiring in many buildings, C&C must work aggressively and with creativity to
leverage the existing in-building voice plant for ethernet connectivity even when
it does not fully meet new wiring standards or closet requirements. As resources
become available the voice data copper infrastructure should be replaced with
high speed links. Special projects in information intensive contexts such as the
new Koerner Library should ensure pervasive installation of plug in and fixed
ethernet connectivity in all carrels as well as other areas of the facilities.
18. New construction mustfollow the most recent integrated voice, video and
data communications standards. Where possible similar standards should
be applied to large scale renovations.
With leadership by C&C. UBC should establish communications systems wiring
and distribution standards for new construction that will ensure that occupants
of those buildings will enjoy ready and inexpensive access to the full range of
networking and communications equipment and capabilities that will become
available throughout the life ofthe structure. This approach is now common in
business and in peer institutions throughout Europe and North America and is
seen by universities as a key effort in ensuring the long term adaptability and
cost effectiveness of their buildings and the programs and operatives which they
will house.
19. In areas where no other options exist the University should use analog
voice telephone lines with low cost v32 or v42 modems as an interim step
to enable access by faculty, staff and students until they can be provided
with ethernet connectivity.
Even in cases where it is not possible to provide ethernet connectivity to an
individual's office or desktop, it is crucial to ensure that they can participate in
at least the most basic elements of a UBC electronic community by using e-mail,
web and other services albeit at low speeds. People's access to the greater
networked community should not be deferred due to difficulties in providing
ethernet services. At the very least this should be provided with dial-in
capabilities. However, as dial-up access is intrinsically inadequate to current
and future research university standards and applications. UBC should undertake an aggressive long-term program to replace these interim modem connections by providing ethernet access to all desktops as soon as is possible.
20. The TELEcentre should be a service provider with its priorities dictated
by the needs of its clients and CET.
There is a great deal of communications, media and technical expertise within
Media Services. The leadership and staff are imaginative and are doing a good
job in running the unit. The Committee feels that Media Services is appropriately placed in the Computing & Communications umbrella, given its technology orientation and its reliance on the communications infrastructure.
The TELEcentre plays an important role in the promotion and showcasing
education technology. Positioning the TELEcentre as an ancillary is not entirely
appropriate given that electronic educational technology (EET) is still in its
infancy and rapidly evolving, and that adopting such technology is still beyond
the capacity of individual departments. To advance UBC to the foreground in
EET, there needs to be some central coordination ofthe application of education
technology with priorities set by the clients and Centre for Educational
Technology.
21. The PrintShop should promote document standards and provide consultation and advice to its customers.
The PrintShop is the largest division of Media Services and generates approximately 75% of the department's revenue. It has operated successfully as an
ancillary. With electronic printing and publishing becoming a more significant
component ofthe printing business, the PrintShop needs to improve efficiency
by promoting document standards. The PrintShop should also provide consultation and advice to its customers on desktop publication software.
22. The roles and functions of Media Services and Biomedical Communications should be re-examined to determine if there are opportunities for
alignment.
Although the possibility of merging Media Services and Biomedical Communications was examined in 1993, the Committee feels that there exists certain
common functions within the two units (e.g. photography and video production)
and changing economic conditions may warrant a revisit ofthe issue.
23. The UBC Press should not be designated an ancillary service expected to
recover its full costs and, moreover, should be provided with a modest
subsidy to support select publication priorities.
24. As an important intellectual enterprise, the Press should more appropri
ately report to the Vice President, Student & Academic Services independently of Computing & Communications, as does the Library, or
alternatively to the Vice President, Academic & Provost.
25.  The possibility of the Press becoming the university press of B.C.
sustained by a consortium of provincial universities should be explored.
The UBC Press is extremely well run and has controlled its costs well. It has
expanded its mandate and increased its influence as one ofthe nation's major
publishers of academic work. It has also succeeded in publishing works of
interest to a wider audience. However, it has incurred significant reductions in
subsidies from the University and government granting agencies. At the same
time, as an ancillary service it is expect to recover fully its costs. These
constraints seriously undermine its viability. It should be re-emphasized that
university presses throughout North America are commonly substantially
subsidized.
H. Appendices
1. Definitions
ACIT - The Advisory Committee on Information Technology was established to
review and coordinate the use of IT at UBC. Its mandate includes computing and
data processing, as well as voice, video, and data communications in support of
teaching, research, and administrative activities.
CET - The Centre for Educational Technology is an initiative of the Deans
reporting to the Provost. Its mandate is to advance the use of information
technology in teaching, learning and research.
C&C - Computing and Communications; the umbrella unit which includes
University Computing Services (UCS), Telecommunication Services, Media Services and UBC Press.
Dial-in -access - A method of connecting two computers over a phone line. Each
computer requires a modem. The speed of data transfer is considerably slower
than ethernet.
EET - Electronic Educational Technology; this involves the use of computing and
related technologies in the support of teaching.
Ethernet - A standardized way of connecting two computers together thereby
establishing a network. Ethernet theoretically transmits data at the rate of 10
million bits per second (10Mbps).
Ethernet card - hardware which is installed in a computer to support an ethernet
connection.
Mbps - stands for million bits per second; a measure of the speed at which data
can be transmitted.
Modem - a device that converts signals the computer understands into signals
which can be accurately transmitted over a telephone line to another modem.
Computers use modems to talk to each other.
IT - Information Technology; this encompases computing and voice, video, and
data communications.
UCS - University Computing Services; a part of C&C.
V.32 - a standard for modems which permits communication at up to 9600 bps.
V.42- a standard for modems which incorporates error control and supports data
compression.
2. List of Written Submissions
Ed Auld. Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy
Jean Barman, Professor, Department of Educational Studies
John Demco. Computing Facilities Manager. Department of Computer Science
Margaret Ellis, Coordinator, Centre for Educational Technology
Jim Hu
Judith R Johnston, Director. School of Audiology & Speech Sciences
Susan Mair, Manager/Senior Consultant, University Computing Services
Sara Mcintosh, President, Thunderbird Resident's Association
Sham Pendleton, Registration Administrator. Office of the Registrar
Brian Sieben, Resident at Thunderbird
Glen Skene. MIS graduate student
Peter Ward, Head, Department of History
3. List of Persons Interviewed
Ed Auld. Professor, Department of Physics & Astronomy
Tony Bates, Director, Distance Education & Technology
Rainor Beltzner, KPMG
Bob Bruce, Director, Education Computing
Bob Carveth, Director, Science Communications
John Chase, Director, Budget & Planning
Mike Davies, Associate Dean, Applied Science
John Demco, Facilities Manager, Computer Science
Greg Fahlman, Professor, Astronomy & Geophysics
Eoin Finn, KPMG
Ian Franks, Director, Media Services
Bob Goldstein, Vice Chair, Advisory Committee on Information Technology
Doris Huang, Netinfo Coordinator
Maria Klawe, Vice President, Student & Academic Services
Rolf Kullak, Electrical Engineer, Plant Operations
Jack Leigh, Executive Director, Computing & Communications
John Madden, Rogers Cable representative
Janet McGregor, Chief Information Office
Peter Milroy, Director, UBC Press
Jock Munroe, former Vice President Academic, Simon Fraser University
Mary Risebrough. Director, Housing & Conferences
Rob Reid. Manager, Financial Planning, Computing & Communications
Bernie Sheehan, President, Technical University of British Columbia
Glen Skene, MIS graduate student
Julie Stevens, Netinfo Coordinator. Library
Jim Tom, Director. Telecommunications
Peter Ward, Head. History Department
Nancy Wiggs, Faculty of Law representative
Bob Woodham. Head, Computer Science UBC Reports • September 19, 1996 17
Forum
Some ideas about
teaching
By Lee Gass
Lee Gass lias taught first-year biology at UBC since 1974 as well as a
human ecology course for non-scientists.
A former member of the Science One
teaching team. Gass is currently seconded to the Faculty of Science as a
general consultant to the biology program.
One operating principle in science is
that it is easier to solve problems if we
know what they are. 1 believe that it is
not yet time to reinvent lower-division
teaching of science because we have not
yet agreed on the problems we must
solve or what we want our students to
take with them when they leave us.
More basically, we
have not yet identi- 	
fled principles by
which we could
reinvent educational programs in
the Faculty of Science. To this end I
will suggest some
very basic ideas
about teaching and
learning in general,
and about teaching
and learnintj sci-
ence. ;
Limitations of
human memory capacity make it impossible to remember large amounts
of unrelated information. Among Gass
many other things,
what we mean by
intelligence rests on the ability to discover, remember, and use relationships
among facts, "chunking" large information sets into manageable units.
It is useful to consider that the fundamental unit of understanding is not the
fact but the relationship, and that "scientific memory" comprises a network of
such relationships. One implication is
that we remember the facts of scientific
arguments by remembering the logical
structure in which they reside. I suggest
that when people remember scientific
details for more than a few days, they
often remember the structure and make
up the details. (I do.)
To illustrate a logical structure by
exposing students to it is not the same
as to develop it. For a teacher to develop
an argument is not the same as for a
student to develop it. These points are
subtle, but they are important to consider if we expect students to develop
scientific arguments.
Many issues converge on this point.
Most importantly, students must not
think of arguments as noun-like objects
that can exist in completed form, but as
a verb-like communicative process, arguing, through which they can convince
people. The metaphor of lawyers arguing
in court usually makes this distinction
clear to them, especially when they realize that we are the jury that they must
convince in the end. It is worth considering that a basic unit of process in
teaching may be the argument.
Two ways to develop logical structures can be called inductive and deductive. In the inductive approach, students
confront sets of information and later
confront a structure that unifies them.
In practice, the instructor "zooms
out" from the details toward an integrated view of them. In the deductive
approach, the instructor "zooms in"
from global to increasingly local views
of a phenomenon.
Science, as practiced by working scientists, requires both deduction and
induction. To the extent that our own
scientific ability rests in our performance of these operations, our objective
must be for our students to perform
them as well. This implies that in every
science course, both teachers and students perform both operations repeatedly.
Students from incoming undergraduates to incoming
graduate students
have little experience of either induction or deduction in
my experience.
They find comparisons of all kinds difficult, usually for
lack of simple linguistic structures
(they do not understand what comparison is!), and find
logical argumentation much more
than difficult. If we
are serious about
argumentation, we
must help students
learn simple linguistic tools for
comparison and
simple logical structures such as syllogisms to help them
link statements into trains of thought.
We must teach them the power of simplifying assumptions: none of these
things are obvious to the uninitiated.
Whether or not we blame others for
failing to provide these tools, they didn't
and so we must. If our revolution is a
serious one, we must accept that things
like this do not merely support learning
the material; they are integral to the
material and cannot be separated from
it. Ifyou doubt this, just consider the
contingency of results on methods and
experimental designs in your own work
as a scientist.
Students have rarely had to make
arguments at all. let alone formally and
rigourously. Our students must begin
sometime, and someone has to help
them.
Students will risk their ideas in public as soon as they trust that their
public wants to hear them. The first
component of this "public" is us, because we hold such great power to
discourage active, creative thought.
That we hold this power is known to
all students before they meet us, and
they believe it strongly because teachers before us have used it against them.
(In a more cynical incarnation, I believed that the single most effective
contribution of teachers to students is
to destroy creative thought.) The fact is
that most of our students suffered horribly from exactly this power for a long
time before we meet them, if only
through neglect. Unless we are very
careful they will continue to suffer at
our hands.
Staff photo
Liquid Line-Up
Students who lined up to buy parking passes during the first week of
classes experienced Vancouver's liquid sunshine and enjoyed liquid
refreshments provided by Parking and Security Services. Parking Manager
David Miller said more than 1,000 parking passes were sold during the
week. "We thought putting out the free drinks would help make the lineup a little more pleasant," he said. Students who waited until the second
week of classes had much better luck with the weather.
Pros and cons of ethics
topics for class debate
by Stephen Forgacs
Staff writer
Should a tobacco firm aggressively
market its products abroad or to specific social groups such as females and
youth to compensate for otherwise declining demand? Should multinational
firms apply the same ethical, safety
and environmental standards in all
countries in which they operate?
These are a few of the questions
Bernhard Schwab, a professor in the
Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration, has his students in the
BCom and MBA programs debate to
ensure they consider ethics as an important component of management
decisions.
Decisions based on good ethics sometimes entail costs, says Schwab—costs
that may make unethical behaviour
attractive in some cases.
Schwab recently published an article in the Strategic Management Journal challenging a University of Michigan professor's position that being ethical is invariably good for business.
"Unfortunately life is more complex,
and the view that ethical behaviour is
always the most profitable one is too
simple," says Schwab, who is not an
ethicist but includes discussion of ethics in the context of business strategy.
"If good ethics were always good for
business, we would require much less
in terms of laws, regulations, and enforcement than we typically observe in
our societies."
Being ethical is something that you
may pay a price for, both in personal
life and in business, Schwab says. Not
being tied to a particular code of ethics
provides flexibility of choice, and that
choice can become valuable. In extreme situations, it could even mean
the difference between bankruptcy and
survival.
"You should not condone unethical
behaviour but one has to recognize
that the temptation is there. This temptation often increases under competitive pressure. It is easier to be ethical
when you're well off and declaring profits than when you've got water up to
here and you may have a chance to
save yourself."
Recognizing such temptations, many
companies have developed corporate
guidelines for ethical business conduct to guide managers and employees
as to what behaviour is deemed appropriate.
"Clearly, there may be advantages to
the company that portrays itself as
striving to be ethical, in that this can
build trust with various stakeholder
groups. Ethics, however, should not
just become a public relations exercise," Schwab says.
"Ideally, ethical conduct should also
prevail when nobody sees it, or when
there is no tomorrow. Ultimately, ethical behaviour has to be rooted in personal values and the belief that there is
more to life and to managing a business than narrow personal or economic
gain."
While ethical issues can be complex,
particularly in multicultural settings,
Schwab gives his students some guidelines they can use to ensure their future business transactions are ones
they can live with. These include being
comfortable explaining particular decisions to your family, feeling at ease in
reading about your business dealings
on the front page of a newspaper, and
ensuring relationships with colleagues,
employees and customers are such that
friendship with those individuals could
always be possible at a later date.
ItBnn^litTheBest
In All Of Ik
UnibedVW^y
of the Lower Mainland
A New
Spirit of
Giving 18 UBC Reports • September 19, 1996
News Digest
A new set of scholarships will enable some of Canada's most
promising students to pursue undergraduate and graduate studies
at Cambridge University.
Initially, four scholarships — two undergraduate and two graduate — will be awarded to students admitted to Cambridge for the fall
of 1997.
Created by the Cambridge Canadian Trust, the scholarships will
fully fund a student at the university, including tuition fees,
reasonable living expenses and return travel from Canada to
Cambridge once a year.
Applicants must be Canadian citizens or landed immigrants.
Candidates will be selected for their outstanding academic achievement, with significant consideration given to extra-curricular achievement in areas such as community service, arts, sports and music.
Scholarships are tenable for one to three years, depending on the
program, and are available for any approved course of study leading
to a diploma, affiliated degree or research degree.
Application deadline is Oct. 11, 1996. For more information, call
the Canadian Cambridge Scholarships Secretariat at (416) 413-
4893 or toll-free at 1 -800-977-8573. Applicants may also send a fax
to (416) 413-4887 or pick-up scholarship application materials at
UBC's Awards and Financial Aid Office, Room 1036, Brock Hall,
1874 East Mall.
The Alma Mater Society is going off on a Tangent — a new
publication that promises extensive coverage of news, issues and
events affecting the university community.
The first issue of the bi-monthly, 48-page magazine is slated to
appear on campus Oct. 1.
"A magazine format allows us to delve more deeply than existing
campus tabloids and newsletters," said editor-in-chief Fran Champagne.
"Tangent offers an alternative news source for people who want
to know more about UBC research, services and facilities."
Also featured will be items of local and global interest such as
human rights, the theme chosen for the magazine's inaugural issue,
added Champagne, a Master of Arts student in Education.
Regular departments will include arts, entertainment, mixed
media, music, science and the environment.
Tangent is a project of the New Initiatives Fund, established last
year with proceeds from UBC's value-added agreement with Coca-
Cola. Champagne hopes to have the magazine available on-line by
the new year.
Staff is needed including writers and illustrators, as well as
people interested in forming an editorial board. For more information, call 822-9084, visit room 249B in the Student Union Building
or send e-mail to tangent@ams.ubc.ca
The UBC Library document delivery system was recognized at the
Canadian Association of University Business Officers (CAUBO)
summer conference in Whistler.
The delivery system won second prize in the association's Quality
and Productivity Awards Program. The computer system allows
people in other libraries to easily locate and request delivery of UBC
library books and journal articles. The system has resulted in
reduced paperwork and staff mediation, reduced costs and efficient
delivery times of one to three days.
For example, in 1993-94 the number of items delivered from UBC
to Simon Fraser University through traditional inter-library lending
was 3,347. In 1994-95, the number of deliveries through the new
document delivery system rose to 6,958. UBC's unit costs for
lending documents decreased from $11.67 in 1991 to $5.15 in
1994.
The delivery system was developed by UBC librarians Ruth
Patrick, Heather Keate, Brian Owen, Leonora Crema and David
Winter. CAUBO represents more than 90 universities and colleges
across Canada.
Continuing Studies is redirecting resources and modifying
programs in response to emerging student needs and budget
considerations.
New directions include an increase in certificate programs, the
expansion of distance education credit and non-credit courses and
more international studies.
Continuing Studies will continue to offer non-credit courses in
public affairs, history, literature and environmental field studies to
reflect the university's commitment to the arts and sciences.
Programs such as the Third Age Community of Scholars and the
Spring Program for Retired People will also return.
These initiatives have necessitated the reduction or elimination
of non-credit courses offered to the general public in science, studio
arts and creative writing.
For more information, or to receive a Continuing Studies course
calendar, please call 822-1444.
Alan Donald, Ph.D.
Biostatistical Consultant
Medicine, dentistry, biosciences, aquaculture
101-5805 Balsam Street, Vancouver, V6M 4B9
264 -9918 donald@portal.ca
Classified
The classified advertising rate is $15.75 for 35 words or less. Each additional word
is 50 cents. Rate includes GST. Ads must be submitted in writing 10 days before
publication date to the UBC Public Affairs Office, 310 - 6251 Cecil Green Park Road,
Vancouver B.C., V6T 1Z1, accompanied by payment in cash, cheque (made out to UBC
Reports) or internal requisition. Advertising enquiries: 822-3131.
The deadline for the October 3, 1996 issue of UBC Reports is noon, September 24.
Services
Accommodation
MADRONA      SCHOOL.      An
independent elementary school
for academically advanced,
well motivated children.
Challenging academic
program. Modern facility, ten
minutes from UBC. 2165 West 10
Ave. 732-9965.   	
LICENSED ELECTRICIAN living in
Point Grey specialising in home
repairs and installations. Can fix
anything (almost). Reasonable.
References. Call Brian 733-3171.
DAYCARE OPENING Full-time.
Ages: 2.5 to 5 yrs. University
Kindercare Daycare. Pleasant,
spacious surroundings, small
group. Snacks and tender loving
care provided by ECE-qualified
staff. 1 blk. from UBC gates. 4595
West 8th Ave. Call 228-5885.
|       House Sitters
RELIABLE NS GRADUATE STUDENT
wishes to house-sit. Will take
excellent care of your home, pets
and plants. Available October 1.
Call Stephane, 734-3513.
POINT GREY GUEST HOUSE A
perfect spot to reserve
accommodation for guest
lecturers or other university
members who visit throughout
the year. Close to UBC and other
Vancouver attractions, a tasteful
representation of our city and of
UBC. 4103 W. 10th Ave.,
Vancouver. BC. V6R2H2. Phone
or fax (604)222-4104.
TINA'S GUEST HOUSE Elegant
accom. in Pt. Grey area. Minutes
to UBC. On main bus routes. Close
to shops and restaurants. Inc. TV,
tea and coffee making, private
phone/fridge. Weekly rates
available. Tel: 222-3461. Fax:222-
9279.
ENGLISH COUNTRY GARDEN bed
and breakfast. Warm hospitality
and full breakfast welcome you
to this central view home. Close
to UBC, downtown and bus
service. Large ensuite rooms with
TV and phone. 3466 West 15th
Avenue. 737-2526.
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
Food Science
Head
Applications or nominations are invited from within the
University of British Columbia for the position of Head of
the Department of Food Science.
The successful candidate will have a record of excellence in
teaching, research and service, and have the ability to
provide leadership for the Department through a period of
anticipated academic and organizational change.
More information is available from Dr. J.F. Richards, Dean,
Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, Suite 248, MacMillan
Building, 2357 Main Mall, Zone 4, to whom applications or
nominations should be sent no later than September 30,
1996.
The University of British Columbia welcomes all qualified
applicants, especially women, aboriginal people, visible
minorities and persons with disabilities.
Building a CD-ROM or
World Wide Web site?
Wouldn't it be great if...
You could catch significant user interface pitfalls
before students actually start using your software?
Wouldn't it be great if...
All that substantial content that you've been
creating for your software project could be more
quickly and easily accessed by your students?
Wouldn't it be great if...
You could have on your production team an
experienced software designer who's designed
and built several commercial products?
Well guess what? You can!
Paul D. Hibbitts of Republic Software Design
provides user interface consultation and software
production services to a variety of clients, with a
focus on creating effective user interfaces.
Call 730-2466 to get more information or visit
http://www.interchange.ubc.ca/republic/
Accommodation
MONET'S ROOM. BED AND
BREAKFAST. Close to UBC. Close
to ocean, shops and restaurants.
Smoke-free environment, en suite
bathroom. Weekly rates
available. Call 734-2921.
GREEN COLLEGE GUEST HOUSE
Five suites available for
academic visitors to UBC only.
Guests dine with residents and
enjoy college life. Daily rate $50,
plus $ 13/day for meals Sun.-Thurs.
Call 822-8660 for more
information and availability.
FULLY FURNISHED 2-3 bedroom
house in Kerrisdale to sublet
November 1 until March 31 (dates
flexible). Gas fireplace, very cosy
and comfortable, lots of storage.
Ideal for visiting professor. $ 1500/
month. 261-3649.
BROWN'SBYUBC B&B. Comfortable
and relaxing accommodation
close to UBC in quiet area. Quality
breakfasts, queen-sized beds,
private bath available. Satisfaction
is assured for your friends or
professional guests. Reasonable
rates. 222-8073.
TWO BEDROOM GROUND FLOOR
SUITE 47th and Victoria. $780 incl.
utilities NS/NP. Convenient bus
and skytrain location. Available
immediately. Call 321-1665.
SUBLET JANUARY-JULY Kitsilano 2
bedroom bungalow. New
appliances, Jacuzzi tub, deck,
back yard. Quiet street, near
shopping and buses. 10 minute
drive to UBC and downtown. Non
smoker, no pets. Isabel 731-1686.
BRIGHT 2 BR GARDEN SUITE with
high ceilings. Professionally
designed and newly completed
in heritage house. Full kitchen.
Accesstolaundry. Security system.
Heated floors. French doors open
on to terrace and beautiful
garden. Private entry. NS/NP. Ideal
for 1 or 2 quiet people. Kitsilano.
$1200 monthly. 730-1812.
COMPLETELY RENOVATED HOUSE
for rent in quiet neighbourhood,
close to UBC, shops, park. Fully
furnished, 4 bedrooms, 3 1/2
bathrooms, hardwood floors,
skylights,sauna, fireplace, piano,
south deck. No pets, non-
smokers. Available January 1 to
June 30,1997. $1,800 per month.
Contact Ray Pederson 822-4224
(UBC) or e-mail:
pederson@unixg,ubc.ca.
SUNNY FURNISHED BASEMENT
SUITE for one person available in
private home, South Vancouver,
15 min. bus ride from UBC.
Kitchen/laundry facilities and
spacious sitting area. Quiet NS/
NP. $500/mo. 822-9370 (day),
263-9770 or 266-1390 (eves.)
Events
SINGLES IN SCIENCE. Single
people interested in science or
nature are meeting through a
nationwide network. Contact us
for info: Science Connection,
P.O. Box 389, Port Dover, ON
N0A 1N0; e-mail
71554.2160@compuserve.com;
1-800-667-5179. UBC Reports • September 19, 1996 19
*   f JV *
Mentor Andrew Gorman, left, a graduate student in Earth and Ocean Sciences, demonstrates one
ofthe principles of physics (what goes up, must come down) as he shares cooking duties with first-
year science student Michaela McDonald at the annual Faculty of Science pancake breakfast.
Program rolls out carpet for
first-time science students
A pancake breakfast is the traditional kick-off for a Faculty of
Science program that introduces
new students to faculty mem-
GERARD EMANUEL - HAUTE COIFFURE
Let Yourself Be Transformed
20% off hairstyling
Gerard does not cut your hair right away. First he looks at the shape of your face.
He wants to know what you want, the time you want to spend on your hair, your
lifestyle. Once your desires are communicated. Gerard's design creativity
flourishes into action to leave you feeling great by looking your very best.
Gerard uses natural products to leave your hair soft and free of chemicals. He
also specializes in men and women's hair loss using Edonil from Paris, France,
and is the only one in North America using this technique. Gerard was trained
in Paris and worked for Nexus as a platform artist. Gerard invites you to his
recently opened salon in Kitsilano.
3432 W. Broadway 732-4240
RjBd
\otv
Co^
Af3>      ,,ue^
„isu»l
bers, graduate students and senior undergraduates who will help
them adjust to university life.
Each mentor meets with a
group of four or five new students throughout the winter session to offer advice on available
resources and services and help
them feel more comfortable with
senior members of the university community.
In large first-year classes, students may feel too intimidated or
have too few opportunities to deal
directly with faculty members.
Each group is chosen to match
the interest of the students with
the field of study of the mentors.
The students groups reflect a mix
of those living in residence, those
from outside the Lower Mainland
and long-time Vancouverites.
The program is available to all
new science students at UBC.
United Way
broadens
appeal
UBC United Way campaign
co-chairs Margaret Sayer of University Computing Services and
Theatre Prof Raymond Mall are
reaching out to the extended
campus community for help in
achieving the 1996 campus campaign goal of $290,260.
More than 6,600 UBC employees emeritii and retirees will
be asked to join UBC students,
staff and faculty in the campaign that supports abroad spectrum of the Lower Mainland's
charitable organizations.
Last year's UBC campaign
raised $274,000 towards a United
Way 1995 total of $20.8 million.
The United Way supports
health care and rehabilitation
services, crisis and emergency
services, care for seniors, community services, and provides
assistance to families and individuals through its 99 affiliated
charitable agencies.
The United Way also processes donations for more than
1,000 registered Canadian charities when a donation is designated by a United Way donor.
This service is performed at no
cost to the receiving charity and
is a means through which the
United Way promotes philanthropy in Canadian society.
People
by staff writers
Two members of the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences are
the recipients of special awards
bestowed by their alma maters.
Gerald Straley. research scientist
and curator of collections at UBC's
Botanical Garden, has been honored
with the 1996 Significant Achievement Award from the College of Arts
and Sciences at Ohio University.
Straley was cited for his accomplishments at the Botanical Garden
and as co-ordinator ofthe multi-
volume Flora of North America.
Eleanore Vaines-Chamberlain,
an associate professor of Family and
Nutritional Sciences, was selected as
an outstanding alumna by the
College of Human Ecology at Michigan State University.
Vaines-Chamberlain's research interests include family life
in contemporary society and communication in families. She
will be presented with the award this fall during special
celebration ceremonies marking the college's centennial year.
Straley
Dr. Ray Baker, an assistant professor in the Dept. of
Family Practice, is one of seven B.C. nominees for
the 1996 Manning Awards.
Baker was nominated for the creation of the AMIR (Addiction Medicine and Intercollegial Responsibility) program.
AMIR uses a multidisciplinary team of academics and
community-based instructors to train UBC medical students
to detect and prevent substance abuse in patients and to
motivate them to take part in treatment and recovery programs.
Introduced into the curriculum in 1991. AMIR is the only
program of its kind at a Canadian university.
The Ernest C. Manning Awards Foundation is a national,
privately funded non-profit organization established to
promote the recognition and encouragement of Canadian
innovators in all disciplines. Awards range from $5,000 to
$100,000.
Award winners will be announced in October.
Michael Smith is one of 12 prominent Canadians
named by Prime Minister Jean Chretien to the newly
formed Advisory Council on Science and Technology.
The council, a cornerstone of the recently announced
federal science and technology
strategy, will report to the prime
minister and advise the cabinet's
Economic Development Policy
Committee.
In its first year, the council will
focus on the development of private
sector leadership in innovation and
~^m      ~"    ur-    ^K£»a     the establishment of new partner-
^ - w *  j     ships between government and the
private sector to address the innovation challenges facing Canadian
industry.
Smith, winner ofthe 1993 Nobel
Prize in Chemistry, is a Peter Wall
Distinguished Professor of Biotechnology, a University Killam Professor and a professor of
biochemistry.
Smith
Mary Kelly, a doctoral candidate in the Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration, has been
awarded a $10,000 renewal grant to fund her PhD
thesis research from the Society of Actuaries. The society
awards grants to candidates whose thesis research can make
a significant contribution to academic and actuarial literature. Her thesis is titled An Economic Analysis ofthe Property-
Casualty Insurance Market. Kelly is one of three recipients of
renewal grants in Canada and the U.S. The Society of Actuaries is an international educational, research and professional
membership organization with more than 17,000 members in
the U.S. and Canada practising in the fields of life and health
insurance, investments, pensions and employee benefits.
• • • • •
Rajesh Krishna, a PhD student in the Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences, is one of six graduate
students in North America to receive this year's
American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists/Proctor
and Gamble award for excellence in graduate research in
drug delivery and pharmaceutical technology.
Krishna's research focuses on devising pharmacothera-
peutic strategies to overcome the problem of multidrug
resistance in cancer.
I le will deliver a paper on the topic at the association's
annual meeting in October. 20 UBC Reports ■ September 19, 1996
Storyteller of the silver screen
Writing is Prof. Peggy Thompson's passion
by Connie Bagshaw
Staff writer
"When I get excited about something
I give it everything I've got. I'm funny
that way."
—Lauren Bacall,
Dark Passage (1947)
Creative Writing Prof. Peggy
Thompson is funny that way
too. Since childhood, she has
been giving everything she's got to what
excites her the most — writing — a
passion that has, over the years,
produced works as diverse as Canada's
first improvised theatrical soap opera to
award-winning films.
Thompson admits that her early
attempts at storytelling usually put her
audience to sleep.
"I began by making up bedtime
stories about a ladybug for my younger
sister," she recalls. 'They were wildly
popular."
So was Thompson's first movie
which she wrote and co-produced a
decade ago. Titled It's A Party!, the
short comedy was nominated for a
Genie Award (the Canadian equivalent
of an Oscar) and took home more
honours from the Pacific Northwest
Film and Video Festival. In addition to
screenings at film festivals around the
world. It's A Party! has been broadcast
on the A&E, PBS and CBC television
networks.
A Vancouver native, Thompson was
raised in a family that loves to read and
holds books in high esteem. An aunt
and uncle, both of whom were artists,
also influenced her early years.
They showed me that your life
doesn't need to follow conventional
paths, that there's room in life for a lot
of different choices."
After graduating with a scholarship
from Point Grey Secondary School in
1972, Thompson chose to study theatre
and film at UBC.
By the mid-1970s, she was busy
acting, stage managing and writing
radio dramas and plays including The
Bittersweet Kid, which toured in
schools throughout Canada, the United
States, Europe, Australia and Hong
Kong. A stint as a television series
writer for CBC's adventure show. The
Beachcombers, followed in the early
'80s.
Thompson has concentrated on
writing primarily for and about film for
the past six years, as well as co-
producing many of the film projects
she's involved with.
Her fllmography is scattered with Genie
Award winners including In Search ofthe
Last Good Man, another short comedy
Thompson wrote and co-produced, and
The Lotus Eaters, her first feature film
which captured three Genies in 1995.
including one for best screenplay.
Rosamond Norbury photo
Peggy Thompson's first feature film The Lotus Eaters received numerous
awards and was voted most popular Canadian film at the Vancouver Film
Festival. Her latest book, Hard-Boiled: Great Lines from Classic Noir Films,
focuses on a genre which has intrigued Thompson since childhood.
The Lotus Eaters also took three
awards at the Atlantic Film Festival
that year and was voted the most
popular film at the Fort Lauderdale
Film Festival and the most popular
Canadian film at the Vancouver Film
Festival.
Like her film influences — Scottish
director Bill Forsythe (Local Hero.
Gregory's Girl) and the late
French film-maker Francois Truffaut
[Day for Night, Small Change) —
Thompson gets most of her inspiration
from friends and their life experiences.
"I think that gives the work a feeling
of authenticity," she explains. 'The art
of storytelling is all about making it
seem like the story really happened or
is happening or could happen to you."
Actual settings, especially ones
Thompson is intimate with, also play a
major role in her creative process.
"Place seems to be where I start
from, whether it's a Gulf Island [The
Lotus Eaters), an apartment building
[It's A Party!), a coffee bar, (In Search of
the Last Good Man), or my new screenplay, Maggie and Lila, which is set
around a bookstore. Once I know
where the characters are. then I can
build the story around the feeling of the
place."
Thompson describes her own taste
in film as "very catholic" — evident in
the projects she is currently developing
including a romantic comedy, a historical biography and a police series.
Other works run the gamut from A
Girl. Her Motorcycle and A Boy, a play
for high school audiences about
teenage alcoholism, to They Went
Thataway, a book of quotations from
Hollywood Westerns being co-authored
with Saeko Usukawa and slated for
publication in 1997/98.
Thompson's latest book is Hard-
Boiled: Great Lines from Classic Noir
Films, also written with Usukawa.
A collection of more than 300
lines from about 150 films,
Hard-Boiled is described by Lee
Server in her introduction to the book
as "a glamorous and handy round-up
of the unrestrained words of the
drifters and dreamers, lovers and
killers whose lives are the stuff of film
noir."
It's a genre that has fascinated
Thompson since watching her first film
noir at about the same time she started
telling bedtime stories. Coincidentally,
the film was The Big Sleep, with
Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall,
but it wasn't the title of the movie alone
that got her attention.
"I remember it very well. I was about
12, it was a Saturday afternoon, I was
in the rec room.
"I think what drew me to the film
was that everything about it felt
dangerous: the sexiness of it, the
mystery, the actors' personas, the
world of the film, the presence of evil. It
was a tremendous contrast to the
safety of my 12-year-old world."
Thompson adds that it's the pro
foundly visual expression of film noir,
the questions it raises about morality
and its exploration of evil that continue
to hold her fascination.
"It's the fact that morality and
nobility, when they're found in these
films, come from the most unlikely
places — the B-Girl played by Gloria
Grahame in The Big Heat, the grifter
played by Elisha Cook Jr. in Murder My
Sweet. Although the films are black
and white, they really explore the
shades of good and evil."
Although she didn't plan a career in
screenwriting, Thompson enjoys what
she does and considers herself lucky to
be able to do it.
"It is competitive, difficult, heartbreaking and very exciting."
That's the mantra she repeats to
students when they ask her advice
about a career in writing.
Thompson strives to give students
in her screenwriting course at
UBC the courage of their convictions which, she says, is necessary to
pursue writing professionally. She also
attempts to invoke in them a feeling for
who their audience might be and how
to reach them.
"I try to do that by supporting
students in their creative work, developing their vision as far as they can
take it, and assisting them in getting
their work out into the community."
One of Thompson's students recently received a commission from the
CBC based on a screenplay she developed in class. Another student was
honoured with a 1996 National Screen
Institute Drama Prize to produce a
short film derived from a script which
also started as a class project.
When Thompson isn't in a classroom
teaching, she's in one learning and
collaborating with peers, something she
did recently at the Canadian Film
Centre based in Toronto.
While attending a workshop at the
centre this spring, she had the opportunity to develop her police series with
British producer Paul Marcus of Prime
Suspect fame and with Jeff King, the
writer and producer of Due South.
In between writing, producing,
teaching and professional development,
Thompson has found time to make her
directing debut with Broken Images, an
art documentary about conceptual
photographer Michelle Normoyle. The
film has been selected for screening at
this year's Vancouver Film Festival
taking place Oct. 4-20.
The pace she sets for herself is
dizzying, something that makes it easy
for Thompson to lose track of time. She
woke up one day last February and
thought it was May. She laughs at the
recollection.
"Having a sense of humour is the
only way to survive in this industry."

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