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UBC Reports Oct 20, 1988

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 JC  AiC-1"-'
Support costs growing
Research grants threatened
By DEBORA SWEENEY
UBC administrators and researchers say
they're caught in a funding crunch that
could force the university to turn down lucrative research grants in the future.
While the university is one of the most
successful in Canada in attracting research
funding, it is having trouble keeping up with
mushrooming support costs that go along
with the grants.
"I think there are circumstances where
we could have to turn away grants," said
Robert Miller, vice-president, research.
"For instance, if we get a major piece of
equipment that we can't afford to install,
then we can't take the grant."
In Canada, research funding from federal
agencies such as the Medical Research
Council (MRC), the Social Sciences and
Humanities Research Council (SSHRC),
the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) and the Canada
Council is distributed on the basis that provincial government operating grants and
tuition fees will cover overhead costs.
A federal research grant covers salaries,
supplies, equipment, computer time, and
limited travel. Overhead costs which are not
included are secretarial support, renovations, repairs, utilities, postage, courier,
telephone, janitorial and administration.
"I've been on 14 granting committees
and I have never seen anybody get supported for secretaries or janitors or hospital-
See SUCCESS on Page 2
Study focuses
on how parties
influence voters
during election
By PAULA MARTIN
A UBC-led political science team studying the Nov. 21 federal election
aims to tell Canadians what techniques political parties use to influence
voters.
' 'We're dealing voters in on what the parties are trying to do to them,"
said Richard Johnston, principle investigator of the $470,000 national
federal election study.
"This includes manipulating the
leaders' images, their own and other
parties, and controlling the agenda by
framing the issues in the voters'
minds."
The research team will examine,
among other things, the impact ofthe
media, poll results and the economy
on voters' perceptions, as well as
voters' perceptions of party leaders
and candidates.
Johnston said this is likely a very
special election because of predicted
fundamental changes in the party
system if the Tories dominate in
Quebec and the NDP supplant the
Liberals as the official opposition.
And, although most campaigns
don't have much impact on an election, this one promises to have more,
he added.
"We will have a better handle than
anybody on why the election worked
Advisory group
set to oversee
UBC Reports
An advisory committee has been
established to oversee the publication
of UBC Reports and ensure the twice-
monthly faculty and staff newspaper
fulfills the mandate set by the President's Office.
The seven-member UBC Reports
Advisory Committee will also act as a
sounding board for story ideas and
policy proposals, and offer advice on
potentially controversial issues.
UBC Reports was named best college/university newspaper in 1987 by
the Association of Universities and
Colleges of Canada, an award it
shared with the University of Toronto
Bulletin.
The newspaper's goal is to keep
the university community informed
about issues that affect it. As well,
UBC Reports strives to keep the
campus and off-campus communities
informed   about   UBC's   research,
See ADVISORY on Page 2
out the way it did," Johnston said.
' 'The study is technically and conceptually more sophisticated than any of
its predecessors."
Although there have been six previous national election studies, this is
the first one to track the campaign by
a "rolling cross-section." Instead of
taking one sample, researchers will
collect 45, one for each day of the
campaign.
"We can then get into analyses
that compare the early part of the campaign with the late part of the campaign," Johnston said. "If there is a
dramatic event in the middle of the
campaign, we can split the sample
from before to after and see if we can
see any impact of that event."
The researchers will also be conducting experiments by varying the
order and wording of questions they
ask.
' 'The most innovative thing is that
we will be looking at the issues that
seemed to us, on the eve of the election, most likely to play a role in the
campaign," Johnston said, citing free
trade, defence, environment, housing
and abortion as examples.
The study will show how parties
and other groups mobilize the vote by
devices such as advertising and constituency campaigning.
The rolling cross-section will consist of a 40-minute interview with
about 3,500 voters chosen by random
sample. As many as possible of these
voters will be interviewed for 20
minutes after the election. The same
people will also be asked to complete
a written questionnaire.
The confidential nature of the
study means the researchers won't be
able to comment on its findings or
election issues during the campaign.
Also working on the three-year
study will be Andre Blais of the University of Montreal, Jean Crete of
Laval University and Henry Brady of
the University of Chicago. Preliminary results ofthe research, funded by
the Social Sciences and Humanities
Research Council of Canada, should
be ready in the spring.
The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, B.C.
Volume 34, Number 18, Oct.20, 1988
A donation box at the Intramural noon hour runs on Tuesday and Friday last week encouraged participants to
support UBC's United Way Campaign. Pledge forms were distributed to many on campus last week.
University leaders meet
World peace discussed
By PAULA MARTIN
University presidents from around
the globe tackled world peace at a
recent meeting in Talloires, France.
"The universities of the world
have profound moral responsibilities
to increase understanding ofthe awful
risks of the nuclear age," the newly
formed Talloires Group declared at
the end of its week-long conference,
held to discuss worldwide education
on arms control, negotiation and conflict management.
UBC President David Strangway,
who helped develop the Talloires
declaration, was the only Canadian
representative at the meeting of 45
academic leaders, who agreed to organize into a force for disarmament
through education.
"Universities, of course, have
very   large   numbers   of   students
around the world and these are the
people who are going to be making
many of the decisions of the future,"
Panel named
in contract talks
University and Faculty Association representatives have named an
arbitration panel to help resolve stalemated contract negotiations. No date
has been set for the panel's first hearing.
Panel members are Stephen Kelle-
her, former chairman of the Labor
Relations Board, Leon Getz, a lawyer
with the firm of Freeman and Company and Hugh Ladner, Q.C., of the
law firm Edwards, Kenny and Bray.
Neither side has ruled out the possibility of mediation if terms agreeable to both parties can be worked out.
Strangway said. There are about 60-
million students and six- million faculty members in higher education
around the globe.
He said that he found it refreshing
to discuss global concerns with educators.
"University presidents are beginning to talk among themselves about
these kinds of issues, which I find
very encouraging because it does reinforce the significance of our role in
society," Strangway said.
The UBC president said he was
particularly interested in discussions
on conflict management and negotiation. It is important "whether you're
dealing with the children in the playground who are fighting to get the toy,
management and labor try ing to negotiate salaries, or nations resolving
disputes."
See AGREEMENT on Page 3 UBC REPORTS   Oct 20, 1988       2
Guards seize Antigone (Allison Sanders) in a scene from the Jean Anouilh play
Antigone, a UBC theatre department production which ran Oct. 11-15. The
guards were played by Glen Thompson, Timothy Hyland and Kurt Eby.
Success creates
added burden
ity," said Miller. "Now, imagine
everything else it takes to run a research project: How do the people get
hired? Who types and mails the
grants? Who's responsible for employee benefits, heat, light, gas, janitors, maintenance of space, alterations? Almost anything else you can
think of is called an indirect cost."
According to UBC's operating
budget for 1988-89, the total for research grants and contracts was $75-
million — up $ll-million, or 17 per
cent, from the previous year.
"When I first came to this university in 1971, most professors had only
one or two grants," said Miller.
"Now, many have half-a-dozen
grants and several have more than 10
grants that they're primary investigators on."
That success carries a high cost,
said Daniel Birch, vice-president,
academic and provost.
"The more successful we are in
getting those research funds, the more
burden we're putting on an operating
grant that' s driven by students and not
by research activity," said Birch.
"There is nothing at the provincial
level that relates to success in obtaining competitive research funding."
Birch said continuing research at
the university is important if UBC is
to maintain its role of being an excellent teaching university.
While   UBC   receives   approxi-
Continued from Page 1
mately 80 per cent of the competitive
research funding in B.C., it gets only
60 per cent of the operating grants
distributed to the province's three
major universities, Birch said. And, a
recent study by the Canadian Association of University Business Officers (C AUBO) shows the actual overhead cost of research in Canadian
universities is more than half of the
direct costs.
A 1984 NSERC task force report
recognized an urgent need for support
for the $48-million of NSERC-spon-
sored research.
"There is unanimity among senior
administrators that universities will
have increasing difficulty supporting
the infrastructure costs of research,"
the report said.
It also said the province of Quebec
had begun to support both basic and
applied research in its universities.
University administrators across
Canada are lobbying for more federal
and provincial government support.
They have proposed more funding for
national granting councils to cover
indirect costs. They also want provincial governments to reward their institutions for success in obtaining research grants by covering those costs.
"I'm not saying we should be living in the lap of luxury, but to be
competitive, we need to make sure we
have some way of keeping our overhead costs in tow," said Dr. Bernard
Bressler, associate dean of medicine.
Epstein Barr Virus
Diagnosis often wrong: MD
By DEBORA SWEENEY
Chronic fatigue is one of the most
common complaints patients take to
their doctors, but associating the condition with Epstein Barr Virus is irresponsible and unsubstantiated, says
the doctor who identified the virus.
In an interview at UBC, Dr. Michael Epstein of the Royal Society of
London said the diagnosis of Chronic
Epstein Barr virus is of little or no help
in determining the cause of a patient's
tiredness or what the treatment should
be. He added that, in his opinion,
doctors diagnose the condition to get
patients off their backs.
"I think the situation is very well
summed up by a scientific friend of
mine on the east coast of the United
States who was asked by a journalist,
'Well, what is this new epidemic of
Chronic Epstein Barr virus infection?' and he replied, "There is no
epidemic of infection — there is an
epidemic of diagnosis.'''
In recent years Epstein Barr virus,
which is'a cause of mononeucleosis,
has been suspected as a cause of
chronic fatigue, also known as
"Yuppie flu" because it appeared to
strike mainly young, creative women
in their 20s and 30s.
Eighty-five per cent ofthe world's
population is exposed to and has antibodies to Epstein Barr virus, a herpes
virus. Antibodies are natural disease-
fighting agents produced by a person's system after it detects invading
infections. However, there is no
documented scientific evidence that
links the virus with "Yuppie flu."
"I don't think you'll find any serious virologist working with Epstein
Barr virus who would attach much
significance to this new phenome
non," said Dr. Epstein. "I hesitate to
say this, but I think that from the
practitioner's point of view, the diagnosis gets these people off their
backs."
"I think it's a myth but, mark my
words, I'd take back everything tomorrow if someone came forward
with important evidence. There isn't
any, and that's the trouble," he said.
UBC will review
Gay Games request
UBC has asked organizers of Celebration 90: Gay Games III and Cultural Festival to make formal its request to the university for the use of
housing and facilities on campus for
the planned 1990 games and festival.
The request was made after representatives of the Gay Games, including Burnaby MP Svend Robinson,
appeared before the Board of Governors.
At the meeting, Gay Games representatives said that when they first
contacted UBC, they were not sure
what campus athletic facilities were
needed or how many people needed
accomodation.
In clarifying their position, the
organizers said the request was limited to a gym for volleyball and possibly a basketball tournament. They
requested the use of up to 200 rooms
sshould there not be enough accomodation elsewhere. They added that the
arrangements were essentially complete and that the games would use
housing and athletic facilities
throughout the city.
UBC President David Strangway
said the university will review the
formal request from Gay Games organizers. The Board of Governors
will consider the request at a future
meeting.
Ford Foundation grant awarded
The Ford Foundation, the largest
charitable foundation in the U.S., has
awarded UBC a $173,000 (Cdn.)
grant to fund Southeast Asian studies.
The money is part of a $500,000
(U.S.) grant awarded by the foundation to the Northwest Regional Consortium for Southeast Asian Studies.
The consortium, which includes
the University of Washington and the
University of Oregon, as well as UBC,
was formed in May, 1987 and held its
first conference this month in Eugene,
Ore.
"This grant will enable UBC to
continue to build on its core resources
on Southeast Asia and increase
graduate and undergraduate knowledge ofthe area,'' said Terry McGee,
director of the Institute of Asian Research.
"It shows that because the university has developed a depth of resources on Asia, major foundations
are willing to support the ongoing
development of centres of excellence."
A grant from the provincial government has already resulted in a new
Indonesian language and culture post
in the Asian Studies Department. An
Indonesian research project, funded
by the Canadian International Development Agency, is in place in the
Institute of Asian Research and UBC
is the first university in Canada to
teach the Indonesian language.
The new funding will help establish a post at the Institute of Asian
Research in modern Indonesian studies in either political science, sociology or anthropology. Some of the
money will also be used to sponsor a
yearly conference, faculty exchanges
and lectures.
X-Ray grant proves costly
By DEBORA SWEENEY
In the basement of UBC's chemistry building, a small seminar room
constructed in 1950 is being renovated to house the latest in 1980s
technology — an X-Ray Photoelec-
tron Spectrometer.
Made possible through a $700,000
funding grant, it is the first machine of
its kind in North America to be
awarded to a university.
The purpose of the machine is to
chemically analyze why substances
adhere to different surfaces. Researchers hope to find out why automobiles corrode, how fillings stick in
teeth, what keeps wings on airplanes,
and to develop better methods of using wood preservatives.
The university's chemistry department was awarded the federal grant
after an intense funding competition.
"UBC's chemistry department is
the most successful in Canada," said
Dr. Lawrence Weiler, head of chemistry. "We received six major grants
in the last seven years. Usually if you
get one every five years, you're
lucky."
Weiler has seen research funding
in his department triple from $2-mil-
lion to more than $6-million in five
years. He estimates research overhead costs this year will be $3.5-mil-
lion - $90,000 for the X-Ray Photoe-
lectron Spectrometer alone.
Dr. Keith Mitchell applied for the
grant. Aside from his teaching duties
at the university, he researched and
wrote a 150-page grant application
with support from 30 university professors and 18 outside companies,
including B.C. Hydro, MacMillan
Bloedel, Moli Energy, B.C. Research,
Cominco and the Pulp and Paper
Research Institute.
When the grant application was
approved, Mitchell applied for further
support for a research scientist to run
the machine.
Then, renovations began to convert a seminar room to house the
machine. The total cost: $20,000,
including $5,000 for a power line and
$5,000 for air conditioning. Costs
also include tools, cables, curtains, a
sink, waterlines, a water filter, and a
special rig for a tank of liquid nitrogen
which could explode if it tipped over.
When the machine arrives next
month from West Germany, overhead
costs also will include $20,000 to
$25,000 in installation costs, and
$40,000 to $45,000 for maintenance
and repair.
' 'We can't allow the machine to be
down,'' said Weiler. ' 'That would be
like leaving $700,000 sitting in the
bank and not getting interest."
Advisory
Continued from Page 1
teaching and public service contributions.
The five faculty members sitting,
on the committee are: John Dennison,
professor, Department of Administrative, Adult and Higher Education;
David Dolphin, acting dean, Faculty
of Science, Morton Low, co-ordinator, Health Sciences; June Lythgoe,
director, Office for Women Students;
and Patricia Marchak, head, Department of Anthropology and Sociology.
The two representatives from the
Community Relations Office are:
Howard Fluxgold, editor, UBC Reports and Don Whiteley, manager,
News Bureau. UBCREPORTS   Oct. 20, 1988       3
Science Council awards
UBC researcher, grads win gold
By GAVIN WILSON
A UBC medical researcher and two UBC
graduates who founded the Nexus Engineering Corp. are among the 1988 winners of the
B.C. Science and Engineering Gold Medals,
the province's highest award for excellence in
science and engineering.
The awards, presented by the Science
Council of B.C., will be formally announced
tonight (Oct. 20) at 7 p.m. on a special one-
hour live television program broadcast on the
Knowledge Network.
Donald Calne, who holds a chair as a
Belzberg Family Professor of Medicine at
UBC, will collect his award for research into
neurological diseases. He has studied brain
disorders in the elderly such as Parkinson's,
Alzheimer's and Lou Gehrig's disease (also
known as motor neuron
disease or ALS). He has
also achieved international acclaim for his pioneering treatment of the
neurological disease,
dystonia, using botu-
linum toxin.
Calne, who has published nearly 300 scien- _
tific   papers,   several               Calne
books and chapters of
books, is a vigorous advocate of the hypothesis
that environmental factors may contribute significantly to common neurological diseases of
the elderly and even to normal aging ofthe brain.
UBC electrical engineering grads Basil Peters and Peter van der Gracht share an award for
their work in founding one of the university's
most successful spin-off
companies. Nexus,
which they began in a
Burnaby garage, has
grown into a multi-million dollar operation employing 200 people. It designs and manufactures
more than 50 products for
satellite, broadcasting
and cable television systems.
The other gold medal
winner for 1988 is University of Victoria astronomer Don VandenBerg. His theoretical
work into the age of globular star clusters has
helped to push back the accepted age of the universe to as much as 14-billion years.
This year's winners were selected from a field
of 29 nominees, the
largest ever, by a panel
chaired by TRIUMF
director Erich Vogt.
The panel also included former medal
winners and representatives of both the local
and national scientific
and engineering communities.
The 1988 medallists I
will be honored at a |
dinner to be held Tuesday,  Oct.  25  at the
Hotel Vancouver. Guest speaker at the dinner will be Geraldine Kenney-Wallace,
chairman ofthe Science Council of Canada.
van der Gracht
Seoul teaches
painful lesson,
sports MD says
By DEBORA SWEENEY
Dr. Doug Clement of the UBC
Sports Medicine Clinic compares his
recent experiences at the Seoul Olympics to going to the dentist.
' 'It may have been a painful experience, but often you like the end result," he said.
A coach for the Canadian Olympic
track and field team, Dr. Clement saw
Ben Johnson stripped of his gold
medal after testing positive for anabolic steroids and had to deal with the
anxiety and confusion experienced by
Johnson's teammates.
As a longtime crusader against the
use of drugs in sports, Dr. Clement
hopes the Johnson tragedy will lead to
the eradication of drug use by athletes.
"For years, there's been suspicion
of drug use among a segment of the
Canadian track and field team and
segments of other national teams,"
said Dr. Clement. "This positive test
in such a prominent athlete confirms
it, and the action by the International
Olympic Committee is a clear indication that action will be taken against
anyone who uses drugs."
The Johnson drug scandal immediately forced several Olympic athletes to reconsider their attitudes
about the use of performance enhancing drugs, Dr. Clement added.
"They saw the successes of the
master group and Ben Johnson and
started to question whether our approach of prohibiting drug use was
correct," he said. "In the light ofthe
Johnson scandal, they said 'You were
always right and I was totally wrong
to even be thinking of using drugs.'''
Dr. Clement hopes the strong public condemnation of drug use in the
wake of the Johnson affair will en-
Gr*-f»*
"Clement
courage athletes everywhere, including here on the UBC campus, to rule
out the use of performance enhancing
drugs.
"I don't think anyone perceives
it's worth it because ofthe devastating
results we've seen on Ben Johnson's
life. His life is on the line in terms that
he'll end up, in all likelihood, bankrupt and without any positive feelings
about himself. It's a moral lesson that
shows it's just not worth it," he said.
On Fri., Oct. 21, Lynda Filsinger,
Director of the Sports Medicine
Council of B.C., will discuss the use
and misuse of drugs in sport at 12:30
p.m., main concourse, SUB.
Letter to the editor
Enrolment issue clarified
Editor:
I am concerned that your article on
student enrolment at UBC (UBC
Reports Sept. 22) may have left readers with an incorrect perception about
students in the School of Family and
Nutritional Sciences.
First, high school applicants constitute only a fraction of incoming
students. Thus, simply presenting
information about high school graduates applying directly to the school
does not present a full picture.
Second, the school has been restructured in the last three years.
Only Dietetics and Home Economics
students register in the school per se.
Students can now enrol in the Faculty
of Arts and major in Family Science.
Or they can enrol in the Faculty of
Science and major in Nutritional Sciences. Both these faculties, of
course, have quotas.
Since   becoming   available   for
elective credit, enrolments in Family
Science courses have increased 115 per
cent. And Dietetics is the school's
most popular program. Increases in
demand have been very noticeable in
the last few years and there is now a
limited enrolment, with approximately 125 applicants for 50 spaces.
I'm sure that those people who
were rejected from those programs,
despite meeting admission standards,
feel your headline "Programs full,
qualified students turned away" applied to Family and Nutritional Sciences too.
Daniel Perlman
Director, School of Family and
Nutritional Sciences
Agreement reached
To achieve their goals, the educators agreed that research and teaching
should be interdisciplinary, combining arts, sciences, humanities and
social sciences.
The group also agreed that universities should actively support the
training of scholars and the development of courses to incorporate arms
control, negotiation and conflict man-
Continued from Page 1
agement.
As well, the Talloires Group
agreed that each participating university should create an international
information centre to support the exchange of information, communication links, access to computer networks and television linkages by satellites between university classrooms
arou"'' the world.
Universities asked
to set up centres
of excellence
By JO MOSS
The federal government has invited UBC and other Canadian universities to establish centres of excellence to carry out research on important issues or particular regions in
developing countries.
Monique Landry, federal Minister
for External Relations and International Development, announced last
March that the government would
provide up to $10-million annually to
support development of these centres.
Letters were recently sent to Canadian universities inviting their participation.
The Canadian International Development Agency wants to encourage Canadian universities to play a
greater role in Canada's overseas
development projects, said Aubrey
Morantz, Director General of CIDA's
Institutional Cooperation and Development Services Division.
UBC is currently involved in 18
CIDA-funded projects.
Morantz was on campus Oct. 3 to
help UBC celebrate Development
Day, established by CIDA this year to
highlight and increase awareness
about Canada's overseas development programs.
Establishing centres of excellence
reflects an increased commitment in
Canada's development assistance
and signals a new direction in Canadian overseas aid, Morantz said.
Providing technical expertise and
training in remote countries such as
Peru may seem far removed from the
day-to-day lives of most Canadians.
But how Canada deals with the problems of developing countries now
will affect our economic future by
enhancing ties, he added.
The fastest growing sector of the
world economy, developing countries account for one quarter of all
world trade. And while Canadian aid
is administered with no strings attached, Morantz said more than one
firm has found new markets in a developing country through involvement in an aid program.
Under the new federal development assistance strategy tabled in
Parliament last March, Canada is
committed to helping solve common
global problems. CIDA projects involving hydro-electric power or industrial processes, for example, will
now be assessed for their impact on
the local environment.
Other areas of concern include
desertification which claims six-million hectares—an area larger than
Nova Scotia—each year, and contributions to the greenhouse effect
through logging of 12-million hectares annually worldwide, an area
comparable to one twelfth of B.C. A
burgeoning global population is predicted to rise to six billion, from five
billion, in the next 20 years.
Morantz said these concerns have
become international, rather than individual problems. "Development
programs can no longer be a one-way
street because the world has become
much more interdependent."
One area of development assistance in which Canada is taking a
leadership role is in integrating
women in all development projects.
Agricultural training programs, for
example, were formerly geared to
male farmers when much of the agricultural work is traditionally done by
women.
' 'We were training the wrong segment of the population," Morantz
explained. ' "The needs and interests
of women should be taken into account."
In addition, Canada has forgiven
$700-million in aid loans to developing countries and converted the loan
program to non-repayable grants or
contributions. And CIDA plans to
double funding for scholarships over
the next five years.
Two cents of every Canadian tax
dollar, a total of $2.7-billion annually,
currently goes to assist developing
countries. Of the 40 least developed
countries in the world, 27 are in Africa, a continent that will receive 45
per cent of Canada' s bilateral aid over
the next five years. The University of British Columbia
Report of the Vice-President
Administration and Finance
1987-88
The audited financial statements are a
public document. Copies of the University's audited financial statements have
been provided to each University Department and the University Library. For those
interested in more information than .provided in these highlights, please refer to
the copy in your department.
Table 1 describes the activities in each
of five of the six separate funds involved in
the financial reporting of UBC during the
1987-88 fiscal year. Excluded is the Student Loan and Endowment Principal
Fund. The concept of fund accounting
organizes transactions so that revenues
and their related expenses are accounted
for in separate funds in accordance with
objectives specified by donors, limitations
and restrictions imposed by sources outside the University, and determinations
made by the Board of Governors.
GENERAL PURPOSE
OPERATING FUND
The revenue and expenses used in the
general operations of the University are in
this fund. The University ended the 1987-
88 fiscal year with a surplus of $.2 million
after provision for an inter-fund transfer of
$.6 million and appropriations for the year
of $3.4 million. There was an increase in
operating income over 1986-87 of $12.6
million resulting primarily from increases
in Provincial grants of $8.6 million and
student fee credit course revenues of $1.4
million. Total expenses at $230.4 million
were up $7.9 million with $6.8 million ofthe
increase attributable to salaries and benefits.
SPECIFIC PURPOSES FUND
The revenues and expenditures for
projects stipulated by donors and income
earned on the Endowment Principal Fund
are included in this fund. Trust fund revenue was $21.2 million and Endowment
Fund investment income was $10.5 million for a total of $31.7 million. With
expenses of $26.9 million and a $6.1 million interfund transfer, the year-end balance was $26.6 million, $1.3 million lower
than last year. The 1987-88 endowment
fund income of $10.5 million while representing a return on investments of approximately 9.3% is $6.4 million lower
than the $16.9 million earned in 1986-87.
However, the ,$16.9 million was higher
than normal due to extraordinary capital
gains as a result of a reorganization of the
portfolio by external money managers.
SPONSORED RESEARCH
FUND
Included are funds specifically identified for research grants and contracts or
related activities as provided by govern
ment granting agencies, research institutes and other public and private agencies. Revenue increased from $65.3 million in 1986-87 to $71.5 million this year.
The $6.2 million increase is accounted for
by increases in Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council grants of $1.4
million, Medical Research Council grants
of $1.2 million, Business and industry
funding of $.8 million and other less significant variations. Schedule 5 to the Financial Statements provides additional details.
ANCILLARY ENTERPRISES
FUND
Ancillary enterprises provide goods
and services to the University community
and are expected to operate on a breakeven basis. Included are the Bookstore,
Food Services, Student Housing and
Conferences, Oyster River Farm, Parking, Health Sciences Parkade, Tennis
Centre, Athletic and Sport Services, UBC
Press, Media Services and the Education
Measurement Research Group. In 1987-
88 an administrative charge of 1 /2 of 1 % of
sales and services was implemented
which generated an additional $250,000
of revenues to the General Purpose
Operating Fund. This charge will increase
to 1% in 1988-89 and 1.5% in 1989-90.
The charge partially covers the cost of university services not specifically billed to
the ancillary enterprises such as Purchasing, Personnel Services, Financial Services, Occupational Health and Safety and
Security.
CAPITAL FUND
The capital fund consists of gifts,
grants, interest and authorized capital
borrowing received for the purpose of
acquiring capital assets including those
pertaining to ancillary enterprises. $15.8
million of the revenue and expenses are
offsetting amounts which relate to servicing the debt on long-term debenture funding for completed buildings and other past
capital projects financed by the Provincial
government. The loan of $4.8 million is
for the upgraded SL-1 telephone switch
and will be repaid from operating savings
generated by the new system over the
next 7 years.
COMBINED FUNDS
The total revenue and expenses of all
five funds are shown by object of revenue
and expenses. The total revenue for all
funds was $420.5 million, up$15.5 million.
Total salaries and benefits were $259.5
million. All expense objects increased
over 1986-87 except Building contracts
which decreased $5.1 million.
Table 2 shows the source and distribution of general purpose operating funds
over the past five years.
Table 3 shows a comparison of the
Total General Purpose Operating Expenses by object of expense for the five
years 1983-84 to 1987-88.
Table 4 shows the change in total
Sponsored Research Funding since
1983-84.
Table 5 shows the source and distribution of Sponsored Research Funds.
GENERAL
Telereg was introduced in 1988 allowing students to register using touch-tone
telephone and voice response technology. Between June 15 and September
15, 1988 there were approximately
158,000 calls handled by Telereg. The
planning phase of the new Integrated
Human Resources Information system
which includes Budgets, Personnel and
Payroll is underway and is scheduled for
completion in December, 1988. During
the year there were additional enhancements to the Alumni/Development system, whose features include a centralized
donor database and a pledge system, in
anticipation of the major fund raising
campaign. In December, 1987 Purchasing installed a microbased Requisition
Tracking system. The system facilitates
processing and allows Purchasing to respond quickly to questions regarding the
status of a Requisition.
During the year the University participated in the development of an Insurance
Reciprocal arrangement for Canadian
universities. The work culminated with the
formation of the Canadian Universities
Reciprocal Insurance Exchange (CURIE)
which began operations in January, 1988.
CURIE is an insurance mechanism that is
designed to bring stability and reduction in
premiums and to provide broader coverage than that available from the regular insurance marketplace. 42 Canadian universities have contractually agreed to
share their property and liability risks. The
Agreement is licensed and supervised by
the provincial Superintendents of Insurance.
In January, 1988 students were given
the option of paying tuition fees at any
branch of the Bank of Montreal in Canada.
A significant number of students have
taken advantage of this service, reducing
the long lineups of students paying fees at
Registration time in Financial Services.
The way in which the university deals with
couriers was changed during the year.
Previously, we dealt with approximately
55 courier companies with varying degrees of success and rates. After a tender
proposal to 70 companies, 7 were selected for two years with discounted rates
averaging 35%. During September, 1987
to April, 1988 the university saved approximately $100,000 in courier charges.
The Acadia Park Phase III ($7.0 million)
development of 77 units for family housing
is underway and is scheduled for completion in January, 1989. The new Parkade
($6.3 million) is under construction and is
scheduled for completion in December,
1988. It will accommodate 1,125 vehicles
and 125 surface parking spaces and replaces the Student Union Building lot facility. Also under construction is the Chemistry/Physics building ($16.4 million) to be
completed in June, 1989. Capital projects
which have been tendered include the
David Lam Asian Gardens ($2.0 million)
and the Children's Day Care Centre ($2.0
million). Both will be completed in April,
1989.
The past year has seen the Provincial
Government proclaim the University
Foundations Act, establishing the University of British Columbia Foundation with
full status as an Agent of the Crown. The
intention of the Foundation is to facilitate
the transfer of substantive gifts to the university. As of September 1, 1988 the
Foundation has received over $3.4 million
in donations. During the year the University itself also established two other entities designed to increase donations and
enhance cash flows. The American Foundation for UBC has been incorporated in
Washington, D.C. as a American nonprofit organization. As such, the university
can utilize the Foundation as its nominee
for encouraging donations from American
friends and alumni. The incorporation and
subsequent successful application for exemption for taxation purposes as a public
foundation allow American donors similar
tax advantages to their Canadian counterparts when donating to the university. The
UBC Real Estate Corporation is a wholly-
owned subsidiary of the university, incorporated in April, 1988 to manage and
develop the university's land holdings.
The Corporation is an entrepreneurial
response to the university's on-going financial needs. The university's principal
objective is to generate an annual net
cash flow which would be utilized for selected capital and endowment fund purposes.
A.B. Gellatly
Vice-President,
Administration  and Finance
MARCH 31, 1988 Revenue and other additions
Government grants and contracts
TABLE 1
THE UNIVERSITY OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
STATEMENT OF CHANGES IN UNAPPROPRIATED FUND BALANCES
FOR THE YEAR ENDED MARCH 31,1988
(thousands of dollars)
General
Purpose Specific Sponsored Ancillary
Operating Purposes Research Enterprises
Capital
1988
Totals
1987
Government of Canada
Province of British Columbia
Base operating
Designated
Early terminations
Engineering expansion
Other
Municipalities
Other provincial govts.
Foreign governments
Student fees
Bequests, donations and non government grants
Sales and services
Income from investments
Loans
Expenses and other deductions:
Salaries     - Academic
- Student service
-Staff
Benefits
Travel.field trips.moving
Library acquisitions
Operational supplies and expenses
Furniture and equipment
Utilities
Renovations & alterations
Scholarships, fellowships and bursaries
Professional fees
Cost of goods sold
Debt servicing
Building contracts
Internal cost recoveries
External cost recoveries
Transfers and appropriations:
Released from prior years' appropriations
Interfund transfers
Appropriations for the year
Net increase (decrease) during the year
Unappropriated Fund balance, beginning of year
Unappropriated Fund balance, end of year
$   •
$ 2,180
$48,414
$
$           5
$ 50,599
$48,163
183,30
-
.
.
183,301
163,093
2,555
6,811
434
-
-
9,800
14,900
2,600
750
6,455
5,665
26,181
38,301
34,108
-
16
20
-
-
36
10
-
305
50
-
355
172
-
831
1,157
1,988
2,738
44,182
208
-
1,012
-
45,402
41,701
-
4,453
15,578
-
986
21,017
19,772
1,199
-
193
49,006
-
50,398
47,198
2,882
10,469
-
573
598
14,522
20,913
-
-
10
4,770
4,780
8,947
234,119
31,728
71,511
50,601
32,540
420,499
405,065
97,021
6,505
12,557
116,083
110,965
5,641
2,715
7,562
-
-
15,918
16,707
67,482
4,841
16,294
12,918
496
102,031
95,744
170,144
14,061
36,413
12,918
496
234,032
223,416
21,097
735
2,365
1,186
41
25,424
23,833
3,739
1,768
4,506
-
76
10,089
8.666
5,162
427
406
-
-
5,995
5,979
17,496
989
15,076
5,553
3,446
42,560
38,906
3,538
2,287
7,867
787
5,230
19,709
13,972
8,177
85
682
1,288
361
10,593
10,363
490
108
110
1,672
5,870
8,250
4,581
3,489
3,932
521
-
-
7,942
7,422
2,369
2,266
671
-
1,547    .
6,853
5,708
-
-
-
17,451
-
17,451
15,473
-
-
-
6,304
15,926
22,230
21,224
-
-
-
-
3,110
3,110
8,245
( 1,609)
205
1,154
250
-
-
-
( 3,695)
-
-
-
-
( 3,695)
( 3,464)
230,397
26,863
69,771
47,409
36,103
410,543
384,324
1,035
-
.
3,898
5,949
10,882
5,889
(   606)
( 6,156)
245
(5,840)
6,486
( 5,871)
( 3,828)
( 3,381)
-
-
(1,272)
(3,214)
(8,976)
3,459
( 13,629)
(   8,618)
( 10,882)
( 2,952)
( 6,156)
245
( 8,821)
770
( 1.291)
1,985
(    22)
(   104)
1,338
11,920
(    547)
27,921
, $ 26,630
15,380
$17,365
261
2,566
$ 2,462
45,581
$46,919
33,661
$    223
$   239
$ 45,581
TABLE 3
SUMMARY COMPARISONS OF TOTAL GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING EXPENSES
1983-84 TO 1987-88
Academic
%
Student
Service
%
Staff
%
Total
%
Benefits
%
Sub
Total
%
Travel &     Library    Supplies &
Field Trips Acquisitions Expenses
%              %             %
Utilities
%
Equipment &
Alterations
%
Tota
%
1987-88
42.2*
2.4
29.2
73.8
9.2
83.0
1.6
2.3
8.1
3.5
1.5
100.0
1986-87
42.8
2.5
28.5
73.8
9.0
82.8
1.4
2.4
8.1
3.7
1.6
100.0
1985-86
43.7
2.5
28.4
74.6
9.1
83.7
1.1
2.3
5.2
4.3
3.4
100.0
1984-85
44.0
2.3
29.1
75.4
9.1
84.5
1.1
1.9
5.7
4.1
2.7
100.0
1983-84
45.1
2.4
29.2
76.7
9.0
85.7
1.1
1.9
6.2
3.3
1.8
100.0
" Prior to 1987-88 early termination salary costs were charged
to General Purpose Operating expenses. Starting in 1987-88
most of these costs are charged to an endowment income account
in the Specific Purposes Fund.
TABLE 2
SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF THE GENERAL PURPOSE OPERATING FUND
FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31,1984 TO 1988
1988
1987
1986
1985
1984
%
%
%
%
%
Source
Province of B.C. - Grants
79.4
80.0
79.7
81.2
83.9
Student Fees - Credit
15.2
15.4
15.3
14.1
11.5
Student Fees - Non-credit
3.7
3.0
3.2
2.9
2.8
Other
_LZ
_L£
_L£
_LS
_L£
100,0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Distribution by Function
Academic and Associated
Academic Sen/ices
72.4
72.1
73.2
72.9
73.4
Library
7.3
7.5
7.3
7.5
7.6
Student Awards and Services
2.7
2.6
2.6
3.0
2.5
Administration
5.6
5.3
4.3
4.2
4.2
General
1.1
1.2
.7
.7
.6
Plant
11.4
11.8
12.3
12.2
12.0
Overhead Recovered on
Research
1IL5J
{JL5J
um
UL5)
tfljj)
100.0
100.0
lQOJtt
100.0
100.0
TABLE 4
TOTAL SPONSORED RESEARCH FUNDING
(thousands of dollars)
Amount
1983-84
$54,906
1984-85
63,096
1985-86
59,619
1986-87
65,280
1987-88
71,511
TABLE 5
SOURCE AND DISTRIBUTION OF SPONSORED RESEARCH FUND
FOR THE YEARS ENDED MARCH 31,1984 TO 1988
12SS
1987
1986
Source
Distribution
Salaries and benefits
Travel and field trips
Operational supplies and
expenses
Equipment
Other
1985
1984
Government of Canada
67.7
68.9
62.6
69.6
67.9
Province of British Columbia
8.5
7.9
9.2
7.7
10.0
Other governments & agencies
_LZ
_L5
2,8
2,2
2,3
Total governments
77.9
79.3
74.6
79.5
80.2
Individuals, business,
foundations
21.8
20.5
24.9
20.1
19.4
Other
_£
_£
^5.
-A
_^4
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
55.6
58.2
56.7
56.6
58.0
6.5
6.3
6.1
5.9
6.2
21.6
20.4
18.1
17.7
18.2
11.3
10.1
13.1
13.7
13.0
-5JI
_5£
-&fl
-SJ.
JL&
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
1000 UBC REPORTS   Oct 20, 1988       4
A Haida artisan adds texture to a cedar wall, part of a longhouse being
constructed in Masset on the Queen Charlotte Islands for the new
National Museum of Civilization in Ottawa. Work on six longhouses —
one from each of the major cultural groups of the Northwest Coast
Indians — will form the centrepiece ofthe museum's Grand Hall. The
work is being subcontracted by the Museum of Anthropology.
Computer law project
seeks alternate funding
By GAVIN WILSON
A three-year project that has turned
UBC into North America's leading
centre for research into the use of
computer in the legal profession
wraps up at the end of the year.
But associate law professor Robert
Franson, director of the Law and
Computers Project, is looking for alternative funding to keep some aspects of the program alive.
" It is generally regarded as the best
project of its type anywhere," said
Peter Burns, Dean of Law.' 'And it is
certainly the largest single legal research project at any law faculty in
Canada."
The project's legacy includes a
classroom with 20 computer terminals, a fully computerized legal clinic,
a research lab with five computers and
an outreach office in downtown Vancouver.
"We accomplished much more
than we set out to do — it's been a real
success story," said Franson. "It's
absolutely unique in Canada, and
we're the only ones in North America
doing anything close to the depth and
breadth of this project.''
The Law and Computers project
began as a cooperative venture with
IBM, which provided equipment that
included 134 personal computers, a
minicomputer, software and professional services with a total value of
more than $2-million. The Continuing Legal Education Society of B.C.
also evolved into an important partner
in the project.
Financial and other assistance for
the project came from the Attorney-
General's office, the federal departments of Justice and Communications
and ministries of Supply and Services
and Science and Technology, the
Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council and the Law Foundation of B.C. Private sector companies
such as Teknowledge and Gandalf
Corp. also contributed.
Outside cash and other gifts in kind
were valued at $1.5-million.
Franson said that some ofthe aims
that were met during the project were
an increase in computer literacy
among students and professionals,
production of computer-assisted legal
instruction materials and creation of
computer tools forjudges and lawyers
such as the sentencing database and
evidence retrieval systems.
The retrieval system allows judges
to call up pieces of evidence from
earlier testimony with just a few keystrokes instead of a tedious search
through a pile of documents.
It was developed for use by B.C.
Supreme Court Chief Justice Allan
McEachern (recently named Chief
Justice of the B.C. Court of Appeal)
during the lengthy Gitksan native
land claim trial. The extremely complex case has already produced a
mountain of evidence during the first
year of hearings, and is expected to go
on for another year.
Franson is also pleased with the
results at UBC's legal clinic, which
under the project has been fully computerized.
Another successful component of
the project is the development of an
expert system for civil law.
The system, which guides the user
through a bewildering body of material directly to the most important case
law, has been widely demonstrated
throughout Canada and the United
States.
The sentencing database project,
which earned national attention in the
media and in legal circles, is now in
place in courthouses across B.C.
Raging hatred can lead
women to commit fraud
By DEBORA SWEENEY
The manipulative, consuming
rage exhibited by actress Glenn Close
in the movie Fatal Attraction is shared
by many women who commit fraud,
says Dr. Peggy Koopman, a UBC
psychologist.
"This particular form of fraud is
specific to a lot of women and is
associated with the clinical diagnosis
of borderline personality," Koopman
said. "In my opinion, Glenn Close's
behavior was a different form of acting out by a borderline personality -
but the hatred experienced by these
women is equally murderous."
Dr. Koopman has diagnosed and
treated several women who spent
time in prison for committing fraud.
Each exhibited similar passive-aggressive behavior resulting from feelings of resentment, anger and revenge.
Because the courts view the motivation for committing fraud as greed,
it is not seen as a crime that requires
psychological or psychiatric evaluation and the problem is either ignored or misdiagnosed, Dr. Koopman
said.
"It starts with spending excessively - overdrawing the chequing
account while not keeping track ofthe
balance; to willfully writing cheques
knowing there isn't money in the
bank; to stealing money from someone else's bank account," she said.
"It's not like taking a gun or a knife
and holding somebody up, but the
underlay is very violent and very
angry."
The women Dr. Koopman treated
spent their lives as over-achievers,
trying to gain acceptance and love.
After hopelessly trying to fulfill these
insatiable needs, they did not see their
thefts as crimes, but retaliation for the
overwhelming rejection they felt.
"When they don't get what they
need - and they can't because it's sort
of a bottomless pit - then, they're
totally devastated," said Dr. Koopman.
As prison inmates, they obeyed the
rules ofthe institution and got on well
with guards. All received early parole
dates.
Dr. Koopman is lecturing in the
U.S. and Canada, hoping to educate
other health-care professionals about
her findings.
Therapy involves establishing
boundaries for patients by forbidding
them to react impulsively to situations. As well, the therapist emphasizes the patient's positive qualities,
to create self-esteem.
'' I think that there is a considerable
number of women who are quote -
'overly emotional' - or have many
destructive relationships, although
otherwise they are very capable
people. They may be misdiagnosed
as neurotic or depressive when in fact,
they should be considered for this
problem instead," she said.
Changes to Act
1 Patent first, think later1
By JO MOSS
Changes to Canada's Patent Act
will put pressure on university researchers to apply for patents earlier,
but will also provide additional
sources of funding for research, says
Jim Murray, director of UBC's Industry Liaison Office.
Under Bill C-22, which goes into
effect gradually over the next year,
Canada is moving from a policy of
first-to-invent to a policy of first-to-
file.
Current legislation allows a researcher to challenge a patent application if he can prove that he, and not the
patent applicant, was the first to invent.
The new first-to-file amendment
will make it important for university
researchers to file a patent application
as soon as they believe there's a reasonable chance of commercial application, Murray said.
"You won't have time to go out
and spend a year to decide whether
there really is a commercial application or not. You'll have to patent first
and think later."
Early patenting is also important in
encouraging industry collaboration,
Murray said.
"It sets a milestone and assures a
company that it will share in the value
added to original research if there is
additional intellectual input into the
project."
No firm date has been set for implementation of the bill, but it will be
in place within a year, according to the
federal Patent Office.
"The public has to be given fair
notice. You can't spring it on them
overnight," said Tony McDonough,
Patent Office director.
Patent Act changes were announced by the Ministry of Consumer
and Corporate Affairs last November
and are intended to simplify Canada's
patent system and bring it in line with
systems in other countries.
At the same time as the first-to-file
proviso goes into effect, Canada's
current two-year grace period between disclosure and patent applica
tion will drop to one year. Once
information on an invention has been
publicy disclosed, through discussion
or publication, a researcher will have
one year in which to file for a patent.
"The two-year waiting period is
eccentric," McDonough explained
"No other country has it."
But Canada and the United States
will be the only countries in the world
with a one-year grace period. Other
countries have none. Disclosure in
North America may preclude applicants from obtaining foreign patents.
There are no plans to eliminate the
one-year grace period, McDonough
said.
Murray said that changes to the
Patent Act also opened up additional
funding sources for university research relating to pharmaceuticals.
Combining this new source of
funding with existing grant programs
from the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council and Medical Research Council, UBC will be
able to increase research and development funding to areas that are in need
"by a significant amount."
A patent amendment extending the
life of pharmaceutical drug patents to
ten years, from four years, brought a
committment from pharmaceutical
companies to spend a percentage of
revenue generated from drug sales on
drug-related research in Canada over
the next five years. Murray estimates
that figure may be close to $50-mil-
lion.
Dean of Pharmaceutical Sciences
John McNeill said the faculty has
been in contact with drug company
representatives and discussions are
under way with several companies.
Rural doctors helped
by faxed illustrations
By DEBORA SWEENEY
Medical illustrators at UBC say
they now have a direct line to contracts from remote communities,
thanks to their office's fax machine.
For the first time they have successfully transmitted several illustrations to a surgeon in Ontario — which
proves they can expand their services
cheaply and efficiently to doctors
wherever they may be, said Bruce
Stewart, Art Division Coordinator in
the Biomedical Communications
Department.
"Aside from having a paintbrush
and an airbrush, now all we need is a
fax machine and a photocopier,'' said
Stewart.
Until now, many rural doctors
have had virtually no way of getting
important illustrations that show the
most up-to-the minute medical procedures, Stewart added.
The idea of sending the illustrations by fax came when Dr. Richard
Hawkins,   a  London,   Ont.   sports
Crymble
medicine specialist, decided to M
write a textbook
outlining the
most up-to-date
methods of
mending athletes
injured during
competition. Dr.
Hawkins wanted
UBC to do the job
— but he wanted
the job done fast.
Mailing the documents would take
too long, so illustrator Frank Crymble
suggested transmitting on the fax machine.
The entire project took less than
two weeks, and cost about $ 13 for fax
and long-distance charges.
"The fax made an excellent reproduction of the illustrations," said
Crymble. ' 'The doctor had no problem recognizing the diagrams. In fact,
the whole procedure was carried out
with no problems at all." UBC REPORTS   Oct. 20, 1988       5
People
Goldberg heads finance centre
Commerce professor Michael
Goldberg was appointed chairman of Vancouver's new international finance centre Sept. 29, the
day the centre officially opened its
offices in the World Trade Centre.
Goldberg, who is on leave from
UBC, is also acting executive director of International Finance
Centre (IFC) Vancouver, a nonprofit organization funded by the
provincial government.
IFC will promote the advantages of Vancouver as one of the
world's financial centres and assist
potential off-shore investors to
explore financial business opportunities in Canada.
Recent federal and provincial
legislation provides for tax-exempt status for some financial
transactions executed by registered IFC firms.
Kogila Adam-Moodley, an associate professor of anthropology
in Social and Educational Studies,
will head up the newly formed
Multicultural Liaison Office
(MLO).
As part of the President's Office, the MLO will explore ways in
which UBC can extend its education and research resources to
groups not well-represented at the
university.
As part of her new duties,
Adam-Moodley will work to obtain financial support for multicultural projects from sources such as
the Secretary of State and the new
federal Ministry of Multiculturalism.
Adam-Moodley's research has
focused on ethnicity and on education in multicultural societies, including South Africa and Canada.
She also has co-ordinated the Multicultural Teacher Education Program.
Woodham
The Institute of Electrical and"
Electronics Engineers (IEEE) Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society,
recently awarded UBC professor
Robert Woodham, and UBC
graduate Malcolm Gray, a prize for a
paper which appeared in the IEEE's
international journal, Transactions on
Geoscience and Remote Sensing.
The annual Transactions Paper
Prize Award is presented to an author
who has made "significant contributions" to the society's field of endeavor.
Woodham and Gray' s paper, titled
"An Analytic Method for Radiometric Correction of Satellite Multispec-
tral Scanner Data," describes how
remote sensing technology can be
better applied to mapping B.C.'s forests.
'' Remote sensing images are often
not obtained under optimal conditions," Woodham explained. B.C.'s
rugged complicates matters, making
it difficult for the computer to differentiate between ground cover and
topography.
Woodham and Gray developed a
computerized method of obtaining
accurate ground cover information
from these images and demonstrated
that it could be used reliably.
A fellow ofthe Canadian Institute
for Advanced Research, Woodham
holds a dual appointment at UBC in
the forestry faculty and computer science department. His research focus
is artificial intelligence and robotics.
Gray, who graduated in 1986 with a
master's degree in forestry, now
works as a research officer with the
Surveys and Resource Mapping
Branch of the Ministry of Crown
Lands, in Victoria.
Sie-Tan Chieng, a Bio-Resource
Engineering professor, has been
named Agricultural Engineer of the
Year by the Canadian Society of Agricultural Engineering.
The annual award goes to a society
member under 40 and recognizes
outstanding contributions to agricultural engineering design and development, extension and management, or
research and teaching.
Chieng, who received the award at
the society's annual meeting in August, was cited for "highly effective
teaching and research, expanding
contributions in developing international academic relations, and significant contributions to scientific societies".
Since coming to UBC in 1980,
Chieng has achieved international
recognition for his research in irrigation, drainage and water resources
and especially for his pioneering
work in computerized drainage design methodologies.
Commerce professor Izak Benbasat and doctoral student Blaize
Homer Reich recently received an
award from the Administrative Science Association of Canada for the
best paper in the Information Systems
Division.
The award was presented at the
society's annual conference held recently in Halifax.
Entitled ' "The Use of Information
Technology for Competitive
Advantage: An Examination
of Information Systems Linking Companies to their Customers," the paper examined
11 Canadian companies which
had built computer systems
and offered them to their customers. The systems ranged
from a cash management
workstation for corporate
treasurers to an inventory system which tracked rolls of
newsprint. In each case, the
system was built to gain competitive advantage in the marketplace.
Reich and Benbasat identified the technological and organizational factors which
separated successful and unsuccessful companies and
made recommendations for
firms which are attempting to
built these "customer-oriented strategic systems,"
Reich said.
Norman Young, assistant
professor of stage management and production in the
Theatre Department, has been
appointed to the Arts Advisory
Committee of the Vancouver
Foundation.
The multi-million-dollar
charitable foundation funds
projects in several areas, including the arts.
Young, who was chairman
of the B.C. Arts Board and a
member of the Canada Council for several years, is chairman of the Civic Theatre
Board (Orpheum, Queen
Elizabeth Theatre and Playhouse). He is also a member of
the Vancouver Museum
Board and the Vancouver
Archives Commission.
Campus
may be
used as
morgue
in crisis
By DEBORA SWEENEY
The UBC campus could be turned
into a make-shift morgue in the event
of adisaster, said Bart Bastien, B.C.'s
coroner of forensic odontology.
Bastien is in charge of identifying
the remains of victims through their
dental records.
In the event of a plane crash, an
earthquake, a major fire or a mass
slaying, the Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre could be converted into
a morgue and faculty and dentists
from the Faculty of Dentistry could be
conscripted to help with identification
of remains, said Bastien.
The provincial coronor's office
does not need authority to move in
during a crisis, he added.
The province's Attorney-General's office is drawing up a new disaster plan for B.C. which is expected
to be completed by the end of November. It will include recommendations
on how the UBC campus could be
used, Bastien said.
UBC is a likely site because it can
provide a wide range of services,
added Dr. David Sweet, a forensic
dentist at UBC who assisted the coroner's office in developing the plan.
Sweet, who lectures at UBC, said
dentistry students who receive forensic training would be familiar with
protocol and procedures for identification. The university has catering
facilities that could feed a large number of people involved in the identification process; it has an RCMP detachment which has access to computer information across Canada; the
ice rinks at the Thunderbird Winter
Sports Centre could be made into
temporary morgue facilities; and
UBC has the forensic technology to
identify remains on-site, Sweet said.
Faculty Recital
David Astor, tenor; Harold Brown, piano Free
admission. For information call 228-3113. Recital
Hall, Music Bldg. 12:30 p.m.
x      Psychology Colloquium
, Biobehavioural Mechanisms ol Chronic Pain.  Dr.
I-        Michael Feuerstein, Dept. of Psychiatry, Marquette
U.   For information call 228-2755.   Room 2510,
Kenny Bldg. 12t>.m. (noon)
Neuroscience Discussion Group
Modulation of the Mesocorticolimbic Dopamine
System by Neuropeptides. Dr. Peter Kalivas, Pharmacology & Physiology, College of Veterinary
Medicine, Pullman, Wash. For information call Dr.
^ Reiner  at  228-7369.      IRC   Lecture   Hall  #1,
Woodward Bldg. 4 p.m.
Psychology Colloquium
Magical Illusory Conjunctions and Neon Colors. Dr.
Bill Prinzmetal. For information call 228-2755.
Room 2510, Kenny Bldg. 4 p.m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 4     |
Committee on Lectures
Film and History: Images of Revolution 1918. Prof.
Yvette Biro, History, New York U. For information
call 228-5181. Room A-100, Buchanan Bldg. 2:30
p.m.
Music Recital
UBC Chamber Singers. Corland Hulberg, director.
Free admission. For information call 228-3113.
Recital Hall. Music Bldg. 12:30 & 8 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar
Bindings and Catalytic Domains of Cellulase:
Medical Implications. Dr. Robert C Miller, Jr. Pro
fessor, Dept. of Microbiology & Dean, Faculty of
Science, UBC. For information call 228-5311. Parentcraft Room, Grace Hospital, 4490 Oak St. 1 p.m.
Historical Conference
Conference on 1918-1988 in Central Europe.
Opening Lecture 12:30 p.m., Buch 100. Ph. Long-
worth (McGill U) on historical concepts of east
central Europe; sessions on Friday p.m. and Saturday on and off campus. Registration and programme available at the lecture and in front of Buch
100, Friday 2:30-4:30 p.m. For information call Dept
of History at 228-5181 or 228-5557.
SATURDAY, NOV. 5 |
THE VANCOUVER
INSTITUTE
Saturday, Oct.
29
The Literary Revolution
of 1789. Prof. Robert
Darnton, Dept. of History, Princeton.
Saturday, Nov. 5
The Equality Gap: Canadian Law and Women's Reality. Miss Mary
Eberts, Partner, Tory, Tory, DesLauriers & Binng-
ton, Barristers & Solicitors, Toronto.
All lectures are in Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional Resources Centre at 8:15 p.m.
Field Trip to Fraser Institute
Student Economic Workshop: Why Markets Work.
Paul Heyne, Ph.D, U. of Washington/Walter Block,
Ph.D. Sr. Research Fellow & Michael Walker, Ph.D,
Exec, Fraser Institute. There will be frequent oppor-
tunites for students to ask questions and participate
in discussion. $20 includes luch. For information
call Lorena Baren 688-0221 or David Crawford at
222-4650.
NOTICES
Assertiveness for Women - Basic
Free Workshop. Tuesdays, Oct. 25, Nov. 1 and 8.
An introduction to basic communication skills.
Participants to learn more effective methods of
expressing themselves and their needs in a wide
range of social settings - from classroom to relationships. Enquiries 228-2415. Registration required.
Brock 106A. 12:30-2 p.m.
Duncan Lectureship
Nov. 2-3. "The City: For God's Sake." Dr. Ray
Bakke, Prof, of Hisotry & Applied Theology, Northern Baptist Theological Seminary, Chicago. For
information call 228-3245. Chapel/Auditorium,
Regent College, 2130 Wesbrook Mall. 11:30 a.m.-
12:30 p.m.
Walter Gage Toastmastery
Wednesdays. Public Speaking Club Meeting.
Speeches and tabletopics. Guests are welcome.
For information call 224-9976. Room 215, SUB.
7:30 p.m.
Language Exchange Program
Free service to match up people who want to exchange their language for another. For information
call Mawele Shamaila at 228-5021.
Lanugage Bank Program.
Free translation/interpretation services offered by
International students and community in general.
For information call Teresa Uyeno at 228-5021.
International House
E.S.L. Classes and Keep Fit Classes. All classes
are free. For information call 228-5021.
Native Expressions
Starting Oct. 18 - every Tues. night at the Extra Extra
Bistro, 3347 West Broadway, from 8:00-10:30 p.m.
$3.00 at the door. Native performers & creative
artist on stage. For information call Kathy at 222-
8940. Proceeds to First Nations' Student Fund.
Opening night performance features David
Campbell and Len George.
UBC Fine Arts Gallery
Oct. 4-Nov. 10. Recent Portraits: Fred Rosenberg
(33 b/w photographs). Hours: Tues.-Fri. 1:00a.m.-
5:00 p.m. Sat. 12 (noon) -5 p.m.
Keep Fit Classes
Int'l House is looking for volunteers, certified Keep
Fit instructors. Please call Vivian forfurther information at 228-5021.
Special Issue on Africa and the
French Caribbean
Contemporary French Civilization is preparing a
special issue on Francophone Africa and the Caribbean for1989. Articles in English or French, 15-20
typed pages, on any contemporary cuiture/civiliza-
tion topic in Africa or the Caribbean, must be submitted by March 1,1989. For more information call Dr.
Claude Bouygues, 228-2879.
Teaching Kids to Share
Mothers with 2 children between 2 1/2 and 6 years
of age are invited to participate in a free parent-
education programme being evaluated in the Dept.
of Psychology at UBC. The 5-session programme
offers child development info and positive parenting
strategies designed to help parents guide their children in the development of sharing and cooperative
play skills. For further information call Georgia
Tiedemann at the Sharing Project 228-6771.
Fitness Appraisal
Physical Education & Recreation, through the John
M. Buchanan Fitness and Research Centre, is
administering a physical fitness assessment program to students, faculty, staff and the general
public. Approx. 1 hour, students $25, all others $30.
For information call 228-4356.
Surplus Equipment
Recycling Facility
All surplus items. For information call 228-2813.
Every Wednesday 12 noon - 3 p.m. Task Force
Bldg, 2352 Health Science Mall.
Neville Scarfe Children's Garden
Visit the Neville Scarfe Children's Garden located
west of the Education Building. Open all year - free.
Families interested in planting, weeding and watering in the garden contact Jo-Anne Naslund at 434-
1081 or 228-3767.
Badminton Club
Faculty, Staff and Graduate Student Badminton
Club meets Thursdays 8:30-10:30 p.m. and Fridays
6:30-8:30 p.m. in Gym A of the Robert Osborne
Sports Centre. Cost is $15 plus REC UBC card. For
more information call Bernie 228-4025 or 731-9966.
Faculty Club Art Exhibition
Photographs by Bill Keay. Until Nov. 11th. For
information call the Faculty Club at 228-2708.
Department of Psychology
Individuals 18 and older are needed for a research
project on changes in memory across the adult life
span. For information call Jo Ann Miller at 228-
4772.
Nitobe Memorial Garden
Open 10:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m., Oct. 12 - Mar. 16,1989.
Monday - Friday Free. UBC REPORTS    Oct. 20, 1988        6
MONDAY, OCT. 24   |
Film Showing
The Shining, starring Jack Nicholson & Scatman
Crothers. Tickets $2.50 each. For information call
the hotline at 228-3697. Sub Theatre, SUB. 7 &
9:45 p.m.
Hewitt Bostock Lecture
French Seminar
Watteau et le Theatre. Prof. Francois Moureau, U.
de Bourgogne, Dijon, France. For information call
228-4036. Room 826, Buchanan Tower. 10:30
a.m.
Hewitt Bostock Lecture - French
Lecture
Les Annees 1788/89 Dans La Presse Du Temps.
Prof. Francois Moureau. U. de Bourgogne. Dijon,
France. For information call 228-4036. Penthouse,
Buchanan Bldg. 12:30 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar
Kinematics of the Thick Disk. Dr. Eileen Friel,
Dominion Astrophysical Observatory, Victoria.
Coffee served. For information call 228-4134.
Room 260, Geophysics & Astronomy Bldg. 4 p.m.
Mech 598 Seminar
Space Platform Based Tethers: Dynamics & Control. Prem K. Laksmanan, Graduate Student. For
information call 228-4350. Room 1215, CEME
Bldg. 3:30 p.m.
Mech 598 Seminar
An Investigation Into the Effect of Turbulence on the
Combustion ot Premixed Fuel Air Mixtures. Ken
Das, Graduate Student. For information call 228-
4350. Room 1215, CEME Bldg. 4 p.m.
Paediatrics Seminar
Opsono-lndifference: Or Why Macrophages Dont
Care How Their Food is Served. Dr. David Speert,
Division of Infectious Disease, UBC. Refreshments
provided. Room D308, Shaughnessy Hospital,
4500 Oak St. 12 p.m. (noon)
Biochemical Seminar
Yeast Artificial Chromosomes. Dr. Maynard Olson,
Genetics Dept. Wash. U, St. Louis. For information
call Dr. Caroline Astell at 228-2142. Lecture Hall #4,
IRC Bldg. 3:45 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT. 25 |
Oceanography Seminar
Mixing in Stratified Flows. Dr. G. A. Lawrence, Dept.
of Civil Engineering. For information call Dr. S.E.
Calvert at 228-5210. Room 1465, Bio Sciences
Bldg. 3:30 p.m.
Statistics Seminar
Time Series Models for Count or Qualitative Observation. Prof. Andrew Harvey, London School of
Economics. For information call 228-3319. Room
102C, Ponderosa Annex C. 4 p.m.
Education Lecture
The Meaning of Education - The Force of Greater
Learning - Ancient Chinese Method in Modern
Times. Master Hsuan Hua, Prof. & Chancellor of
Dharma Relam Buddhist U. Talmage, Cal. For
information call Gold Buddha Monastery 684-3754
or Maria Koh 683-5509. Seminar Room 604, Asian
Centre. 12:30 p.m.
Lecture on Buddhism
Confucianism & the Human Roots & In Search of
Great Wisdom & Harmony. Master Husan Hua, Prot
& Chancellor, Dharma Realm Buddhist U. Talmage,
Cal. For information call Gold Buddha Monastery
684-3754 or Maria Koh 683-5509. Auditorium,
Asian Centre. 7 - 9 p.m.
Health Seminar
Unpacking Illness Meanings: Chinese & Anglo-
Canadian Women with Diabetes. Dr. Joan Anderson. Nursing, UBC. Presented as part of an informal, interdisciplinary health studies exchange
group. For information call 228-2258. 4th Floor
Boardroom, IRC Bldg. 12:30 - 1:30 p.m.
Christian Lecture
John Milton and Christian Apologetics. Dr. D.
Danielson, English, UBC. Coffee at 4:15. For
information call 228-3112. Buchanan Penthouse,
Buchanan "B" Bldg. 4:30 p.m.
Botany Seminar
Antiherbivore Mechanisms in the Plant Family
Meliaceae. Don Champagne, Botany Dept., UBC.
For information call 228-2133. Room 2000, Biological Sciences Bldg. 12:30 p.m.
Merck Frosst Lecture
Spectroscopy of Molecular Ions: The Third Generation. Prof. Richard J. Saykally. Dept. of Chemistry,
UCLA. For information call 228-3299. Refreshments served. Room 250, Chemistry Bldg. 1:00
p.m.
UBC Reports h published every
second Thursday by the UBC
Community Relations Office,
4328 Memorial Rd., Vancouver,
B.C., VfiT 1W5. Telephone 228-
3131.
Editor-in-Chief: Don Whiteley
Editor: Howard HuxgnM
Contrtbaten: Jo Mom,  Paula
Martin, Debora Sweeney.  Gavin Wilaon.
calendar
Oct.23 - Nov.5
Christopher Miller ofthe Museum of Anthropology takes a close look at a new acquisition from the estate ofthe late artist
Andy Warhol — an Alaskan Chilkat blanket that went on display Oct. 5. The MOA also purchased a headdress from
Warhol's extensive collection of American Indian Art that was auctioned in New York.
CALENDAR DEADLINES
For events in the period Nov.6 to Nov.19 .notices must be submitted on proper Calendar forms no later than 4 p.m. on
Wednesday, Oct.26 to the Community Relations Office, 6328 Memorial Road, Room 207, Old Administration Building.
For more information call 228-3131. Due to production deadlines, it has been necessary to move the calendar
deadline back half a day.
WED., OCT. 26      |
Applied Mathematics Seminar
Perturbations of Symmetric Bifurcations and Convection in Fluids. Dr. Wayne Nagata, Dept. of
Mathematics, UBC. For information call 228-4584.
Room 229, Mathematics Bldg. 3:45 p.m.
Murrin Lecture
Partnership Between Genders. Dr. Pauline Webb,
Murrin Scholar in Residence. For information call
224-3722. Room A106, Buchanan A Bldg. 12:30
p.m.
Poetry Reading
Germanic Studies - Swedish writer Gunnar Harding
reads from his poetry (in English). For information
call 228-5119. Penthouse, Buchanan Bldg. 12:30
p.m.
Noon-Hour Recital
Hal Ott, Flute: Peter Gries, Piano. Admission $2.
For information call 228-3113. Recital Hall, Music
Bldg. 12:30 p.m.
Ecology Seminar
The Evolution of Mammalian Life Histories. John S.
Miller, Zoology, U of Western Ont. For information
call 228-4329. Room 2000, Biological Sciences
Bldg. 4:30 p.m.
Merck Frosst Lecture
Far Infrared Laser Spectroscopy of Van Der Waals
Bonds: A New Probe of Intermolecular Forces.
Prof. Richard J. Saykally, Dept. of Chemistry,
UCLA. For information call 228-3299. Room 225,
Chemistry Bldg. 2:30 p.m.
Pharmacology Seminar
Recent Studies of Parkinsonism & Dystonia. Dr. D.
Calne, Dept. of Medicine, UBC. For information call
228-2575. Room 317, Basic Medical Sciences
Bldg., Block "C". 12:30 p.m.
English Colloquium
Milton's Lycidas and Earlier Seventeenth Century
Opera. Prof. P. Stanwood, English. For information
call 228-5122. Buchanan Penthouse. Buchanan
Bldg. 3:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. 27 |
Working Breakfasts for
Working Women
A series of four working breakfasts is again being
sponsored this fall by Women in Management Programs, UBC Cont. Ed.
The next breakfast is 7:30-8:45 a.m., Le Meridien
Hotel, 845 Burrard Street featuring Lisa Tant, fashion editor and columnist, on fashion trends & forecasts.
Cost for the Early Riser Breakfast Series is $64 or
$17.75 each. For information call 222-5272.
Public Sale
Surplus Equipment Recycling Facility. For additional information contact Vincent Grant at 228-
2813. Location 2352 Health Sciences Mall, Task
Force Bldg. 12-3 p.m.
Ocean Sciences Seminar
Submarine Tailings Disposal. Dr. G. Poling, Prof.,
Dept. of Mining and Mineral Process Engineering.
For information call 228-5210. Room 202, Macleod
Bldg. 3:30 p.m.
Physics Colloquium
USR Reserach in High Tc Superconductors. R.
Keifl, UBC. For information call 288-3853. Room
201. Hennings Bldg. 4 p.m.
Political Science Lecture
Environment in Crisis: A Threat to Our Common
Security. Ambassador Ola Ullsten (Sweden). For
information call 228-2717. Room A100. Buchanan
Bldg.  12:30-1:30 p.m.
Music Recital
UBC Wind Ensemble. Martin Berinbaum, Director.
Free Admission. For information call 228-3113. Old
Auditorium. 12:30 p.m.
Music at the Museum
UBC Percussion Ensemble. John Rudolph, Director. Free with Museum Admission. For information
call 228-3113. Great Hall. Museum of Anthropology. 3:00 p.m.
Engineering Meeting
Information meeting for 1 st year Engineering students (all branches except Electrical). Janet Land,
Acting Director, Cooperative Education Programs.
For information call 228-3022. Room 200. Computer Science Bldg. 12:30 -1:30 p.m.
Research Lecture
Deindustrialization in British India: The Handloom
Weavers of the Central Provinces of India, 1800-
1947. Dr. Peter Harnetty, Prof., Dept. of Asian
Studies. For information call 228-3881. Room 604,
Asian Centre. 1:00 p.m.
Medicine Lecture
Hypertension: A Lifetime of Mining Salt. Dr. Sydney
M. Friedman, Prof. Emeritus, Dept. of Anatomy. For
information call 228-4305. University Hospital,
Room G-279, Lecture Theatre, Ground Floor,
Koerner Pavilion, HSCH. 12 p.m. noon
Art History Lecture
Sexual Politics & Public Virtue in Late 18th Century
Painting. Michael Merrinan. Columbia U. For information call 228-2757. Room 102, Lasserre Bldg.
12:30 p.m.
Psychology Colloquium
Panic. Dr. Jack Rachman. Psychology, UBC. .For
information call 228-2755. Room 2510, Kenny 4
p.m.
Schaffer Lecture
Gene Conservation in Forest Trees. Dr. F. Thomas
Ledig, U.S. Forest Service. For information call
228-2507 or 228-4166. Room 166, MacMillan Bldg.
12:30-1:30 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 28
Talk/Discussion
Stories of Women from North and South told by Dr.
Pauline Webb, International Journalist & Broadcaster. For information call 228-2747. Women
Students' Lounge, Brock Hall. Room 223. 12:30 -
1:30 p.m.
Literature Lecture
Living Apart Together: Swedish and Danish Literatures from the Second World War to the Eighties.
Lars-Olof Franzen. Swedish novelist. Stockholm.
For information call 228-5157. Room D224,
Buchanan "D" Bldg. 12:30 p.m.
Health Care Rounds
Hospital Utilization Evaluation. Sandi Wiggins,
Inst.. Dept. of Health Care & Epid. For information
call 228-2772. Room 253, James Mather Bldg. 9 -
10 a.m.
Political Science Lecture
Why are Intellectuals More Listened to in Societies
of Catholic Tradition. Prof. Andre-J. Belanger. U of
Montreal. For information call 228-2717. Room
A100. Buchanan Bldg. 12:30-1:30 p.m.
Fine Arts Lecture
Gar Lecherlich: Low-Life Painting in Rudolfian
Prague. Thomas Da Costa Kauffman, Princeton U.
For information call 228-2757. Room 102, Lasserre
Bldg. 12:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar
Clinical Case Presentations. Genetic Fellows.
Clinical Genetics Unit, Grace Hospital. For information call 228-5311. Parentcraft Room, Grace Hospital, 4490 Oak St. 1 p.m.
SUNDAY, OCT. 30   |
MONDAY, OCT. 31   |
Cecil & Ida Green Visiting Professorships - History Seminar
The Science ot Piracy: Publishing in 18th Century
France.  Prof. Robert Darnton. History, Princeton.      i
For   information   call   228-5675.       Penthouse,
Buchanan Bldg. 3:30 p.m. *
Biochemical Seminar
Globin Gene Evolution and Regulation. Dr. Ross
Haroison, Penn State U. For information call 228-
3027. Lecture Hall #4, IRC Bldg. 3:45 p.m.
Film Showing
The Rocky Horror Picture Show. Tickets $2.50
each until further notice. For information call the
hotline at 228-3697. Sub Theatre. SUB. 7 & 9:30
p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar
Alligators: Modelling Pattern Formation Mechanisms and Concepts ot Developmental Constraints
in Evolution. Dr. Jim Murray, F.R.S., Dept. of Applied Mathematics, U of Washington. For information call 228-4584. Room 229. Mathematics Bldg. »
3:45 p.m.
Paediatrics Seminar
Effect of Alcohol and Drugs on Fetal Development.
Prof. Ragnar Olegard. Prof, of Paediatrics, U of
Goteberg, Sweden. Refreshments provided.
Room D308, Shaughnessy Hospital, 4500 Oak St.
12 p.m. (noon) *
Mech 598 Seminar
Directional Wave Effects on Offshore Structures.
Dr. M. Isaacson, Civil Eng. For information call 228-
4350. Room 1215, CEME Bldg. 3:30 p.m.
Dow Distinguished Lecturer
Creativity and Innovation.   Dr. G. Graham Allan,
Dept. of Chemical Eng. & College of Forest Re-     T
sources, U. of Washington.   For information call    »
224-8560. Room 101, Pulp & Paper Centre, 2385
East Mall. 2:00 p.m.
Cancer Seminar
Computerized Literature Searches and Data
Bases. Mr. David Noble, CCABC. For information
call 877-6010. Lecture Theatre, B.C. Cancer Foundation, 601 W. 10th Avenue. 12-1p.m. I
TUESDAY, NOV. 1
Oceanography Seminar
What Controls Plankton Production in Sub-Polar
Open Seas? Dr. B.W. Frost, School of Oceanography, U of Washington. For additional information
call S.E. Calvert at 228-5210. Room 1465, Bio
Sciences Bldg. 3:30 p.m.
Cecil & Ida Green Visiting
Professorships - History Seminar
The Literary Marketplace: Bookselling in 18th
Century France. Prof. Robert Darnton, History,
Princeton. For information call 228-5674. Penthouse, Buchanan Brdg. 3:30 p.m.
Orientation Evening
School of Rehabilitation Medicine. Admission, Q &
A Period and Career Presentations (BCSOT &
PABC). For information call 228-7771. Lecture Hall
#6. IRC Bldg   7 p.m.
Botany Seminar
Variation in Tidal Marsh Vegetation Along BC's
Coast. Dr. Gary Bradfield, Botany Dept, UBC. For
information call 228-2133 Room 2000 Biological
Sciences Bldg.  12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Seminar
Platinum Metal Emissions of the Hawaiian Volcanoes. Prof. William H. Zoller. Dept. of Chemistry, U.
of Washington. For information call 228-3299.
Refreshments served. Room 250, Chemistry Bldg.
1 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 2J
Pharmacology Seminar
Pharmacology of Leukotrienes . Dr. Ford-Hutchin-
son, Sr. Dir. Pharmacology, Merck Frosst, Montreal.
For information call 228-2575. Basic Medical Sciences "C" Bldg.  12 noon.
Ecology Seminar
Seasonal Food Limitation of Detritivorous Stream
Insects. John S. Richardson, Zoology, UBC. For
information call 228-4329. Room 2000 Biological
Sciences Bldg. 4:30 p.m.
Noon-Hour Recital
Steven Dann, viola; Rena Sharon, piano. Admission $2.00. For information call 228-3113. Recital
Hall, Music Bldg.  12:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOV. 3
Music Recital
Honor Band Festival Concert. Martin Berinbaum,
Director. Free Admission. For information call 228-
3113. Old Auditorium. 2:30 p.m.
Cecil & Ida Green
Visiting Professorships
General Lecture
Forgotten & Forbidden Best-Sellers of Prerevolu-
tionary France. Prof. Robert Darnton, History, Princeton. For information call 228-5675. RoomA-102,
Buchanan Bldg. 12:30 p.m.
Physics Colloquium
Status of Superstring Theory. P. Freund, U of
Chicago. Forinformationcall228-3853. Room201,
Hennings Bldg. 4 p.m.
Continued on Page 5

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