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UBC Reports Nov 14, 1984

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Array Acknowledging receipt of Great Trekker award by students of UBC is Dr. Cecil Green, who went on from this University to become a leader in
geophysical exploration and a brilliant engineer. He was a founding member of Texas Instruments. Cecil and Ida Green (co-recipient of the
award with her husband) have endowed a visiting professorship program bearing their names, have given Cecil Green Park to the University,
and have helped in many other ways. Head table guests in the photo are Dean Emeritus of Agriculture Blythe Eagles and Betty Clyne, wife of
former chancellor f. V. Clyne.
President Pedersen imposes hiring freeze
A University-wide hiring freeze has been
imposed by President George Pedersen,
and it will remain in force at least until next
Jan. 21.
The freeze order came just three days
after Dr. Pedersen notified the University
community last week that the administration
was attempting to cope with an expected
shortfall of $6.6 million in the fiscal year
beginning next April 1.
"Until there is a means of dealing with
this shortfall," the president said,
"additional or replacement ongoing salary
commitments on the operating budget
must not be made. Therefore, I am
imposing a hiring freeze immediately for
both faculty and non-faculty positions.
"This freeze will remain in force at least
until Jan. 21, 1985, when the situation will
be reviewed in light of the circumstances
prevailing at that time."
Dr. Pedersen said the only exemptions
would be vacancies arising from involuntary
severance — denial of tenure or of
reappointment in the faculty area, or for
termination of appointment for unsatisfactory
performance in the non-faculty area.
He added that positions funded from
sponsored research or ancillary enterprise
funds (non-University operating budget
sources) would also be exempt
In explaining the freeze, the president
said:
"I have taken this action because it is
quite clear that in coming to grips with the
anticipated shortfall, we will have no
alternative but to reduce substantially the
wage and salary component of our budget,
a reduction which is most likely to include,
among other things, the discontinuance of
academic programs and, possibly, entire
units."
Three co-op students honored
Three students involved in UBC's
Co-operative Education Program were
honored for outstanding technical papers at
a recent meeting of the UBC Co-op
Employers' Council.
Fourth-year Agricultural Sciences students
Jill Ranson and Mary Margaret Gaye
received awards for technical papers
written during their summer placements
with UBC's Department of Food Science
and Agriculture Canada, respectively. The
third winner, second-year Engineering
Physics student Samir Shah, was employed
by UBC Physics professor Dr. Rudy
Haering on a lithium-pyrite battery project
The awards were given this year by H.A.
Simons (International), Du Pont Canada
and Ebco Industries Ltd.
UBC's Co-operative Education Program,
which is open to students in the Faculties of
Applied Science and Agricultural Sciences,
placed 82 students in jobs related to their
field of study this summer. Students must
complete three consecutive work placements
to fufill their commitment to the program
and a technical report is required each
summer. In 1984, 60 employers and 44
faculty advisors were involved in the
program.
Energy
program
will cut
costs
Work on the first phase of a three-phase
program of energy conservation that could
save the University more than $2 million a
year has been started at UBC.
The program was designed by Neptune
Dynamics, a Vancouver firm of energy
consultants. A report by Neptune projects
immediate savings of $300,000, additional
medium-term savings of at least $600,000
within three years, and long-term savings
of another $1 million or more a year.
"We are going ahead now with the
short-term program," said Bruce Gellatly,
vice-president Finance, "since in the first
year alone we expect to save more than we
spend. No decisions have been made yet
on phases two and three.
The Neptune report notes that energy
consumption at UBC is far higher than the
Canadian average for universities, with a
consumption rate almost double that of the
University of Victoria.
"If UBC could get to the UVic rate, then
the annual cost savings would be closer to
$4 million," Neptune says.
Implementing the short-term program
will cost the University $265,000, less than
the first year's savings. Medium-term
ouday would be $1.2 million, recoverable
with two years of savings.
Proposals under the short-term plan
include:
• Lowering the pressure and temperature
of the superheated steam that is now
piped out of the powerhouse. This would
also reduce the amount of heat lost from
underground steam pipes.
• Connecting more buildings to a low
pressure steam supply, so that excess steam
would not be wasted by venting. This
could include the Sedgewick Library, Scarfe,
Ponderosa and Mathematics. The report
notes that some of the necessary steam
piping is already in place.
• Seeking a partial exemption for UBC
from the 7-per-cent B.C. sales tax that is
levied on gas and electricity. Consumption
for residential-purposes is not taxed, and
student residences may qualify for this
exemption.
Mr. Gellady said discussions with
Neptune on aspects of the longer term
proposals would continue. He <aid the
report contained many excellent suggestions,
some highly technical and some extremely
easy to follow.
As an example of the latter, he cited
Neptune's plan for the Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre.
Under this proposal, heat given off by
the refrigeration system used to make the
ice for the three skating rinks would be
recovered and piped into the water system.
The hot water would then be used by the
Zamboni ice-cleaning machines. The
expected saving would be $14,000 a year. UBC Reports, November 14, 1984
Financial Services reorganized
Financial Services, the department
responsible for recording and reporting
the financial affairs of the University, has
made a number of organizational changes.
The changes include an expansion of the
section that services research and trust
funds, some shift in responsibilities within
the department and an increased
emphasis on new systems design.
Through the reorganization the
research/trust section will increase by two
staff members, one of whom will be a
professional accountant with responsibility
for the day-to-day supervision of the
section. UBC associate vice-president and
treasurer Allen Baxter said expansion in
this area was critical in order to meet the
growing need for services to faculty
members, federal, provincial and private
granting agencies, other governmental
organizations and UBC's Office of Research
Services.
"Over the past 10 years the growth in
research grants and contracts has been
three-fold while the number of staff
members in that section has remained
static," he said. "During this time the
amount of administrative work involved in
contract research has increased as well."
Enquiries about daily operations in the
section can be directed to assistant
accountant Winnie Wong at local 4193.
Research/trust accounting will report to
assistant treasurer Craig Smith.
In addition, Mr. Smith will assume overall
responsibility for the payroll organization,
recognizing the significant work necessary
in developing and implementing the new
personnel/payroll system, Mr. Baxter added.
Daily operations and supervision of
payroll remain under the direction of Bob
Seeley (6355).
Manager of accounting services, Paul
Bullen, will continue to be responsible for
the areas of general accounting, pre-audit,
endowment, student aid and accounts
payable. The daily administration of each of
these areas is under the direction of:
* Doug Chan (6779) - general
accounting, fees and fines collection, room
and board rents, accounts receivable;
♦Jim Prasad (2321) - pre-audit
processing of requisitions, bank reconciliations;
* Jill Darling (2564) — processing and
payment of invoices from suppliers;
* Pe8gy Guy (2702) — endowment and
student aid.
The department is also placing greater
emphasis on new systems design and has
recently added Steve Ryan, a Certified
General Accountant with 20 years of
computer and systems experience in
industry, to develop this area. The first
priority is to develop a new general ledger
system that will be capable of producing
timely financial reports, monitoring
commitments (money for salaries, supplies
and expenses that is committed for
specific purposes but has not yet been
spent), allow departments to make on-line
enquiries and provide flexible ledger
information geared to the varying needs of
departments and administrative offices on
campus.
Members of the University community
are invited to direct ideas and suggestions
in this area to Mr. Ryan at local 6883.
Earlier this year the budget planning
function of the department was moved to
the Office of Budget, Planning and
Systems Management headed by Dr. John
Chase, but the responsibility for budget
control and monitoring of expenditures
which exceed budgeted amounts remains
with Financial Services. Ron Mercer (2554)
can answer queries in these areas.
Mr. Baxter added that the sections in
Financial Services which deal with
investment management, insurance and
benefits administration are currendy being
reviewed as well.
Commerce parents enjoy visit
The first parent information meeting
organized by any UBC faculty took place
last week when mothers and fathers of
first-year Commerce students visited the
University.
The enthusiasm of the parents was
evident before the event started. Scheduled
to begin at 7:30 p.m., parents began filling
the hall at 6:50 p.m. while organizers were
still hanging up posters.
Dean Peter Lusztig described the faculty
to the parents, telling them of the
academic challenges students would have to
meet and which years of the program
students normally find most difficult.
The parents applauded spontaneously
two or three times during a question period
that followed these remarks.
The meeting was the brain-child of Mrs.
Catherine Vertesi, director of the
undergraduate program. She said its
purpose was to inform parents about the
academic options available to students in
the faculty and the career choices they
would have to make.
Organizers also included Mr. Gerald
Smeltzer and Dr. Dean Uyeno, assistant
directors of the undergraduate program,
and members of the Commerce Undergraduate Society.
Dean Lusztig said one potential
problem facing the organizers was that some
students might not have wanted their
parents invited.
"Some students could have taken the
view that as adults they thought it improper
for their parents to be involved," he said.
"So we left it up to the students. They either
addressed a letter of invitation to their
parents or they didn't.
"But as it turned out, the meeting was a
great success, with about 150 parents
attending.
"I wouldn't hesitate to do it on an annual
basis."
Grants cut need for animals
Grants totalling $22,500 have been
awarded to four UBC scientists to find
ways of reducing or eliminating the need
for laboratory animals.
The projects affect the use of animals in
medical teaching and research, and the
use of animals in routine tests for toxins
harmful to humans carried out in
government laboratories.
Money for the research comes from an
initiative of the B.C. SPCA. The SPCA has
donated $10,000 for each of the last two
years towards this type of research and the
University has matched it
Public support for more research can be
made through tax-deductible donations to
the B.C. SPCA-UBC Fund for Alternatives
to Animals in Research, Office of Research
Services, University of B.C., 2075 Wesbrook
Mall, Vancouver, V6T 1W5.
Dr. John Ledsome, head of UBC's
physiology department, aims at developing
a microcomputer simulation to mimic the
UBC employee Lome Lamont and his wife, Audrey, were guests of President Pedersen last
week at a luncheon honoring Lome for his quick action which saved the life of Percy
Mikkelsen, a fellow employee at UBC's Oyster River Research Farm near Campbell River.
Lamont revived his colleague using CPR techniques he learned as a volunteer fireman at
Oyster River.
complex responses of the body in
life-threatening situations. It is to replace
anesthetized animals used to teach
medical and other senior students the
variety of body responses when heart or
breathing action is interrupted.
The amount of his grant is $4,000. The
grant is an extension of a project that
received $2,100 from the SPCA fund last
year.
Another project continued from last
year when it received $8,500 involves
teaching a technique called tissue culture.
Tissue culture allows researchers to carry
out experiments on animals or human
cells grown in the laboratory. Last year the
technique was taught to honors students.
The project, under Dr. David Mathers of the
physiology department, received a further
$3,500 this year and the course is open to
anyone at the University.
Two new projects are using two different
methods to try to eliminate the use of
mice now used to test whether shellfish
have been contaminated by red tide or
other toxins.
Red tide is a naturally-occurring and
extremely dangerous toxin present on the
B.C. coast and elsewhere in the world.
B.C. shellfish are constantly monitored for
the disease using large numbers of mice.
Dr. David Kitts will receive $7,000 and Dr.
Phil Townsley $8,000 to try to find an
alternative method of testing for the disease.
Both are in UBC's agricultural sciences
faculty.
Last year Drs. Keith M. McErlane and
James M. Orr of UBC's pharmaceutical
sciences faculty received $9,400 to develop
a chemical analysis method to determine
the purity of a hormone currently
analysed using laboratory animals. They are
continuing their work.
Dr. Peter Larkin, associate vice-president
for research and chairman of the
University's committee on the use of
animals in research, said work to find
alternatives to animals is extremely valuable.
"There are scientific and economic
reasons as well as humanitarian'considerations
behind this research," Dr. Larkin said.
"Methods that substitute animals are often
cheaper and faster. And the results are
frequendy as good, and sometimes better,
than can be obtained with the use of
animals. That is what this research hopes to
achieve."
Ken Andrews
Ken Andrews
says he'll
return soon
Ken Andrews says he's on the road to
recovery following triple bypass heart
surgery in September and hopes to be back
on the job at UBC soon.
Mr. Andrews, an electrician in Physical
Plant and president of Local 116 of the
Canadian Union of Public Employees
(CUPE) since 1971, spoke with UBC
Reports from his home in Richmond last
week.
He said he has been "surprised, grateful
and really, really pleased" with the support
he has received from friends on campus.
He's had more than a hundred cards and
many, many flowers and omeYgi'fts.'*"*"3^
"All of this has really helped a loV'he
said. "You can tell everybody I'm definitely
on the road to recovery and hope to
retunvsoon."
Apart from his long career as CUPE
president, Mr. Andrews also has the
distinction of having been the first
non-academic elected member of the UBC
Board of Governors. He served two terms,
six years, on the Board.
Mr. Andrews has also been an elected
member of the Board of Directors of the
UBC Staff Pension Plan for many years.
U.S. cellist
to conduct
free classes
American cellist George Neikrug will
conduct free public master classes for local
musicians and perform at a public conceit
when he visits the University of B.C. later
this month.
Neikrug, who has made solo appearances
with orchestras conducted by Leonard
Bernstein, Bruno Walter and Alfred
Wallenstein, will give a concert of music by
Brahms and Kodaly at 8 p.m. on Nov. 24
in the Recital Hall of the Music Building.
He will be accompanied by pianist Robert
Rogers of the UBC music department
Tickets ($6, $3 for students) are available
from the UBC music department (228-3113)
or at Ward Music Co. (682-5288).
Neikrug will conduct master classes on
Nov. 22 from 3:30 to 5:30 p.m. and on
Nov. 23 and 26 from 1:30 to 330 p.m., also
in the Recital Hall of the UBC Music
Building. Spectators are welcome at all
sessions.
Neikrug, who now teaches at Boston
University, has also performed as a soloist
in most major European centres. He has
been widely acclajmed for his presentation
of all six Bach suites in a single recital, a feat
that he has performed on 10 occasions. UBC Reports, November 14, 1984
(IDC
CalcndaR
CALENDAR DEADLINES
For events in the weeks of Dec. 2 and 9. material
must be submitted not later than 4 p.m. on
Thursday, Nov. 22. Send notices to Community
Relations, 6328 Memorial Road (Old
Administration Building). For further information
call 228-3131.
The Vancouver Institute.
Saturday, Nov. 24
The Other Orwell:
Getting Away from 1984.
Dr. Bernard Crick,
Politics, University of
London.
Lecture Hall 2, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre, 8:15 p.m. Free admission.
SUNDAY, NOV. 18
Lutheran Campus Ministry.
Ray Schultz will discuss the close involvement of
theology in politics within a Latin American
context Lutheran Campus Centre. 7 p.m.
MONDAY, NOV. 19
History of Medicine Lecture.
Ethics of Experimentation on Humans. Dr. W.A.
Webber, Medicine, UBC. Room 80B, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 850 a.m.
Pathology Seminar.
Regulatory Factors in Hematopoiesis. Prof. Peter
Galbraith, Medicine, Queens University.
Pathology Seminar Room, Heather Pavilion,
VGH. 9 a.m.
Mahlzeit.
An opportunity to hear and speak German.
Everyone welcome. International House.
1230 p.m.
Plant Science Seminar.
Photorespiratory Characteristics in a Set of
Tobacco Mutants. Prof. Ryuichi, Agriculture,
University of Tokyo. Room 342, MacMillan
Building. 1230 p.m.
Leisure and Cultural Studies Seminar.
The Contradictions of Pop: Culture and
Commerce in Popular Music. Martin Laba,
Communication Studies, SFU. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 330 p.m.
Hydrology Lecture.
Ground Water Pollution and Its Remediation. Dr.
Richard Jackson, Environment Canada, Ottawa.
Lecture Hall 6, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre. 330 p.m.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
Regenerators for Process Plant. A. Riahi. Room
1202, Civil and Mechanical Engineering
Building. 330 p.m.
Urban Land Economics Workshop.
Natural Resource Inputs to a Spatial System.
Edwin von Boventer, University of Munich.
Penthouse, Angus Building. 330 p.m.
The Pedersen Exchange.
An opportunity for members of the University
community to meet with President George
Pedersen to discuss matters of cqncern. Persons
wishing to meet with the president should
identify themselves to the receptionist in the
Librarian's office, immediately to the left of the
main entrance to the Main Library. 3:30 to
5 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Reaction-Diffusion: Problems of Correlating
Theory With F.xperiment in Developmental
Biology. Prof. Lionel G. Harrison, Chemistry,
UBC. Room 229, Mathematics Building.
3:45 p.m.
Biochemical Discussion Group
Seminar.
Genes Controlling Chromosomes in Yeast-
Molecular and Genetic Analysis. Dr. Rochelle
Esposito, Biology, University of Chicago.
Lecture Hall 4, Woodward Instructional
Resources Centre. 4 p.m.
Zoology "Physiology Group" Seminar.
Developmental Gene Switches Are Controlled
by Physiological Influences. Dr. W.F.H.M.
Mommaerts, Physiology, U.C.L.A. School of
Medicine. Room 2449, Biological Sciences
Building. 4:30 p.m.
Immunology Seminar.
Positive and Negative Signals that Regulate
Granulopoiesis — Involvement of Intermediary
Cells. Dr. Peter Galbraith, chairman, Hematology,
Queen's University. Music Room, Faculty Club.
8 p.m.
TUESDAY, NOV. 20
Botany Seminar.
Vegetational and Environmental History of the
Sahara. J. Ritchie, Scarborough College,
University of Toronto. Room 3219, Biological
Sciences Building. 1230 p.m.
Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar.
Mechanism of Action of Intestinal Secretagogues.
Dr. Paul Bass, Centre for Health Sciences,
University of Wisconsin. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Lecture.
Spouted Beds. Prof. Norman Epstein, Chemical
Engineering, UBC. Room 250, Chemistry
Building. 1 p.m.
Statisics Workshop.
Principal Curves and Surfaces. Trevor Hastie,
Stanford University. Room 101, Ponderosa Annex
C. 3:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Aspects of Vancouver Island Continental Shelf
Sedimentation. Dr. Brian Bomhokl, Pacific
Geoscience Centre, Sidney, B.C. Room 1465,
Biological Sciences Building. 330 p.m.
Neuroscience Discussion Group
Seminar.
MPTP-Induced Parkinsonism in Human and
Non-Human Primates. Dr. J. William Langston,
Neurology, Stanford University. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
430 p.m.
CUSO Presentation.
Rural Development m Bangladesh. A film and
presentation by Gilles Latour, director of
Overseas Programs of the Unitarian Service
Committee. Hosted by CUSO-UBC. Free
admission. Upper Lounge, International House.
730 p.m.
Social Work Colloquium.
Social Work and the Nuclear Threat Susan
Hargraves, Psychology, SFU, speaks on her
research on Burnaby childrens' perceptions of
the nuclear threat Wilson Head, visiting
professor of Social Work, University of Victoria,
and long-time peace activist speaks on action
strategies for social workers. Free admission.
Lecture hall A, School of Social Work. 7:30 p.m.
Student symphony praised
UBC's 70-member student symphony
orchestra earned high praise from one of
the world's leading experts on the music of
Finnish composer Jan Sibelius.
Prof. Erik Tawaststjerna of the University
of Helsinki, who was at UBC to lecture in
the music department, was so deeply moved
by a performance of Sibelius' Symphony
No. 2 at a campus concert on Oct. 19 that he
publicly congratulated the orchestra and
its conductor, Gerald Stanick, when the
concert ended.
He told the orchestra it had played "with
the enthusiasm of students but with the
skill of professionals." He said he had been
"deeply moved" by the "magnificent
performance" of the Sibelius symphony and
had been particularly impressed with the
orchestra's conductor:
Mr. Stanick, the orchestra's conductor, is
also a part-time instructor of violin and
viola in the music department A
Canadian who was raised in Vancouver, he
was a member of the noted Fine Arts
Quartet in the early 1960's, when it was
rated as one of the world's top three
chamber music groups by Time magazine.
He is a former conductor of the Ars
Musica Orchestra in Milwaukee and has
taught at the Universities of Western
Ontario, Calgary, Wisconsin, Cincinatti and
Washington.
The community will again be able to hear
the symphony orchestra when it performs
two concerts under Stanick later this month
in the Recital Hall of the Music Building.
The program on Nov. 29 at 12:30 p.m.
and on Nov. 30 at 8:30 p.m. includes
Beethoven's Prometheus Overture,
Mendelsohn's fourth symphony (The
Italian), and Rimsky-KorsakofFs Capriccio
Espagnol. Admission to the concerts is free.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 21
Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Seminar.
Role of Cyclic Nucleotides in Adrenergic-
Cholinergic Interactions in the Heart Dr. Cathy
MacLeod, Pharmaceutical Sciences, UBC. Room
317, Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
12 noon.
Poetry Reading.
Reading by Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst
whose volume The Beauty of the Weapons was
recently nominated tor the Governor-General's
Award. Sponsored by the Canada Council.
Penthouse, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Noon-Hour Concert.
Music of Hetu, Caselfa and Jolivet Jane Martin,
flute. Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Forestry Seminar.
Chemotaxconomy of Western Conifers. Dr. E.
von Rudloff, Principal Research Officer, NRC.
(retired). Room 166, MacMillan Building.
1230 p.m.
Committee on Lectures.
The Archeology of Greece. Prof. Anthony
Snodgrass, Classical Archaeology, Cambridge
University. Room 105, Lasserre Building.
1230 p.m.
Geography CoUoquium.
John Ruskin and Victorian and Early Modern
Landscape Aesthetics. Edward Gibson, Geography,
SFU. Room 201, Geography Building. 3:30 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology Seminar.
Lampreys — The Most Primitive and Advanced
of Vertebrates. Dr. Richard Beamish, Pacific
Biological Laboratory, Nanaimo. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building. 430 p.m.
Indfortnation Science Lecture.
Use of Artificial Intelligence in the Representation
of Spacial Information. Dr. S. William Havens,
Computer Science, UBC. Conference Room, B.C.
Research. 730 p.m.
Dorothy Somerset Studio.
Opening night of Timothy Findlay's play Can
You See Me Yet*Shows at 8 p.m. Nov. 21 to 23 and
at 5 and 830 p.m. on Nov. 24. Ticket
information at 228-2678. Dorothy Somerset
Studio. 8 p.m.
Archaeological Institute Lecture.
Myth and Legend in Eariy Greek Art Prof.
Anthony Snodgrass, Classical Archaeology,
Cambridge University. Theatre, Museum of
Anthropology. 8 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOV. 22
Rare Art Presentation.
36 exquisitely colored stone lithographs. An
historical documentation of decorative motifs:
Primitive to Baroque. Hand drawn and printed in
Impressionist Paris (text in French, 1875). Some
available for purchase. Ralf Kelman will be in
attendance. 4th floor foyer, Lasserre Building.
One day only. 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.
UBC Choral Union.
Music of Gabrieli, Brahms and Vaughan-
Williams. Jeffrey Campbell, director. Recital
Hall, Music Building. 1230 p.m.
Science, Technology and Society
Studies Meeting.
Committee on Science, Technology and Society
Studies. D. Fisher, Education, and S. Straker,
History. Papers and reports on conference of
Society for Social Studies of Science. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 1230 p.m.
History Presentation.
The White Rose,"documentary recreation of
student resistance to the Nazis, third of three
special features on the Nazi experience in
Europe, 1933-1945 presented by the Department
of History. Room A205, Buchanan Building.
12:30 p.m.
Human Nutrition Lecture.
Iron Nutrition: A. Bioavailability; B. Fortification
of Foods; and C. The Case of the Super Blood
Donor. Dr. Elaine Monson, Human Nutrition,
Dietetics and Foods, University of Washington,
Seattle. Room 60, Family and Nutritional
Sciences. 1230 p.m.
Geology Colloquium.
Vector Representation and Manipulation of
Optical Properties of Minerals. Dr. Jim Nicholls,
University of Calgary. Room 330A, Geological
Sciences Building. 12:30 p.m.
Community and Regional Planning
Lecture.
Acid Rain: A Transboundary Issue. Dr. John H.
Baldwin, director of Environmental Studies,
School of Planning, Public Policy and
Management, University of Oregon. Room 102,
Lasserre Building. 12:30 pym.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
Muon Spin Relaxation in Magnetic
Superconductors. David Noakes, TRIUMF, UBC.
Room 318, Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
English Colloquium.
Twentieth-Century Composers Make Hamlet
(Hamlet) Speak. Dr. Reginald Ingram. Penthouse,
Buchanan Building. 3:30 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology Seminar.
The Role of Aluminum in Acidifying Stream
Ecosystems: An Experimental Field Study. David
Bernard, Animal Resource Ecology, UBC.
Room 101, Ponderosa Annex C. 3:30 p.m.
Physics Colloquium.
Excited Cooper Pair States in Superfluid    He.
William Halperin, Physics, Northwestern
University. Room 201, Hennings Building. 4 p.m.
SUB Films.
The Dresser. Continues until Nov. 25 with shows at
7 p.m. on Thursday and Sunday, 7 and 9:30
p.m. on Friday and Saturday. Auditorium,
Student Union Building. 7 p.m.
UBC Wind Symphony.
Music of Gould and Cowell. Martin Berinbaum,
director. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 23
UBC Wind Symphony.
Music of Gould and Cowell. Martin Berinbaum,
director. Recital Hall, Music Building.
12:30 p.m.
Forum/Discussion.
Daughters of Immigrant Families. June Lythgoe,
director. Office for Women Students, will lead a
discussion on daughters of immigrant families.
Details at 228-2415. Room 223, Brock Hall.
12:30 p.m.
Community and Regional Planning
Lecture.
The Environmental Future: From Ecotopia to
Megatrends. Dr. John H. Baldwin, director of
Environmental Studies, School of Planning,
Public Policy and Management University of
Oregon. Room 102, Lasserre Building.
12:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Treasure Your Exceptions. Dr. J.M. Connor,
University of Glasgow, Scotland. Parentcraft
Room, Grace Hospital. 1 p.m.  .
Geology Colloquium.
Problems in Magma Transport Dr. Jim Nicholls,
University of Calgary. Room 330A, Geological
Sciences Building. 330 p.m.
Linguistics Colloquium.
Word Order Change: Typology versus
Reconstruction. Prof. Gary Holland, University
of California, Berkeley. Room D224, Buchanan
Building. 330 p.m.
Wrestling.
UBC vs. the University of Calgary. Gym E,
Osborne Centre. 5-9 p.m.
Women's Basketball.
Canada West Classic. Games on Friday at 6 and 8
p.m., Saturday at 4, 6 and 8 p.m. and on Sunday
at 10 a.m. and 12 and 2 p.m. War Memorial Gym.
Hockey.
UBC vs. the University of Alberta. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre. 730 p.m.
Ethnic Studies Lecture.
George Faludy, Hungarian writer living in
Canada, will talk about his life experience and
give a reading in conjunction with Jacqueline
D'Amboise, director of UBC's Creative Writing •
literary translation program. Hebb Theatre.
8 p.m.
UBC Choral Union.
Music of Gabrieli, Brahms and Vaughan-
Williams. Jeffrey Campbell, director. Recital
Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
SATURDAY, NOV. 24
Hockey.
UBC vs. the University of Alberta. Thunderbird
Winter Sports Centre. 730 p.m.
Cello Recital.
Noted American cellist George Neikrug of
Boston University performs music of Brahms and
Kodaly, accompanied by pianist Robert Rogers
of UBC's music department Tickets $6, $3
students, available at the UBC music
department 228-3113, or at Ward Music Co.,
682-5288. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
(See Notices for information on cello master
classes by George Neikrug.)
Continued on Page 4 UBC Reports, November 14, 1984
UDC
CalcnqaR
Continued from Page 3
SUNDAY, NOV. 25
Lutheran Campus Ministry.
Chile in Review: A Canadian Perspective.
Chileans obliged to seek refuge among us tell of
the reality of life under Pinochet and of coming
to Canada to build a new home. Lutheran
Campus Centre. 7 p.m.
Early Music Recital.
Johann Sebastian Bach: The Coffee Cantata. For
ticket information, call 228-3113. Recital Hall,
Music Building. 8 p.m.
MONDAY, NOV. 26
History of Medicine Lecture.
Public Support for Health Care in B.C. Prof. R.G.
Evans, Economics, UBC. Rom 80B, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 830 a.m.
UBC Collegium Musicum.
Small Choir Music of the 15th and 16th
Centuries. John Chappell, director. Recital Hall,
Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Dal .Grauer Memorial Lecture.
Canada: The Quest for Community: The
Foundations. Eric Kierans, Canadian politician,
economist and radio commentator. Rooms
101/102, Curtis Building. 12:30 p.m.
Plant Science Seminar.
Homeostats for the Maintenance of the
Inorganic Content of Plant Cells. Dr. T. Class,
Botany, UBC. Room 342, MacMillan Building.
1230 p.m.
Urban Land Economics Workshop.
A Test of Positive Theories of Intervention: Rent
Controls in Ontario 1975. Bill Stanbury,
Commerce, UBC. Penthouse, Angus Building.
330 p.m.
The Pedersen Exchange.
An opportunity for members of the University
community to meet with President George
Pedersen to discuss matters of concern. Persons
wishing to meet with the president should
identify themselves to the receptionist in the
Librarian's office, immediately to the left of the
main entrance to the Main Library. 330 to
5 p.m.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
Dynamic Analysis of Moditied Structures. S.
Hutton. Room 1202, Civil and Mechanical
Engineering Building. 330 p.m.
CO
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Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Trench Wave Generation by Incident Rossby
Waves. Brof. lawrence A. Mysak, Mathematics,
Oceanography and IAM, UBC. Room 229,
Mathematics Building. 3:45 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
Radio Patrol of the Northern Milky Way:
Progress and Future Hori/ons. Dr. Philip C.
Gregory, Physics, UBC. Room 318. Hennings
Building. 4 p.m.
Preventive Medicine Seminar.
Practical Program Evaluation in a Community
Hospital Setting. Valerie Young, administrative
director. Medical Day Centre, Lions Gate
Hospital, North Vancouver. Room 253, Mather
Building. 4 p.m.
Biomembranes Discussion Group.
Membrane Transport and Response to a
Membrane Potential. Dr. Marcel Bally,
Biochemistry, UBC. Lecture Hall 4, Woodward
Instructional Resources Centre. 4 p.m.
Zoology "Physiology Group" Seminar.
Regulation of Body Temperature During Sleep
and Hibernation. Dr. H.C. Heller. Biological
Science, Stanford University. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Cinema 16.
Mirage. Auditorium, Student Union Building.
6:30 and 8:30 p.m.
TUESDAY, NOV. 27
Food and Fitness.
A videotape of a three-hour international
teleconference (March 30, 1984) on "Uplink to
Food and Fitness" will be shown. Details
available from Jean Promnitz, 228-5319. Room
204A, Scarfe Building. 10:30 a.m.
Botany Seminar.
Neighbor Relationships and Variations in White
Clover. R. Evans, graduate student, Botany, UBC.
Room 3219, Biological Sciences Building.
12:30 p.m.
Marketing Workshop.
The Choice of Functional Forms for Sales
Response Functions. Tae Oum, Commerce,
UBC. Penthouse, Angus Building. 12:30 p.m.
Film/Discussion.
Survivors: A film about Japanese American atomic
bomb victims. Sponsored by the Office for
Women Students and the Leon and Thea
Koerner Foundation. Rooms 106, A. B and C,
Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Lecture.
Investigations of Drug-Receptor Interactions
Using X-Ray Crystallography. Prof. Arthur
Camerman, Medicine (Neurology) and
Pharmacology, University of Washington,
Seattle. Room 250, Chemistry Building. 1 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
The Nature of Two-Layer Flow Over Topography.
Dr. Peter Baines, CSIRO, Aspendale, Australia.
Room 1465, Biological Sciences Building. 3:30
p.m.
Statistics Workshop.
Some Nonparametric Test Procedures for
Litter-Matched Survival Times. Dr. June Morita.
Room 101, Ponderosa Annex C. 3:30 p.m.
Neuroscience Discussion Group
Seminar.
Pathophysiology of Axonal Demyelination. Dr.
Austin Sumner, Neurology, University of
Pennsylvania, Philadelphia. Lecture Hall 3,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre.
430 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 28
Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Seminar.
The Role of Arginine Vasopressin the the
Central Control of Blood Pressure. K. King,
Pharmacology and Therapeutics, UBC. Room
317, Block C, Medical Sciences Building.
12 noon.
Noon-Hour Concert.
Music of Beethoven, Ravel, Schubert, Ibert and
Warlock. Paul Douglas, flute; Eric Wilson, cello;
Donald Brown, baritone; and Philip Tillotson,
piano. Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Dal Grauer Memorial Lecture.
Canada: The Quest for Community: The
Institutions. Eric Kierans, Canadian politician,
economist and radio commentator. Rooms
101/102, Curtis Building. 12:30 p.m.
Chemical Engineering Seminar.
Characterization of Liquid Fuels from Spouted
Bed Pyrolysis of Canadian Coals. K.C. Teo,
Chemical Engineering, UBC. Room 206,
Chemical Engineering Building. 2:30 p.m.
Geography CoUoquium.
Early SetUement in the Chilliwack Valley. Donna
Cook. Room 201, Geography Building.
3:30 p.m.
Geophysics Seminar.
Earthquake Studies at the Seismological
Observatory, Wellington, New Zealand. Dr.
Warwick D. Smith, Geophysics, Department of
Scientific and Industrial Research, Wellington,
New Zealand. Room 260, Geophysics and
Astronomy Building. 4 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology Seminar.
An Experimental Analysis of the Dynamics of
the Snowshoe Hare Cycle. Drs. Charles Krebs,
Tonv Sinclair and Jamie Smith, Zoology and
Animal Resource Ecology, UBC. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Cinema West.
Lolita. Auditorium, Student Union Building.
7:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, NOV. 29
Lipids and Lipoprotein Discussion
Group.
Phospholipid Transfer Protein in the Lung
Surfactant System. Dr. Roger Lumb, Biology,
Western Carolina University. Room 4210, Block
A, Medical Sciences Building. 12 noon.
UBC Symphony Orchestra.
Sibelius' Concerto for Violin in D Minor and
Other Works. Gerald Stanick, conductor, and
Joanne Opgenorth, violin soloist Recital Hall,
Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
The Direct Detection of Double Quantum
Coherence in Magnetic Resonance. Mark Legros,
UBC. Room 318, Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
Statistics Lecture.
A Prospective View of the SIMS Study on Acid
Rain. Jim Zidek, Statistics, UBC. Room-101,
Ponderosa Annex C. 3:30 p.m.
Religious Studies Colloquium.
Levi-Strauss in the Garden of Eden: Let Him In
or Throw the Blighter Out? Prof. Paul G. Mosca,
Religious Studies, UBC. Room B325, Buchanan
Building. 3:30 p.m.
Physics Colloquium.
The EMC Effect: Direct Evidence for Quarks in
Nuclei. Tony Thomas, Physics, University of
Adelaide, Australia. Room 201, Hennings
Building. 4 p.m.
SUB Films.
Merry Christmas Mr. Lautrerue. Continues until
Dec. 2 with shows at 7 p.m. on Thursday and
Sunday and at 7 and 9:30 p.m. on Friday and
Saturday. Auditorium, Student Union Building.
7 p.m.
UBC Opera Theatre.
An Evening of Opera: Music of Mozart,
Paisiello, Verdi, Puccini, Bizet and Massenet.
French Tickner, director. Old Auditorium.
8 p.m.
FRIDAY, NOV. 30
Poetry Reading.
Reading by Canadian poet Roo Borson, author of
A Sad Device, Rain,  and the just-published The
Whole Night, Coming Home. Penthouse, Buchanan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
UBC Collegium Choir.
Program TBA. John Chappell, director. Recital
Hall, Music Buidling. 12:30 p.m.
Slavonic Studies Seminar.
An Introduction to Jaroslav Seifert Nobel Prize
for Literature 1984. Dr. Peter Petro, Slavonic
Studies, UBC. Room B214, Buchanan Building.
1230 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Noonan Syndrome — The Whole Story —
Almost! Dr. David Witt Parentcraft Room, Grace
Hospital. 1 p.m.
Geology Colloquium.
Lasers and Mineral Composition. Dr. Tom
Pearce, Queens University. Room 330A,
Geological Sciences Building. 3:30 p.m.
Hockey.
UBC vs. the University of Lethbridge.
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre. 730 p.m.
UBC Symphony Orchestra.
Sibelius' Concerto for Violin in D. Minor and
other Works. Gerald Stanick, conductor, and
Joanne Opgenorth, violin soloist Recital Hall,
Music Building. 8 p.m.
Men's Basketball.
UBC vs. Vancouver Police. 8:30 p.m.
SATURDAY, DEC. 1
Hockey.
UBC vs. the University of Lethbridge.
Thunderbird Winter Sports Centre. 730 p.m.
UBC Opera Theatre.
An Evening of Opera: Music of Mozart, Paisiello,
Verdi, Puccini, Bizet and Massenet Old
Auditorium. 8 p.m.
Notices...
W.O. Mitchell coming
Writer W.O. Mitchell will be at the Bookstore this
Friday (Nov. 16) during the lunch hour to
autograph copies of his latest book, Since Daisy
Creek. On Nov. 22, cartoonist Len Norris will be
at the Bookstore to autograph copies of his latest
collection. Timothy Findlay (Not Wanted on The
Voyage) will be at Hebb Theatre at noon Nov. 26
for a reading.
Public master classes
Noted American cellist George Neikrug of Boston
University will give free master classes for cello
players on three occasions while visiting UBC. He
will be available on Nov. 22 from 330 to 530
p.m. and Nov. 23 and 26 from 130 to 330 p.m. in
the Recital Hall of the Music Building.
Spectators are welcome at all sessions.
UNESCO exhibit
An exhibit of more than 100 publications of the
United Nations Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization is on display at the UBC
Bookstore until Nov. 24.
Bookstore sale
The Annual Book Sale at the Bookstore will run
this year from Nov. 17 to Dec. 1. Opening Hours:
Weekdays from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., (open until
8:30 p.m. on Wednesdays), and Saturdays from
9:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. The book sale will include
library discards, specially-priced editions and
remainders, as well as technical and textbooks.
Special """""^rim "rlwhit_. ■
Lest We Forget — The UBC Battalion. The poignant
story of the young men who were recruited at
UBC in 1916 and formed "D" Company of the
Western Universities Battalion is displayed in
photographs and documents in the Special
Collections Division, upstairs in the Main
Library until Dec. 1. The records show "D"
Company's early days, the University's work in
soldiers' civil re-establishment and the military
career of S. Morlev Scott who enlisted as a
private in "D" Company.
Christmas market
Unusual and exciting Christmas gift items from
around the world will be offered by the Museum
of Anthropology Nov. 20 to 25, noon to 4 p.m.
Upper Lounge, Museum of Anthropology.
Statistical consulting
The Department of Statistics provides statistical
advice and assistance to faculty and graduate
students at UBC. For details, call 228-4037.
Dance Horizons
Interested students, faculty and staff are invited
to join Dance Horizons, UBC's dance ensemble.
Previous experience is not necessary. Rehearsals
Sunday, 2-4 p.m. in the SUB Ballroom, Tuesday
6:30-8 p.m. and Thursday 5-630 p.m. in the
SUB Partyroom. For more information, come to
SUB 216E or call 228-6668.
Lost and Found
Hours of operation are as follows:
Mondays - 10.30-11:20 a.m. and 1230-230
p.m.; Tuesdays — 1230-330 p.m.; Wednesdays —
1030-11:20 a.m.; 1230-130 p.m. and 1:40-2:40
p.m.; Thursdays — 1230-430 p.m.; Fridays —
9:15-10:15 am. and 1030-1130a.m.
The Lost and Found is located in Room 108 of
Brock Hall, telephone 228-5751.
Pipes and drums
Pipers and drummers among faculty, students
and staff interested in playing on campus are
asked to contact Dr. Edward Mornin, Germanic
Studies at 228-5140.
Exhibit
Vancouver School of Theology presents an
exhibition of Methodist Heritage, 1784-1984,
daily 2-4 p.m., Nov. 5-23. The exhibition will
include unique historic items pertaining to the
development of 200 years of Methodism in
England and North America.
iU«

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