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UBC Reports Oct 9, 1986

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 f
UBC
j
Volume 32 Number 16, October 9, 1986
New Antarctic
base for UBC
Engine in high gear
University of B.C. researchers will be able to use
several Argentinian bases in Antarctica under the
terms of an agreement signed by the University and
Argentina.
Prof. Peter Suedfeld, the dean of UBC's Faculty of
Graduate Studies, said the agreement, which provides
for studies involving human subjects, offers new
research opportunities to UBC faculty members in a
broad range of departments and faculties.
"In effect," he said, " we now have a laboratory
in a remote, harsh and isolated environment that will
be of interest to researchers in several social sciences
departments, including anthropology and sociology,
psychology and geography, as well as departments
such as physiology in the Faculty of Medicine."
Under the terms of the agreement, Argentina will
provide free return transportation to its Antarctic
bases from Buenos Aires as well as logistical support
for research teams.
• Lottery funds
health research
British Columbians hoping for a big win have
helped finance more than $26 million in health care
research.
That's the amount of money allocated from B.C.
Lottery proceeds since the lottery began in 1978.
The latest allocations, made through the B.C.
Health Care Research Foundation, provided more
than $1.7 million for 73 research projects in basic and
clinical research and health service research, including
32 renewals of previously funded studies.
UBC, with the only Faculties of Dentistry,
Medicine and Pharmaceutical Sciences in the province,
received more than two—thirds of the awards.
The foundation makes the awards with the assistance of national and international experts who check
proposals to avoid duplication of work done elsewhere.
The foundation encourages research into cardiovascular disease, cancer, fitness, lifestyles and mental
health. It also emphasizes projects designed to assess
health—care programs and to develop evaluation
techniques.
United Way
campaign begins
4 A  17—member UBC committee  is making an all-
out effort to increase giving to the United Way of
the Lower Mainland in 1986.
The committee, chaired by Prof. Cyril Finnegan,
acting associate vice—president, includes representatives   of  all   UBC   faculties,   the   Library,   Computing
, ^Centre,   the    three    largest    campus   unions    and   the
professional and supervisory staff.
"I   think   it's   safe   to   say
that    in    1986    we're    better
organized        and    enthusiastic
about  increasing  participation
in the United Way than any
j.   year in the past," said Byron
Hender, director of the
-*   campus  Awards   Office  and  a
member    of    the     organizing
committee.
Several members of the  committee are  taking the
United  Way  message  to  colleagues   through  personalized  letters   or  organizing  United   Way   information
meetings featuring speakers and films.
" To heighten interest in giving early to the appeal,
organizers are planning an Early Bird Draw bn Oct.
16 at 12:30 p.m. at the Cairn on the Main Mall
between   the   Chemistry   Building   and   the   Bus   Stop
! Turn to Page Two
see UNITED WAY
Last month, President Strangway released a new
document prepared under his direction by the
Community Relations Department. The document was
designed to present the university's case clearly and
concisely to the community at large, most specifically
to the B.C. government, industry and the media. The
President felt that it was timely for him to outline
UBC's strengths and concerns, in his own way.
The document has received extraordinary critical
acclaim, and we reprint here an excerpt from an
article that appeared in the Victoria Times Colonist,
Oct. 2, 1986.
"The defenders of post—secondary education in
B.C. have a new ally. He is David W. Strangway,
president of the University of British Columbia.
Strangway has issued a glossy magazine entitled
The University of British Columbia: Engine of
Recovery. This document which has been mailed to
politicians, businessmen and the media is a bold essay
in defence of the university.
UBC's president refers to the "close relationship
between the university and the government: but he
also says that his university "faces a critical point in
its development." The reasons for this critical situation are displayed in graphs, which bravely point out
the contrasts between the achievements of the
university and the simultaneous erosion of government
support.
The university  is a  "dynamic environment for the
development of fresh ideas and new technologies"	
but government grants to the universities fell by 9.7
per cent in two years, while elsewhere across Canada
and the U.S., governments were increasing significantly their contributions to universities.
In 10 years, research grants won by UBC professors  increased from about  $18 million  a year  to  over
$60 million  in  1985/86 but  average  salaries  have
fallen below those at most other Canadian universities.        Competitive    salaries,    new    equipment    and
Turn to Page Two
see ENGINE
***•*'•"- \i&
Premier  Van der
Zalm, who visited
campus
informally to
meet with
students last
week, is to meet
with President
David Strangway
soon to discuss
needs of UBC
Schools vie to come to UBC
Schools from all over the province are making
their plans now to come to UBC's March '87 Open
House.
The Open House committee is receiving calls from
as far away as Revelstoke and Williams Lake, from
school principals who can hardly wait to introduce
their students to UBC. "Many of our students are
intimidated by the size of Vancouver and of UBC,"
says Mr. John Dressier, principal of Anne Stevenson
Junior Secondary School in Williams Lake. "We
welcome the opportunity to bring students we consider potential UBC material to the campus."
Already four months into planning, Open House
'87 looks set to be a great success. Dedicated groups
around campus are working hard to put together a
strong and exciting program.
In the Faculty of Arts, many different departments
are putting on individual displays and demonstrations.
One of the most active is music, whose program
includes free music lessons, concerts on the hour
every hour, electronic studio and computer music
demonstrations.     Their  Dixieland  Jazz  Band  will  be
touring the campus, leading visitors to the music
building.
The Museum of Anthropology, always a big
attraction for visitors to campus, will be open, free of
charge, throughout the three days. Museum staff are
creating special shows and events, including multicultural music and dance performances in the Great
Hall and informal slide—talks on some of the
museum's many research projects.
The department of Creative Writing are planning
cross—province workshops for high school writers, a
festival of short plays and a reading by short story
writer Guy Vanderhaege, winner of the governor
general's award for his short story Man Descending.
Mr. Vanderhaege will be the special judge for finalists
in this year's PRISM international fiction competition.
These are just a few of the many activities and
events planned by the Faculty of Arts.
Anyone who is interested in becoming involved
with Open House event planning and activities should
get in touch with their faculty representative, or
should call Community Relations at 228-3131. ENGINE
continued from Page One
first—class libraries are essential — but provincial
operating grants to universities in B.C. have fallen
from over 6.5 per cent of provincial spending in 1972
to 2.8 per cent in 1986.
The demand for university education is increasing
— but tuition fees are among the highest in Canada
and the university must restrict enrolment.
A final section of this remarkable document is
called "Dispelling the Myths." Despite the repeated
reassurance that the university and the government
are getting along well together, the myths being dispelled  are  the  basis  of provincial  government  policy
towards the universities for the last four years at
least.
Is the demand for university education declining
because of poulation trends, as Patrick McGeer
claimed? Not at all. Is UBC over-staffed? Not by
comparison with other Canadian universities with
similar programs. Are B.C. universities well funded
on a per student basis? "Funding on a per student
basis is now the lowest in Canadian provinces, except
for Nova Scotia." Is UBC an inflexible institution
unwilling to change? Is UBC badly managed?
Rubbish.
Strangway's defence of his university is remarkable
for its contents and for its timing. It appeared just
before a provincial election.    It appeared at the same
time as the government distributed a Provincial
Report containing an amusing piece of propaganda
about post—secondary education. Provincial Report
said that universities are wonderful places, but said
nothing at all about restraint, frozen salaries, departing professors and the collapse of student financial aid
(which has dropped by 47 per cent since 1983).
Strangway's publication is not exactly a rebuttal of
the government's propaganda, but it is more honest
and more accurate."
Note: If you are interested in receiving a copy of
"Engine of Recovery", please contact the Community
Relations Department at 228-3131.
UNITED WAY
continued from Page One
coffee shop. In the event of rain, the
draw will take place at the south end
of the nearby Sedgewick Library concourse.
Entries in the draw must be
received by the Department of Financial Services by 4 p.m. on Oct. 15.
Draw prizes include tickets to a series
of music school concerts, passes to the
Museum of Anthropology, food services
vouchers and a book from the UBC
Press.
Dr. John Dennison, the education
faculty's representative on the organizing committee, urged members of the
University community to give generously to the appeal in recognition of
the many services that the United Way
of the Lower Mainland provides to the
University.
Some examples:
* Students in the School of Nursing
get valuable practical experience and
training with United Way agencies such
as the Vancouver Crisis Centre.
* Students in the Faculty of
Education are associated with a number
of UA—funded organizations, including
the Parents in Crisis Society, the
Vancouver Association for Children and
Adults with Learning Disorders and the
Society for Children and Youth of B.C.
Contributions to the appeal will fund
almost 90 organizations that provide
health services, youth leadership training and recreation and services to
families and individuals on the Lower
Mainland.
Homecoming honours Forst
Herpes victims
show compassion
The greatest fear of herpes patients
is transmitting the disease to others.
This conclusion comes from a survey
completed by 370 patients at the
Herpes Clinic at the Health Sciences
Centre Hospital at UBC.
The results were released Sept. 30
by clinic director Dr. Stephen L. Sacks
of UBC's Department of Medicine, and
Dr. Michael Koss of UBC's Department
of Family Practice, at the 26th inter-
science conference on antimicrobial
agents and chemotherapy in New
Orleans.
"Doctors should shift more attention
to less visible effects of genital herpes,"
Dr. Sacks said. "Patients are more
concerned about transmitting the
disease than for the actual discomfort
of recurring sores.
"This is particularly true of people
with frequent recurrences who are not
involved in long—term relationships.
Their fear of infecting others often
leads to depression with physical manifestations such as sleep disturbances."
Dr. Sacks said outbreaks of herpes
lesions — described by patients as
mild and uncomfortable and lasting
from six to eight days — were a
concern to only 40 per cent of patients.
But two—thirds of that group were
worried about transmitting herpes to
their partner, despite that fact that
more than 75 per cent of them had
never transmitted herpes to anyone.
Ninety per cent of pregnant women
were most concerned with transmitting
the disease to their babies during
childbirth, he said.
For the UBC grads of 1936, this
year's Homecoming Week marks their
50th year reunion. And about a third
of the 319 grads plan to visit the
university to catch up on the news and
see how the campus has changed.
They're coming from all over Canada,
the United States and even from
England.
Homecoming Week runs from Oct.
20—25 and various faculties have
organized reunions for their alumni.
The Engineering class of '46 celebrates
their 30th reunion and the Commerce
class of '76 their 10th reunion. Some
departments, such as Social Work and
Pharmacy, are planning open functions
and are inviting graduates from all
years.
Homecoming kicks off on MONDAY,
OCT. 20 with the Alumni Awards
luncheon at the Hotel Meridien where
opera singer Judith Forst will receive
the alumni award of distinction.
Students have an opportunity to "Meet
the Brass" when the Board of Governors and members of the university
administration convene in the Pit from
7:00 to  10:00 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT 21 the undergraduate societies recognize someone
who went out of their way to help
students. Recipients receive their "Just
Desserts" in a reception at Cecil Green
Park Lodge from 6:30 to 9:30.
Desserts will be provided by the
Faculty Women's Club.
Perhaps the most well—known event,
the Great Trekker dinner and presentation of the Great Trekker Award,
takes place in the SUB ballroom on
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 22. Since 1950,
this award has been presented to
alumni who have not only achieved
eminence in their field of activity and '
made a special contribution to the
community, but also demonstrated a
continued interest in UBC after graduation. Anne Stevenson is this year's
recipient for her achievements in
education.
Intramurals sponsors a re—creation
of   the    Great    Trek    on    THURSDAY,
Expo not a bust
for economy
The boom of fireworks that brings
Expo to an end will not mean a bust
for the economy, predicts Dr. Dennis
R. Capozza of UBC's Faculty of
Commerce and Business Administration.
There will be little change in real
estate markets and only a slight change
in employment, Dr. Capozza said.
Tourism will decline temporarily.
"The owner—occupied residential real
estate market will not be affected," he
said.
"Apartment vacancies at one per
cent are now abnormally low. They will
rise to their normal level of two to
three per cent."
"The high vacancy rate for offices  —
—  between  15 and 20 per cent are
high but will not change.
"No change is anticipated in retail
or industrial real estate demand."
The urban economics expert said
tourism will drop for a year or two
before regaining pre—Expo trend levels,
the normal experience in areas that
have hosted world fairs.
OCT. 23 when university teams race
along the original Trek route in the
Arts 20 Relay.
To wrap up on FRIDAY, OCT. 24,
the UBC and University of Manitoba
hockey teams meet on the ice for Blue
and Gold Night. The Homecoming
Dance follows in the SUB ballroom.
In addition special displays will run
all week. The AMS Art Gallery will
feature a show of contemporary Canadian art from the AMS Collection and
there will be an exhibition of
photographs in the SUB concourse.
For many alumni, Homecoming is an
important event on their calendar, and
for others it serves as an introductory
week to encourage grads to come back
on a more regular basis.
"Graduates can support the university in many ways, by giving money or
sharing their experiences," AMS president Simon Seshadri said.
Last year, for example, the Arts
faculty and Alumni Association sponsored "After the-B.A.", a panel discussion where graduates such as
Vancouver Sun columnist Nicole Parton
talked about their careers. Graduates -
can also act as mentors for students or
offer their services to the Alumni *
Assocation.
Last year about 1100 alumni
attended Homecoming Week events.
Many others went to reunions held
throughout    the    year. This    year,
alumni are being actively encouraged to   4
participate     in     UBC's     largest     Open
House ever, to be held March 6, 7 and
8, 1987.
The Alumni Assocation assists grads
in sponsoring events and, by using the
resources of over 40 Branch Representatives, they can contact alumni
anywhere in the world.
Rhodes Scholarships
UBC students who think they're
candidates for the Rhodes Scholarship
must submit applications for the 1987
awards by Oct. 24.
The B.C. winner of the prestigious
award will study for at least two and
possibly three years at Oxford University in England commencing next
September. Each award is worth about
10,000 British pounds a year.
Eligible candidates are preferably in
their third  or fourth year  of university
work, unmarried and between 18 and
24 years old.
Application forms are available from
the UBC Awards Office in the General
Services Administration Building or
from P.D. Fairey, 669-2611, provincial
secretary for the Rhodes Scholarship
Trust.
The Rhodes Scholar is selected by a
provincial committee after personal
interviews and on the basis of applicants' records.
GRANT  DEADLINES
NOVEMBER 1986
* Agriculture Canada (CPD)
-New Crop Development Fund [1]
* Agriculture Research Council of Alberta
-Farming for the Future [1]
* American Council of Learned Societies
-Intl. Travel Grants for Humanists [1]
* American Lung Association
-Research [1]
Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Society of Canada
-Research Fellowship [1]
* Arthritis Society: Group Grants
-Multi-Centre, Facilitation, Development [15]
* Assoc, for Canadian Studies
-Intercultural/
Interregional Enrichment [15]
* Calgary Institute for the Humanities
-Visiting Post-doctoral Fellowship [7]
* Canada Israel Fdn. Academic Exchange
-Canadian Studies Program at Hebrew
University [1]
Canadian Institute for International Peace and
Security
-Research [14]
* Canadian Veterinary Research Trust Fund
-Grants in aid of Research [30]
* Cancer Research Society Inc.
-Nutrition in Relation to Cancer [15]
* Energy, Mines and Resources Canada
-Research Agreements Programme [15]
* Hannah Institute for the History of Medicine
-Fellowship [1]
-Grants-in-aid [1]
-Scholarships [1]
Health and Welfare Canada: Welfare
-National Welfare Grant [1]
Health, Education and Welfare, U.S. Dept. of
-NIH Grants to Foreign Institutions [t]
* Kidney Foundation of Canada
-Nephrology Scholarship [1]
* Lady Davis Fellowship Trust
-Fellowships [30]
-Visiting Professorships [30]
* Lindbergh, Charles A. Fund
-Lindbergh Grant [16]
* MRC: Awards Program
-MRC Scientist Award [1]
"      MRC: Grants Program
-Maintenance Grants [1]
-Major Equipment [1]
-Operating Grants - RENEWAL [1]
-Program Grants [1]
* Muscular Dystrophy Assn. (U.S.)
-Basic Research [10]
-Clinical Research [10]
-Postdoctoral Fellowships [10]
* Muscular Dystrophy Assn. of Canada
-Research [30]
National Cancer Institute of Canada
-Cancer Research Unitorequiv. [15]
-Equipment {15]
-Equipment [15]
* National Research Council of Canada
-Research Associateships in NRC Labs [30]
North Atlantic Treaty Organization
-International Collaborative Research [30]
NSERC: Fellowships Division
-University Research Fellowship [1]
NSERC: Individual Grants
-Conference Grants [1]
-Equipment [1]
-Grants for Scientific Publications [1]
-Individual Research [1]
-Infrastructure Grants [1]
-Intermediate and High Energy Physics [1]
-Northern Supplements [1]
-Team Research [1]
-Travel Grants [1]
* NSERC: Major Equipment
-Major Equipment [1]
* Science Council of B.C.
-Research [1]
* Secretary of State: Canadian Studies
-Canadian Studies: Learning Materials [1]
* Spencer, Chris Foundation
-Foundation Grants [30]
SSHRC: Intl. Relations Division
-Travel to Int'l Scholarly Conferences [1]
SSHRC: Strategic Grants Division
-Management Science: Doctoral Completion
[15]
* Universityof British Columbia
-UBC: Killam Senior Fellowship [1]
* Von Humboldt Fdn. (W. Germany)
-Research Fellowship [1]
* Weirmann Inst, of Science
-Charles H. Revs on Career Development
Chairs [30]
* World University Services
-Awards to Foreign Nationals: Fellowships [1]
2   UBC REPORTS October 9,1986 OUTREACH
0
Family Practice Unit serves community
Tucked away behind the trees on
Fairview Avenue is a facility few people
know exists. It's the Family Practice
Teaching Unit and Community Health
Centre and for anyone in need of a
family doctor it can provide a complete
array of medical services. Whether it's
immunization shots, family counselling,
or simply a common cold, one of the
health professionals at the centre can
offer their expertise.
The Family Practice Teaching Unit
and Community Health Centre is an
integral part of the Family Practice
Department, and a major training
centre for the UBC School of Medicine.
Graduate doctors specializing in Family
practice spend several months of their
two year program working here. The
nine member Community Health Centre
staff share their varied skills and
experience with the resident doctors.
A typical day begins with rounds
and ends with a meeting where residents and staff discuss each case history and diagnosis.
"The emphasis is on whole person
medicine," says Dr. Carol Herbert, staff
physician. For example, doctors may
refer a patient who needs counselling to
Gary Grams, the staff social worker. A
parent with a small child may be
directed to Dr. Suzanne Buckley, a
part—time paediatric consultant. Adele
Jenkins, the clinic nurse, assists in the
patients care and runs the allergy
clinic. Pharmacist Penny Miller fills
prescriptions and provides drug information, and Public Health Nurse Joan
Morison can provide immunization shots
and a range of educational services.
Dr. Paul Stein is a part—time psychiatric consultant and Dr. Al Boggie and
Dr. Bill Buchan complete the team as
staff physicians.
Dr. Buchan is also co—ordinator of
the centre.
"Family practice means continuity,"
Dr. Buchan explains.
A typical family physician will see a
patient through a lifetime of medical
problems from childhood measles to
perhaps a loss of hearing in old age.
At the Community Health Centre, this
kind of continuity of health care is
maintained by the medical team of
residents and staff working together out
of the same location. Many of the
patients come from the married housing
area on campus, located very nearby.
Dr. Buchan said families often discover
the centre by chance as they are
walking by.
A new patient will notice a few
differences between the Family Practice
Teaching Unit and Community Health
Centre facility and the private practice
of a family doctor. When the patient
enters the examining room, he might
be surprised to see the camera perched
unobtrusively on the wall. It may
seem out of place for a doctor's office,
but for a teaching unit it is an
invaluable      tool. By      videotaping
patient/doctor interviews, resident
doctors have a unique opportunity to
review their technique. "They can see
themselves as others see them," Dr.
Buchan said. "Often they'll find out
some surprising things."
A one way mirror is also employed
in training, but the new patient should
not become alarmed. These instructional devices are never used without
consulting patients beforehand and
obtaining their permission.
A patient will be examined by a
resident doctor who consults with a
staff physician before deciding on
treatment. "The obvious drawback is
that not everyone likes that," Dr.
Buchan    said. "On    the    plus    side
patients have a guarantee, if the
university is involved, that our
standards are high. And because of
the slower pace of the centre, the
resident has more time to spend with
his patients. "Some people like the
residents because they take the time,"
added Dr. Buchan. "Often young
doctors try harder."
In the month of July, 665 people
came to the unit. Another 130 allergy
sufferers and would—be travellers needing immunization shots visited the
allergy clinic and immunization centre.
"For the number of doctors involved
(in this unit) that is much less (than
in a regular practice)," Dr. Buchan
said. "If we have to see a patient
every ten minutes we can't teach."
Dr. Buchan admitted it has been
four or five years since "a head count"
was done on who uses the centre's
facilities. The last statistics showed an
even split. About half the patients
were students, faculty or campus staff,
the rest came from outside the university.
The year the centre has eight first
year residents. After completing their
work at the Community Health Centre
they move on to fulfill program
requirements at other locations. But,
in the interests of providing continuity
of care,  they return to the centre  one
Routine baby check is part of clinic nurse's day
afternoon a week for the remainder of
the two years. Twelve other UBC
residents work out of the Fairmont
Family Practice Unit at Vancouver
General Hospital and the Shaughnessy
Family Practice Unit at Shaughnessy
Hospital.
The UBC Family Practice Teaching
Unit and Community Health Centre is
a relatively recent development in the
School of Medicine. There was a chil—
drens' clinic on campus in 1959, but a
division of Family Practice was not
created until ten years later. In 1971,
the first resident was enrolled in the
Family Practice program. Around the
same time, the James Mather building,
which houses the community health
centre, was organized under the auspices of Jim McCreary, then Dean of
Medicine.
According to Dr. Peter Grantham,
head of the Family Practice Department, McCreary was a strong supporter
of the idea of community health
centres.    It was a concept of combined
Ancient tool used in surgery
Dr. David Pokotylo, curator of
archaeology at the UBC Museum of
Anthropology, put his convictions on
the line earlier this year in order to
demonstrate the superiority of cutting
edges on some types of ancient stone
tools. Using not only contemporary
scalpels, but also replicas of ancient
surgical tools made from flakes of
glass—like obsidian, Pokotylo underwent
reconstructive surgery to his hands.
The UBC professor enlisted the
assitance of Len McFarlane, MOA's
technician and resident expert in the
art of reproduction of ancient artifacts,
to construct several finished scalpels
with the blades he had fashioned.
These instruments had not only to
conform to surgical specifications, but
were also required to survive the
rigorous process of sterilization.
Pokotylo underwent the surgery in
the  spring  of  1986,   and  the   success  of
the experiment the first  of its kind
in      Canada has      been      very
encouraging. Incisions made by the
obsidian microblade seemed to heal
faster and neater than those made by
the conventional steel blade. ■ Dr. Lome
Brown, who performed the surgery,
points out that the results warrant
further examination as a multitude of
factors in surgical procedure can affect
the   healing   process.       Both    Pokotylo
and Brown agree that the implications
resulting from this experiment are great
for other areas of surgery.
David Pokotylo and Len McFarlane
have joined forces on several occasions
to recreate the past. On their list of
credits is Universal Studios for whom
they produced several properties for the
feature film Iceman.
Dr. David Pokotylo and obsidian knife
services where professionals in various
medical fields would work closely out of
one location sharing information, ideas
and skills. For one reason or another
the concept never became as
widespread as its proponents might
have liked. Dr. Grantham said he
believes patients would prefer to see
their personal doctor supply all their
needs rather than a team of people.
The concept of community health
centres may have waned, but the UBC
Family Practice Teaching Unit and
Community Health Centre is very much
alive. As an outreach program into
the community providing health care
services Dr. Grantham describes the
centre as "being of considerable significance."
It also operates as a focal point for
community physicians to get in touch
with     the     university. Centre     staff
attend conferences to share their
expertise, and other physicians are
invited to the centre to find out what
the university is doing in the Family
Practice    area.
Germanic Studies
fund kick off
Two prominent members of
Vancouver's German community,
Helmut and Hugo Eppich, are spearheading a fund drive aimed at raising
$120,000 for an endowment that will
establish an annual graduate fellowship
in the Department of Germanic Studies.
The Eppich family has pledged
$50,000 to the endowment fund
campaign, which was launched at a
Sept. 22 dinner in the UBC Faculty
Club.
President David Strangway, speaking
at the dinner, expressed the University's appreciation for the involvement
of B.C.'s German—speaking community
in UBC activities.
Special guests at the dinner included
representatives from the consulates of
German federal republic, Austria and
Switzerland.
LETTERS
Are academics too busy to write?
We look forward to receiving your
views and opinions on topics of interest
to UBC readers.
Please write to The Editor, UBC
Reports, and we will print what we
can.
UBC REPORTS October 9, 1986   3 Table 1
The University of British Columbia
Statement of Changes in Unappropriated Fund Balances
For The Year Ended March 31,1986
(thousands of dollars)
General
Purpose
Operating
Specific
Purposes
Sponsored
Research
Ancillary
Enterprises
Totals
Capital
1986
1985
Revenue and other additions:
Government grants and contracts
Government of Canada
Province of British Columbia
Other governments
Foreign governments
Student fees
Bequests, donations and non government grants
Sales and Services
Income from investments
Loans
Expenses and other deductions:
Salaries—Academic
—Student service
-Staff
Benefits
Travel, field trips, moving
Library acquisitions
Operational supplies and expenses
Furniture and equipment
Utilities
Renovations and alterations
Scholarships, fellowships and bursaries
Professional fees
Cost of goods sold
Debt servicing
Building contracts
Internal cost recoveries
External cost recoveries
Change in year
Add:
Expended from prior years' appropriations
Interfund transfers
Deduct:
Appropriations for the-year
Add:
Unappropriated fund balance, beginning of year
Unappropriated fund balance, end of year
—
2,056
37,338
-
-
39,394
45,966^
170,917
4,676
5,484
—
23,590
204.667
204,434
—
64
86
—
-
150
88
—
203
1,574
—
—
1,777
1,393
39,713
282
—
—
-
39,995
36,558
—
5,442
14,842
-
2,363
22,647
24,366
794
1,184
295
36,347
-
38,620
31,054*
3,099
9,643
—
190
207
13,139
13,392*
—
—
—
300
36,837
11,967
38,127
12,267
372,656
8,532
214,523
23,550
59,619
365,783
94,534
3,478
10,650
_
108,662
109,325
5,286
2,800
7,605
-
-
15,691
13,796
61,533
2,904
15,232
10,493
143
90,305
88,077^*
161,353
9.182
33,487
10,493
143
214,658
211,198
19,699
455
2,082
1,006
2
23.244
22,597
2,383
996
3,830
—
11
7,220
7,132
4,887
339
363
—
1
5,590
4,770 p
12,119
3,728
11,378
4.378
990
32,593
29,353
4.100
2,663
8,193
481
1,773
17,210
14,898*
9.313
99
458
724
65
10.659
10,311
3,153
267
459
1,618
3,075
8,572
6,323
3,167
3,606
887
-
-
7,660
7,366
892
1,054
814
—
1,913
4,673
3.412
—
—
—
13,608
-
13,608
11,688
—
—
—
3,816
15,773
19,589
17,546
—
—
—
—
16,318
16,318
21,289*
( 1.066)
122
944
-
-
-
—  *
( 3,634)
( 1.121)
(  138)
-
-
< 4.893)
( 5.790)
216,366
21,390
62,757
36,124
40,064
376,701
362,093
( 1,843)
2,160
( 3,138)
713
( 1.937)
( 4,045)
3,690
1,898
359
4,233
6,490
7,331*
1,308
( 3,705)
1
(  216)
1.482
( 1.130)
(  371 r
1,363
( 1.545)
( 3,137)
856
3,778
1.315
10,650
( 1,319)
-
-
(  570)
( 4,000)
( 5,889)
( 6,490)
14
17.202
17,753
625
2,641
38.235
34.075 s
58
$   15,657
$   14,616
$     911
$   2,419
$  33,661
$  38,235-
MARCH 31, 1986
Report  of the  Vice—President,  Administration and Finance
The audited financial statements are
a public document. Copies of the
University's audited financial statements
have been provided to each University
Department and the University Library.
For those interested in more information than provided in these highlights,
please refer to the copy in your
department.
Table 1 describes the activities in
each of five of the six separate funds
involved in the financial life of UBC
during the 1985-86 fiscal year.
Excluded is the Student Loan and
Endowment Principal Fund. The concept of fund accounting organizes
transactions so that revenues and their
related expenses are accounted for in
separate funds in accordance with
objectives specified by donors, limitations and restrictions imposed by
sources outside the University, and
determinations made by the Board of
Governors.
GENERAL     PURPOSE     OPERATING
FUND
The revenue and expenses used in
the general operations of the University
are in this fund. The University ended
the 1985—86 fiscal year with a balance
of $58,000. There was no increase in
operating income over 1984—85 with
both years totalling $214 million.
However, Provincial grants were down
$3 million with tuition fees up by the
same amount. The distribution of
expenses was very similar to last year
with the salaries and benefits remaining
the same for both years at $181
million. Total expenses at $216 million
were up by $2 million which would
have resulted in a deficit were it not
for a reduction in the year—end
appropriations of $579 thousand, and
an inter—fund transfer of $1.3 million
from the Specific Purposes Fund
applicable to eligible operating expenses.
SPECIFIC PURPOSES FUND
The revenues and expenses used for
projects stipulated by donors, and
income earned on the Endowment
Principal Fund are included in this
fund. Trust fund revenue was $14
million and Endowment fund revenue
was $9.5 million for a total of $23.5
million. With expenses of $21.4 million
and a $3.7 million interfund transfer,
the year—end balance was reduced to
$15.7 million, $1.5 million lower than
last year.
SPONSORED RESEARCH FUND
Included are funds specifically
identified for research grants and
contracts or related activities as provided by government granting agencies,
research institutes and other public and
private agencies. Revenue decreased
from $63.1 million in 1984-85 to $59.6
million this year with reductions in all
Government of Canada agencies, particularly in N.S.E.R.C. and M.R.C.
grants. Expenses exceeded revenue
thereby reducing the research funds on
hand at year-end by $3.1 million
compared to last year.
ANCILLARY ENTERPRISES FUND T
Ancillary enterprises provide goods
and services to the University
community and are expected to operate
on a break—even basis. Included are
the Bookstore, Food Services, Student
Housing and Conferences, Oyster River
Farm and the Health Sciences Parkade—
This year the fund has been increasecr
by the addition of Parking, Athletig**^
and Tennis, UBC Press and the
Satellite     Communications. Revenue
increased by $7.1 million to $36.8
million or 24%. Expenses increased to
$36.1 million.
4   UBC REPORTS October 9,1986 port 1986-87
*
k*
Table 2
Source and Distribution of the General Purpose Operating Fund
for the Years Ended March 31,1983 to 1986
4
1986
1985
1984
1983
%
%
%
%
Source
Province of B.C.—grants
79.8
81.2
83.9
84.3
Student fees—credit
15.3
14.1
11.5
10.6
Student fees-non-credit
3.2
2.9
2.8
2.1
Income from investments
1.4
1.5
1.5
2.2
Other
.3
.3
.3
.3
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Distribution By Function
Academic and associated
academic services
73.2
72.9
73.4
73.3
Library
7.3
7.5
7.6
7.4
Student awards and
services
2.6
3.0
2.5
3.1
Administration
4.3
4.2
4.2
4.1
General
.7
.7
.6
.5
Plant
12.3
12.2
12.0
11.9
Overhead recovered on
research
(         .4 )
(        .5 )
(. .3)
(        .3
100.0
100.0
100.0
100.0
Table 5
Source and Distribution of Sponsored Research Fund
for the Year Ended March 31,1983 to 1986
Source
Government of Canada
Province of B.C.
Other governments
Total governments
Individuals, business,
foundations
Other
Distribution
Salaries and benefits
Travel and field trips
Operational supplies and
expenses
Equipment
Other
1986
62.6
9.2
2.8
1985
%
69.6
7.7
2.2
1984
%
67.9
10.0
2.3
1983
%
67.5
10.0
2.2
74.6
79.5
80.2
79.7
24.9
.5
100.0
20.1
.4
100.0
19.4
.4
100.0
19.6
.7
100.0
56.7
6.1
18.1
13.1
 6J)
100.0
56.6
5.9
17.7
13.7
 6J.
100.0
58.0
6.2
18.2
13.0
 i§
100.0
58.2
6.3
17.6
12.7
 5,2
100.0
1
Table 4
Total Sponsored Research Funding
(thousands of dollars)
1974-75
1978-79
1982-83
1983-84
1984-85
1985-86
Amount
Index
15.830
1.0
25,333
1.6
48,010
3.0
54,906
3.5
63,096
4.0
59.619
3.8
Table 3
The University of British Columbia
Summary Comparisons of Total General Purpose Operating Expenses
1982-83 to 1985-86
Salaries
Operational
Furniture
Student
Sub
Travel &
Library
Supplies &
Equipment &
Academic
Service
Staff
Total
Benefits
Total
Field Trips
Acquisitions
Expenses
Utilities
Alterations
Total
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
%
1985-86 Expense
43.7
2.5
28.4
74.6
9.1
83.7
1.1
2.3
5.2
4.3
3.4
100.0
1984-85 Expense
44.0
2.3
29.1
75.4
9.1
84.5
1.1
1.9
5.7
4.1
2.7
100.0
1983-84 Expense .
45.1
2.4
29.2
76.7
9.0
85.7
1.1
1.9
6.2
3.3
1.8
100.0
1982-83 Expense
44.4
2.3
28.2
74.9
8.3
83.2
1.2
2.0
7.9
2.9
2.8
100.0
* CAPITAL FUND
.# The capital fund consists of gifts,
grants, interest and authorized capital
borrowing received for the purpose of
acquiring capital assets including those
pertaining to ancillary enterprises.
$15.8    million     of    the     revenue     and
.», expenses are offsetting amounts which
v'   relate   to   servicing   the   debt   on   long—
fa term debenture funding for completed
buildings and other past capital projects by the Provincial government.
The loan funds of almost $12 million
were provided for housing, bookstore,
parking   and   other   ancillary   enterprise
». capital projects. The loans will be
repaid   from   future   operating   revenues
* of these agencies over the next 15 to
20 years.
COMBINED FUNDS
The total revenue and expenses of
all five funds are shown by object of
revenue     and     expense. The     total
revenue for all funds was $372.7
million, up $6.9 million, most of which
was in the Ancillary Enterprises Fund.
Total salaries and benefits were $237.9
million. All expense objects increased
over 1984—85 except building contracts
which decreased about $5 million.
Table I shows the source and
distribution of general purpose
operating funds over the past four
years. Note the decrease in the
proportion of revenue from Province
of B.C. grants. It drops from
84.8% in 1982-83 to 79.8% in
1985-86.
Table 3 shows a comparison of the
Total General Purpose Operating
Expenses by object of expense for
the four years 1982-83 to 1985-86.
Table 4 shows the change in total
Sponsored Research Funds since
1974-75.
Table 5 shows the source and
distribution of Sponsored Research
Funds. Note the decrease in the
proportion from governments and
the increase from individuals,
business and foundations.
GENERAL
During the year the staff pension
plan assets of approximately $90 million
were placed with three external money
managers. The Endowment Principal
of about $82.4 million was also placed
with an external money manager. The
Canada Trust Company was appointed
trustee for these funds.
The Pulp and Paper Centre, the
Shaughnessy Site Research Centre, and
the Fairview Crescent Housing were the
building projects completed in 1985—86.
The Campus (non—residential) Food
Services began paying utilities costs this
year. The    parking    operation    was
established as an ancillary enterprise
which requires that it operate on a
break—even   basis.        It    assumes    that
parking is a user-pay service with all
income used and retained for the
operation, maintenance, and capital
development of parking facilities. $2.5
million was borrowed from the Province
of British Columbia and expended on
improvements to B lot. The loan will
be repaid from parking operating
revenue over the next 20 years. The
paving of these lots increased the
capacity by about 1100 places. The
capital fund balance for the next
parkade was $806,000 at March 31,
1986.
The   general purpose   operating   fund
budget     details for     1986-87     will    be
included in a future issue of UBC
Reports.
s
A.B. Gellatly, Vice-President,
Administration and Finance
October 1986
UBC REPORTS October 9,1986   5 SPECIAL    REPORT
UBC's doors no joking matter
Dr. Richard Seaton of UBC's School
of Architecture jokingly describes himself as "one of the world's most
knowledgeable doormen."
However, almost a decade of
research and observation of doors and
how people use them has led Dr.
Seaton to the conclusion that doors are
not a joking matter.
Records compiled by U.S. and
Canadian government departments
concerned with consumer protection
indicate that accidents involving
ordinary doors result in between 200
and 300 deaths annually and hospital
emergency treatment for upwards of
250,000 persons. (Dr. Seaton emphasizes
that his research isn't concerned with
car doors or special types of doors such
as the all—glass door).
"These are reported accidents that
are serious enough to warrant medical
attention," Dr. Seaton emphasizes. "I
suspect the figures could be multiplied
five to ten times if less serious, unreported accidents involving doors were
taken into account."
Dr. Seaton is convinced that door
accidents, confusion and inconvenience
are largely the result of a lack of
standardization.
"There are some 5,000 door manufacturers in North America," he says,
"but they have not focussed on the
human use of doors. Most of the
emphasis has been on fire protection
and security and the aesthetic appearance of doors."
What the door user needs, he says,
is a standardized set of signals
analagous to those that have been
developed to help minimize mistakes by
car drivers. He admits, however, that
even international efforts to standardize
door signage have not been very
sucessful.
Why not label every door either
"Push" or "Pull" then?
"The problem is that both those
words in English begin with the same
two letters," says Dr. Seaton.
"Experience has shown that people
often misread the two words and do
the opposite of what's intended."
Then why not doors that open both
ways?
Double swing doors have some
notable deficiencies, Dr. Seaton says.
"They leak from the positive air-
pressure caused by air conditioning or
create drafts as the result of negative
air pressure caused by wind. And
anyone who's worked in a restaurant
knows  that   double  swinging  doors  can
Dr. Seaton in front of the music building
Seaton eyes difficult doors
UBC Reports asked Dr. Seaton to
look at a number of doors on the
campus. Here are his comments.
New metal doors on the west side of
the Geography Building.
"The people who use this building
must be midgets. The hardware for
opening this door can't be more than
three feet from the bottom of it. Very
inconvenient for entering the building,
particularly if you're carrying something.
"People leaving the building will
probably be confused about which end
of the push bar to use because it is
identical at both ends and the hinging
is   all   wrong.   For   error-free   use,   the
hinges should be located on the side of
the frame nearer to an adjacent wall
and the door should have clearly
marked push plates on its free side."
Inside the Geography Building, Dr.
Seaton came on an electrically operated
door that was clearly meant to be open
at all times but designed to close
automatically in case of fire. Someone
had put stickers on the door that read
"Fire Exit. Please keep door closed."
His comment: "Just plain loony."
Doors    to the Music Building.
"The problem here is that the
hardware on both sides of the door is
identical and looks like a push plate.
Someone entering the building might be
confused and attempt to push when
they should pull. The solution would be
a handle on the outside of the door
that would provide a clear signal to
the user that he or she had to pull."
Doors to the Main Library.
"Here's a situation where you have
an outer set of doors leading into a
vestibule where you encounter a second
set of doors leading into the library
lobby. The outer set of doors are
heavy and require more energy than is
necessary to open. The pair of outer
doors on the right open inward, which
violates the normative rule that you
enter a building by pulling the door
open. The designer was probably
thinking in terms of trying to make it
easier to enter the building. The inner
set of doors open outward with the
result that you have the potential for
accident and inconvenience.
"There's also been a lame attempt
to control entry and egress by labelling
the doors 'In' and 'Out.' But the
lettering has become shabby and
wouldn't be easily readable in any case
because it's black against the black
interior of the  library.  My  guess  would
be that there is a lot of confusion
about which of the four doors one uses
to enter and leave the building and
how one operates them."
Doors leading to Room 102 of tht.
Law Building (major classroom also
used for monthly meetings of UBC's
Senatel.
"About as irritating and inconvenient a set of doors as could be
imagined. If you have to unlock the
door and you're carrying something you
would literally have to pull it open
with the key. Then, as you pull the
door through its opening arc, the load
increases instead of decreasing or at
least remaining constant. There's a
door stop embedded in the floor that
prevents the door opening wide.
Damned inconvenient to get through if
you're carrying a heavy load. The
tension on the door could possibly be
adjusted by that screw on the closer
but likely no one is monitoring the
problem. A plain bad door from many
points of view, awkwardly designed."
cause noisy accidents."
Yet another factor that causes confusion and inconvenience is the lack of
standardization of the hardware that is
used to open and close doors and its
positioning on doors.
"The most efficient way of opening
a door is to extend your arm and push
or pull at roughly shoulder height," Dr.
Seaton says. "But the hardware on
most doors is located roughly at hip
height. This means the user has to use
more energy than necessary and if
you're burdened with books, as most
people are at UBC, hardware location
can cause additional inconvenience."
People leaving buildings are often
confused by the type of door that is
opened by a push bar. They'll often
try to open it by pushing on the
wrong end of the bar. "The manufacturers like to think that people will
look up to see the location of the door
hinge," says Dr. Seaton. "But people
simply don't do that and are often
confused and irritated by this type of
door.
"This problem could be solved with
a standardized push plate and pull
handle that would alert the user to the
appropriate place to push or pull.
Using identical hardware such as door
knobs on both sides of a door simply
isn't very informative."
Currently, Dr. Seaton is studying
B.C. Transit and the provincial ferry
system traffic—flow problems in long
passenger corridors with doors.
Dr. Seaton observes and videotapes
crowds leaving: the Sea Bus terminal
on the Vancouver waterfront (via the
long corridor over the CPR railway
tracks); and the elevated corridor at
the Tsawwassen ferry terminal (where
foot passengers disembark without
interfering with car and truck traffic).
Doors to geography (upper right) and Main library  (bottom)
6   UBC REPORTS October 9, 1986 PEOPLE
International award for English prof.
Dr.   Andrew   Parkin   of  the   English
£    department     has     been     awarded     a
prestigious Humanities Research Centre
*   fellowship   at   the   Australian   National
University   in   Canberra   in   the   June-
August period, 1987.
Dr. Parkin, who edits the Canadian
Journal of Irish Studies and is widely
known for his writing on modern
*- drama, will pursue a research project in
■ t Australia and participate in a July
conference on oriental influences on
western literature.
Dr. Sheila Egoff, professor emeritus
of librarianship,  will  be  in  Fredericton
*"   Oct.   19  to  accept  the honorary  degree
, of Doctor of Letters at the fall
congregation of the University of New
Brunswick.
Prof. Egoff, who retired from teaching duties in 1983, was one of the
founding      members      of      the      UBC
y librarianship school in 1961 and is
internationally   known   for   her   research
*- and writing on literature and library
services for young people.
* « »
Prof. Kal Holsti, former Head of the
Department  of Political Science,  is one
v of three foreign "Distinguished Guest
Speakers"   invited  to  address   the  30th
* Anniversary commemorative conference
of the Japan Association of International Relations, Tokyo, Oct. 18—19.
He joins Prof. Susan Strange, Montague
Burton Professor of International
Relations    at    the    London    School    of
■»   Economics   and   Political   Science,   and
Prof.    Huan    Xian,    Director    of    the.
Centre  for   International   Studies,   State
Council of China.
David Mattison, a graduate of UBC
programs in creative writing and
librarianship, was the recipient of an
award of merit from the Association for
w
Canadian     Studies     for     his     writing
»    activities.
In addition to publishing numerous
articles on photographic history in
journals, he published in 1985 a biographical directory of more than 475
persons   involved   in   the   photographic
y.   industry  of  B.C.  Mr.   Mattison  is  now
employed by  the provincial archives in
"    Victoria.
Another UBC graduate, Dr. Philip
Tetlock, who currently teaches at the
University of California at Berkeley, has
been named  one  of the winners  of the
American Psychological Association's
Early Career Achievement Award for
1986.
Dr. Tetlock received his bachelor
and master of arts degrees from UBC
before going on to Yale for his Ph.D.
He was awarded the Governor-
General's Gold Medal when he
graduated with his BA degree.
• • «
Karen Firis, who was awarded her
Master of Arts degree in film studies in
May, was the overall winner at the
17th Canadian Student Film Festival
held in conjunction with Montreal's
August Film Festival.
She won the $1,000 Norman
McLaren Award for her 16—minute film
entitled Fashion 99, in competition with
60 other movies submitted by students
at  12 other colleges and universities.
Dr. Joseph Belanger of the Department of Language Education in the
Faculty of Education was elected
president of the Canadian Council of
Teachers of English at the council's
annual meeting in Ottawa.
Norman Young of the Department
of Theatre was honored at the annual
Jessie Richardson Theatre Awards,
which recognize outstanding acting and
management skills. Mr. Young was the
recipient of the Vancouver Professional
Theatre Alliance Award for his contributions to the Vancouver theatre scene
over time.
* * *
Creative    writing    graduate    student
Scot Morison has taken top honours in
the     first     Alberta     Television     Script
Competition.
His half—hour drama, Follow—Up
Story, netted him a $1500 prize,
awarded by Alberta Culture and co-
sponsors ITV and CFAC TV.
In conjunction with the second and
third prize winners and runners up,
Scot participated in a script development workshop in August, where one" of
the group's script was to be polished
for co-production by ITV and CFAC.
* * *
Winona Kent, an MFA58 graduate
and former managing editor of Prism
magazine, was a prize winner in the
recent Okanagan Fiction Competition.
Her story appeared in a volume edited
by     Geoff    Hancock,     a     1975     MFA
Two members ofthe  UBC Library's catalogue records division. Mr.   } uung
Yu Ahn and Mrs.   Tong Sook  Chang,  are cataloguing more  than 2,000
Korean—language titles to be added to the Asian studies library in the
Asian Centre.  The collection, donated by the Daehan Kyokuk Insurance  Co.
of Seoul, includes books on Korean history, language and literature, and
sociology.
graduate, who was also a judge in the
competition.
Jeffrey Schaire, a 1977 MFA graduate and Prism contributor, figured
prominently in the Aug. 18 edition of
Time magazine (Page 46) that dealt
with the secret Andrew Wyeth paintings. He has worked for Harper's
magazine and was editor and designer
of a book by Izaac Singer in the same
year he won the Nobel Prize.
Three members of the University
community, all graduates of UBC, died
over the summer.
Dr. Gordon D. McGregor, a member
of the French department since 1981,
died Aug. 30 after suffering a stroke in
mid—July. He was 38.
Dr. McGregor graduated from UBC
in 1970 with double honours in French
and Theatre. He did graduate work at
Princeton University, where he was
awarded MA and PhD degrees.
Dr. J. Ranton Mcintosh, professor
emeritus of education, died May 29 at
the age of 77. He was a UBC faculty
member for 27 years from 1948 until
his retirement in 1975.
Dr. Mcintosh was director of teacher
training at UBC from 1952 to 1956,
when the provincial normal school
moved to UBC and became the Faculty
of Education. For the balance of his
career at UBC, Dr. Mcintosh served as
director of the secondary division of the
faculty.
Under the terms of his will, UBC
will receive $150,000 for "furthering the
work of the Faculty and College of
Education."
John F. McLean, who held a number
of senior administrative appointments
related to personnel, ancillary and
student services during a 31—year
career at UBC, died July 26 at the age
of 75.
Mr. McLean joined UBC in 1945
after a distinguished war career with
the Seaforth Highlanders. He won the
DSO in Italy. Initially he headed a
combined department of personnel and
student services at UBC.
"Colonel" McLean, as he was
universally known on the campus, was
named director of Personnel and
Ancillary Services in 1963. He ended
his career at UBC as director of
Personnel Analysis and Policy.
UBC Calendar
THE
INSTITUTE
VANCOUVER
Saturday, Oct. 11
Concepts of Justice. Prof.
David Braybrooke, Political
Science and Philosophy,
Dalhousie.
Saturday Oct. 18
Engineering the Future. Sir
Alan Cottrell, Master, Jesus
College Cambridge.
y      Lecture   Hall   2,   Woodward   Instructional   Resources
Centre. Free. 8:15 p.m.
*   NOTICES
Agricurl.
Curling will commence Tuesday, Oct. 14 at 5 p.m. in the
Thunderbird Curling Rink. For both experienced and
beginning curlers. Fees (Oct. through March) and the
closing banquet are $65.00. More information may be
^ obtained from A. Finlayson, 228-4707, P. Willing,
228-3240 and J. Shelford 228-6578.
Homecoming Weekend.
For the perfect Homecoming Weekend, have your
visitors stay right on campus. A comfortable one-
bedroom suite in the Walter Gage Lowrise is only $45
per night single or double occupancy. For reservations
call, 228-2963.
Pipers and Drummers.
Any pipers and drummers among faculty, students and
staff interested in practicing and playing on campus are
asked to contact Dr. Edward Mornin, Germanic Studies,
228-5140.
Computing Centre Fall Open
House.
The Computing Centre is holding an Open House on
Thursday, Oct. 9 from 12:30- 3:30 p.m. Visitors will be
able to take a self-guided tour ofthe Machine Room
and seethe mainframe computers and their peripheral
equipment. Staff members will be stationed at points
along the tour route to answer any questions. The
starting point of the tour will be the Reception Area,
Room 100, Computer Sciences Building. Notethatthis
will be the only opportunity for stu dents to seethe
Machine Room during this term. For further information
please call 228-4295.
Faculty Staff Exercise Class.
Monday, Tuesday and Thursday 12:30- 1:05 p.m.
Robert Osborne Gymnasium B East. Forfurther
information call 228-3996.
Volleyball.
Faculty and staff volleyball group meets from 12:30-
1:30 p.m. every Monday (Gymnasium A) and Wednesday
(Gymnasium B) in the Robert Osborne Centre. New or
experienced players are welcome to participate in
recreational games at anytime. For further information,
call Ken Coutts, 228-3838.
Fine Arts Gallery.
Life Jackets.  Recent paintings by Judith Lodge at the
Fine Arts Gallery until Nov. 8. Tuesday to Friday, 10 a.m.
- 5 p.m. Saturday, 12 noon - 5 p.m. Forfurther
information, call 228-4381,
Radiation Protection Courses.
The second session of the Radiation Protection Course
is scheduled for Oct. 20 - 23. The course is aimed at
UBC faculty, technicians and students who will be using
radioactive materials this year. All new users must
attend the course before ordering or handling any
radioisotope. Additional course sessions are scheduled
for the following periods: Nov. 17 - 20; Dec. 15- 18;
Jan. 19-22; Feb. 23-26; March 23-26. All sessions
will be held from 9 a.m. to noon, except those in
December and January, which will meet from 1 to 4 p.m.
To register, send a memo to Armando E. Zea, Radiation
Protection Office, G-325, Acute Care Unit, giving name,
department, supervisor's name (if applicable), office or
lab phone number and first or second choice of course
dates. Telephone applications are not allowed.
Badminton Club.
Faculty and Graduate Student Badminton Club meets
Tuesday, 8:30- 10:30 p.m. and Fridays, 7:30- 9:30 p.m.
(except Oct. 10 and 24) in Gymnasium A of the Robert
Osborne Sports Centre. Fees $15.00 per year. New
members welcome. For more information call Bernie
228-4025.
Photography Exhibit.
Pacific Rim: The Scenic Wonders of Our Living Land, by
Wah-Youk John Louis, Scenic Wonders Photography
Association.  Oct. 10 to Oct. 19.  Free. Asian Centre
Auditorium.  12 noon-5 p.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 13
Thanksgiving Day Holiday.
University Closed.
TUESDAY, OCT. 14
History Lecture.
The Netherlands and Asia: Shipping of the Dutch East
India Company. Prof. J. R. Bruijn, Leiden. RoomA102,
Buchanan Building. 12:30p.m.
Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting
Professor.
Technological Power and Social Responsibility. Sir Alan
Cottrell, Materials Science, Jesus College, Cambridge
University. Room A106, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Chemistry Seminar.
Marine Natural Products as Exploratory Leads in the
Development of Anti-Inflammatory Drugs. Dr. William
Fenical, Institute of Marine Resources, Scripps
Institution of Oceanography. Room 250, Chemistry
Building.  1 p.m.
Continued on Page Eight
UBC REPORTS October 9,1986   7 UBC Calendar
Continued from Page Seven
Oceanography Seminar.
An Accuracy Analysis of Selected Finite Difference
Models. M. Foreman, Oceanography, UBC. Room
1465, Biological Sciences. 3:30 p.m.
Metallurgical Engineering Seminar.
The Metallurgical Industry, Materials and Canada. Dr. J.
P. McGeer, Director, Alcan International Ltd., Kingston
Laboratories. Room 317, Frank Forward Building. 3:30
p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
A Gene Expression in the Human Brain. Dr. Randall
McKinnon, Script's Institute, La Jo Ma, California. Room
F167, Koerner Pavilion. 4 p.m.
Research Centre Seminar.
Metabolic Defense Mechanisms Against Hypoxia. Or.
Peter Hochachka, Zoology, UBC. Room 202, The
Research Centre, 950 West 28th Avenue. 4 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 15
Computer Show.
UBC computer suppliers display their latest wares.
Continues on Oct. 16. Information: 228-2348. Free.
Ballroom and Party Room, Student Union Building, to
a, m. -4 p.m. daily.
Pharmacology and Therapeutics
Seminar.   ++
The Ability of Mn     to Inhibit and then Potentiate
Smooth Muscle Contraction. Dr. M. C. Sutter,
Pharmacology and Therapeutics, UBC. Room 317,
Basic Medical Sciences Building, Block C. 12 noon.
Forestry Seminar.
Growth and Yield Predictions and Their Uses. Dr. Kim
Isles, MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. Room 168, MacMillan
Building. 12:30 p.m.
Noon-Hour Recital.
Eric Wilson, cello. Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30
p.m.
Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting
Professor.
Modern Structural Materials. Sir Alan Cottrell, Materials
Science, Jesus College, Cambridge University. Room
1202 Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building. 12:30
p.m.
Poetry Reading.
Reading by Canadian poet Lorna Crozier, author of
Humans and Other Beasts, Crow's Black Joy and the
recent The Garden Going On Without Us. Buchanan
Penthouse. 12:30 p.m.
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Comparative Literature
Colloquium.
A Performing Self and Its Collapse: Henry Fielding and
the History of Social Identity. Prof. Edward Hundert,
History, UBC. Buchanan Penthouse. 3:30 p.m.
Geography Colloquium.
Zoning: Economic and Policy Considerations. Prof.
Michael Goldberg, Commerce and Business
Administration, UBC. Room 201, Geogrpahy Building.
3:30 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology
Seminar.
Implicit Scaling in the Choice of Organism: On When to
Make Studies of Mice and Men. Dr. Timothy Allen,
Botany, Universityof Wisconsin. Room 2449, Biolgoical
Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
Cinema 16.
Muddy River, part of the Japanese film series. $2.00
plus a one time $1.00 membership fee. SUB Auditorium,
7 and 9:30 p.m.
Classical Music Nights.
The Graduate Student Society sponsors jazz and
classical music nights every Wednesday evening in the
Graduate Student Centre Lounge. 8:30 - 11:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. 16
Office for Women Students
Workshop.
Assertiveness for Women — Basic and Social. Provides
an introduction to basic communications skills.
Repeated on Oct. 23 and 30. Enquiries: 228-2415. Free.
Room 105A, Brock Hall. 12:30 p.m.
UBC Contemporary Players.
Stephen Chatman and Eugene Wilson, directors. Music
of Latoslawski, Retch, Fortnerand Schoenberg. Recital
Hall, Music Building. 12:30 p.m.
Office for Women Students
Workshop.
Essay Skills Workshops by Nancy Horsman. Repeated
on Oct. 23 and 30. Enquiries: 228-2415. Free. Room
B212, Buchanan Building.  12:30 p.m.
Finance Workshop.
Capital Structure and Imperfect Competition in Products
Markets.  Franklin Allen, Wharton School, Universityof
Pennsylvania. Room 419, Henry Angus Building. 1p.m.
Cecil H. and Ida Green Visiting
Professor.
Technological Olympics. Sir Alan Cottrell, Materials
Science, Jesus College, Cambridge University. IRC 6.
1:30 p.m.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
The Recirculating Cryogenic Hydrogen Maser. Martin
Hurlimann. Room 318, Hennings Building. 2:30 p.m.
Psychology Colloquium.
Experimental and Physiological Correlates of
Extraversion and Introversion. Dr. Manfred Amelang,
Psychologisties Institut Der Universitat Heidelberg.
Peter Suedfeld Lounge, Kenny Building. 4 p.m.
Asian Research Seminar.
Towards a Social Revolution in a Sri Lankan Village. Dr.
Barrie M. Morrison, Asian Studies, UBC. Seminar Room
604, Asian Centre. 4:30 p.m.
Alumni Association.
Reception and fashion show for those wishing to know
more about facilities at Cecil Green Park House. If you
plan to attend, call Carrie Holcapek, 228-3313. Cecil
Green Park House. 5-7 p.m.
Theatresports.
The Graduate Student Society sponsors Theatresports
featuring the Vancouver Theatresports League every
Thursday evening. Graduate Student admission is $4.
Bar service available. Graduate Student Centre
Ballroom. 8 p.m.-10 p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 17
History Lecture.
The Jerusalem Question in International Diplomacy.
Bernard Wasserstein, History, Brandeis University.
Room B212, Buchanan Building. 12:30 p.m.
Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar.
Cytochromes P-450: Enzyme and Substrate Radicals.
Dr. D. Dolphin, Science, UBC. IRC 3. 12:30 p.m.
Office for Women Students.
Workshop on the Imposter Syndrome by Janet Fraser,
Centre for Continuing Education. Designed for women
in graduate studies to explore the causes and
consequences of the Imposter Syndrome. Suggestions
for overcoming anxiety associated with feelings of
fraudulence will be offered. Free workshop lasts two
hours.   Room 223, Brock Hall.   12:30 p.m.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Report on International Congress of Human Genetics.
Faculty. Parentcraft Room, Grace Hospital, 4490 Oak
Street. 1 p.m.
Finance Workshop.
Contracts to Sell Information. Franklin Allen, Wharton
School, University of Pennsylvania. Penthouse, Henry
Angus Building. 3:30 p.m,
SATURDAY, OCT. 18
Health Sciences Research Day.
Health Sciences students will present the results of
research projects. Lecture halls 1, 3, 4, 5 and 8,
Woodward Instructional Resources Centre, and Room
G279, Koerner Acute Care Unit. 12:30-5:30 p.m.
Guest Artist Performance.
Works by visiting Italian composer Luciano Berio,
performed by musicians and dancers of the Musicus
Concentusof Florence, Italy. Co-sponsored by the
Italian Cultural Institute. Tickets: $7.00 adults; $4.00
students/seniors. For further information call, 228-
3113. Recital Hall, Music Building. 8 p.m.
MONDAY, OCT. 20
Cancer Research Lecture.
Site Directed Mutagenesis and the Synthesis of
Mammalian Pituitary Hormones by Bacteria. Dr. Dennis
Luck, Biochemistry, UBC. Lecture Theatre, B.C.
Cancer Research Centre, 601 West 10th Avenue. 12
noon.
Medicine Rounds.
Physiological Role of Atrial Natriuretic Factor. Dr.
Harald Sonneberg, Physiology, University of Toronto.
S168, Patrick O'Doherty Conference Room, Health
Sciences Centre Hospital. 12 noon.
Alumni Awards Luncheon.
Judith Forst will be presented with the Alumni Award of
Distinction at a luncheon and recital. Please call the
Alumni Programmes Office 228-3313 for more details.
Meridian Hotel. 12:15p.m.
Poetry Reading.
Reading by Canadian poet Robert Bringhurst, author of
The Beauty of the Weapons and the recent Pieces of
Map, Pieces of Music. Sponsored by the English
Department and the Canadian Writer' Union. Buchanan
Penthouse. 12:30 p.m.
Biochemical Discussion Group.
Mechanism of Splicing of Precursor mRNA. Dr. Phillip
A. Sharp, Director, Center for Cancer Research, MIT.
IRC 2. 3:30p.m.
Mechanical Engineering Seminar.
Sloshing Motion in Nutation Dampers and its Application
to Wind Engineering. Mr. Francois Welt, Graduate
Student, Mechanical Engineering, UBC. Room 1215,
Civil and Mechanical Engineering Building. 3:30 p.m.
Applied Mathematics Seminar.
Symmetry and Separation of Variables forPDE's.  Dr. G.
Reid, Mathematics, University of Waikato, New
Zealand.  Room 229, Mathematics Building. 3:45 p.m.
Astronomy Seminar.
Star Formation.  Dr. Richard N. Henrlksen, Physics,
Queen's University. .Room 260, Geophysics and
Astronomy Building. 4 p.m.
Physiology Seminar.
Renal Mechanism of ANF.  Dr. Harold Sonnenberg. IRC
1. 4:45 p.m.
TUESDAY, OCT. 21
Chemistry Seminar.
En2ymes in Organic Chemistry. Some Illustrative
Examples. Prof. J. Bryan Jones, Chemistry, University
of Toronto. Room 250, Chemistry Building. 1 p.m.
Metallurgical Engineering Seminar.
Mathematical Modelling of the ESR Process.  Bernardo
Hernandez, Graduate Student, Metallurgical
Engineering, UBC. Room 317, Frank Forward Building.
3:30 p.m.
Oceanography Seminar.
Damped Capillary Waves Revisited. Dr. P. H. LeBlond,
Oceanography, UBC. Room 1465, Biological Sciences
Building. 3;30 p.m.
WEDNESDAY, OCT. 22
Office Automation.
Manufacturers willshowthe latest in office automation
equipment. Information: 228-2348. Continues on Oct.
23. Free. Ballroom, Student Union Building. 10 a.m.-4
p.m. daily.
Hewitt Bostock Memorial Lecture.
Reading and Talk on Music and Poetry. Mr. Ralph
Gustafson, Canadian poet. Penthouse, Buchanan
Building. 12:30p.m.
Noon-Hour Recital.
Martin Berinbaum, trumpet, Johannes Somary, organ.
Music by Neihybel, Sommerfeldt, Hindemith, Somary,
Vaughan-Williamsand Pinkham. Recital Hall, Music
Building.  12:30 p.m.
Geography Colloquium.
Measurement and Modelling: Cornerstones of
Environmental Science. Prof. John Hay, Geography,
UBC. Room 201, Geography Building. 3:30 p.m.
Animal Resource Ecology
Seminar.
Territorial Resource Use in Fishing (TURF)and the
Management of Small Scale Fisheries: A Case Study of
Lake Titicaca in Peru. Mr. Dominique LavieM,
Community and Regional Planning, UBC. Room 2449,
Biological Sciences Building. 4:30 p.m.
THURSDAY, OCT. 23
Psychiatry Lecture.
Symptom amd Symbol in Diagnosis and Therapy. Dr.
Renaat Devisch, Social and Cultural Anthropology,
University of Leuven, Belgium. Room 2NA/B,
Psychiatric Pavilion, Health Sciences Centre Hospital. 9
a.m.
IAESTE Information.
An information meeting of the International Association
for the Exchange of Students for Technical Experience
will be held in Room 1202, Civil and Mechanical
Engineering. 12:30 p.m. For more information contact
the Co-operative Education Office, Room 213, Brock
Hall, or phone 228-3022.
Leslie Schaffer Forestry Lecture.
Wood Properties and Anatomical Structure - An Intimate
Relationship. Prof. Wilfred A. Cote. Room 166,
MacMillan Building. 12:30p.m.
University Wind Symphony.
Martin Berinbaum, director and trumpet soloist. Old
Auditorium. Freeadmission. 12:30p.m.
Condensed Matter Seminar.
Magnetism in bcc solid 3He. Yoshika Masuda, Aichi-
Gakuin University. Room 318, Hennings Building. 2:30
p.m.
FRIDAY, OCT. 24
Office for Women Students
Workshops.
First of four sessions on Women and Self-Confidence.
Other sessions on Oct. 31, Nov. 7 and 14. Focus will be
on overcoming shyness and building self-esteem.
Enquiries: 228-2415. Free. Room 106A, Brock Hall.
12:30 p.m.
Band Festival Concert.
Martin Berinbaum, director. For further information call,
228-3113.  Recital Hall, Music Building.  12:30p.m.
Pharmaceutical Sciences Seminar.
Biosynthesis of Plasmenytcholine in the Guinea Pig
Heart. Monica Wientzek, Pharmacology and Toxicology,
UBC.   IRC3.   12:30p.m.
German Studies Reading.
Per Wastberg, Swedish writer and past president,
International Pen Club, reads from his works. Buchanan
Penthouse.  12:30 p.m.
Native Law Program.
In Honour of All.  Film.   Room 101-102, Law Building.
12:30 p.m. For further information, call 228-6165.
Medical Genetics Seminar.
Evolutionary Aspects of EukaryoticTransposons. Linda
Harris, Medical Genetics, UBC.   Parentcraft Room,
Grace Hospital, 4490 Oak Street. 1 p.m.
Regional Mass Spectometry
Discussion Group.
Analytical Instrumentation in Clinical Investigation. Dr.
W. Godolphin. Room 1200, Clinical Chemistry, Laurel
Street Pavilion, First Floor, VGH. 2 p.m.
Rutherford Lecture.
The Incorporation and Loss of VolatMes by the Earth.
Prof. R. K. O'Nions, Earth Sciences, Cambridge
University. Sponsored by Royal Societies of London
and Canada. IRC 6. 3:30 p.m.
Graduate Music Colloquium.
The Chant of the Keivan Rus: The Byzantine Beginnings
of Russian Liturgical Music. Gregory Myers. Seminar
Room, Music Room. 3:30 p.m.
Finance Workshop.
Bankruptcy Costs and the Theory of Oligopoly. Jim
Brander, UBC. Penthouse, Henry Angus Building. 3:30
p.m.
University Wind Symphony.
Martin Berinbaum, directorand trumpet soloist. Old
Auditorium. Freeadmission. 8p.m.
SATURDAY, OCT. 25
Band Festival Concert.
Army Band Concert. For further information call, 228-
3113. Recital Hall, Music Building. 12:30p.m.
Band Festival Concert.
Pacific Wind Ensemble. Morrie Backun conductor. For
further information call, 228-3113. Old Auditorium. 8
p.m.
Calendar Deadlines.
For events in the period Oct. 26 to Nov. 8, notices must be submitted on proper Calendar forms no later than 4
p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 16 to the Community Relations Office, 6328 Memorial Road, Room 207,  Old
Administration Building.    For more information, call 228-8131.

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