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 SPECIAL MENTORING ISSUE
THE  UNIVERSITY  OF  BRITISH  COLUMBIA
UBC
VOLUME  51   I  NUMBER  6   I  JUNE  2,2005
UBC REPORTS
PRINCIPAL   PHOTOGRAPHY:   MARTIN   DEE
THAT AHA! MOMENT
Inventive approaches to mentoring are helping a growing number of students, faculty and alumni staff discover fresh possibilities. BY randy SCHMIDT
"A year and a half ago, I was wondering if my degree would be
any good once I graduated," says Meghan McLennan, a biology graduate who, like many students, found herself
struggling with the transition into the 'real world.' "Now,
I'm employed in a job I love, thinking about doing my PhD
in a couple of years."
What made the difference? For McLennan, who works as a
research technician, it was a new program that puts a unique
twist on an old concept: mentorship. Called tri-mentoring, the
innovative approach is leading a resurgence in mentoring
initiatives throughout UBC.
The idea behind tri-mentoring is to engage and support
students at key transition points. Senior students are assigned
industry mentors, who help them navigate the difficult road
from campus life to the work world. At the same time,
those senior students mentor junior students, helping them
make the transition to the newfound freedom and rigours
of university.
Launched in 2001-02 with 42 students and 21 mentors in
the Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, it has quickly expanded
to include 537 students and 260 mentors in the Dept. of
Computer Science, the Faculty of Engineering, the life
sciences, the Faculty of Arts, the Faculty of Dentistry,
UBC's Golden Key (Honour) Society and the Campus
Sustainability Office.
" My mentor in fourth year was a PhD candidate named
Erin Boyle from [UBC researcher] Brett Finlay's lab,"
says McLennan. "She was able to provide a couple of
directions I could take after I finished my degree. Erin
helped proofread my resume since I didn't know what academic employers wanted to see, and she also suggested the
best way to approach the professors about employment."
Linda Alexander, director of UBC's Career Services,
the unit that helps faculties and groups at UBC develop
customized tri-mentoring programs, says the growth of
continued on page 15
Duo Share Conservation
Research, Friendship
*..    4     BY BRIAN LIN
m Sarah Foster and Amanda
I Vincent went on a six-hour
\ bus ride in February 2004
W in search of the perfect
margarita, having been
disappointed by the uninspiring
big-box hotel and littered beach in
Mazatlan, Mexico, the site of a
United Nations technical workshop
on ensuring sustainable international
trade in seahorses.
"We finally found the perfect margarita, " says Foster, who is Vincent's
PhD student at UBC's Fisheries
Centre. "But not before meandering
through mangrove swamps and past
crocodiles. Then we went for a swim
not 10 metres from them."
Despite the detour, Foster and
Vincent, Canada Research Chair in
Marine Conservation and director
of the world-renowned Project
Seahorse, wowed an international
audience of delegates with their
research on seahorse biology, trade
and conservation. They have been
working for several years toward
successful management of the
world's trade in seahorses under the
Convention on International Trade
in Endangered Species in Wild Fauna
and Flora (CITES).
The Convention, which addresses
species whose trade must be
controlled in order to ensure their
survival, voted in November 2002
to include seahorses as a regulated
species. The decision, which took
effect in May 2004, made seahorses
the first fully marine fish species of
commercial importance to be listed
in CITES and — with more than 25
million seahorses a year moving
among at least 75 nations —
represent the most volume.
The two first met when Foster
introduced Vincent as a guest speaker
at her old high school in 1998, but
got to know each other when Vincent
hired Foster as a research assistant
for Project Seahorse in 2001, after
her stint as a volunteer on the team's
field research in the Philippines.
" I probably wasn't the best
candidate when it came to the
technical aspect of the work," says
Foster, whose PhD work involves the
bycatch of small fish species in
tropical shrimp trawl fisheries.
"Amanda took a chance on me and
her trust made me feel really good
about myself. I've been given more
opportunities in the last three years
than perhaps many would have
gotten in 15 years in the working
world — and I came out of it with
a great friend."
"The biggest contribution I've
made to Sarah is probably
eliminating the word 'like' from her
sentences," laughs Vincent, who adds
that Foster's ability to communicate
complex ideas clearly is a testament
of her significant growth both
academically and personally.
Vincent says she has also benefited
greatly from the relationship. "As a
project leader, you face a lot of
challenges, so it's important to know
that people in the team, like Sarah,
share your values and are working
with you toward a common goal."
"Sarah's special strength is her
ability to remain kind even when
she's under enormous pressure,"
says Vincent. "As her advisor, I
need to give her unstinting support
without taking away her opportunity
to rise to the challenge — which she
always does." □
Sarah Foster (1) and Amanda Vincent, pictured at the Vancouver Aquarium, found the perfect margarita while working on Project Seahorse. I      UBC      REPORTS       |      JUNE     2,     2005
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IN THE NEWS
Highlights of UBC Media Coverage in May 2005. compiled bybrian lin
High Price of Flying to Toronto
For the second consecutive year,
Toronto's Pearson International
Airport has ranked second in an
annual survey of the highest
landing fees at airports around the
world.
UBC air transportation expert
Tae Oum from the Sauder School
of Business, told The Globe and
Mail that Pearson should restrain
any further future increases in
landing fees to ensure that foreign
airlines maintain Toronto as a
North American gateway.
Oum added that Pearson needs
to diversify its revenue stream into
areas such as retailing, fast food,
car parking and leasing space to
airport users.
U BC Building a Model of
Sustainable Architecture
In Canada, composting toilets have
made their way into retail and
academic buildings.
Since its completion in 1996, the
OK. Choi Building for the Institute
of Asian Research at UBC has
remained a model of sustainable
architecture, reports The Chicago
Tribune.
The three-story, $4.5-million
building features five composting
toilets, functioning completely off
the sewerage and power grids. The
building's five compost bins only
need to be emptied every 10 years.
Ninety percent of the waste is
urine, pumped out and treated in a
constructed wetland, and red wriggler worms digest the solid waste.
Learning Exchange Cultivates
Global Citizens
Since the UBC Learning Exchange
set up shop in Vancouver's
Downtown Eastside in 2000, the
The C. K. Choi Building's composting toilets are making news around the world.
number of student volunteers has
grown from 30 to 800 last year,
reports The Globe and Mail.
With programs and resources
including women's centres, community kitchens and inner-city schools,
the Learning Exchange is a great
example of Trek 2010, the university's mission statement which vows
to produce graduates who are global citizens and contributors to the
well-being of society.
Prof Rocks Wall for
Safer Schools
UBC earthquake engineering
professor Carlos Ventura is pleased
at the results of a recent test where
a 4.5-metre-high brick wall was put
through a simulated magnitude
seven quake.
The wall, restrained at the top
and bottom and representative of
many old B.C. schools, showed
Ventura and fellow researchers
the stability of such a structure in a
strong earthquake. The results
will help them find ways to
strengthen B.C.'s large inventory
of unreinforced brick schools
in an economical fashion, Ventura
told Maclean's Magazine. □
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LETTER TO EDITOR
Dear UBC Reports:
In the last issue you published a summary of a
lengthy Globe and Mail article in which I was
quoted several times. The original article came
periously close to misrepresenting my views.
Your summary completely inverted them.
Regarding the two points you chose to
summarize, let me clarify: 1. The Singh decision
has nothing to do with Hargit Singh;
2. Humanitarian and compassionate exceptions
have little to do with humanitarianism or
compassion.
Thank you,
Catherine Dauvergne
Assoc. Professor
Faculty of Law
UBC REPORTS
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randyschmidt@ubc.ca or call UBC.NEWS (604.822.6397) UBC      REPORTS      |      JUNE      2,     2005      |      3
Physics Alum has Clear Image of Future
BY BRIAN LIN
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PhD student Helge Seetzen is grateful for the opportunities given to him by VP Academic Lome Whitehead.
Helge Seetzen is about to revolutionize what millions of people
watch every day — thanks, in part,
to the German military.
Seetzen is a UBC physics and philosophy alumnus and chief technology officer of Sunnybrook
Technologies, a UBC spin-off company developing monitors that display images as life-like as the real
thing.
Arriving at UBC in 1998 immediately following compulsory military
service in Germany, Seetzen was
which are combined with sophisticated software and the human eye's
natural reaction to scattered light. It
is also more energy efficient and
environmentally friendly, as can last
decades.
The technology is being pursued
for medical imaging to improve
diagnostic accuracy, and is being
used by film post-production company Technicolour and software giant
Adobe, whose latest version of
Photoshop fully supports HDR.
Seetzen says his experience with
invest the maximum amount of
funding into research and development, " says Seetzen, whose proudest accomplishment is his staff.
"Most of the people working
here are co-op students," says
Seetzen, who has also helped to
establish a student co-op program
with a number of German institutions. "But they are not fetching
coffee or doing grunt work. All of
them are encouraged to create their
own projects contributing to the
research and development — and
The technology is being pursued for medical imaging to improve diagnostic accuracy,
and is being used by film post-production company Technicolor and software giant Adobe.
inspired by then dean of science
Maria Klawe — who is now dean
of engineering at Princeton
University and a Sunnybrook board
member — to help bring more outstanding international students to
the Vancouver campus.
" I had this idea to collaborate
with the German military and
recruit the brightest students
straight out of military service,"
recalls Seetzen, who pitched the idea
to Vice-President, Academic, Lome
Whitehead, who at the time was an
associate dean in the faculty.
" I was immediately impressed by
his entrepreneurial and creative
approach, and his interest in helping
things work in new and better
ways," says Whitehead, who offered
Seetzen a job in his laboratory on
the spot.
Since then, Seetzen has improved
upon Whitehead's invention in high
dynamic range (HDR) imaging and
identified commercial applications.
He then co-founded Sunnybrook
which, with more than a dozen
patents filed, recently received the
TSX Venture award for "Most
promising company to go public"
— all before the tender age of 26.
"Normally I would probably just
be getting out of university and
fetching coffee on my first job,"
says Seetzen, who adds Whitehead
has always treated him as a peer
rather than a student.
"Instead, I'm working on an
exciting technology that can really
change lives."
The jewel in Sunnybrook's crown
is an advanced display technology
that accomplishes a 100-fold
improvement in brightness and contrast to conventional monitors. The
innovation replaces fluorescent
backlights in LCD monitors and televisions with a small number of
individually-controlled LED lights,
Whitehead has also inspired him to
run Sunnybrook very differently
from other technology-based
companies.
"We firmly believe that people
who create value should receive
value," says Seetzen. "The university, which developed the original
technology, should receive a large
share of the benefits from the commercialization, and so should the
people who worked on improving
and promoting the technology."
Currently, 14 research groups —
many of which are based in post-secondary institutions — are contributing to Sunnybrook's technology
development and over a dozen
inventors have received common
shares ofthe company's stock. "This
allows us to run the company on a
small core group of people and
they all receive stock options."
In addition to extensive volunteer
work as an undergraduate at UBC
— Seetzen received the UBC
Faculty of Science Ambassador
Award five times — Seetzen is a
mentor with the Vancouver School
Board's Gifted/Enrichment
Education program and a "Big
Brother" with young offenders and
disabled children.
"I'm indeed proud of Helge,"
says Whitehead. "But pride is a
tricky word because it suggests that
you deserve some credit for it.
"I'd like to think the opportunity
I made available to an undergraduate student was a bit unusual. So
I'm proud that I recognized his
entrepreneurial ability and was
able to create a space for him to
shine."   □
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REPORTS      |      JUNE     2,     2005
"Father" Hanson
Coaches On, and
Off, Court
Kevin Hanson, UBC head coach,
men's basketball, has a master's
degree in coaching science from
the School of Human Kinetics,
Faculty of Education. He uses his
expertise in sports psychology to
motivate athletes, plan game
strategies and to promote individual development as well as team
cohesion.
He was head coach for the
Canadian Men's National
BY BRENDA AUSTIN
course work for his master's
program in human kinetics next
fall, with Hanson acting as an
advisor for his thesis and his
directed study.
Bains has also been a teaching
assistant for Hanson as well as
head instructor for some of
Hanson's UBC summer basketball
camps.
University basketball coaches
identify and recruit players on an
"We call him Father Hanson," says Bains, "and he's
taken me under his wing. We have long, long talks. I
want to be a professional basketball player for a few
years and my long-term goal is coaching."
Development Basketball Team,
which competes in the World
University Games, when he first
met Pasha Bains, who tried out for
the team in 2003.
" It was a dream of his to
become an elite basketball player,"
Hanson says of Bains, who has
helped lead the UBC Thunderbirds
to several successful seasons.
"Once he was at UBC, we had a
natural connection as he became
interested in taking a master's
degree in coaching science."
For his part, Bains says Hanson
is a mentor for many athletes.
"We call him Father Hanson,"
he says, "and he's taken me under
his wing. We have long, long talks.
I want to be a professional
basketball player for a few years
and my long-term goal is
coaching."
Bains and fellow UBC basketball
player Chad Clifford run camps
and youth programs in which they
pass on some of the techniques in
sports psychology they have
learned from coach Hanson.
The camps are for Grade 3 to
12 students and form a tremendous network for training and
recruiting players for university,
according to Hanson. They also
provide exceptional experience
for Bains, who will continue
ongoing basis provincially
nationally and internationally,
says Hanson, trying to get the
best athletes.
"The annual mentoring-
recruiting day in May, hosted by
the men's basketball team, pulls all
the efforts together to welcome and
orient the new students to UBC,"
says Hanson.
Men's basketball at UBC benefits
from external mentors, too. David
McLean, a strong supporter of
UBC basketball, hosts a golf tour
in Whistler, which raises money
for men's basketball athletes and
increases the number of scholarships available. All money raised
through this event goes into the
David McLean Men's Basketball
Scholarship Endowment fund.
David Nelson, a UBC academic
and basketball alumnus, hosts a
retreat for the men's basketball
team at his summer property in
Roberts Creek which features an
outdoor basketball court. The
retreat allows players to meet
alumni in a wide variety of
professions and occupations.
"Playing basketball, the students
learn a lot of life skills, too,"
Hanson says, "working with
different types of people, getting
along with everyone and managing
the psychology of the game." □
Coach Kevin Hanson (1) chats with Pasha Bains, master's candidate in the School of Human Kinetics, Faculty of Education.
Computer Sci Grad Changes
Perspective, Discovers Possibilities
Computer Science grad student Micheline Manske(l) is much more sure of her
career path after working with IT Services Executive Director Susanne Hille.
BY BRIAN LIN
Susanne Hille knows choosing a
career is no picnic in the park. The
UBC IT Services Executive Director
learned the hard way but is
determined to make things easier
for young women like computer
science graduate student Micheline
Manske.
"As a student, I really struggled
with my career options," says
Hille, who arrived at UBC almost
two years ago and immediately
volunteered for the Dept. of
Computer Science's tri-mentoring
program. "I loved mathematics,
and took computer science as an
elective and just fell into it as a
career, which is quite common
when you're young and taking
those first uncertain career steps."
Manske was at a similar
crossroad when she met Hille a
year ago. "I had a vague idea that
I wanted to combine computer
science with my teaching skills,"
says Manske, who will graduate
from UBC this summer. "But I was
at a loss as to what kind of jobs
were out there."
" Micheline was very quiet and
uncertain when I first met her,"
recalls Hille. "In her mind, there
were only a few options open to
her, and part of my goal was to
help her explore other ideas, even
ones that seemed totally radical to
her.
" We often form mental pictures
of ourselves and put up barriers
based on those pictures," says
Hille, whose own mentors inspired
her to reach farther than she
otherwise might have. "They
helped me to see myself doing
things I didn't think I could ever
do, gave me confidence, courage
and great advice. They made a big
difference in my life."
Through a series of one-on-one
discussions and guided research
with Hille, Manske identified
corporate training as an area of
interest, and is now pursuing leads
with IBM and educational
institutions in Toronto.
" Learning to network was the
hardest part for me," says
Manske. "But once I got started, I
was surprised at all the
opportunities that were open
to me."
"At the program's official
closing dinner, Micheline walked
in and it was as if she was a
different person," says Hille. "She
was buzzing with excitement from
the positive responses she's
received and the many possibilities
she now sees for her career path.
"It's extremely rewarding to see
someone change her perspectives
in that way."
Manske says the tri-mentoring
program is especially popular with
female students. "About 22 per
cent of undergraduate students
in computer science are female,
but the percentage of female
participants in the tri-mentoring
program is much higher.
"It just shows how important it
is to have a strong female role
model," Manske adds. "I think
more than anything, what I
learned from Susanne is that what
I want out of my life and my
career is achievable." □ \ C      REPORTS       |      JUNE     2,      2005      |      5
UBC's Inaugural Graduate
Mentorship Awards
BY HILARY THOMSON
Creative writing Prof. George McWhirter says mentoring is a learning and
leading process.
Commitment, consistency and
continuity are the hallmarks of a
successful mentoring relationship,
according to two faculty members
who have received the inaugural
Killam Graduate Mentorship
Award.
School of Nursing Prof. Joan
Anderson and Creative Writing
Prof. Emeritus George McWhirter
have been honoured for outstanding performance by faculty members in mentoring graduate students. The award is based on sustained mentorship of many students
over many years.
Anderson, who joined UBC in
1975, says she's never thought of
herself as a mentor, but has always
enjoyed the process of reciprocity
and sharing ideas with students.
"The best relationships are those
where students are willing to have
their ideas challenged. I challenge
them and they challenge me," says
Anderson, who was instrumental in
developing one of Canada's first
doctoral programs in nursing. " If
they're ready to explore, I can be a
guide. When the student is ready,
the mentor will appear!"
She cites Prof. Emeritus Roy
Turner, of the Dept. of
Anthropology and Sociology, as
being an outstanding mentor when
she was completing her own PhD
at UBC.
"He shifted my thinking. It was
transformative learning — painful
but exciting," she says. Anderson's
research interests include the
socio-cultural context of health
and illness; gender and health; and
health and public policy. She was
named a 2003 Distinguished UBC
Scholar in Residence at UBC's
Peter Wall Institute for Advanced
Studies.
In addition to the satisfaction of
watching her students succeed,
Anderson is particularly proud
when her students demonstrate
they are "good academic citizens."
" I get a tremendous sense of
satisfaction when students show a
sense of social responsibility and a
commitment to social justice and
civility. That is what brings us
together."
George McWhirter has men-
tored students in the Dept. of
Theatre, Film and Creative
Writing for 35 years and served
10 years as head of the department. This year, he won UBC's
Sam Black Award for Education
and Development of the Visual and
Performing Arts.
Also a UBC alumnus, McWhirter
agrees with Anderson that mentoring is both a "learning and a leading" process. He says he has tried
to take the best from his own mentoring experiences and " put it
together for others."
One of his students has said,
" George guides without chastising,
teaches without patronizing, and
hopes without reservation."
The so-called writers' temperament isn't a particular challenge to
his mentoring, he says, since most
people in academia are passionate
about their work. He believes a
writing workshop is not much different from a laboratory, where
things are tried, challenged and
explored.
" I try to keep the student focused
on the work, not their feelings —
or my feelings — about the work."
McWhirter mentors students
who write plays, poetry, prose and
are involved in literature translation. Over the past six or seven
years, his students have been nominated for and won the Governor
General's Award for poetry. They
continued on page 15
Looking for a Few
Good Women
Engineering program aims to meet a need for female
role models, by brian lin
Spending a year with Naoko Ellis
has helped UBC mechanical
engineering PhD candidate Dana
Kulic solidify her conviction to
pursue a career in academia. The
same journey, however, has led
second-year undergraduate
student Carmen Lau in the
opposite direction.
Ellis, an assistant professor in
chemical and biological engineering, met Kulic and Lau through a
unique program in the Faculty of
Applied Science that provides
female engineering students with
female role models in a predominantly male industry.
Through the tri-mentorship program, which matches a faculty
member or industry leader with a
senior student and a junior student, both Kulic and Lau have
been able to explore the various
aspects of an academic career in
engineering and landed on their
own path.
Kulic, who worked for several
years as a mechanical engineer
before returning to UBC to complete her doctoral degree, says
she's now more aware of the challenges — and benefits — involved
with an academic career.
"I was surprised to find out
that Naoko thought her first year
as a prof was way harder than
doing her PhD," says Kulic.
"There will be a lot more deadlines and various teaching and
research expectations.
"I don't know if I'm prepared,
but I've been warned," laughs
Kulic.
Lau, on the other hand, doesn't
see herself spending years focusing
on one specialized area.
"Academia is no longer my first
choice. And I'm really glad I
found out early on," she says.
" One of the biggest challenges
for women in engineering is the
lack of female role models through
their formative years," says Ellis,
who has also attended Minerva
Foundation conference for B.C.
women to help foster greater
leadership roles for women.
" And the number of women
dwindles as you progress up the
academic or corporate ladder. But
the benefit is far-reaching so it's
worth the effort."
"Female engineers will always
stand out," says Kulic. "You'll
walk into a meeting and be the
only woman in the room. Then
there's the pressure of balancing
your family life.
" I've noticed a lot of young
female engineers, who do as well
as the guys in the first few years,
then they get married and take the
'mommy track,'" says Kulic.
"While the guys keep going up,
the women get stuck in middle-
level positions and can't seem to
advance beyond that. Naoko's personal experience has given me
more confidence in making it
work."
Lau's concerns were more
immediate. Part of the first group
of students in the newly
redesigned second-year mechanical
engineering program, Lau found a
steep learning curve that at times
seemed insurmountable.
"I had trouble adjusting to the
new learning environment," says
Lau. "But Naoko and Dana
encouraged me to keep working at
it, and reminded me that there's
always a light at the end of the
tunnel.
"And they were right," she
adds. □ 6     I
REPORTS      |      JUNE      2,      2005
Stopping Disease
Bacterial disease expert makes lab team a priority, by Hilary Thomson
A combat sport is how UBC bacterial disease researcher Brett
Finlay describes the competitive
world of science research.
So it's not surprising he believes
a big part of mentoring is looking
out for the 25 members of his lab.
"I try to identify lab members'
his talented team.
Communication is a major component of life in his lab, located in
the Michael Smith Biotechnology
Laboratory. When in town, he
makes it a priority to meet with
every lab member in half-hour sessions during the week. He also
ance the demands of research.
Bruce Vallance came to the lab
in 1999 as a post-doc. With his
father, a biology teacher, Vallance
spent a childhood collecting butterflies and frogs and believed his
interest in biology would lead him
to medicine. After his father's
Finlay says he's very selective in taking on new lab members. He looks for
independence, drive, and a well-rounded person —"no lab rats"...
abilities and give them chances to
use those skills in a supportive
environment where they're free
to chase their ideas," says Finlay,
who is the Peter Wall Institute
Distinguished Professor — the
university's highest academic
honour.
Recruited to UBC by the late
Michael Smith, Nobel Laureate,
Finlay counts among his mentors
and role models his parents, both
biologists; his PhD supervisor, Dr.
William Paranchych; and his postdoctoral supervisor at Stanford
University, Dr. Stanley Falkow.
Running a successful lab is an
acquired skill, says Finlay, adding
that he took business courses on
motivation and conflict resolution
to help him manage and mentor
holds a formal weekly lab meeting
where students and post-docs can
practice presentation skills. In addition, he hosts a lab retreat every 18
months where members put forward their vision for where the
work is going.
"At this stage, my contribution
comes not so much from the papers
I publish, but from the people I
train — that's my job right now,"
he says. He has adopted many of
Smith's mentoring techniques —
"giving me all that I needed, keeping distractions to a minimum and
getting out of the way."
Finlay says he's very selective in
taking on new lab members. He
looks for independence, drive, and
a well-rounded person —"no lab
rats" — who has interests that bal-
death from cancer when Vallance
was 16 years old, his interests
shifted toward medical research
and trying to understand what
caused disease.
The 38-year-old is now an
assistant professor of pediatrics
and Canada Research Chair in
Pediatric Gastroenterology. An
expert in developing models of
disease that show how infection
affects the intestinal tract and liver,
his research is focused on the role
of bacteria in causing
Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)
in children. IBDs, such as Crohn's
disease, cause intestinal tissue to
become inflamed, resulting in
chronic abdominal pain, cramping,
fatigue and diarrhea.
He says his mentors, who
J
Microbiologist Brett Finlay (above) taught Bruce Vallance (1) that creating
momentum is key to a successful research program.
include both Finlay and his PhD
supervisor Dr. Steve Collins at
McMaster University, showed him
how to succeed in research.
" I learned from them how to
get people, especially funding
organizations, interested in the
problems you're studying," he
says. "From Brett I learned it's
important to get a running start.
If you can quickly get your ideas
funded and recruit excellent
people, that gives your research
program real momentum and
that's one of the keys to success."
Vallance is the Children with
Intestinal and Liver Disorders
(CH.I.L.D.) Foundation's Research
Chair in Pediatric
Gastroenterology — the first
position of its kind in Canada. He
supervises his own five-member
lab at the B.C. Research Institute
for Children's and Women's Health
(BCRICWH). Vallance and several
other pediatric gastroenterologists
working at the institute comprise
the fastest-growing pediatric gastrointestinal research group in
Canada.
" I feel lucky to have worked
with mentors who allowed me to
try my own ideas," says Vallance,
who is also a Michael Smith
Foundation for Health Research
Scholar. "While nobody's ideas
work all the time, you can't be
afraid of failure, you have to keep
trying. Learning to have confidence in your own ideas is crucial
to becoming a successful
researcher, and when some crazy
idea you dreamed up works,
there's nothing more exciting." □
The CH.I.L.D. Foundation
The Michael Smith
began in 1995 with the goal of
Foundation for Health Research
finding a cure for digestive dis
leads, partners and serves as a
orders such as Crohn's disease,
catalyst to build British
ulcerative colitis and liver disor
Columbia's capacity for excel
ders.
lence in clinical, biomedical,
The Canada Research Chairs
health services and population
program, designed to build
health research.
Canada's research capacity, rep
BCRICWH operates in part
resents a Government of Canada
nership with UBC and the
investment of $900 million to
Children's & Women's Health
establish 2,000 research profes
Centre of BC, an agency of the
sorships in universities across
Provincial Health Services
the country.
Authority. □ THE UNIVERSITY OF
BRITISH COLUMBIA
Equity Office Discrimination and Harassment Report 2004
OVERVIEW
The University of British Columbia adopted and implemented the Policy on
Discrimination and Harassment (hereinafter referred to in this report as the "Policy")
in 1995, and revised it to its current form in 1996. According to the Policy, members of
the UBC community — students, faculty and staff — are prohibited from discriminating
or harassing other UBC community members on the basis of actual or perceived
personal characteristics, such as race or sex. More specifically, the Policy delineates 13
prohibited grounds of discrimination and harassment, characteristics based on the BC
Human Rights Code; these are:
• Race
• Colour
• Ancestry
• Place of origin
• Age (applies to those older than 19 and less than 65)
• Sex (includes sexual harassment)
• Physical or mental disability
• Sexual orientation
• Unrelated criminal conviction (in the context of employment only)
• Political belief (in the context of employment only)
The Policy assigns both rights and responsibilities to the UBC community. Students,
faculty and staff are promised, by virtue of the Policy, a discrimination and
harassment-free environment in which to study, work and reside. Similarly, all students,
faculty and staff are held responsible for adhering to the Policy and upholding its
principles. The Policy provides protection for UBC community members in the context
of employment, academics, residence and athletics. The mandate of the Equity Office is
to ensure that these rights and responsibilities are fulfilled by the UBC community — by
offering mechanisms to address complaints of discrimination and harassment; and by
offering educational programming to heighten awareness of human rights. The purpose
of this report is to share the data collected by the Equity Office on its handling of
discrimination and harassment incidents in 2004.
DISCRIMINATION & HARASSMENT DEFINED
According to the BC Human Rights Code and the UBC Policy, discrimination is defined
as the denial of an opportunity to, or a biased decision against an individual or a group
because of some personal attribute, such as sexual orientation or religion (one of the
13 grounds listed above). Discrimination also occurs when individuals are judged on
the basis of their group membership rather than their individual capabilities or merit.
For example, to determine that a female applicant is unfit for a manually intensive
job because "women are not strong," is an unfounded, unjustifiable denial of an
opportunity. In some situations, different treatment might be justified, perhaps
because of a reasonable occupational requirement. To reject a blind applicant for
a job as a pilot, is for example, a justifiable reason for different treatment.
Harassment is a form of discrimination, which entails offensive or insulting treatment,
of individuals or groups, again, because of one's personal characteristic. Another
important element of harassment is that it is unwelcome; this is particularly
important to distinguish in situations of sexual harassment. Discrimination and
harassment, whether intentional or unintentional, are unlawful and in violation of the
UBC Policy. As such, the law in BC and in Canada measures impact on the aggrieved
person rather than the intent of the perpetrator, when assessing allegations of human
rights violations.
COMPLAINT MANAGEMENT
According to the Policy, Administrative Heads are responsible for addressing
discrimination and harassment in their units. Administrative Heads are the lead
administrators in a given unit — institutes, faculties, departments, and so forth; and
may include, for example, Directors, academic Heads, Deans, Associate Vice Presidents,
and Vice Presidents. Thus, Administrative Heads and the Equity Office share the
responsibility for enforcing the Policy. Individuals who believe they have a human rights
complaint may take their concerns to their Administrative Head (or designated Equity
person or committee) or the Equity Office; the option is theirs. In most cases, the
Equity Office and Administrative Heads work in tandem to address complaints and
concerns brought forth. Equity Advisors do not advocate for any one group on campus
(faculty, staff or students) or individuals, but rather serve as advocates for the Policy —
to ensure a discrimination and harassment free campus.
Students, faculty and staff bring their various concerns to the Equity Office; some
of these concerns trigger the Policy, and translate into bona fide discrimination or
harassment mandate cases. Many others, however, do not activate the Policy —
because, for example, they fall outside the one year time limit for reporting incidents,
or involve non-UBC parties, or fall under the mandate of another UBC policy or
procedure. The Equity Office refers to these non-mandate situations as consultations,
and, as such, the Equity Office Advisors and staff endeavor to provide counsel to
individuals and departments in finding appropriate redress for their concerns.
Consultations may take the form of answering questions about the Policy, bridging
communication gaps between parties, or referring individuals to other UBC offices
or external community services. At times, Equity Advisors coach clients through
challenging situations, by assisting them with letter writing or role-playing difficult
conversations. Sometimes people come to the Equity Office with stories of harassment
or discrimination, but are too fearful of retaliation to pursue a complaint. Since
discrimination or harassment cases cannot be pursued anonymously, Advisors approach
these incidents in a consultative manner.
More and more of the incidents brought to the Equity Office fall under the rubric of
personal harassment — situations in which parties are reportedly behaving badly
towards each other, but not on the basis of one of the 13 prohibited grounds set out in
the BC Human Rights Code. This broad category of personal harassment includes such
behaviour as bullying (also referred to as psychological harassment), mean-spirited
gossiping, and heated disagreements, to name a few. Currently, UBC does not have
a policy to address such non-human rights conflicts or harassment. Although such
interpersonal conflicts fall outside the Discrimination and Harassment Policy, the
Equity Office, nonetheless, plays a consultative role in addressing them.
For reporting purposes, mandated discrimination and harassment cases are divided into
four broad categories — all of which include a requisite human rights element: biased
conduct or behaviour, retaliation (for bringing forth a complaint), physical assault
or threats, and poisoned or hostile environment. The first three apply generally to
Figure 1  Discrimination & Harassment Complaints and Consultations
Covered v. Not Covered Under UBC's Policy
Covered under UBC's Policy
Not Covered under UBC's Policy
2002
Out of 103 total
complaints, 47
covered under Policy (46%)
2003
Out of 156 total
complaints, 70
covered under Policy (45%)
2004
Out of 122 total
complaints, 41
covered under Policy (34%)
Age
0
0
2
3%
1
2%
Disability
2
4%
9
13%
12
29%
Ethnicity (ancestry/colour/race)
11
23%
14
20%
7
17%
Family Status
0
0
0
0
0
0
Marital Status
0
0
0
0
0
0
Political Belief
0
0
1
1%
0
0
Religion
3
6%
2
3%
4
10%
Sex/Gender
29
62%
38
54%
13
32%
Sexual Orientation
2
4%
4
6%
4
10%
Unrelated Criminal Offense
0
0
0
0
0
0
Not Specified
0
0
0
0
0
0
TOTAL
47
99%
70
100%
41
100%
2002
Out of 103 total
complaints, 58 not
covered under Policy (54%)
2003
Out of 156 total
complaints, 86 not
covered under Policy(55%)
2004
Out of 122 total
complaints, 81 not
covered under Policy (66%)
Behaviour covered under other UBC policy or procedures
35
63%
37
43%
46
57%
Event outside one-year limit
1
2%
3
3%
0
0
Respondent and/or context not under UBCjurisdiction
5
9%
23
27%
6
7%
Personal Harassment
15
27%
23
27%
29
36%
TOTAL
56
101%
86
100%
81
100% UBC     REPORTS      |     JUNE     2,     2005
Figure 2 Number of Complaints Under the Policy by Reason
40
35
30
25
20
15
10
Sex/Gender
0     i-
2001
2002
2003
2004
individual complainants, whereas the last category — the poisoned environment —
refers to behaviours that are not necessarily directed at an individual, but manifest
themselves in a chilly or toxic climate, impacting a group of individuals.
The Equity Office employs both informal and formal resolution methods in addressing
mandate complaints. The vast majority of cases are handled informally by Equity
Advisors, in conjunction with Administrative Heads, who serve as neutrals to sort
out the issues, facts and find workable solutions. Each mandate case is unique — with
different issues, players, contexts, and severity — and, therefore the approach taken
and resolutions brokered are tailored to the parties' needs. Sometimes complainants
have a particular resolution in mind, e.g., an apology, a change in policy, the removal
of offensive pictures from a work station. Other times, appropriate resolutions
materialize through dialogue among the parties.
In rare situations, mandate complaints are addressed through formal rather than
informal proceedings. Complainants who experience severe infringement of their
human rights may apply for a formal investigation by submitting a written request to
the Equity Office. Upon considering the complainants' request and initial fact-finding
on the matter, the Associate Vice-President, Equity, may grant the request and order
and an independent investigation and panel. From 1998 to date, only one case has
been addressed through formal proceedings. This case, in 2002, involved a complaint
of sexual harassment by a student against a sessional lecturer. The three-person
independent panel determined that the lecturer had sexually harassed the student, and
ordered an official warning letter be placed in the lecturer's faculty file. No case was
forwarded to formal investigation in 2004.
Following is a summary of complaints (cases and consultations) received and handled
by the Equity Office in 2004. These data reflect only those situations in which the
Equity Office was specifically contacted, and does not include the many other incidents
in which Administrative Heads or units managed incidents independently.
COMPLAINTS RECEIVED IN 2004
The Equity Office handled 23 mandate cases and offered 99 consultations from January
through December 2004. Ofthe 99 consultations, 18 (18% of all consultations) would
have been addressed as mandate complaints, but for various reasons the parties chose
not to pursue the complaint. Thus, ofthe total 122 complaints for 2004, 41 incidents
fell within the purview of the Policy, representing 34% of all complaints (cases and
consultations) in the calendar year. Figure 1 tracks mandated case activity in the Equity
Office from 2002 through 2004, inclusive.
By examining this longitudinal data, one can note the rise and fall of Policy-mandated
case handling by the Equity Office from 2002-2004. Although we cannot fully explain
this year to year fluctuation, we believe that certain factors play a determining role:
1) Very brief consultations with parties or Administrative Heads (or their designates)
may not be recorded, or are recorded with varying diligence, in the computer database
from which these numbers are generated. 2) The educational programs offered by
the Equity Office staff may be effective in raising discrimination and harassment
awareness, limiting inappropriate behaviour and promoting respectful interactions in
the workplace, classroom and residences. Participation in the many workshops offered
by the Equity Office Advisors, likewise, varies from year to year. 3) Administrative
Heads, whom have been trained by the Equity Office in complaint handling, are
becoming more and more adept at resolving human rights issues locally and early.
Many situations, therefore, never reach the Equity Office and are not recorded in our
records. However, with changes in unit leadership, the effectiveness with which Policy
related incidents are dealt with in the unit, is similarly subject to change.
Of the 41 mandate cases and consultations addressed by the Equity Office in 2004, 13
were based on sex/gender discrimination (32% of all mandate complaints), 12 (29%)
on disability, 7 (17%) on ancestry/colour/race, 4 (10%) on sexual orientation, 4 (10%)
on religion, and 1 (2%) on age. According to data from 2002-2004, discrimination and
harassment based on sex/gender has been the most frequently reported kind of human
rights violation brought to the attention of the Equity Office over these recent years.
However, there has been a dramatic drop in the percentage of sex/gender cases,
proportional to a dramatic rise in the percentage of cases alleging discrimination and
harassment based on disability. See Figure 1 and Figure 2, which illustrate the trends
of complaints by reason or kind of discrimination.
Figure 1 tracks incidents brought to the Equity Office from 2002-2004 that fell outside
the Policy because of jurisdiction or time limitations. In 2004, 81 out of 122 cases
fell outside the reach of the Policy. As explained above, such situations are addressed
as consultations by Equity Office staff. Of these 81 consultations, more than half —
specifically 46 (57%) — fell outside the Policy because other UBC policies and
procedures were more appropriate avenues of redress. For instance, students who bring
forth complaints over grades are often referred to the academic appeals procedures
(unless poor marks can be clearly linked to retaliation for bringing a human rights
complaint.) Complaints involving personal harassment totaled 29 (36%) in 2004; while
6 (7%) cases involved parties or contexts external to UBC, and therefore did not invoke
the Policy. Due to the increasing numbers of personal harassment incidents, the Equity
Office, in concert with other UBC offices, is currently exploring ways to best address
personal harassment on campus.
The Policy promises that discrimination and harassment will not be tolerated in the
various domains of the university — the classroom, the workplace, residences, athletic
teams and clubs. Figure 3 illustrates the breakdown of incidents in these various
university settings. Employment and academic matters have consistently been the
primary sources of Equity cases over the last five years. Of the 122 complaints handled
by the Equity Office in 2004, 63 (52%) fell within the context of employment.
This data represents an increase over the last few years in the number of employment
related incidents brought to the Equity Office. In 2000, 35% of all complaints and
consultations fell within the employment context, while in 2003 43% alleged a biased
workplace. However, the raw number of employment-based incidents in 2003 and 2004
are nearly equal, these being 63 and 68 respectively.
Following closely behind the employment category, 48 (39%) complaints in 2004
alleged discrimination and harassment in the classroom. This 2004 data reflecting the
academic context closely match those from 2003: Academic-based incidents comprised
41% of all 2003 complaints. Over the course of these last few years, then, one can
discern a trend of decreased academic-based complaints and increased employment-
based complaints. Few complaints of discrimination and harassment were brought forth
from residence and athletics in 2004 — a mere 5 (4%) involving resident living and 2
(2%) from the athletics context. In comparing 2004 and 2003 data, there has been a
slight decline in residence based complaints in the last year. This decline may be the
result of awareness-raising educational programs conducted in residence halls, skilled
Residence Advisors handling complaints locally, or matters simply not being brought
forward to the Equity Office. Four cases fell outside the jurisdictional context of UBC;
these include, for example, incidents that occurred wholly in the city of Vancouver or
involved respondents unaffiliated with UBC.
Figure 4 illustrates the gender of parties involved in discrimination and harassment
complaints over the last three years. Consistently throughout this time period, women
have been more likely to bring matters to the Equity Office than men. In 2004, out
of 122 complaints, 77 (66%) women sought assistance from the Equity Office, as
Figure 3 Context of Discrimination & Harassment Cases
Non UBC (4) 3%
Athletic (2)1%
Residential (7) 5%
Employment (48) 35%
2000   N=136
Academic (75) 55%
Non UBC (11) 7%
Athletic (1)1%
Residential (12) 8%
Employment (68) 43%
2003   N=156
Academic (64) 41%
Non UBC (4) 3%
Athletic (2) 2%
Residential (5) 4%
Employment (63) 52%
2004   N=122
Academic (48) 39% IC     REPORTS      |     JUNE     2,     2005      |      9
Figure 4 Gender of Complainants and Respondents
Figure 6 Position of Complainants in Relation to Respondents
2002
2003
2004
Female complainant
17
16%
24
15%
30
24%
Female respondent
Female complainant
40
39%
58
37%
33
27%
Male respondent
Female complainant
1
1%
1
1%
2
2%
Male and female respondent
Female complainant
12
12%
19
12%
9
7%
Department/University respondent
Female complainant
3
3%
10
6%
3
2%
Unknown respondent
Male complainant
11
11%
11
7%
16
13%
Male respondent
Male complainant
8
8%
11
7%
7
6%
Female respondent
Male complainant
0
0
3
2%
2
2%
Male and female respondent
Male complainant
8
8%
9
6%
12
10%
Department/University respondent
Male complainant
1
1%
2
1%
3
2%
Unknown respondent
Male and female complainant
1
1%
3
2%
0
0
Female respondent
Male and female complainant
0
0
1
1%
0
0
Male and female respondent
Male and female complainant
0
0
3
2%
0
0
Male respondent
Male and female complainant
0
0
0
0
1
1%
Department/University respondent
Male and female complainant
0
0
0
0
2
2%
Unknown respondent
Unknown complainant
0
0
1
1%
0
0
Male respondent
Unknown complainant
1
1%
0
0
0
0
Department/University respondent
Unknown complainant
0
0
0
0
2
2%
Unknown respondent
TOTAL
103
101%
156
100%
122
100%
compared to 40 (34%) men; five matters could not be classified on pure gender lines
because these complaints were brought by groups of people of both genders, by a
department, or in one instance, a complaint was registered by a person in gender
transition. Of the 77 complaints brought by women, 43% were against men, 39%
were against other women, while 12% were against a department or the University. Of
the 40 complaints brought to the Equity Office by men, 40% were against other men,
17.5% were against women, and 30% were against a department or the University.
Just as women are more likely to initiate complaints with the Equity Office, men
are more likely to be named as the responding party. In 2004, men were named as
respondents in 40% of complaints, whereas women were named as respondents in
30%. The remaining 30% of respondents were either groups of individuals from both
genders, departments or the University, and those classified as "unknown." Sometimes
people seek assistance from the Equity Office without knowing or revealing the gender
of the other party or parties in question. The gender of respondents is recorded as
"unknown" when, for example, the harassing party is anonymously calling, or writing
notes. At other times, administrators or other interested third parties may contact
the Equity Office for counsel without naming the individual (s) about whom they are
concerned. In 2004, 10 (8%) cases and/or consultations involved an unknown
respondent.
Figure 5 Complaints by Campus Groups
2002
2003
2004
Undergraduate Student
35
34%
48
31%
36
29%
Graduate Student
20
19%
26
17%
15
12%
Support Staff
20
19%
28
18%
23
19%
Faculty
13
13%
20
13%
18
15%
Management & Professional
8
8%
15
10%
17
13%
Administrative Head of Unit
3
3%
5
3%
5
4%
Student/Employee Association
0
0
0
0
1
1%
Non-UBC
4
4%
14
9%
6
5%
Department/University
1
2%
TOTAL
103
100%
156
100%
122
100%
2002
2003
2004
Undergraduate Student
N=35
N=48
N=36
Undergraduate Student
10
28%
17
35%
5
14%
Graduate Student
3
8%
0
0
2
6%
Support Staff
1
3%
2
4%
0
0
Administrative Head of Unit
2
6%
0
0
0
0
Management & Professional
0
0
2
4%
0
0
Faculty
8
23%
9
19%
14
39%
Student/Employee Association
1
3%
0
0
0
0
Non-UBC
6
17%
8
17%
3
8%
Department/University
3
9%
6
13%
7
19%
Unknown
1
3%
4
8%
5
14%
TOTAL
35
100%
48
100%
36
100%
Graduate Student
N=20
N=26
N=15
Undergraduate
3
15%
1
4%
1
7%
Graduate Student
1
5%
5
19%
0
0
Support Staff
0
0
2
8%
0
0
Administrative Head of Unit
0
0
2
8%
3
20%
Management & Professional
2
10%
0
0
1
7%
Faculty
6
30%
9
35%
4
27%
Student/Employee Association
0
0
0
0
0
0
Non UBC
1
5%
3
12%
2
13%
Department/University
6
30%
4
15%
2
13%
Unknown
1
5%
0
0
2
13%
TOTAL
20
100%
26
101%
15
100%
Support Staff
N=20
N=28
N=23
Undergraduate Student
0
0
1
4%
4
17%
Support Staff
6
30%
9
32%
3
13%
Administrative Head of Unit
1
5%
4
14%
1
4%
Management & Professional
7
35%
3
11%
9
39%
Faculty
2
10%
4
14%
4
17%
Student Employee Association
0
0
0
0
0
0
Non-UBC
1
5%
0
0
0
0
Department/University
2
10%
4
14%
1
4%
Unknown
1
5%
3
11%
1
4%
TOTAL
20
100%
28
100%
23
98%
Faculty
N=13
N=20
N=18
Undergraduate Student
2
15%
2
10%
2
11%
Graduate Student
2
15%
1
5%
2
11%
Support Staff
1
1%
0
0
1
5%
Administrative Head of Unit
1
8%
5
25%
3
17%
Faculty
4
31%
5
25%
4
22%
Non-UBC
1
8%
0
0
1
5%
Department/University
2
15%
5
25%
5
28%
Unknown
0
0
2
10%
0
0
TOTAL
13
100%
20
100%
18
100%
Management & Professional
N=8
N=15
N=17
Undergraduate Student
0
0
0
0
0
0
Graduate Student
0
0
0
0
0
0
Support Staff
1
12%
0
0
0
0
Administrative Head of Unit
1
12%
4
27%
2
12%
Management & Professional
3
38%
4
27%
12
70%
Faculty
1
13%
1
7%
2
12%
Department/University
2
25%
3
20%
1
6%
Non-UBC
0
0
2
13%
0
0
Unknown
1
7%
0
0%
TOTAL
8
100%
15
101%
17
100%
Administrative Head of Unit
N=3
N=5
N=5
Undergraduate
1
33%
1
20%
2
40%
Graduate Student
0
0
0
0
0
0
Support Staff
1
33%
0
0
0
0
Administrative Head of Unit
0
0
0
0
0
0
Faculty
0
0
4
80%
3
60%
Department/University
0
0
0
0
0
0
Unknown
1
33%
0
0
0
0
TOTAL
3
99%
5
100%
5
100%
Student/Employee Association
N=0
N=0
N=1
Administrative Head of Unit
0
0
0
0
0
0
Management & Professional
0
0
0
0
1
100%
Undergraduate Student
0
0
0
0
0
0
Student/Employee Association
0
0
0
0
0
0
Off Campus
0
0
0
0
0
0
Unknown
0
0
0
0
0
0
TOTAL
0
0
0
0
1
100%
Non-UBC
N=4
N=14
N=6
Undergraduate Student
0
0
1
7%
1
17%
Graduate Student
0
0
0
0
0
0
Management & Professional
0
0
0
0
0
0
Faculty
0
0
3
21%
0
0
Non-UBC
3
75%
5
36%
0
0
Department/University
1
25%
4
29%
3
50%
Unknown
0
0
1
7%
1
17%
TOTAL
4
100%
14
100%
6
100%
Department/University
N=1
Department/University
0
0
0
0
1
100%
TOTAL
0
0
0
0
1
100% io
IC     REPORTS      |     JUNE     2,     2005
As previously explained, the Equity Office and the Policy serve the students, faculty,
and staff of UBC. Of these constituents, students are the most likely group to access
the Equity Office, a phenomenon that has been consistent over the last three years.
Students — undergraduates and graduates — brought 51 (42%) of the 122 complaints
in 2004, with undergraduates bringing twice as many as graduate students. See Figure
5. Faculty complaints comprised 18 (15%) ofthe 122 complaints in 2004. Staff
brought 40 (33%) ofthe 122 complaints in 2004. Within the staff category, 23 (57.5%)
of the 40 cases registered or consultations sought were by support staff, whereas 17
(42.5%) were brought by management & professional staff. A relatively small number
of complaints stemmed from administrators (4%), departments (2%), and student and
employee associations (1%). The breakdown of complaints by campus constituents
has been relatively consistent throughout the last few years, a split which roughly
reflects the overall population numbers of these groups on the UBC campus.1
Figure 6 examines the profiles of responding parties — those persons and units about
whom the initiating party sought advice or redress. This data demonstrates that in 2004
undergraduates raised most of their equity concerns in relation to faculty members: Of
the 36 undergraduate initiated complaints, 14 (39%) were brought against professors
and lecturers, alleging, for example, biased decisions in grading, inappropriate course
materials, or toxic classroom climate. Undergraduate students also raised equity
concerns against their departments or the university, constituting 19% of this group's
cases and consultations. Five out of the 36 (14%) complaints brought by undergraduate
students were against other undergraduates, while 2 (6%) incidents named graduate
students at the responding party. In previous years (2002-2003), the Equity Office
received more complaints by undergraduates against their fellow undergraduates;
however, 2004 figures show a significant drop in this category. One might suggest that
the Equity Ambassadors Program has played a role in this decline.
Like their undergraduate counterparts, graduate students raised most of their equity
related concerns against faculty members, this category comprising 27% of all graduate
student initiated complaints. In addition to concerns with faculty members, graduate
students named administrators as respondents in 3 complaints (20%), and departments
in 2 (13%). There were no complaints initiated by graduate students against other
graduate students, although one graduate student named an undergraduate as a
responding party.
The majority of complaints brought by support staff in 2004 were against management
& professional staff. Of the 23 incidents raised by support staff, 39% alleged bad
behaviour on the part of management & professional staff. By comparison, complaints
by support staff against other support staff accounted for 13%. Among matters
initiated by management & professional staff, 70% named fellow management &
professional employees. See Figure 6 for a more complete picture of staff cases and
consultations.
The faculty initiated 18 complaints with the Equity Office in 2004, naming, in rather
equal distribution, undergraduate and graduate students (22%), administrative heads
(17%), departments or the University (28%), and other faculty members (22%) as
respondents. These 2004 numbers generally mirror the breakdown of faculty initiated
complaints in 2003, except in this past year a shift has occurred where more concerns
were raised against students, while fewer were raised against Administrative Heads of
Units. See Figure 6.
Figure 7 illustrates the kinds of behaviour about which individuals complain when they
seek assistance from the Equity Office. This table reflects those incidents that trigger
the Policy, i.e., behaviour that infringes on one of the thirteen grounds of human rights,
as well as those incidents that do not contain a human rights element, such as bullying.
This year, most incidents reported fell within the category of biased conduct or
behaviour, of a human rights nature, directed at individuals (38%), followed closely
by those incidents of non-human rights bad behaviour that fell outside the Policy
(36%). In the immediate preceding years, non-human rights based incidents (those not
covered under the Policy) topped all other groups, whereas this year these numbers
seemed to have shifted to human rights based discrimination. Reports of assault (sexual
and physical) were down significantly in 2004 as compared to the previous two years.
SELECTED COMPLAINT OUTCOMES FOR 2004
As described throughout this report, the Equity Office offers a valuable service to UBC
students, faculty and staff through its advising on human rights issues and counseling
on other challenging matters. The management of each situation is unique to meet the
specific needs of the parties. Below is a brief description of a few mandated complaints
and how they were addressed:
• An instructor reported being sexually harassed and stalked by a student, who
made repeated invitations to social events, suggestive phone calls and e-mails.
The instructor sent clear messages to the student that such advances were not
welcome.
This incident triggered the Policy on the grounds of sex (sexual harassment and
stalking). The Equity Advisor invited the respondent student into the Equity
Office and gathered the respondent's perspective on the situation. The respondent
was advised of the Discrimination and Harassment Policy as well as the law
on stalking or criminal harassment; and directed to cease all contact with the
instructor. A warning was given that further contact with the Instructor would
result in bringing in the RCMP with regards to criminal harassment.
• A student reported that anti-Semitic and homophobic graffiti was posted in a
residence hall.
This incident triggered the Policy on the grounds of religion and sexual
orientation. The Equity Advisor contacted Housing to inform them of the
incident; and assisted the student in writing a letter that was then posted in
the same residence hall, decrying the incident as a violation of the Policy. In
addition, the Advisor assisted the student in writing an article on the incident
for a residence newsletter.
• An Administrative Head contacted the Equity Office on behalf of a staff member
who was verbally harassed with racist comments by a student/patron in one of
UBC's service units.
This case invoked the Policy on the grounds of race. The Equity Advisor assisted
the administrator in writing a letter to the respondent outlining the inappropriate
behaviour. Follow-up with respondent was conducted by the administrator.
• A person with a disability asked for accommodation, which was initially denied.
This case violated the Policy's protection of persons with disabilities. The
Advisor contacted the persons responsible for providing accommodations and
invited them to offer their perspective on the situation. After assessing the facts
and consulting with other disability resources on campus, it was determined that
the request for accommodation was indeed reasonable. The person who denied
the accommodation has been ordered to attend a disability awareness workshop
by the administrative head; and the administrative head has issued a letter of
apology to the complainant on behalf of the unit.
Figure 7 Behavioural Descriptions of Complaints
2002
N=103
2003
N=156
2004
N=122
Poisoned Environment
Insults/slurs/unacceptable jokes
11
11%
10
6%
7
6%
Following/staring/stalking
9
9%
11
7%
5
4%
Unwelcome verbal/written advances
10
10%
8
5%
6
5%
Non-physical verbal/written threats
0
0
1
1%
3
2%
Offensive visual material
1
1%
7
4%
5
4%
Total
31
30%
37
24%
26
21%
Retaliation
2
2%
3
2%
2
2%
Total
2
2%
3
2%
2
2%
Assault
Assault or threat of assault, unwelcome sexual atttention
9
9%
16
10%
3
2%
Assault or threat of assault, unwelcome physical contact
3
3%
0
0
1
1%
Total
12
12%
16
10%
4
3%
Other Forms of Discrimination
Biased academic decisions
6
6%
11
7%
13
11%
Biased employment decisions
2
2%
15
10%
13
11%
Exclusion or denial of access
4
4%
14
9%
15
12%
Systemic
5
5%
5
3%
5
4%
Total
17
17%
45
29%
46
38%
Allegations not Covered under Policy
Interpersonal Conflict
18
17%
29
19%
18
15%
Bullying
5
5%
5
3%
9
7%
Work/Study place harassment
18
17%
21
13%
17
14%
Total
41
40%
55
35%
44
36%
1 According to November 2003 statistics from UBC's Planning and Institutional Research office, the UBC campus community totals 51,397 people. Students make up approximately 80% of this population — 65%
(or 33,566) being undergraduates and 15% (7,379) graduate students. Faculty members, totaling 3,872 make up 7.5% ofthe UBC community; with staff comprising 6,580 or 13%. IC      REPORTS       |      JUNE     2,      2005      |
Graduate student Michael Mori (1) gets close attention and some vocal assistance from UBC Director of Voice and Opera Nancy Hermiston.
Finding the Voice Within
Mentors are integral for aspiring opera singers, by brenda Austin
Twenty-two students from the
UBC Opera Ensemble sang in the
chorus of Verdi's Un ballo in
maschera (the Masked Ball),
performed by the Vancouver Opera
this spring. Every year the opera
company attends the ensemble's
performances, and auditions
selected singers for their upcoming
season.
This is one way Nancy
Hermiston, director of the voice
and opera divisions of UBC's
School of Music, connects students
to the professional world.
She also makes connections for
them with the Vancouver
Symphony Orchestra, with other
Canadian opera companies and
with premier companies in the
Czech Republic and Germany.
"The students are all at different
stages of development," says
Hermiston. " I mentor them when
they are ready, providing them with
opportunities for auditions and
professional events.
"I teach them how to prepare
themselves for the discipline of
performing and to deal with the
rejection sometimes experienced
in auditions, as well as the
tremendous highs they will
experience when they have great
success on stage."
Many students continue contact
with Hermiston after they graduate from UBC. One called recently
from Newfoundland with problems rehearsing a role in Ariadne.
"Sometimes when they are far
away like that you have to give
them guidance over the phone,"
says Hermiston. "I ask them are
you breathing? Is your jaw
relaxed? Are you keeping the ribs
out when you breathe? Talking to
someone who believes in you
before a performance is very
important. Don't let them panic."
Mentoring happens in other
ways, too. Doctoral, master's and
undergraduate music students
learn from one another at the two
main UBC Opera Ensemble
productions each season, or during
the year on tours to local schools
and B.C. communities.
Students benefit greatly and gain
confidence as well from the annual
tours to Europe, performing with
professional singers, symphonies
and opera companies.
"We create a legacy of mentoring," says Hermiston, "that goes
on throughout a singer's career. I
am still mentored by my own
teachers from the University of
Toronto."
Michael Mori, a first year
graduate student in the opera
ensemble, attests to the vibrancy
of Hermiston's mentoring, and the
value of the contacts she makes for
students with other professionals.
"Her door is always open for
everyone," he says. "She's been
fantastic to me, helping me with a
family crisis and giving me bigger
and bigger opportunities."
Because of his artistic achieve
ment, Hermiston recommended
Mori, who is of Japanese descent,
for the 2005 Pan Asian Youth
Award, which he won.
Some students first meet
Hermiston at the annual UBC
Summer Music Institute, open
to everyone from high school
onward. Simone Osborne is one
such student who attended the
summer camp early in her high
school years.
Hermiston considers Osborne
very gifted and has mentored her
every year since. Now a first year
student in the voice and opera
divisions, she has already sung in
many public performances,
including a special fundraiser for
the Vancouver Opera.
Teiya Kasahara, a second year
student, also met Hermiston at the
Summer Music Institute, and has
worked with her since then. She
received a Ben Heppner Scholarship
this year and also sang at a master
class Heppner held at UBC.
Shauna Martin, Hermiston's
assistant, a professional singer and
teacher, is an embodiment of the
fulfillment of the mentoring circle,
according to Hermiston.
"When we first met, I told her
she would be the Queen of the
Night in the Magic Flute one day,"
says Hermiston. "After three years
of study, obtaining a master's
degree, traveling and singing in
Europe for a year, as well as teaching voice to her own students, she
sang the role with great success at
UBC and in Europe."
Now, Martin's own voice
students are coming to UBC and
she is watching them perform their
first major roles.
"Mentoring for singers is
long-term. We're like one big
family, passing knowledge and
traditions on to the next generation
of singers." Hermiston says. "In
the long run, a mentor is the most
influential person in someone's
career." □
Tsur Somerville (1) director of the
Centre for Urban Economics and
Real Estate and BComm student
Yosh Kasahara.
Business Prof Makes Challenge a
Winning Experience
BY BRENDA AUSTIN
When Yosh Kasahara talks to a
prospective employer he finds it a
huge advantage to show he has
"real-world" experience.
A fourth year BComm student at
the UBC Sauder School of
Business, Kasahara was one of six
members of the winning team in
the Northwest Real Estate
Challenge, put on by the National
Association of Industrial and
Office Properties (NAIOP). UBC's
competitors were graduates from
Portland State University and the
University of Washington.
The project for each team was
the production of a professional
proposal for a multi-use urban
community site in Seattle — a
problem area with political,
heritage and ownership issues. The
site was adjacent to the home
stadium of the Seattle Seahawks
football team.
The initiative for getting UBC
students involved in the challenge
came from Tsur Somerville, director of the Centre for Urban
Economics and Real Estate at
Sauder. He acted as a mentor to
the UBC students who say he did
an incredible amount of work to
add value to the program.
"The type of experience we had
in the challenge," says Kasahara,
"is important for a complete
education and it is appreciated by
employers." He was able to show
the published proposal with
creative solutions at a recent job
interview with a leading Lower
Mainland residential developer,
which resulted in a job offer.
The UBC winning project,
named "Stadium Square," was the
result of three months' research,
analysis and problem-solving by
the students from January to
March 2005. It tried to link the
excitement a stadium generates to
the heritage environment of nearby
Pioneer Square.
UBC students began work for
the challenge with an internal competition at Sauder, to determine
which of two teams of students
continued on page 13 12      |
IC      REPORTS      |      JUNE     2,     2005
KUDOS
2005 Killam Teachers
It's like an engaging sightseeing tour where the
guide makes sure no "tourist" gets left behind.
That's what students have said about lectures by
Pharmaceutical Sciences Asst. Prof. Brian Cairns,
one of 20 faculty members who recently received
2005 Killam Teaching Prizes.
Students commend Prof. Peter Boothroyd, of the
School of Community and Regional Planning, for
his commitment to social justice and his belief in
the democratization of planning. Assoc. Prof.
Barbara Arneil, of the department of political science, has been recognized as a teacher who works
with "the whole student, heart as well as head."
Killam winners are selected by their faculties
based on recommendations from students and colleagues. Each receives $5,000 from university
endowment sources. Recipients are distinguished by
their creativity, commitment and dynamic approach
to learning.
Other recipients are: (in alphabetical order)
Prof. Raymond Andersen, Biochemistry and
Molecular Biology • Assoc. Prof. Patricia Badir,
English • Senior Instructor Richard Barton,
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology • Prof. Chris
Clark, Oral Health Sciences • Instructor Paul
Carter, Computer Science • Prof. John Grace,
Dr. Joanne Weinberg is among UBC's top teachers.
Chemical and Biological Engineering • Prof. Robert
Guy, Forest Sciences • Assoc. Prof. Janet Jamieson,
Educational and Counselling Psychology & Special
Education • Lecturer Jeff Kroeker, Sauder School of
Business • Lecturer Mark MacLean, Science One
program • Prof. Janis McKenna, Physics and
Astronomy • Asst. Prof. Alain-Michel Rocheleau,
French, Hispanic and Italian Studies • Assoc. Prof.
Becki Ross, Anthropology & Sociology and
Women's Studies • Sessional Lecturer Henri-Paul
Sicsic, School of Music • Senior Instructor Stephen
Taylor, School of Architecture • Dr. Eric Webber,
Surgery • Dr. Joanne Weinberg, Cellular and
Physiological Sciences
UBC Film Students Nominated for Leos
Six recent UBC graduates have been nominated for
the 2005 Leo Awards, which honours the best and
brightest talents in film and television in British
Columbia.
Creative writing graduate Tara Gereaux has been
nominated for Best Screenwriting in the Youth or
Children s Series category for an episode of the CBC
television series Edgemont which she co-wrote with
the series' producer Ian Weir.
Jesse McKeown, also from the creative writing
program, has been nominated for Best
Screenwriting in a Dramatic Series for the yet-to-be
aired CTV series Robson Arms: The Tell Tale Latex.
Abigal Kinch, graduate of the creative writing
master's program, is nominated for Best
Screenwriting in a Short Film for White Out.
Film Production graduate Dylan Akio Smith's
film Man Feel Pain has been nominated for Best
Director, Best Cinematography, Best Short Film,
Best Screenwriting and Best Actor in the short film
category.
Fellow film production graduate James Wallace
receives a nod for his short film in both the Best
Actor and Best Editing categories.
Film diploma graduate Alex Levine's short film
My Old Man has been nominated in the Best
Cinematography, Best Costume Design, Best
Production Design and Best Musical Score in the
short film category.
For more information and winners, visit
http://www.leoawards.com/ □
Faculty Make Science
and Medicine Friendly
BY HILARY THOMSON
A gateway to what the future may
hold is how Jane Roskams
describes a web-based centre that
connects elementary and high
school students with university
mentoring experiences.
Called the UBC Mentor Centre,
the resource has been operating as
a pilot project by the Faculties of
Science and Medicine since 2002
and offers opportunities that
include guided group visits, supervised use of lab equipment, one-
on-one shadowing and project
development, visits to schools and
e-mentoring.
The only program in Canada to
offer such a centralized resource, it
is attracting attention from U.S.
universities wishing to establish
similar programs.
"This is a way to show students
that a lab is a lively, interactive
place and that scientists are real
people, too," says Roskams, an
associate professor of zoology,
who originated the idea of the centre. "We're encouraging these students to find someone they can
talk to who can help them realize
their potential."
More than 50 students in grades
5-12 have connected with the centre since its inception, and
upwards of 60 faculty, post-docs,
grad students and undergraduates
from the faculties of medicine and
science have volunteered mentoring experiences. Many mentors —
including Roskams — have their
own school-age children and know
how valuable mentoring experiences can be for young people.
Patricia Lau was 16 when she
spent a day shadowing Roskams in
her lab at the Centre for
Molecular Medicine and
Therapeutics. Now a fourth-year
UBC science student, Lau has
worked during the past three summers as an undergraduate
researcher in the lab and is
described by Roskams as a driving
force in UBC undergraduate science.
"Working and volunteering at
the lab has been an amazing experience," says the 21-year-old, who
is now a mentor herself. "A
research lab is vastly different
from my other labs. It's opened
my eyes to the world of research
and academia and I've really gotten a feeling of what it would be
like to be a grad student."
Shadowing a science or medicine researcher is one of the most
beneficial and popular activities,
says Dave Thomson, of the
Michael Smith Laboratories, who
co-ordinates the program.
Students have participated in harvesting research plants; witnessed
a CT scan and were introduced to
topics ranging from bioinformatics to applying for research
grants. They also learned about
resources such as science and
nature societies in the area, recommended readings and online
databases.
"These experiences do make a
difference in a young person's
life," says Teresa Milden,
Vancouver School Board (VSB)
district resource teacher for gifted/enrichment education, who has
helped co-ordinate UBC mentoring experiences. "Besides the
continued on page 15
On a clear day, can you really see living anywhere else?
m .  C      REPORTS       |      JUNE     2,      2005      |      13
Arts Faculty Launches Tri-Mentorship
BY BRENDA AUSTIN
Andrea Burgoyne, a theatre major
participating in the Faculty of Arts
tri-mentorship program, enjoyed
her experience at the Granville
Island Arts Club where she was
paired with Stephanie Hargreaves,
a UBC alumna, now working as
the Artist Liaison.
"Stephanie gave me opportunities to work in new environments
with professionals in the field,"
says Burgoyne. "I learned there are
many roles to be filled in the
industry, so my vision of theatre as
a career became a reality."
The Faculty of Arts tri-mentorship program, launched this year,
matches a professional with a
third- or fourth-year student to
support career and life planning
after graduation. In turn, the student is matched with a first-year
student, from the Arts One or
Foundations programs, to support
the student's academic career path.
Burgoyne met her first year student, Marshall McMahen, at the
tri-mentoring launch October
2004. They met a few times over
the course of the term, toured the
Arts Club together and attended
one of each other's theatrical
events.
Burgoyne shared her knowledge
about the courses she had taken
over three years at UBC, and
learned from McMahen what it
was like for someone else coming
to the university for the first time.
Hargreaves attended the
tri-mentoring launch too, and
although she had hired summer
interns before did not have a clear
idea of the procedure for
mentoring.
" I followed the best course I
could to expose Andrea to the Arts
Club," she says. "She was here five
or six times on several projects.
She helped with a workshop for a
new play at the ReAct Festival on
Granville Island and had a stage
management role for a show at
Theatre major Andrea Burgoyne (1) and mentor, Artistic Liaison Stephanie Hargreaves, take a moment to sit out front at Granville Island Arts Club.
World Theatre Day at the
Waterfront Theatre."
"She asked questions," says
Hargreaves, "and I gave her some
jobs I thought she was suited for,
and some jobs that I needed
completed, such as archiving.
Andrea is a born stage manager."
The experience worked well for
all three and they were asked to
present their opinions on the
program at the March 2005
wrap-up session attended by the
other 19 triads of arts alumni,
senior and junior student
mentoring participants.
The Arts Co-op Students'
Association runs another excellent
mentorship program. It is a
completely student-run peer-
mentorship program through
which senior co-op students
support new co-op students in
their job search with advice and
suggestions. This ongoing program
attracts 50-70 pairs each year.
The tri-mentorship program will
continue in the 2005-06 year. □
Real Estate Prof Makes Challenge
a Winning Experience
continued from page 8
would represent the school at the
Seattle competition. Somerville
enlisted mentors for each UBC
team from his industry contacts —
Doug Avis from Canada Lands,
UBC alumnus Michael Flanigan of
the City of Vancouver, Michael
Katz, of Katz Architecture, and
John Scott, of CEI Architecture.
Both teams worked on the
Seattle project with two mentors
each and then presented their
bility, and resource utilization of
the Seattle project.
"The judges said the reason we
won was because we concluded
the return on this project for an
investor was insufficient in relation to the risk level, and because
we showed how lifting some key
constraints would make the project feasible," says Kasahara.
They worked, as did the teams
from Portland University and
pie at a NAIOP-organized dinner.
The announcement of UBC as
the winning team was made immediately following this event and
they received a trophy, plus
$5,000.
"The students who competed in
this challenge and in the earlier
competition at UBC are light years
ahead in getting a job, not only
through the experience they
gained, but from the contacts they
"The students who competed in this challenge and in the earlier
competition at UBC are light years ahead in getting a job..."
analysis and solutions to three real
estate professionals at UBC Robson
Square.
The wining team of Kasahara
and fellow students Scarlett Duntz,
Varinder Grewal, Neil Hahn,
Hanson Ng and Roy Parappilly
with help from Timothy "T.J." Rak
from the other team, continued to
the next phase of the competition.
Each student put in at least 30
hours a week to research the feasibility, marketability, financial via-
Washington University, with
Washington State industry
resources familiar with the project,
who specialized in finance, construction, architecture and real
estate. The teams presented their
respective proposals to a panel of
13 industry judges drawn from
Seattle, Portland, Bellevue and
Vancouver.
While the judges deliberated, the
teams presented their solutions to
a larger group of around 200 peo-
made," says Somerville.
The success in the challenge
project rested for some students on
their previous participation in one
of the other Sauder mentoring programs such as the summer internship program, which has been in
operation for about four years.
Somerville arranges 10 or 11
internships a year with groups
such as Bentall Capital, Grosvenor,
Colliers, and UBC Properties
Trust. □
Somerville (r) works hard to add value to the experience of students like Kasahara at UBC'c Sauder School of Business. '4     I
IC      REPORTS      |      JUNE     2,      2005
Pay it Forward: Pharmacy Prof
Honours Own Mentor
BY HILARY THOMSON
Driven to discover? Inspired to
investigate? For many undergrads,
the leap from lecture hall to laboratory can be daunting. In UBC's
Faculty of Pharmaceutical
Sciences, Assoc. Prof. Kishor
Wasan is there to help students
make the transition.
A faculty member since 1995
and a Distinguished University
Scholar, Wasan's perspective on turning students
on to science was greatly
influenced by his own
mentor, the late Alan C.
Hayman, a professor at
Wasan's alma mater, the
University of Texas.
"I wouldn't be where I
am today if it wasn't for
him," says Wasan, who
chairs the faculty's division of pharmaceutics and
biopharmaceutics. "He
had a personal passion
and took the time to
encourage young scientists. "
When Wasan asked
himself how he could
repay Hayman's gift of
mentorship, the answer
was clear: do it for someone else. Thus was born the Alan
C. Hayman Memorial Award for
Summer Student Research, established by Wasan and his wife, Dr.
Ellen Wasan, a research scientist at
the BC Cancer Agency.
A recipient of a 2001/02 Killam
Teaching Prize, Wasan has his own
passion when it comes to teaching
and mentoring undergrad research.
He expanded the faculty's fledgling
summer student research program
(SSRP) to about 30 participants
annually. Almost 15 per cent of
SSRP students go on to graduate
studies. In addition, Wasan founded and since 2001 has served as
national director of the Canadian
Summer Research Program for
Undergraduate Pharmacy
Students.
"I learn as much or more than I
give," he says. "Being a mentor is
different than being a boss. I want
the student to become empowered
— to be creative and find their
own path."
With undergraduates who are
exploring many choices, he concentrates on convincing them that
science is "cool" and worth pursuing. Grad students and post-
docs don't need convincing but do
require guidance and support.
Factors that distinguish mentoring in the Faculty of
Pharmaceutical Sciences include a
culture and history of undergrads
working in research labs. In addition, the relatively small size of the
faculty — 550 students — means
"everybody knows everybody"
making it easier to form relationships. Even so, Wasan says one of
the hardest aspects of mentoring is
getting students comfortable discussing their feelings
about their research,
especially if it's not
going well.
"Students don't want
to displease a mentor,"
he says. "I really try to
break down those barriers so I can know
when my students need
support."
Although Wasan
acknowledges that
mentoring is a great
u s   tool to recruit students
o
I "i   to a future in pharma-
L 1   cy research, he is
I £   happy to watch stu-
|   dents become investi-
P o   gators in other areas of
°   science or move on to
other professions.
"Sometimes they
come by years later and still
remember their experience as an
undergrad researcher — that's really satisfying."
A student who recently benefited
from Wasan's mentorship is second-year student Ross Taylor.
During his first year in pharmacy, he approached Wasan because
of his reputation as an enthusiastic
teacher and mentor.
"He lets you discover on your
own," says the 21-year-old. "He
Kishor Wasan (above) has a passion for mentoring that helped Ross Taylor (1)
earn a faculty undergrad research prize.
helped me see all the options but
also let me make my own decisions — he gives you the freedom
to try things."
But mentoring is a two-way
street, and Carlos Leon, a post-
doc in Wasan's lab, says Taylor
stood out because of his receptive-
ness to learn and his sincerity.
Leon helped him investigate
effects of heat on drugs used to
continued on page 15
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That AHA! Moment
continued from page 1
UBC programs is due to the fact
that participants find many layers
of value, and the time commitment
is manageable.
"They learn who they are as an
individual," says Alexander, who
recently presented UBC's
tri-mentoring program to the
National Association of Student
Personnel Administrators. "There is
that 'AHA!' moment when they see
how what they are doing at university connects to the real world.
Mentoring helps accelerate, or
facilitate, that moment."
UBC's approach allows faculties
to design tri-mentoring to meet
particular needs. In 2003, for
example, Mechanical Engineering
Prof. Elizabeth Croft was
approached by two UBC student
members of the Division for
Advancement of Women in
Engineering and Geoscience of the
Association of the Professional
Engineers and Geoscientists of B.C.
to start a mentoring program for
women.
"Many women students complete
their program without having any
meaningful contact with women
professors and engineering
professionals to provide important
role modeling and mentorship
assistance," says Croft, who started
the program as a pilot for women
students, and then tripled the
program size to accommodate both
men and women.
"The response has been
overwhelmingly positive. We had
twice the number of applicants in
September than we had space for,"
says Croft, who adds she is not
aware of any mentoring program of
similar size or format in an engineering school in Canada.
Mentoring activities exist in a
myriad of other ways at UBC. They
include a range of community
outreach activities that connect
UBC students with local elementary
and high school students, executive
mentorships in UBC's Sauder
School of Business, and a growing
number of alumni mentorship
activities that connected sixty
alumni with more than 1,100
students last year.
UBC's Teaching and Academic
Growth Unit has offered faculty
lunches and networking initiatives
for some time to support incoming
professors. It is growing its faculty
mentorship efforts to support new
professors through a pilot project
in the Faculty of Arts called "Focus
on Teaching." To date 35 faculty
mentees have taken part in the new
program, meant to help junior
faculty members reflect on their
teaching and enhance it.
The UBC's Human Resources
division has created an innovative
new service called UBC Coaching
Services. It provides qualified executive and personal coaches for faculty and staff members to enhance
their professional development. The
service has coached 167 UBC staff
and faculty since it began in 2001.
It has developed a model director
Justin Marples says is a first among
universities that has seen it expand
services to external community
groups and businesses, providing a
revenue stream back into UBC.
Ultimately, says Alexander, the
UBC mentorship culture has grown
as participants enjoy a greater sense
of community and enhanced
personal learning. A case in point
is McLennan, who returned to the
program last year as an industry
mentor, working with two students.
" It brings great benefits for
mentors as well," says Alexander.
" Giving back is a huge motivation.
Mentors learn about themselves
too. It helps re-energize them." □
The UBC Tri-Mentoring
Program is funded by the
Counselling Foundation of Canada,
whose goal is to to engage in charitable and educational activities for
the benefit of people, enabling them
to improve their lifestyles and make
a more effective contribution to
their communities.
(http://www.counselling.net).
UBC's Inaugural
Graduate
Mentorship
Awards
continued from page 5
include winners, Stephanie Bolster
and Roo Borson, and prose writers
Terrence Young and Tammy
Armstrong, who were both nominated for Governor General's
awards for books they worked on
with McWhirter.
"When you see them establish
themselves as the literary entity
you saw in the embryo phase —
that's very satisfying."
The Killam Fellowships and
Prize programs were established in
memory of Izaak Walton Killam, a
Canadian financier whose estate
has provided substantial bequests
to higher education initiatives in
Canada. □
Faculty Make
Science and
Medicine
Friendly
continued from page 12
opportunity to see a lab first-hand,
students also become a class
expert, which can build self-
esteem. Mentoring is more than a
social relationship — this is a very
powerful experience."
Students also witness voluntarism and teamwork, make valuable contacts and are able to add
research experience to their
resumes, she adds.
The centre's web site also links
students and parents to resources
such as UBC's Let's Talk Science
program; Society for Canadian
Women in Science and Technology
mentoring opportunities for young
women; Science World's outreach
programs and even a site that
offers interactive online frog
dissection.
The Vancouver Foundation
provided initial funding for the
pilot, with VSB and UBC
providing additional support for
personnel. The centre's current
focus is to find additional funding
to maintain the centre and expand
it to other faculties.
For more information on the
UBC Mentor Centre, visit
www.mentorcentre.ubc.ca. □
Writing Centre
Intensive Summer Writing Programs
Give your writing a burst of energy with these
week-long programs in July and August!
Women's Writes: A Week of Workshops July 4-8
Writing for the Screen July 4-8
Media Writing Week July 11-15
Writing for Graduate Students July 11-15
Rewriting Your Screenplay July 18-22
Novel Writing Workshop July 18-22
Freelance Article Writing Workshop July 18-22
Autobiography Writing Workshop July 25-29
or Aug 2-5
Short Fiction Intensive Workshop July 25-29
Creative Writing Workshop Aug 2-5
Body Soul Writing Aug 8-12
UBC
Continuing Studies
^g?   604-822-9564
www.writingcentre.ubc.ca
Pharmacy Prof
Honours Own
Mentor
continued from page 14
treat a common fungus. They
showed that heat made the drug
less toxic and the investigation
earned Taylor the faculty's 2004
A. C. Hayman SSRP Poster
Competition.
Taylor also won the People's
Choice award and was one of
five poster winners at UBC's
Multidisciplinary Undergraduate
Research Conference 2005.
Taylor travels to Saskatoon this
month to present his findings to
the Association of Faculties of
Pharmacy annual conference. In
addition, the work will be published in the International
Journal of Pharmaceutics.
Taylor describes his mentoring
experience as "genuinely
positive."
"I got to work with people
who love their jobs and who
were welcoming and patient — I
highly recommend it."
Taylor will complete a clerkship this summer in the small
town of Brooks, Alberta, and
plans to continue research work
in September. □
Get ahead with your MATH
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students considering Math 180 or 184 at UBC
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