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UBC Library News May 31, 1969

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 HJ.B.C LIBRARY NEWS
Volume II, No. 5
May 1969
Vancouver, B.C.
This newsletter appears once a month as an information service for U.B.C. faculty and other readers outside the Library. It
contains feature articles and news about developments in the Library system which we feel will be of interest or concern to the
larger community. The News welcomes all comments, criticisms, and suggestions for future articles.
MAY-JUNE LIBRARY HOURS
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From May until the start of summer school on July 2, most campus libraries will close at 5 p.m. on weekdays and remain
closed on weekends. However, one exception should be noted. Extra-sessional evening courses will be given during this time,
running from 7 to 9:45 four nights a week. For the benefit of students taking these courses, both the Main and Sedgewick
libraries will stay open until 11 p.m. on Tuesdays and Wednesdays only.
Campus library hours for the period May 1 —June 30 are given below:
MAIN AND SEDGEWICK LIBRARIES
:
MONDAY
9 a.m.-5 p.m.
TUESDAY & WEDNESDAY
9 a.m.—11 p.m.
THURSDAYS FRIDAY
9 a.m.—5 p.m.
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
Closed
MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
May 1-May 17
MONDAY-FRIDAY
9 a.m.—5 p.m.
SATURDAYS SUNDAY
Closed
May 20-June 30
MONDAY-FRIDAY
9 a.m.—9 p.m.
SATURDAY
10 a.m.—4 p.m.
SUNDAY
Closed
WOODWARD LIBRARY
May 1 -2
THURSDAYS FRIDAY
8 a.m.—10 p.m.
May 3
SATURDAY
8 a.m.—5 p.m.
May 4
SUNDAY
Closed
May 5-9
MONDAY-FRIDAY
8 a.m.—10 p.m.
May 10
SATURDAY
8 a.m.—5 p.m.
May 11
SUNDAY
Closed
May 12-June30
MONDAY-SATURDAY
8 a.m.—5 p.m.
SUNDAY
Closed
ALL OTHER LIBRARIES
MONDAY-FRIDAY
9 a.m.—5 p.m.
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
Closed
BROCK HALL STUDY AREAS
May 1-June 30
MONDAY-FRIDAY
5 p.m.—11 p.m.
SATURDAYS SUNDAY
Closed
HOLIDAYS
May 19
VICTORIA DAY
ALL LIBRARIES AND BROCK
HALL CLOSED
July 1
DOMINION DAY
ALL LIBRARIES AND BROCK
HALL CLOSED
During July and most of August the Main, Sedgewick, and Woodward Libraries will stay open until 9 p.m. Monday to
Thursday, until 5 Friday and Saturday, and will be closed on Sunday. A more complete schedule for this period will appear in
the June-July issue of the U.B.C. Library News. ORDERING BOOKS: SOME GUIDELINES
As this issue of the News goes to press, the Library moves into a new financial year. A 1969/70 book budget of $1,041,435
has been approved and teaching departments have been informed of their allocations. At this time of year the Library gets more
than the usual number of requests for information about ordering books. The following survey may help those who are still not
familiar with U.B.C's book ordering system.
Until the 1960's almost all the books which came into the Library had to be ordered individually, usually by faculty
members. However, only slightly over half are selected in this way today. All the rest come in automatically on "blanket" or
"approval" plans. Because these two terms are often confused, it is worth taking a moment to define them more closely.
Blanket order plans call for a publisher or book dealer to send the Library everything published in a stated subject area,
provided it is suitable for university students and researchers. It is essential that the supplier understand exactly what type of
material the Library will find useful, because nothing received on a blanket order can be returned (unless, of course, it is clearly
outside the terms of the agreement). Approval plans, on the other hand, permit the Library to reject and return material.
Most European publications come into the U.B.C. Library on blanket orders, while American ones are sent on approval.
Taken together, the two plans provide the broadest possible coverage of current material from the major American and British
publishers and university presses. Continental European coverage is somewhat more restricted.
Besides getting needed books to the Library with all possible speed, these mass order plans leave more time for librarians and
faculty members to select material not covered by the plans. Pamphlets, rare or out-of-print material, works put out by obscure
publishers, and most textbooks must still be ordered individually.
Faculty members who are certain that the material they need will not be coming in automatically are asked to fill out a
standard yellow requisition form. (Supplies of these are kept in the Librarian's Office.) Completed forms should be addressed to
the Searching Section, U.B.C Library.
Please note, though, that books should not be ordered just because they do not appear on the Acquisitions print-out of books
on order. This print-out does not—repeat, NOT—include entries for books which are likely to be coming in on blanket or
approval programs. Orders for such material will be held in the Acquisitions Division and checked against incoming shipments. If
it becomes obvious that the books will not be coming to the Library automatically, the order will of course be fully processed
and sent out.
DEAN COWAN TO RESIGN
When the Senate Library Committee reconvenes in September, one familiar face will be missing. Dean Ian McTaggart-Cowan,
who has served as chairman since 1947, will resign from the Committee before the start of his one-year leave of absence this
summer.
On October 18, 1945, Dr. Cowan (then an assistant professor in the Department of Zoology) attended his first Senate Library
Committee meeting. In that year the Library still consisted of the original centre portion of the Main building, although a north
wing was in the planning stage. Holdings were in the neighbourhood of 160,000 volumes.
Dr. Cowan has served as chairman of the Committee since February 20, 1947. During his twenty-two years in office the
Library has grown phenomenally. Two wings and a rear extension have been added to the Main building, and over one million
volumes to the collection. Resources and services have spread out into a comprehensive system of branch libraries.
One constant factor during this period of development has been the support and guidance of Dr. Cowan. In recognition, the
Library recently presented him with a number of books on his special field, natural history. Another gift of note was a pair of
water colours depicting B.C. wild flowers. The artist, Mrs. Suzanne Dodson, is well known locally as a painter, but perhaps even
better known to library patrons as the head of the Government Publications Division.
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STUDENTS JOIN COMMITTEE
One other change in the Senate Library Committee deserves separate mention. For the first time since the Committee was set
up in 1915, membership has been extended to students. Three have been appointed: Don Munton (7Arts), Ken Bushell (2 App.
Sci.) and Al Keller (9 Sci.) All three have been attending meetings since February, and Mr. Keller has also been appointed to the
Client's Committee on the Undergraduate Library.
ALUMNI FUND FINANCES NEW PROJECTS
The main aim of the U.B.C. Alumni Fund has always been to improve the quality of student life. To this end the fund has
donated $10,500 to the Library, asking that the money be used for a number of special projects. Among these are:
1) A three-dimensional model of the Main Library, to supplement library guides and floor plans
2) Artist's supplies and equipment for signs and displays
3) Remote book returns
4) Paperbacks for a browsing collection in Sedgewick
5) Duplicate copies of books in demand (also for Sedgewick)
Our thanks to all those who made this gift possible.
UNDERGRADUATE LIBRARY PLANS:
A PROGRESS REPORT
If a new undergraduate library is built, where should it be located? What facilities should it have? In attempt to find the
answers the Library has begun issuing a series of questionnaires to library users.
The first one, distributed last month, was designed to show traffic patterns to and from the Main Library and Sedgewick.
Responses from these have already been tabulated by computer. Stop-action films taken from the bell tower are also being used
to chart traffic flow in the vicinity of the Library. Data from both surveys will help in the choice of a site for the new building.
The questionnaire handed out in April was headed, "What Are You Doing Here, Anyway?" It will show patterns of use
within the Main and Sedgewick Libraries, and will indicate weak points in design which should be corrected in the new building.
Later in the summer users will be asked about the type of seating and study facilities they prefer. By the time the final survey
is completed, library planners should be in a position to design a building that will meet every need of both staff and students.
NEW GRANT FOR BOOK PURCHASES
For the second year in a row U.B.C. has received a Canada Council grant for the purchase of library research materials in the
humanities and social sicences. The 1968 grant came to $64,000; this year the total has risen to $70,000. A meeting of deans
will be called shortly to allocate funds to the various teaching departments.
SPOTLIGHT ON THE SUBJECT CATALOGUE
A committee of three librarians has been appointed to carry out a study of Subject Catalogue use in the Main Library. Some
of the questions to be answered are:
— HOW OFTEN is the Subject Catalogue used in relation to the Author-Title Catalogue?
— WHO uses it most: freshmen, upper year students, graduates, or faculty?
— WHY is it used: to find all the Library's holdings on a given subject, or just the most useful ones, or to locate one particular book? Is there a relationship between the needs of a user and his faculty or year?
— HOW LONG do Subject Catalogue users take to find the material they are looking for?
— WHERE are mistakes made most often?
Answers to these and other questions may suggest ways in which the Subject Catalogue can be made easier to use. More about
this study in later issues of the U.B.C. Library News.
EASTMAN PAPERS COME TO U.B.C.
The Library's Special Collections Division has recently acquired the personal papers of the late Dr. S. Mack Eastman, who
founded U.B.C's History Department in 1915.
From 1925 to 1940 Dr. Eastman served as Chief of Section, Research and Information, with the International Labor
Organization in Geneva. After nine years at the University of Saskatchewan he retired and returned to Vancouver, where he died
in September, 1968.
Dr. Eastman was considered one of the outstanding Canadians working in the field of international relations. His papers
reflect his continuing interest in the I.L.O., the United Nations, and international affairs in general.
INSTANT HOUSING FOR LIBRARY?
LIBRARY LOCKERS TO LESSEN LOSSES
To safeguard books, briefcases, and other personal belongings left outside the stacks, the Main Library will shortly be
installing 150 small steel lockers near the turnstiles. One locker area will be located just outside the entrance to stack level 3, and
the other in the Main Concourse.
The lockers are coin-operated, and the key cannot be removed until 25 cents is deposited in a slot. However, the money will
be returned automatically as soon as the locker is reopened.
LOAN REGULATIONS TO BE REVIEWED
Recently the Senate Library Committee at Simon Fraser University voted to extend the Library's fine system to include
faculty. A number of North American university libraries are moving in the same direction, and usually for the same reasons.
First, there seems to be no reason (other than tradition) why all members of the university community should not be subject
to the same penalties for the same misuse of library privileges. The second argument for fining faculty is more simply put: fines
provide an incentive for returning overdue books. All too often, libraries which do not fine faculty must spend an undue amount
of staff time trying to recover books which should have been returned weeks before. When borrowers are waiting for the
material, the reputation of both the library and the faculty member suffers.
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Even if funds are made available for a new undergraduate library, space is at such a premium already that the Library must
begin thinking about temporary accommodation. As a result, a User's Committee on Temporary Space has been formed, headed
by Inglis F. Bell.
The seven-man committee will first determine the Library's requirements for added work and storage space. Later it will look
into the types of prefabricated buildings which might be used to house library staff and collections.
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Although there is much to be said for these arguments, the U.B.C. Library would still prefer not to have to fine faculty
members. On the other hand, we badly need a more efficient method of getting faculty books back so that others can use them.
Under the present system, a faculty member who borrows a book in January is under no obligation to return it until May, even
if it is in demand.
In an attempt to improve the situation, many university libraries have imposed fines on faculty members or reduced the
length of all faculty loans. The U.B.C. Library may not have to do either. This summer the Senate Library Committee will look
into a system which gives faculty members unrestricted use of library material for a period of months, provided that no one else
needs it. Books may be borrowed for two weeks without being subject to recall, and may be kept out after this time as long as
no one else asks for them. It is understood, though, that they may be called in if they have been out over two weeks and if
another borrower is waiting.
Departmental library representatives will take an active part in all discussions. It goes without saying that they will be better
able to make recommendations if they know faculty members' opinions.
IN PURSUIT OF HIGHER THINGS
Much has been said and written about the design of the U.B.C. Library's central working area, the Main Concourse. With its
60-foot vaulted ceiling and narrow opaque windows (the lowest of which is 20 feet above floor level) it has been unfavourably
compared to Grand Central Station, the B.C. Penitentiary, and a minor English cathedral. However, there is no doubt that the
architect knew exactly what he was doing. A library, after all, should further the search for knowledge in every possible way.
The ideal design, then, would be one which cuts the user off completely from the distractions of the outside world. Viewed in
this light, the Concourse takes its place as one of Canada's architectural triumphs. From inside, it is almost impossible to tell
what kind of day it is, or even what season.
But everybody knows when spring comes. It's spring when the janitor opens the big stained-glass windows up near the roof
... and the April breezes waft down into the Concourse ... accompanied by the April pigeons. Spring is when a librarian
discovers:
— that even two pigeons roosting in the Concourse can make life difficult (not to say messy)
— that nothing seems to have been written on removing birds from a catalogue area
— that 60-foot ladders are hard to find
— that the S.P.C.A. feels bringing in a falcon may be carrying things a little bit too far
But if a librarian can't find the answer to a problem, no one can. For the second year in a row the Men From Physical Plant
come in with their tranquilizer guns, and the U.B.C Library holds its annual Pigeon Shoot in the Main Concourse.
Sporting members of the staff are already looking forward to the fall. After all, that's when the geese go south, and if we
leave all the windows open ....
SUMMER SLOWDOWN FOR NEWS
During the summer months the U.B.C. Library News will publish only one issue, a June-July number which will appear during
the first week of summer school. Beginning with an August-September issue early in the fall session, all other issues will come
out monthly, as before.
Editor: Mrs. E. de Bruijn Information S Orientation Division u
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