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UBC Library News 1969

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Array OLB.C LIBRARY NEWS
Volume II, No. 7
Special Fall Issue, 1969
Vancouver, B.C.
This newsletter is published as an information service for UBC faculty, students and other readers outside the Library. It
contains feature articles and news about developments in the Library system which we feel will be of interest or concern to the
larger community. The News welcomes all comments, criticisms, and suggestions for future articles.
CAMPUS LIBRARY HOURS
WINTER SESSION, 1969-70
The following schedule is effective from September 8 to December 18, and from January 5 to April 30.
Main & Sedgewick Libraries
Woodward Library
Law Library
Music Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Mathematics Library
Forestry/Agriculture Library
Social Work Library
Institute of Fisheries Library
Monday-Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00 a.m.-midnight
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
12:00 noon-midnight
Monday-Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00 a.m.-midnight
8:00a.m.-5:00p.m.
12:00 noon-midnight
Monday—Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00 a.m.—midnight
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
10:00 a.m.-10:00p.m
Monday—Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00 a.m.-l 1:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
12:00 noon-6:00p.m.
Monday—Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00a.m.-10:00p.m.
8:00a.m.-5:00p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
Monday—Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
Monday—Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
9:00a.m.-5:00p.m.
CLOSED
Monday—Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00a.m.-10:00p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
Monday—Friday
Saturday
Sunday
9:00a.m.-5:00p.m.
CLOSED
CLOSED Record Collection
Monday-Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
(Feb. 19-20:   8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.)
Brock Hall Study Area Monday—Sunday 8:00 a.m.—midnight
Crane Memorial Library Monday—Friday 8:30 a.m.—4:30 p.m.
Holiday hours for Thanksgiving, Remembrance Day, Christmas and Easter will be listed in later issues of the News.
Building Open
Asian Studies Division
Fine Arts Division
Government Publications Division
Map Division and Special
Collections Division
Main Concourse Information Desk
MAIN LIBRARY HOURS
WINTER SESSION, 1969-70
Monday—Friday
8:00 a.m.-midnight
Saturday
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Sunday
12:00 noon—midnight
luty at the turnstiles and the Main Loan Desk as long as the building is
Monday—Friday
8:30a.m.-5:00p.m.
7:00p.m.-10:00p.m.
Saturday
9:00a.m.-5:00p.m.
Sunday
CLOSED
Monday-Friday
8:00 a.m.—midnight
Saturday
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Sunday
12:00 noon-6:00 p.m.
Monday-Thursday
8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
Friday
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Saturday
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Sunday
CLOSED
Monday—Friday
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
Saturday
9:00a.m.-5:00p.m.
Sunday
CLOSED
i Monday—Friday
8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
■ Saturday
9:00a.m.-5:00p.m.
Sunday
12:00 noon-10:00p.m
LIBRARY ORIENTATION:
THIS YEAR, A NEW LOOK
Learning about the Library is going to be easier this year than ever before. This, at least, is the hope of the Information and
Orientation Division, which co-ordinates most of the tours, programs, and publications.
To begin with, the standard library tour will be partly replaced by a 12-minute colour slide show with a taped commentary.
The program begins with a survey of the campus libraries, but concentrates on the Main and Sedgewick Libraries in particular.
Interior shots of the two libraries, closeups of catalogue cards, and step-by-step explanations of how to find and borrow a book
help newcomers get acquainted with the UBC system. After the show comes a 15-minute tour covering the most important
public services and reference divisions. ... The entire program takes about half an hour, and will be given at least once a day until the middle pf November. By offering
it for a full ten weeks, the Library hopes to make help available to newcomers when they need it (usually just before the first big
assignment is due).
Slide shows and tours can also be arranged for any class or study group. These are especially useful for students who will be
working on term papers this fall. For details, please call the Information Desk at local 2077.
All programs begin in the reading area next to the Main Library's subject Catalogue. A schedule of dates and times for
October and November is given below.
Sept. 29-Oct. 3 9:45 Mon., Wed., Fri.;
l:45Tues.,Thurs.
Oct. 6-10
Oct. 13-17
10:45 and 3:45 daily
Oct. 20-24 1:45 Mon., Wed., Fri.;
Oct. 27-31 9:45 Tues., Thurs.
Nov. 3-7 10:45 and 3:45 daily
Nov. 10-14
...
Nothing can quite replace printed guides, though, and the Library has a number of them. The fullest and most useful is the
new binder-sized student handbook, Know Your Library. Complete with labelled catalogue cards, Main Library floor plans, and
a campus map, it is an excellent guide to the library system in general and to the Main Library in particular. Copies may be
picked up at the Information Desk in the Main Concourse.
Many of the Main Library subject divisions and all of the branch libraries are issuing brochures describing their collections and
services. Ask for these at the public service desk in the individual branch or division.
Finally, a library handbook written especially for faculty will come out during the fall term. Watch for announcements in
later issues of the News.
CHANGES IN FACULTY LOAN PERIODS
Early this summer, the Senate Library Committee revised some of the rules governing faculty loan periods. A feature article
outlining these changes and the Committee's reasons for making them was published in the June/July Library News. Reprints are
available from the Editor. However, the summary below covers most of the main points.
In the past, faculty members who borrowed material from the Main Library did not have to return or renew it until the end
of term call-in. Although the Library could ask that an item be returned for a waiting borrower, it had no real authority to get
the book back until the call-in, often months away. Even if material was held out after this time, faculty members could not be
fined.
Such a system can only work smoothly if borrowers make a point of using library material within a reasonable time and
returning it promptly. This becomes especially important when others are waiting to use the book.
Unfortunately, faculty members have not always lived up to these responsibilities. Many have been keeping books out longer
than they actually need to—often, in fact, right up until the compulsory call-in. Out of the thousands of faculty books returned
at this time, only about half are renewed. Apparently, then, an equal number could just as well have been returned earlier in the
term, since they were no longer of use.
By holding books in this way, faculty members have made it much harder for others to consult and/or borrow material that
they need. Any library user should have the chance to look through a number of books and choose the best. This becomes
difficult, to say the least, when important works are gone from the shelves for months at a time.
Faculty members seldom realize just how great the demand is for material they have signed out. A Library notice is sent to
them, of course, if someone asks for the book, but in a great many cases students decline the Library's offer to call in a book
from a faculty member. Many just want a chance to look through the book to see how useful it will be, and since they do not
yet know this they hesitate to have it called in. Many others seem to be afraid of the consequences. According to a report from
the Circulation Division:
Sometimes the student will state that he has had too little luck in the past. Also, it is common practice for graduate
students and senior undergraduates to insist upon being told the name of the faculty member before deciding to call
in the book. This may be done because they expect to obtain the book very quickly from certain faculty members;
but it is surprising how often a student comments that he would not dare have a book called in from his faculty
advisor or from certain faculty members in his department. On the other hand, faculty borrowers have needs and rights which must be kept in mind too. Many of them really must keep
books out for long periods of time, and a good deal of this material is so specialized that no one else would be likely to need it.
The Senate Library Committee has worked out a revised loan policy which should satisfy both students and faculty. Under
this system, all stack books from the Main Library (as opposed to reserve books and periodicals) are signed out for a two-week
period. During this time the borrower has unrestricted use of the material, and it cannot be called in. At the end of two weeks,
student books must be returned, but faculty books do not; they merely become subject to recall if another borrower asks for
them. In this case the faculty member will receive a notice from the Library asking that the book be returned promptly. If no
one puts in a request for a book that a faculty member has signed out, he may keep it until he is through with it or until the
next general call-in, when it may be renewed if necessary.
The new loan system has been in effect for over a month now, and seems to be meeting with general approval. As always, the
Circulation Division will be happy to answer questions.
DONT LOOK NOW, BUT ...
A good basic rule for returning faculty and students is that the UBC Library is never quite the same in September as it was
when exams ended in May. No really sweeping changes were made this summer, but there are a few differences. Namely:
1. The Location File next to the Main Library's card catalogue is now being expanded. Previously it held location cards for
all periodicals, but not for all books: cards were not filed for books which were available only from the Main Stacks or
from some of the specialized collections such as Fine Arts. Because this was a difficult concept for users to grasp, the
Library has decided to put in a location card for every book in the library system. This will take time, but it is already
making the file easier to use. A simplified set of instructions is posted at the file cabinets.
2. Nearly 170 education periodicals have been transferred from the Main Library to the Curriculum Laboratory, where both
the current issues and the bound volumes will be held from now on. For a full list of the titles which were moved, see the
librarians at the Main Library's Information Desk or the public service desk in the Curriculum Laboratory.
3. A large storage cage on stack level 3 has been removed to provide additional shelving for stack books. This means that all
the books on that floor have had to be rearranged. The stack maps along the walls indicate where each section of call
numbers will now be found, but two major changes might be noted: books with call numbers beginning "PH" to "PM"
have been moved down from stack level 4, and the Juvenile Collection ("j" call numbers) will be found between the "JX"
and "K" sections.
4. Thirty-five departmental reading rooms on campus have officially been added to the library system. The Head of the new
Reading Rooms Division, Mr. Walter Harrington, may be reached at local 2819 or 2304.
5. The Faculty Publications staff have moved from the office area off the Main Concourse to the Faculty Reading Room at
the northeast corner of stack level 5, near the newspaper collection. Telephone messages may be left at local 2304, and a
delivery box for written material is kept behind the Information Desk.
6. Order forms submitted by faculty members will no longer be sent back when the book is catalogued. To find out whether
a newly arrived book has been catalogued, check the computer list, Books on Order, In Process, and Catalogued, at the
Main Library's Information Desk, or phone local 2077.
Forthcoming changes include remodelling of the government documents and microfilm areas and widening of the Main
Library's central doorway. Both of these projects will begin in early October.
MULLOY BEQUEST AIDS ENGLISH COLLECTIONS
Late in 1968 it was announced that the late Miss Florence Mulloy had left over $6,000 to the University "for the purchase of
Library Books for its Department of English". Discussions were later held between the Library and the English Department, and
the bequest has now been evenly divided between three book collections. One-third will go to the English Department's
Graduate Reading Room, one-third to the Main Library's Colbeck Collection, and one-third to the Sedgewick Undergraduate
Library to add specifically to its English collection.
The money received by the Colbeck Collection will be used chiefly to improve holdings of major nineteenth-century authors,
such as Hunt, Coleridge and Hazlitt. Sedgewick's share of the bequest will go toward reading editions (many in paperback) of
both contemporary and standard works. The majority of these have already been ordered, and should be available to students
within the next few months. LIBRARY SECURITY:
A NEW LOOK AT AN OLD PROBLEM
As a library grows in size, and as the community it serves increases, its book losses may be expected to rise too. This is
especially true of a university library, where access to certain material can make the difference between passing or failing a
course. Unless tight security is maintained, books needed by less than honest borrowers are likely to disappear.
For the UBC Library this has been a particularly disturbing problem. Funds are limited, and far too much money that should
be used to develop the collection is going towards buying and processing replacements for missing books. In addition, book
losses, especially in areas that are heavily used, can only make the Library less efficient as it attempts to meet readers' needs.
Just how many books are missing currently? Accurate figures are hard to obtain, because the campus libraries contain over
1,500,000 items, and a complete annual inventory would be virtually impossible. (The last one was done four years ago.)
However, more limited book counts are done as often as possible, and the figures are projected to give a general picture of
holdings and losses.
Over the past four years the loss rate for the library system as a whole has been approximately one per cent per annum.
Although this is not significantly higher than loss rates for other large libraries, it represents several thousand volumes. The real
problem is that most of these books are stolen from a few heavily-used sections of the classification. A survey done last month,
for instance, indicates that as much as seven per cent of the contemporary American fiction has been lost since 1965. Because
the demand for these books is so great, the effect of such losses is out of all proportion to the number of volumes missing.
A committee of eight librarians has now been set up to recommend new and tighter controls over library holdings.
Unfortunately, many of the freedoms enjoyed by UBC borrowers can also be considered security hazards. Bookstacks which are
open to all borrowers, reference collections without turnstiles, building exits without checkpoints—all of these make it easier for
library users to get to and from their material, and for much of that material to vanish from the shelves.
The committee hopes to be able to set up new controls which will combine maximum effect with minimum inconvenience to
borrowers. Beginning immediately, a prominent "UBC LIBRARY" stamp will go on the top edge of all books. Steps are being
taken to protect material in Acquisitions and in the reshelving area off the Circulation Division. The Library is also looking into
an electronic detection system to prevent library users from leaving with books they have not signed out. The UBC Library News
will carry further reports as security changes are made.
FOR YOUR INFORMATION.
It is generally known (we hope) that the Information Desk librarians answer a wide range of questions about the Library and
its holdings. It is not nearly as well known that the indexes and reference aids they use are also available to anyone else. Most of
these volumes or computer print-outs will be found on the counters on each side of the central desk, and the librarians will get
the others whenever they are needed. A list of some of the most useful is given below.
A. GUIDES TO CLASSIFICATION NUMBERS AND SUBJECT HEADINGS.
1. OUTLINE OF THE LIBRARY OF CONGRESS CLASSIFICATION. Available as a bound volume or in bookmark form
for easy reference.
2. LIBRARY OF CONGRESS SUBJECT HEADINGS. A large red volume listing all subject headings which could be used in
the Main Library's Subject Catalogue. Gives cross-references from headings which are not used, and lists headings under
which additional information may be found.
B. INDEXES TO MATERIAL HELD IN THE U.B.C. LIBRARY SYSTEM.
1. OUTSTANDING LOANS LIST ("CIRCULATION PRINT-OUT"). A daily computer list of books and periodicals
borrowed from the Main Library book-stacks, with the date they are due back. Also includes material sent to bindery or
reported missing.
2. LIST OF BOOKS ON ORDER, IN PROCESS, AND CATALOGUED. Alphabetical computer print-out, produced daily
and cumulated monthly. (Books which have been received but not catalogued can still be signed out. See a librarian for
details.)
3. CURRENT ACCESSIONS. A monthly list, in call number order, of newly catalogued books, followed by an alphabetical
listing of any new serials.
4. U.B.C. SERIAL HOLDINGS LIST. Issued each fall and kept at all public service desks. Arranged by title, giving holdings,
location and call number of all serials listed.
5. U.B.C. SERIAL HOLDINGS: DAILY AND WEEKLY LISTS. Computer print-outs, arranged by title, giving date and
location of latest issues received. 6. SERIALS MASTER FILE. Basically a list of UBC serials in call number order. A preliminary volume lists uncatalogued
serials by title.
7. AUTHOR INDEX TO U.B.C. THESES AND DISSERTATIONS. Gives degree for which thesis or dissertation was written
and year of completion, but does not list title, call number, or location of copies.
8. INDEXES TO U.B.C.  LIBRARY RECORDINGS COLLECTION. In two  sets,  one  by  title  and the  other by
composer/author.
•■
C. GENERAL INDEXES TO SERIALS.
1. ULRICH'S INTERNATIONAL PERIODICALS DIRECTORY, 1967-68. Arranged by subject, with tide index. Gives full
publishing information and tells where contents of each periodical are indexed.
2. STANDARD PERIODICAL DIRECTORY, 1967. Arrangement and information much the same, but covers only U.S. and
Canadian periodicals.
3. IRREGULAR SERIALS AND ANNUALS: AN INTERNATIONAL DIRECTORY, 1967. A subject listing with title index.
Gives complete publishing information.
4. UNION LIST OF SERIALS (1965). Exhaustive title list of serials held in North American libraries, with locations.
Especially useful for inter-library loans.
5. NEW SERIAL TITLES. Similar coverage, but only for periodicals which began publishing or changed titles since 1950.
6. PERIODICALS   IN  THE  SOCIAL SCIENCES AND HUMANITIES CURRENTLY RECEIVED BY CANADIAN
LIBRARIES (1968). Title list, telling which libraries have each one and giving details of holdings.
D. GENERAL INDEXES TO BOOKS.
1. BOOKS IN PRINT, 1968. Only covers books published in U.S.A. (Includes paperbacks.) Books are listed by author, title
and subject, with publishing date and price.
2. BRITISH BOOKS IN PRINT, 1968. Indexed chiefly by author and title. Otherwise similar to the U.S. version.
3. CANADIAN BOOKS IN PRINT (1967). Similar, but no subject listing at all.
4. PAPERBOUND BOOKS IN PRINT. Lists U.S. paperbacks only. Issued monthly.
5. FORTHCOMING BOOKS, INCLUDING NEW BOOKS IN PRINT. Again, U.S.-oriented. Issued six times a year.
6. CUMULATIVE BOOK INDEX. Comprehensive author, title and subject list of all books published in the English language
since 1928.
E. GENERAL REFERENCE MATERIAL.
1
1. NEW CENTURY CYCLOPEDIA OF NAMES.
2. WEBSTER'S BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY.
3. ACRONYMS AND INITIALISMS DICTIONARY.
4. COLUMBIA ENCYCLOPEDIA.
5. All 1969—70 UBC calendars, including extension courses.
6. 1969-70 lecture schedules.
7. Library, campus and student telephone directories.
8. Campus maps.
< \     t-     ■ ■ • ■ j- •■ r 11 .■-..• -    - " - -   _   .      . ,        . j,      .    ....
■
THE LIBRARY EXPLAINED, CHAPTER XXXII
Normally the News limits itself to articles on the UBC library system. From time to time, however, a paper is published
elsewhere which makes an outstanding contribution to the library world in general, and which deserves to be much more widely
read. Beginning this month, we will be reprinting some of these as a series, Great Works in Librarianship.
Our first selection comes from D.A. Redmond, Librarian of Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario. "What has been
needed," Mr. Redmond says in his preface, "is a set of laws immediately applicable, as are the minor propositions of Euclid, to
the solution of daily problems in the operation of a library. At last these laws have been revealed." The News takes pleasure in
passing on Mr. Redmond's Seven Laws of Library Science.
■
FIRST LAW
• A very large book on a shelf is always immediately adjacent to a very small book. This is also known as the
Quarto-Duodecimo Syndrome. Some libraries endeavor to thwart the operation of this law by categorizing books by size. This is
known as the Extraction of Folios, which must not be confused with the Mutilation of Quartos, a phenomenon more often
restricted to Reference Collections. COROLLARY 1: The subject matter contained in any volume on a given shelf is constant irrespective of size. This is the
Wide-Margin Theorem.
COROLLARY 2: The average size of volumes located is directly proportional to the distance from the circulation desk.
SECOND LAW
Whatever book is wanted, is out. (Sheep's Law, first stated under a pseudonym by the great mathematician Dodgson.) This is
self-evident, or a Preposterous Axiom, and is therefore not susceptible to any statistical proof or rebuttal, however rigid.
THIRD LAW
The loan period for any given material is always too long, or too short, or should be abolished altogether.
COROLLARY: The loan period allowed to any given class of users is too long, or too short, or should be abolished
altogether.
FOURTH LAW
The card catalogue is the whole of which the classification system is an epitome. This is also known as the Blind Leading the
Blind. The classification system is also referred to as a table of Random Numbers.
COROLLARY: The card catalogue consists entirely of Cross References (example: Snares see also Delusions) ... so called
because the user is invariably cross.
FIFTH LAW
(Everyone has known this law since childhood.) A Love of Books is the prime requisite for librarianship. (The Corollary is
now stated for the first time.)
COROLLARY: The intensity of love for librarianship is directly proportional to the thickness of the layer of dust on a mean
sample of books in the Library. (This is Staub's Principle of Uncertainty when the dust is so thick that spine lettering cannot be
read, or is so to speak uncertain, and it marks the onset of Bibliothecal Paranoia or library fanatacism, the first major sign being
the Shush Syndrome.)
SIXTH LAW
For any one book, one term must be designated the Main Entry.
COROLLARY: For any given book, the effect of the catalogue on the user is directly proportional to the number of possible
Main Entries. (Proof of this Corollary involves the Corollary to the Fourth Law and the alternate form of the Fourth Law itself.)
SEVENTH LAW
The Test of Time must be applied to everything in the library.
COROLLARY 1: A subject heading must be used in its primeval form unless changed by writ of the Library of Congress.
COROLLARY 2: Books must be aged before shelving. (This is also known as the Principle of Ignorance of Backlogs.)
COROLLARY 3: This corollary was originally expressed by Ecclesiastes in the form, "There is nothing new under the sun,"
a corollary to his Theorem, "Of making books there is no end." It is therefore sometimes called Ecclesiastical Verbosity, and
can be expressed in the modern form, "The Library has no new books about anything."
AUTHOR'S NOTE
The instinctive genius of the dedicated library user is seen from the fact that many of these laws have been proclaimed for
generations by those entering the Library, while those cloistered within the precincts refused to recognize or codify them. Now
that the Laws have been proclaimed, librarianship can progress to ever greater achievements.
AND FINALLY.
Anyone wishing copies of the May or June/July Library News may pick them up at the Main Library's Information Desk. For
telephone orders, call local 2077.
Editor: Mrs. E. de Bruijn Information & Orientation Division 

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