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UBC Library News Jul 31, 1969

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 HJ.B.C. LIBRARY NEWS
Volume II, No. 6
June-July 1969
Vancouver, B.C.
This newsletter is published as an information service for U.B.C. faculty and other readers outside the Library. It contains feature articles and news about developments in the Library system which we feel will be of interest or concern to
the larger community. The News welcomes all comments, criticisms, and suggestions for future articles.
JULY - SEPTEMBER LIBRARY HOURS
During the Summer Session the Main Library, Sedgewick, and most of the larger branches will be open for service at
least four nights a week. From August 16 to September 7, almost all libraries will be closed in the evenings and on week
ends. Separate schedules for each period are given below.
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SUMMER SESSION (JULY 2 - AUGUST 15)
:
MAIN AND SEDGEWICK LIBRARIES
MONDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
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CURRICULUM LABORATORY
MONDAY-FRIDAY
SATURDAYS SUNDAY
MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
^MONDAY -FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
8 a.m. - 9 p.m.
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
MUSIC LIBRARY
MONDAY-FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY'
WOODWARD LIBRARY
MONDAY-THURSDAY
FRIDAYS SATURDAY
SUNDAY
O so*
ALL OTHER LIBRARIES
8 a.m.— 9 p.m.
10 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
MONDAY-FRIDAY
SATURDAYS SUNDAY
8 a.m. — 10 p.m.
9 a.m. -   5 p.m.
12 noon - 6 p.m.
8 a.m. — 9 p.m.
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
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9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
AUGUST 16 - SEPTEMBER 7
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MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
August 16-August 26
^  ^>      MONDAY-FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
August 27 - September 7
MONDAY-FRIDAY
SATURDAYS SUNDAY
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WOODWARD LIBRARY
9 a.m.- 9 p.m.
MONDAY-THURSDAY
FRIDAYS SATURDAY
SUNDAY
10 a.m. — 4 p.m.
Closed
ALL OTHER LIBRARIES
5 •ASV
8 a.m. — 9 p.m.
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
9 a.m.— 5 p.m.
Closed
MONDAY-FRIDAY
SATURDAYS SUNDAY
All campus libraries will be closed on Dominion Day and Labour Day (July 1 and September 1)
LIBRARY INFORMATION PROGRAMS
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
h .
Beginning on Thursday, July 3, the Library will offer brief but comprhensive orientation programs to all Summer
School students and teaching staff. Slide shows and short tours will be given twice daily at the following times:
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THURSDAY. JULY 3
FRIDAY, JULY 4
9 a.m.
3 p.m.
10 a.m.
2 p.m. WEDNESDAY. JULY.9 -JO am.
2 p.m.
THURSDAY, JULY 10 10 a.m.
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Please note that this is only a basic schedule; It can be expanded to allow for as many more slide shows and tours as are
necessary. All programs will begin in the Reading Room beside the Main Library's Subject Catalogue.
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New information folders are now available for both the Main Library and Sedgewick. These will be handed out at the
start of each tour, and may also be picked up at public service desks in both libraries. A large illustrated library handbook is
still in preparation, and will be ready during the Summer Session, As sponas it comes out, notices will be published in This
Week at U.B.C. and posted around campus.
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The library is anxious to do all it can to help students and faculty make the best use of'i'ts resources. Faculty members
can do their part by making sure their students know about these library tours and guides.
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The Information and Orientation Division (local 2077) will be-happy to answer any questions.
NEW FACULTY LOAN PERIODS
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The May issue of the News called attention to a few long-standing problems surrounding faculty loan periods. When the
Senate Library Committee met to review loan periods in June, it was agreed that some changes would have to be made. Before getting to these, we might go over some of the main points which influenced the Committee's decision.
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Under the present system. Main Library books signed out to students are due within two weeks at the latest. Faculty
members, however, have no obligation to return or renew material until the next general call-in. (These are held three
times a year,in December, May, and August.) Although the Circulation Divison may ask that an item be returned if another borrower is waiting, it has no real authority to get the book back until the due date. Even if material is returned after
the due date, faculty members cannot be fined.
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In a system with such loose controls, faculty members have certain responsibilities. They should, at the very least, make
a point of using library material within a reasonable time and returning it once they have finished with it, expecially if another borrower is waiting. But the response has left something to be desired.
Many faculty members wait until a call-in before returning the books they have borrowed during the preceding term.
However, only about half of these books are renewed. The Library can only conclude that the other halflcould have been
returned earlier, since they were no longer of use, but that the borrower simply had not bothered to do this. ;  „
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At this point a faculty member mightreasonably say: "Yes, but if no one has asked for the book, does it matter how
long it stays out? Unfortunately, it matters very much indeed. Faculty members seldom realize just how great the demand
is for books they have signed out. This is because many students hesitate to ask for a book to be^calledjin once they learn
who has it. A recent report from the Circulation Division goes into more detail:
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Desk assistants can recount numerous occasions when students decline their offer to call in a book from faculty. Sometimes the student will state that he has had too little luck in the past. Also, it is common practice for graduate students and senior undergraduates to insist upon being told the name of the faculty member before deciding to call in the book. This may be done because they expect to obtain the book very quickly from certain faculty members; but it is surprising how often a student comments that he would not dare
have a book called in from his faculty advisor or from certain faculty members in his department.
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Even when a book is held out past the due date, it is not always easy to get it back from the borrower. Knowing they
will not have to pay a fine, some faculty members simply disregard overdue notices. Statistics compiled by the Main Library show that the number of overdues increases in direct proportion to the loan length, with faculty being the worst
offenders. The most serious aspect is that student demand for these books is increasing all the time. To quote the Circulation
Division's report again:
Each year as undergraduate students become more active in their use of the library, and particularly in
use of material which used to be termed "research" — hence needed only by faculty and possibly graduates — the problem of faculty misuse of the library becomes more urgent. As we move away from the
closed-stack mentality it is important that we have a good supply of books for browsing. We know already that the need for books as demonstrated in the number of holds and call-ins is only a small proportion of the real need. This is not always due to student timidity. Often a reader cannot be sure that a
book will contain useful information until he has a chance to look through it. As part of his education he
should have a chance to look through a number of books and choose the best.
At the same time, faculty borrowers have certain need and rights which must be kept in mind. Sometimes they genuinely need to keep books out for long periods of time, and often this is such specialized material that no one else would
want it.
The Senate Library Committee has worked out a revised loan policy which should satisfy both students and faculty.
Under this system, all Main Library books will be signed out for a two-week period. During this time the borrower has unrestricted use of the material, and it cannot be called in. At the end of two weeks, student books must be returned, but
faculty books do not; they merely become subject to recall if another borrower asks for them. In this case the faculty member will receive a notice from the Library asking that the book be returned promptly. If no one puts in a request for a book
that a faculty member has signed out, he may keep it until he is through with it or until the next general call-in, when it
may be renewed if necessary.
The new loan regulations will not go into effect until the start of the fall term. The changeover will be publicized as
widely as possible, and the Circulation Division (local 3115) will be happy to answer questions at any time.
Reprints of this article are available from the Editor.
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B.C. POWER MINUTES ADDED TO LIBRARY
A recent gift to the University should be of considerable interest to researchers in the fields of commerce, economics,
and B.C. history. The Honourable Mr. Justice A. Bruce Robertson, former chairman and president of the B.C. Power Corporation, has donated all the Corporation's minute books to the U.B.C. Library.
In a letter to the University Librarian, Mr. Justice Robertson gives some of the background to this decision:
From 1928 until 1961 [B.C. Power] was the parent of the British Columbia Electric Company Limited,
and for most of that period was also the parent of the British Columbia Electric Railway Limited. In
1961 the Province of British Columbia purported to takecompulsorilyfrom B.C. Power its shares in the
Electric Company, and from 1961 until 1963 B.C. Power was engaged in litigation with the Province
over that taking; ultimately B.C. Power sold the shares in the Electric Company to the Province. During
the period of the litigation and sale I was the Chairman and President of B.C. Power. Following the sale
it was proposed to put B.C. Power into voluntary liquidation, and the question of what should be done
with its minute books was considered by its Board of Directors. They decided that, when the time to dispose of the minute books came, they should be offered to the University of British Columbia, as they
throw some interesting light on the development over more than 30 years of the largest urban transportation, electric and gas utility in the Province and on the litigation [previously mentioned].
Besides the seventeen-volume set of minute books (1928-1963), the collection includes a ledger containing Letters
Patent, historical records, and miscellaneous material. This will all be sorted, classified, and housed in the Special Collections Division, which already holds the papers of the B.C. Electric Company.
GIFTS HELP SEDGEWICK GROW
Near the end of the regular session the Sedgewick Library received two donations, one from the Alumni Fund and the
other from the 1969 graduating class. The money is being well spent, and Sedgewick has just issued a progress report. The Alumni Fund gift of $1,500 is being used to set up a paperback browsing collection. Local booksellers have cooperated by giving the Sedgewick buyers unusually large discounts, and over 800 fiction and non-fiction titles will be on
the shelves by the start of the Summer Session. Several hundred more are to be added after September. The new collection
■
is being set up on racks along the left-hand side of the Sedgewick stacks.
Initially the idea of making the 1969 graduating class gift to the undergraduates arose in conversation between the
U.B.C. Librarian and the president of the graduating class. The $4,000 gift will be spent on one of the most urgent student
needs: added copies of library books in heavy demand. The undergraduates themselves had shown how great this need was
in their answers to the library questionnaire distributed in the spring.
Sedgewick hopes to buy from 500 to 600 duplicate copies in time for the winter session. The titles will be selected
from those shown by the library's use studies to be most in demand among undergraduates.
INCREASE IN EXTRA-MURAL BORROWERS' FEES
Because of rising wages, a steady increase in the price of books, and increases in other costs, the per capita cost of
library service has risen steadily for some years. The fee for extra-mural readers, however, has remained unchanged since
1963. The library has finally been forced to increase it in order to bring it into line with current costs.
This decision has been taken with regret and only after careful consideration. While we would not wish financial
considerations to hinder the use of the library for serious research, we must ensure that the facilities and service offered
are maintained at a satisfactory level.
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Effective September 1, 1969, the fee for extra-mural readers will be as follows:
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Sept. 1 to August 31 - $ 15.00
Jan. 1 to August 31 -$10.00
May 1 to August 31 - $   5.00
	
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POSTSCRIPTS
■
A big library always gets its share of unusual mail, but two letters that arrived since our last issue deserve special
mention.
The first was one of our own overdue notices, sent out by the Circulation Division. According to the postmark, it had
been mailed last December to a language instructor in the Buchanan Building. The address was still quite readable:
Dr. John Doe
German
As for that four-month delay ... it seems the envelope came back with a German postmark and a handwritten note:
"Bestimmungsort fehlt" ("Insufficient address"). Moral: Never confuse the "Campus" and "Off Campus" mail baskets.
Those signs mean what they say.
Letter number two created rather less of a stir, but did give the female staff some bad moments. Its address:
The Librarian - Reproductive Services,
^University of British Columbia! ''
Editor: Mrs. E. de Bruijn Information S Orientation Division
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