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UBC Library News Aug 31, 1971

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 HXB.C. LIBRARY NEWS
Volume IV, No. 6
July-August, 1971
Vancouver, B.C.
This newsletter is published as an information service for UBC faculty, students and other readers outside the Library. It
contains feature articles and news about developments in the library system which we feel will be of interest or concern to the
larger community. The News welcomes all comments, criticisms and suggestions for future articles.
AUGUST - SEPTEMBER LIBRARY HOURS
During the intersession period (August 12 September 12) most campus libraries will be closed in the evenings and on
weekends. Beginning on September 13, all libraries return to normal service hours. A separate schedule for each period is given
below.
AUGUST 21 - SEPTEMBER 12
o
WOODWARD LIBRARY
August 21 - September 6      MONDAY - FRIDAY
SUNDAY
TUESDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY - SATURDAY
September 7-9
September 10-11
MAIN LIBRARY AND
ALL OTHER BRANCHES
August 21 - September 12    MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY    SUNDAY
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
8 a.m. — 9 p.m.
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
WINTER SESSION
(SEPTEMBER 13     DECEMBER 21
AND JANUARY 3 - APRIL 28)
MAIN AND SEDGEWICK LIBRARIES
MONDAY - FRIDAY 8 a.m.     midnight
SATURDAY 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SUNDAY 12 noon - midnight
MACMILLAN LIBRARY
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed
WOODWARD LIBRARY
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
8 a.m. - midnight
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
12 noon - midnight
MUSIC LIBRARY
MONDAY     FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
8 a.m. - 11 p.m.
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
12 noon - 11 p.m.
n
ANIMAL RESOURCE ECOLOGY
AND CRANE LIBRARIES
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY - SUNDAY
LAW LIBRARY
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
8 a.m. — midnight
9 a.m. — 8 p.m.
10 a.m. - 10 p.m.
RECORDINGS COLLECTION
MONDAY     FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
ALL OTHER LIBRARIES
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
8:30 a.m. -8 p.m.
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
8 a.m. - 10 p.m.
9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed 2
IS YOUR CARD STILL VALID?
Faculty and staff members are reminded that all 1970-71 library cards expired on August 3LRenewing your card for the next
year takes only a minute. Just bring it to the Main Library's Circulation Office, or to the Circulation Desk in the Woodward
Library, any weekday between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m.
Avoid the September rush - do it now!
o
LIBRARY ORIENTATION '71:
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
It's that time of year again. In a few days over 20,000 students arrive on campus for the winter session. Almost one-quarter of
them will be completely new to UBC, and will need help with a library system of this size.
As always, the major problem area will be the Main Library building. This year a special effort is being made to introduce
students to it without confusing them. Group tours will be offered, as before, but students may choose any one of three types:
the standard 20-minute guided tour; a shorter one beginning with a slide-tape show; and a subject-related class tour showing how
the Library can help with the work that particular class will be covering during the fall term. The first two types of tours will
be offered daily, beginning on September 15.
STANDARD TOUR AUDIO-VISUAL TOUR
September 15 - October 15 September 15    October 1
3 p.m., Monday - Friday 11:30 a.m., Monday - Friday
Begins in main entrance hall • Begins in Reserve Reading Room,
next to Fine Arts Division
The subject-oriented class visits can be arranged on request any time after October 1. They are especially useful for students who
will be working on term papers or other library assignments this fall. More detailed information will be given in next month's
News.
The Library is also making more aids available for those who would rather learn at their own speed. From September 6 on, a
"do-it-yourself tour guide can be picked up in the main entrance hall. It shows newcomers how to find their way through the
Main and Sedgewick Libraries, and briefly describes the services given in each area. The Main Card Catalogue - always a problem
for new students - now has simple instruction signs posted on every cabinet, and a self-help centre is being set up nearby. It will
bring together printed library guides, visual aids such as the three-dimensional plexiglass model of the Library building, and an
Audiscan machine which offers a brief audio-visual program on the UBC libraries and their use. More of these centres will be set
up during the fall, in the bookstacks as well as in the major public service areas.
Most branch libraries will be giving out printed guides describing their collections and services. All of them would be happy to
arrange for tours or class visits; please call the branch concerned.
All the campus libraries want to help students and faculty make the best use of their resources. Faculty members can do their
part by making sure that students know about these library orientation programs.
©
INTERSESSION EXHIBITS
Bayefsky Prints
On display in the main entrance hall are seven unusual colour prints by the Canadian artist Aba Bayefsky. Mr. Bayefsky is
perhaps better known in Ontario, where his paintings and murals have won critical acclaim. The prints on display show his
fascination with East Indian myths and spirits. All the work shown is taken from Legends, a portfolio of 12 original Bayefsky
block prints held in the Special Collections Division.
Cheap Literature of Yesterday
This eye-catching display is well worth a detour upstairs to Special Collections. It features the popular chapbooks and
broadsides of the 17th to early 19th centuries. At a time when many people could not afford bound books, these inexpensive
stories and ballads were sold by every peddler. They provided entertainment for generations of common people, and are still well
worth reading today. As the Special Collections Division notes:
... They preserve a record of many details of manners and customs, superstitions and prejudices;
they reflect the popular point of view and transmit a host of romances, songs, jests and anecdotes
in the popular form.
With their lively, full-colour illustrations and large print, the chapbooks drew readers of all ages and tastes. The Special -^_^J
Collections display includes nursery rhymes and fairy tales; brief prose versions of Hamlet and Othello; and a fine assortment of
adventures and romances. The title pages alone make fascinating reading: The Haunted Tower; Cook, theMurdere ; The Princess
of Bagdad; or, The Wife of Eleven Husbands; Richard Turpin, the Noted Highwayman; Horrid Customs; or, An Afflicting 3
Narrative Relative to the Burning of Hindoo Widows. One really deserves to be quoted in full:
The
Miller and his Men
or, the
ATROCITIES OF GRINDOFF
The Terror of Bohemia
AND HIS BANDITTI
who are all destroyed by the blowing-up of a mill and cavern
by
THE GALLANT LOTHAIR
who is rewarded by the hand of
THE BEAUTIFUL CLAUDINE
and a pension from the
Bohemian Government
■
The broadside ballads, although not as sensational, are also worth seeing. Where else could you find a song called The Laidley
Worm of Spindleston Heughl
WE'RE RECYCLING - ARE YOU?
In an effort to help curb the spread of pollution and make better use of our resources, the Library has begun recycling many
types of waste materials. Old IBM printouts, computer cards, form letters and scrap paper are deposited in large containers
throughout the library system. Later this material is picked up by the Joshua Society and delivered to a paper recycling plant.
Staff members are also being encouraged to save and re-use memos, envelopes, file folders and other office materials. A
Library committee in charge of recycling hopes to expand into other areas by advising staff on the various ways that home waste
can be recycled.
Other groups who would like to try something similar should get in touch with Mrs. Joyce Harries, the committee chairman,-
at local 3115.
SHARED CATALOGUING:
B.C. SYSTEM REACHES TO NEWFOUNDLAND
Last year the libraries of B.C.'s three public universities began a cooperative program to speed up book processing. Under the
old system, each library normally received cataloguing copy from the Library of Congress and used that copy to make up sets of
cards for current books. All items without LC copy had to be catalogued by the individual library. Under the new "shared
cataloguing" arrangement, the three libraries waited a maximum of six weeks for the cataloguing copy to arrive. After that,
items without Library of Congress copy were rush catalogued, with each library taking responsibility for one-third of the
alphabet. Duplicates of the master cards were distributed to the other libraries.
Later in 1970 the system expanded to include three eastern universities: Windsor, Waterloo and York. To speed up
cataloguing even more, all current works within a library's alphabetical area were catalogued as soon as they came in. Copy could
then be sent to the other participating libraries with the minimum of delay.
Interest in shared cataloguing is obviously still growing. Although Windsor dropped out this year, five more university
libraries have just joined the system. The new participants are the Universities of Alberta, Calgary, Manitoba and Ottawa, and
Memorial University of Newfoundland.
By helping to cut down the time each library spends on book processing,the shared cataloguing arrangement will indirectly
benefit readers at all ten universities.
o
PURCHASING AND COPYING PRACTICES AT
CANADIAN UNIVERSITY LIBRARIES
In the past year the state of Canadian publishing has become a matter of national concern. Some groups have suggested that
libraries in this country could add considerably to publishers' revenues by changing their purchasing practices, and/or by paying
royalties for photocopies of Canadian material made on library machines. Until now it has been impossible to prove or disprove
these statements. Figures were just not available on the amount of money libraries currently spend inside and outside Canada, or
on the origin and type of material they allow to be copied. The University Librarian, Basil Stuart-Stubbs, organized cross-Canada surveys this spring to look into both questions.
Although these surveys were limited to university libraries, they are still the largest and most detailed studies made to date.
The results of the two surveys have now been published and distributed to all members of the Canadian Association of
College and University Libraries. News readers may be interested in the following extracts from the report on purchasing.
Highlights from the copying survey will appear in the September issue.
A STUDY OF EXPENDITURES ON LIBRARY MATERIALS
AT CANADIAN UNIVERSITIES
II. SCOPE AND LIMITATIONS OF THE STUDY
For many years both the Dominion Bureau of Statistics and the Canadian Association of College and University Libraries
have collected statistics relating to college and university libraries in Canada. Thus the total amount of money spent by each
institution for books, periodicals and other library materials is known. What has not been known, even in general terms, is how
and where funds are being spent.
A rough idea of the nature and origin of library purchases could be obtained by asking libraries to report, under a number of
general categories, expenditures made in various countries.... The information used in this study was obtained by this method.
It [provides], for the first time, an indication of the nature of library acquisitions for higher education in Canada ....
Member university libraries of the Canadian Association of College and University Libraries were asked to fill out a table
which listed twenty-two geographic areas against four general categories of vendors of library materials .... The libraries were
asked to record the total amount of money to the nearest dollar spent under each category in each country, for the budget year
1969/70.
Three categories of vendors were chosen: new book dealers, antiquarian dealers, and periodical agents. Although most library
vendors fall into one of these three groups, a fourth category for miscellaneous vendors was provided, to include vendors of an
assortment of library materials such as microforms, films, records, maps, manuscripts and pictures. Also to be included in this
category were those societies, organizations and individuals which sell library materials, but which would normally be regarded
as being outside of the book trade.
For most libraries, supplying this information was no easy matter. Expense records are not maintained in the way described
above, and the majority of libraries had to examine and classify every paid invoice for 1969/70 in order to obtain the desired
totals. Nevertheless, full reports were received from almost all libraries at degree-granting Canadian universities ....
The survey .. . covers the expenditures of thirty-eight degree-granting Canadian universities. Not included in the survey are
approximately fifty colleges.
III. TOTAL EXPENDITURES ON LIBRARY MATERIALS
Annual national expenditures on library materials have jumped from two million to over twenty million dollars during the
past decade. These figures reflect the general increase in support for higher education ....
The Canadian Association of College and University Libraries has collected the following information about budgets for
library materials, including binding, for 1970/71:
Universities       $23,745,581 (36 reporting)
Colleges     $ 2,255,333 (52 reporting)
TOTAL      $26,000,914
An analysis of the Dominion Bureau of Statistics figures for 1969/70 reveals that Canadian university and college libraries
spend 7.9% of their materials budgets on binding. When this percentage is applied to the C.A.C.U.L. budget figure for 1970/71,
which includes both library materials and binding, a budget figure for library materials alone of $23,946,842 is indicated.
Thus, Canadian university and college libraries are currently spending about $24,000,000 annually on library materials.
The thirty-eight university libraries participating in this survey reported total expenditures of $18,113,797 in 1969/70. This
represents 78.4% of the total reported to the Dominion Bureau of Statistics in that year.
Although the available information regarding university library expenditures is incomplete for recent years, it is clear that the
rate of growth of budgets for library materials is slowing. This follows as a natural result of economic conditions, public concern
over the costs of higher education, and a falling off in the increase in enrollments. Librarians do not anticipate another ten-fold
increase in acquisitions budgets during the nineteen-seventies. On the contrary, librarians assume that they will be unable to
acquire as large a proportion of the world's output of information as they have in recent years.
It must be borne in mind that the $24,000,000 spent on library materials by universities and colleges in 1969/70 covered
expenditures on all types of library materials, not books alone, and not just books which have been recently published; and that
these materials are obtained from every corner of the earth. University library collections reflect the concerns of faculty
members and students in their pursuit of learning and research, and these concerns deal with the future and the past, deal with
every conceivable subject of study, and are expressed in all of the world's languages. Naturally, these collections are complex and
difficult to assemble. The analysis of expenditures which follows reveals the diversity of library requirements, and gives a general
idea of the pattern of development of library collections at the close of a decade of rapid growth. n
IV. EXPENDITURES WITH VENDORS OF NEW BOOKS
Vendors of new books include publishers, agents for publishers, retail and wholesale booksellers, governments, organizations
and individuals, selling books which are in print.
It was pointed out in Chapter 11 that thirty-eight libraries provided information concerning their expenditures; of these,
thirty-seven provided complete information, and one [the University of Toronto] provided partial information. In order to
reflect accurately the relationships between expenditures, survey results will be reported throughout on the basis of the
thirty-seven libraries, which accounted for a total of $ 16,335,319 in expenditures on library materials in 1969/70. Where
applicable, the partial information from the University of Toronto will be used and the use noted.
Of the total of $16,335,319, the thirty-seven libraries paid almost half, $8,084,675, to vendors of new books .... Over six
and a half million of the eight was paid to dealers in Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom. While it is clear that
this is evidence of the importance to Canadian libraries of books printed in English, the relationship is not precise, because
Canadian university libraries, for reasons of economy or efficiency, may buy materials in other languages from dealers in
English-speaking countries. Books published in South America can be purchased in New York, and books published in the Soviet
Union can be purchased in London. This limitation on the implications of expenditure figures expressed in national terms must
by borne in mind throughout this study.
Of the eight million total, $2,357,178, or 29.2%. was spent in Canada. This amount includes expenditures for original
Canadian publications, books published abroad but distributed by Canadian publishers acting as agents, and books published
abroad but distributed by library jobbers and wholesale and retail booksellers who are not publishers.
Of the eight million total, $3,268,249, or 40.47f was spent in the United States. This would include expenditures for U.S. and
other foreign books, sold by publishers, booksellers, jobbers, organizations, governments and individuals.
Of the eight million total, $978,946, or 12.1% was spent in the United Kingdom.
$493,318 was paid to new book dealers in France, a sum representing 6.1% of the total ....
V. EXPENDITURES WITH PERIODICAL PUBLISHERS AND AGENTS
While half the total expenditures of Canadian university libraries in 1969/70 was devoted to the acquisition of new books,
slightly over a quarter of the total was spent on periodical subscriptions. Keeping abreast of current literature is evidently a
priority with the libraries, and an expensive one.
Of the $16,335,319 total, $4,460,519 or 27.37c was paid to periodical publishers and agents....
As in the case of books, expenditures in English-speaking countries bulked high. Publishers and agents in the United States
and the United Kingdom were paid $2,028,962 and $501,819 respectively, or 45.5% and 11.3% of the- total paid for
subscriptions.
Canadian publishers and agents received .,. 24.3% of the total. Given the comparatively small number of journals published
in Canada, it is evident that Canadian university libraries are placing many subscriptions for foreign periodicals through Canadian
agents.
The next highest amount . .. was paid to publishers and agents in the Netherlands. This accounted for 7. \% of the total.
Following was Germany, with .. . 3.5%, and France, with . .. 2.2%.
These countries together proved to be the main suppliers of periodical literature to Canadian universities, accounting for 93%
of the total.
VI. EXPENDITURES WITH ANTIQUARIAN DEALERS
Expenditures with dealers in antiquarian books, periodicals and other library materials accounted for 14.4% of the reported
total expenditures of $16,335,319 ....
Dealers in the United States captured almost half of the total amount spent by Canadian university libraries for antiquarian
materials. The great numbers of antiquarian dealers in the United States account for this imbalance. What is surprising is that
Canadian antiquarian dealers, who are relatively few in number, should have obtained 17.9% of the total, compared with the
more numerous dealers of the United Kingdom who obtained 13.6% of the total. One possible explanation might be that
Canadian libraries are buying heavily in Canadiana ....
VII. EXPENDITURES WITH OTHER VENDORS
In addition to materials which are more conventionally thought of as library materials, Canadian university libraries purchase
microforms, maps, films, magnetic tapes, recordings, pictures and manuscripts. They also purchase books and periodicals which
are not available through normal trade channels. In total, $ 1,430,958 was spent for such materials, 8.7% of the sample total of
$16,335,319....
As in the case of old and new books and periodicals, [Canada, the United States and the United Kingdom] proved to be the
major sources of miscellaneous materials for Canadian university libraries ....
VIII. EXPENDITURES ON ALL LIBRARY MATERIALS BY NATION
Of expenditures on all library materials, the largest amounts are paid to vendors in the United States, Canada and the United
n Kingdom, in that order. The following table provides totals and percentages:
■wr
■
Payments to
Country or Area All Vendors % of $16.335.319
Canada $4,329,378 26.5%
United States 6,935,965 42.5
Great Britain and Ireland 1,901,225 11.6
In the case of the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, payments are distributed in approximately the same way
among types of vendor: about half of the total spent in each of the three countries is for new books, a quarter for periodical
subscriptions, and the balance for antiquarian books and other materials ....
IX. IMPLICATIONS OF THE STUDY OF EXPENDITURES
One purpose of this study was to reveal the pattern of Canadian university library spending, as an indication of how
collections are presently being developed.
The results point to a strong and natura} emphasis on current publications. Expenditures with dealers of new books and
periodicals amounted to $12,545,194 in 1969/70, or 76.7% of the total amount reported, $16,335,319. Of this twelve and a
half million dollars, 27.4% was spent in Canada, 42.2% ... in the United States, and 11.8% ... in the United Kingdom. Thus,
over eighty percent of the funds spent on new books and periodicals was spent in countries which are principally suppliers of
-English language materials.
More money was spent in the United States for new books and periodicals than in any other country, or in Canada and the
United Kingdom combined. One reason for this dependence upon the United States as a source of library materials may be
found in annual book production statistics, compiled by UNESCO for 1968:
United States 59,247
United Kingdom      31,372
Canada           3,527
Since United States and United Kingdom publishers are the major producers of library materials in the English language, it
follows that Canadian libraries will acquire most of then new books and periodicals from these countries. Whether they are
purchased through Canadian agents or from publishers and booksellers abroad, most materials in Canadian academic libraries
originate in the United States or in the United Kingdom, and payments find their way back to the publishers	
A second purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the effects of direct purchasing of library materials from
the country of origin, particularly of books published in the [U.S. and U.K.] which might be available through Canadian agents.
In Chapter HI it was estimated that Canadian university and college libraries are currently spending approximately
$24,000,000 on all library materials. [The survey indicates that the following amounts are being] spent with dealers in new
books in Canada, the U.S. and the U.K	
Canada      $3,336,000
U.S       4,488,000
U.K :  .  .      1,392,000
To know whether the money presently being spent in the United States and the United Kingdom could be spent in Canada
with the same effect, something must also be known about the Canadian agency system. This system deals principally in books.
It could not supply libraries with most of the materials which they require, and has not claimed this ability.
Unfortunately, the available statistics relating to publishing are not full enough to provide completely accurate information
about the relative strength of the Canadian agency system in respect to books. However, some approximations can be obtained
from the use of a combination of sources ....
Among.. .[U.S.] publishers.. . without representation in Canada, but which publish books of importance to academic
libraries, are 101 large and small university and college presses, 324 university and college departments, 48 agencies of federal,
state and municipal governments, 157 art galleries, museums and libraries, and 633 scientific, professional and scholarly
academies, associations, institutes, leagues and similar organizations. [There are also] hundreds of specialist publishers who
concentrate their activities within limited subject areas. .**►*-^
It is clear, therefore, that publisher-agents in Canada are severely limited in their capacity to serve academic library needs, and
that it is not possible to equate the amount of money spent by libraries out of the country with an amount of money lost to
Canadian publisher-agents in potential sales., i
Nevertheless, it has been suggested that Canadian university and college libraries should be required to purchase U.S. and U.K.
books through Canadian agents, and in this fashion to contribute to the support of original Canadian publishing. It is said that
since libraries are supported with public funds, they should be the medium through which the public supports publishing.
This is an oversimplification of a complex issue. It overlooks the fact that universities and colleges derive a substantial amount
of their support from private sources, including student fees.
Moreover, librarians, who purchase abroad in order to obtain lower prices and better service, are making the most efficient
use they can of the tax dollar on behalf of their patrons, assuming service to patrons to be the primary mission of the library.
o
o
Q r^
There are no guarantees that income from the sale of imported books will be diverted into the publishing of Canadian authors.
Nor is there any evidence that sales of imports to libraries have a large effect on the quantity of Canadian publishing.
If public support is required to subsidize Canadian publishing, an effort to wring that support out of university library
budgets seems like an inefficient way of proceeding, and one in which the disadvantages would outweigh the benefits.
The amount of money to be derived through the placing of all possible orders through Canadian agents would not be large. It
has been shown that expenditures with U.S. vendors of new books in all languages are now at the level of about four and a half
million dollars per year. It has also been shown that a great many publishers whose books are required by academic libraries are
not represented in Canada. It would be impractical for agents to import a few copies each of thousands of specialized titles, in an
attempt to meet demands which are difficult to predict. Nevertheless, let it be assumed that the Canadian and U.S. dollars
remain at par, that net prices and discounts were identical in both countries and that Canadian vendors might claim as much as a'
third of $4,488,000, or $1,496,000. From this gross return the publisher-agents would have to pay their own operating
expenses, and these would include payments to the U.S. publishers of books. Nothing is known of the profitability of agency
sales, but if the margin is as high as 6%, which is doubtful, the net gain to the entire publisher-agency system would be about
$89,760.
Results of the photocopying survey will appear in the next issue.
RIDINGTON ROOM BIBLIOGRAPHIES RESHELVED
Readers doing work in the humanities and social sciences should find the Ridington Room reference collection easier to use
this fall. Formerly, all bibliographies were grouped together on the shelves, regardless of subject. This meant that general
reference material on, say, geography (G call numbers) had to be shelved some distance away from bibliographies on the same
subject, which all had ZG numbers and were filed in with the rest of the Z's.
The collection is now being rearranged so that each bibliography will be located next to the general reference material on that
subject. To illustrate: bibliographies on the Arctic (ZG 600 call numbers) would be found immediately after the other reference
material on that subject (G 600 call numbers).
Reshelving should be finished by the start of the fall term. In the meantime, the Social Sciences and Humanities staff can help
you locate any material that is being moved.
MORE ABOUT CAN/SDI
Following our offer to subsidize twenty new subscribers to the National Science Library's CAN/SDI service (see the May-June
Library News, pp. 5 - 7) a number of enquiries have reached the Science Division. However, the number of actual new
subscribers has yet to reach twenty, and those who act now may still be eligible for a $40 subsidy.
For more information, please call R.J. Brongers, Head of the Science Division, at local 3826. Copies of the News article on
CAN/SDI and its benefits are available from the Information and Orientation Division, local 2076.
HELP!
The Library is looking for an extra copy of Western Homes and Living for April, 1970. If you have a copy to donate or sell,
please call Graham Elliston of the Bibliography Division at local 2304.
r>
Editor: Mrs. J.E. de Bruijn Information & Orientation Division ^
1        BELL   INGLIS  F
LIBRARY
107
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