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UBC Library News Jul 31, 1970

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 HJ.B.C. LIBRARY NEWS
Volume III, No. 6
i-vnj:
June - July, 1970
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Vancouver, B.C.
This newsletter is published as an information service for UBC faculty, students and other readers outside the Library. It contains feature articles and news about developments in the library system which we feel
will be of interest or concern to the larger community. The News welcomes all comments, criticisms and suggestions for future articles.
JULY - SEPTEMBER LIBRARY HOURS
During the Summer Session (July 6 — August 21) the Main Library and most of the larger branches will
be open for service at least four nights a week. From August 22 to September 7, almost all campus libraries
will be closed in the evenings and on weekends. Separate schedules for each period are given below.
MAIN AND SEDGEWICK LIBRARIES
SUMMER SESSION
MONDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY'
SUNDAY
CURRICULUM LABORATORY
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY - SUNDAY
MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAYS-
MAIN AND SEDGEWICK LIBRARIES
8 a.m. — 9 p.m.
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
8 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
8 a.m. — 9 p.m.
10 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
MUSIC LIBRARY
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
WOODWARD LIBRARY
MONDAY - THURSDAY
FRIDAY - SATURDAY
SUNDAY
ALL OTHER LIBRARIES
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY - SUNDAY
BROCK HALL STUDY AREAS
MONDAY - SATURDAY
SUNDAY
8 a.m. — 10 p.m.
9 a.m. —   5 p.m.
12 noon —6 p.m.
8 a.m. —
8 a.m. —
Closed
9 p.m.
5 p.m.
vro;
AUGUST 22 - SEPTEMBER 7
WOODWARD LIBRARY
9 a.m. —   5 p.m.
Closed
8 a.m. — 12 midnight
Closed
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY - SUNDAY
9 a.m. — 5 p.m.
Closed
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY - SUNDAY
MATHEMATICS LIBRARY
August 24 - 30
MONDAY - FRIDAY  '       9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
SATURDAY - SUNDAY    Closed
September 1-7
MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
SATURDAY - SUNDAY    Closed
All campus libraries will be closed on Labour Day (September 7)
ALL OTHER LIBRARIES
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY - SUNDAY
BROCK HALL STUDY AREAS
MONDAY - FRIDAY
SATURDAY - SUNDAY
8 a.m. —
Closed
9 a.m. —
Closed
5 p.m.
5 p.m.
BORROWERS' CARDS FOR SUMMER SESSION
5 p.m. — 11 p.m.
Closed
Because of the unsettled postal situation, Summer Session library cards were not mailed out this year.
Faculty and students who have not already picked up their cards may do so at the Main Library's Circulation
Office.
LIBRARY ORIENTATION
Summer Session students and faculty, especially those who have not used the Library recently, are invited to one of the half-hour orientation programs offered during the first two weeks of July. First, a ten-
minute colour slide show will explain the basics of library use. This will be followed by a short tour covering
the most important public service and reference divisions. These programs will be given at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. each weekday from Thursday, July 2 till Friday,
July 17. They begin in Room 835 of the School of Librarianship (top floor, north wing, Main Library). Special
talks and tours can also be arranged for individual classes; please call the Information and Orientation
Division at local 2076 for details.
WHILE YOU WERE AWAY
Since April a number of changes have taken place in the Main Library. To make better use of available
space, some card catalogues, study areas, service desks and stack books have been moved. The many signs
and printed guides should help students and faculty find their bearings again. However, this list of changes
may be useful:
1) The old south Reading Room adjoining the Main Concourse has been converted to an office
area. It will be occupied by Interlibrary Loan, Information and Orientation, and the Reading
Rooms Division. To make up for the loss of study space in the Reading Room, twenty
tables and ninety-five carrells have been added in the bookstacks.
2) Two dozen large cabinets have been added to the Main Card Catalogue, which now extends
to the wall between the Main Concourse and the bookstacks. The Location File is in the
middle of the room, directly in front of the Information Desk, with the Author-Title File on
one side and the Subject File on the other.
3) The Information Desk has been moved to the alcove between the two staircases on the west
side of the Concourse. Serials lists, bibliographic guides, and computer print-outs of books
on loan, on order and in process are kept at the desk or on the counter at the rear of the
alcove.
4) To speed up service, a new wicket has been added on the far side of the Circulation Office.
The staff here will handle all inquiries about UBC library cards and borrowing privileges.
5) The "E" call numbers, formerly on stack level 1, are now split between levels 1 and 2.
Signs posted at the stack entrances show what call numbers will be found on each level.
Anyone working with books classified in the "E"s (United States history) should make a .
special point of checking these signs before going down for material.
. ■■
SEDGEWICK:   SOMETHING TO BE PROUD OF
Each year Canadian Architect magazine holds a national competition for buildings still in the design
stage. Twelve outstanding designs are chosen by a panel of leading architects, and are later featured in the
Canadian Architect Yearbook. This year a record number of entries were submitted — slightly over two hundred. The Library is happy to announce that Rhone & Iredale's design for the new Sedgewick Undergraduate
Library wis among the twelve winners. The judges' comments, along with the architects' plans and sketches,
will be published this fall in the 1970 Yearbook.
Rhone & Iredale's own model of the new building is now on display in the glass case outside the Ridington Room. Also included are two large photographs showing views of the library from the Main Library and the
centre of the Main Mall.
As the model shows, the lawn west of the Ladner Bell Tower will slope down approximately twelve feet
to allow for an entrance to the new library under the Mall. It is hoped that a start can be made on the excavation by August.
■  .
BIGGER, BETTER BIOMEDICAL BRANCH
■ ;
June 10 was a red-letter day for the Woodward Biomedical Library. At 2:45 that afternoon the $2 million
Woodward extension was officially opened, giving the library twice as much shelf space for books and seven
hundred new seats for readers. The extension, consisting of one wing and a new top floor, was a gift of the
Mr. and Mrs. P.A. Woodward Foundation. It was formally opened by Lord Brock of the Royal College of
Surgeons.
Following this, Nobel Prize winner Sir John Eccles unveiled a portrait of Sir Charles Sherrington, the
founder of modern neurophysiology. The painting will hang in the library's Sherrington Room, which has been
set aside for meetings and exhibits. Another most valuable gift came from the Woodward Foundation. One of
the Foundation's trustees, Mr. Douglas Gardiner, presented the library with a rare first edition of William
Harvey's classic De Motu Cordis (1628). Only one other copy is held in Canada.
To mark the opening of the extension, a symposium on "The British Contribution to Medicine" was held
in the Frederic Wood Theatre on June 11 and 12. The papers will later be published in book form.
Within a few weeks, construction will begin again—this time on a six-storey Instructional Resources
Centre, financed equally by the Woodward Foundation and the federal Health Resources Fund. Besides administration offices for health sciences personnel, the building will have a number of lecture theatres and seminar rooms designed to make maximum use of audio-visual teaching aids. Although the IRC is not part of
the library system, it will be joined onto the Woodward Library.
NOTES FROM SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
What kind of material is kept in the Special Collections Division? Nine out of ten readers would answer
"Rare books", and possibly "Manuscripts" or "University archives". Very few would think of business
records, but in fact these make up an important part of the collection. Researchers in commerce and economics
find them a useful source of information that may not be available anywhere else. The papers and minutes of
large companies, such as the B.C. Electric Company and the B.C. Power Corporation, are of interest to
historians as well.
Recently the Division held a special "open house" day for the Vancouver chapter of the American
Records Management Association. About fifteen institutions and companies were represented:   B.C. Telephone,
MacMillan Bloedel, Canadian Kodak, the Workmen's Compensation Board, and many others. They were shown
how business records and other archives are processed when they are received, how the materials are indexed,
and how they may be used for research.
The visitors were among the first to see a display of striking photographs which will be featured during
the Summer Session. The plates, all of British Columbia coast Indians, have been selected from Edward
Curtis's magnificent North American Indian. Those who are not familiar with this work or its history might be
interested in the following account, taken from the Librarian's Annual Report to the Senate, 1936-37 and
1937-38:
At least four . . . gifts merit detailed description.  First to be mentioned is Curtis, Indians
of North America [[sicj, consisting of twenty volumes and twenty large portfolios of plates. The
work is one of the most superb and costly ever published in America. It is printed on vellum and
bound in half morocco. Alike in the splendour of its typography, its sumptuous illustrations, and
its sound scholarship, it is a pre-eminent authority on the native races of this continent. It
^.brings together the results of a lifetime of work by Edward S. Curtis and his associates, and the
ethnological knowledge of Frederick W. Hodge and the staff of the Smithsonian Institution ....
It contains more than 2,200 plates illustrating every aspect of Indian life, art and religion. The
edition was limited to five hundred sets, of which our own is No. 43. Publication commenced in
1907 and was completed in 1930. It was issued in two editions at $3,500 and $4,500 respectively.
It is believed there are but three copies in the Dominion, the other two being owned by the
Library of Parliament and McGill University.
The set of the Library is one of twenty-five purchased by Mr. £j. Pierpont] Morgan for
presentation to personal friends, or institutions in which he was interested. His death occurred
before distribution was complete, and thus opportunity came for its purchase through a Boston
dealer by whom the undistributed sets had been acquired.
No funds being available for the purchase, the Librarian, with the permission of the
University authorities, solicited subscriptions from friends of the Library for the $930 required
to purchase the set. Twenty-four contributors supplied the necessary funds. Their names are
duly recorded on a special book plate placed in each of the volumes and portfolios as a suitable
memento of their generosity. The Library is proud to have this notable set in its collection.
This is the first time in recent years that Special Collections has had any part of The North American
Indian on display. Anyone with a few minutes to spare should make a point of seeing it.
JOINT CATALOGUING EXPANDS
The March issue of the News reported that the UBC, Simon Fraser and University of Victoria libraries
had begun a shared-cataloguing program. Since then, three Ontario libraries — Windsor, Waterloo and York —
have asked to be included in the program. '
Under the old system, cataloguing copy sent from the Library of Congress was used in cataloguing current books. All items without LC copy had to be catalogued by the individual library. Under the new arrangement, it will not matter as much if LC copy is slow in arriving. Each of the six libraries will be responsible
for roughly one-sixth of the alphabet, and all current works within an individual library's alphabetical area
will be catalogued as soon as they come in. The cataloguing copy will then be sent to the other five libraries.
SCAN JOURNALS FAST WITH CURRENT CONTENTS
Many readers working in the sciences have seen or used the various Current Contents publications. Each
weekly edition reproduces the table-of-contents pages of journals in a particular subject area, often in advance
of publication. By checking Current Contents once a week, a_student or researcher can keep abreast of virtually all the articles being written in his field of interest. Until recently this service was restricted to journals in the pure sciences and technology. Last year,
however, Current Contents: Education began publication, and the Curriculum Laboratory immediately took out
a subscription. Now the Social Sciences Division has just begun receiving the newest in the series, Current
Contents: Behavioral, Social and Management Sciences. This one covers more than 700 journals in subject
areas ranging from anthropology, automation and banking to sociology and urban affairs. They are grouped
roughly by topic, but a title index has been included as a guide for readers who only want to see the contents
page for one particular journal. A second index in the back lists the authors of all articles covered, with their
addresses.
.
This new set will be a valuable aid to hundreds of students and faculty members working in the behavioural and social sciences. All the issues received are held near the Social Sciences reference desk, in a
bright red box on top of the vertical pamphlet file. For more information, see the Social Sciences staff or
phone them at 228-2725.
ENJOY READING?   READ ON
'
The Crane Memorial Library for the Blind has just begun its summer reading project. This year the goal
is to tape-record the entire English 100 and 200 reading list. Over 20 blind students will be taking these
courses in September, and few of the novels, plays, poems or recommended readings are available in braille.
Some of the students have lost their sight so recently that they find it difficult to read braille in any case.
Taping takes place in the Crane recording studios, with each reader contributing one hour a week.
Already a number of students, faculty and staff members have volunteered, but there is room for anyone else
who would like to help out. If you are interested, please phone Crane at 228-2373.
!
SIMON FRASER LIBRARY CARDS
As we noted in the May News, UBC faculty and graduate students are now eligible for library cards from
Simon Fraser University. However, the application procedure has been changed. Anyone wishing a card is
asked to see Mrs. M. Jans, Supervisor of the SFU Library's Loan Division, between 10 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. or
2:30 to 3 p.m., Monday through Friday.   (Remember to take along some identification.)
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Editor:   Mrs. E. de Bruijn Information & Orientation Division

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