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UBC Library News Mar 31, 1985

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Array ubc library news
new series no. 12/march 1985
EMILY CARR LETTERS DONATED TO THE LIBRARY
The UBC Archives has recently received a bequest of personal papers from the estate of the
late Ruth Humphrey, a faculty member in the Department of English from 1945 to 1964. The
papers include 47 letters from Emily Carr to Professor Humphrey.
The collection, along with other material relating to Emily Carr, is on display in the Special
Collections Division in the Main Library.
COMPUTER SEARCHING: THE SELF SERVICE ERA BEGINS
//■
/
'  ./
y   /
/
Increasing numbers of library
users ask us if instead of
coming into the library, they
can use their own computer
terminals to search for
bibliographic information.
If you are interested in
consulting journal indexes &
abstracts, the answer is yes —
online access to remote
databases is an option.
However, it costs money and
requires some pre-planning
and training.
(Please note:  The Library's
catalogue is NOT yet available
online.)
Computer searching has been available to UBC Library users since 1973 through reference
librarians. The Library CABS (Computer Assisted Bibliographic Services) is still thriving and
expanding. Ask about CABS at the reference desk in any UBC library. A reference librarian
will consult with you, prepare and perform an online search, then give you a list of citations
produced as a result of the search. The fee charged by the distributor is passed on to you.
Now, however, if you have access to a computer terminal* or a microcomputer with
communications software, a modem, and a major credit card, you can set up an account with a
distributor such as KNOWLEDGE INDEX, BRS/AFTER DARK, COMPUSERVE, or THE
SOURCE and perform your own searches. These and other distributors have developed new
software directed to 'end-users': the faculty members, students, and professionals who use the
information. The new services are simpler to use; encourage use at non-peak hours (6pm to
4am); cost less; and offer fewer databases than the regular daytime services.    As well, the
•For example, if you have an MTS ID, you could use a terminal in the UBC Computing Centre. more sophisticated services which have until recently been available only to institutions have
eased their restrictions on who may access their systems.
The databases available vary from service to service, but generally include the online
equivalents to familiar sources such as INDEX MEDICUS, CHEMICAL ABSTRACTS,
PSYCHOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS, the ERIC indexes, and ENGINEERING INDEX. Not only
bibliographic indexes but also reference works and full text articles are beginning to be
available. For example, a physician can access PHYCOM for pharmaceutical product
information. A stockbroker can use STANDARD & POOR'S NEWS for financial reports on
corporations. A bookseller might use BOOKS IN PRINT online. Extremely current information
is available without going to the library, investing in expensive reference works, or cluttering
up your bookshelves.
Using a microcomputer to search opens up further options if you have the money to purchase
and the time to implement software packages aimed at the end-user. 'Front end' packages can
obviate learning command languages and simplify the selection of databases and the search
process. Bibliographic database management packages and word processing packages can
enhance the usefulness of the lists of references retrieved.
The reference librarian in your field can advise you on databases and systems appropriate for
your subject. Manuals and printed aids for particular databases may be available. The Health
Sciences Library Network is preparing an information package on end-user searching. The
package is oriented towards the health sciences, but the sections on accessingsystems,hardware and
software requirements, methods of payment, distributor names and addresses, will be useful to
anyone interested in becoming an end-user. Reference librarians at the Health Sciences
Network libraries (Woodward and the hospital libraries) can provide more information about
the package.
COLLECTIONS BUDGET INCREASED
For Fiscal Year 1984/85 the University granted a 5% increase in "non-salary" budget items to
partially counter the erosion in purchasing power due to inflation. We were pleased to learn
recently that the Library's collections budget has been included in this category. The increase
is the first since the 1981/82 fiscal year.
LIBRARY SERVICE IN COMMERCE AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
The Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration has recently opened the David Lam
Management Research Library, a facility made possible by a $1 million gift from Vancouver
businessman, David Lam. Although not officially part of the UBC Library system, the new
library is a valuable adjunct to the resources and services now provided by the Main Library.
It is located in the Henry Angus Building, Room 307.
The Management Research Library will concentrate on acquiring current materials relevant to
research going on in the Faculty. For the time being its clientele is limited to faculty
members in Commerce; students in the PhD., 2nd year Masters, and 4th year Undergraduate
programs in Commerce; users seeking material locally available only in the Management
Research Library; and representatives of sponsor companies or individual donors. The material
in the Library does not circulate.
The Main Library's collection, available to anyone, will continue to be maintained as a
comprehensive source of commerce and business materials and will provide backfiles of older
materials and a wide range of related information. Reserve materials for undergraduate
students in Commerce will still be housed in the Main Library Reserve Book Collection and
librarians in the Humanities and Social Sciences Division can provide reference assistance. HELP FOR FLOUNDERING STUDENTS
A program to provide extra assistance to students doing research for term papers and essays
began at the Sedgewick Library on January 28th. The purpose of the program, called
"Intensive Term Paper Help," is to introduce students to the materials and strategies involved
in library research. The program is limited to students in first and second year Arts and
Science. They may complete a form describing their research topics at the Sedgewick
Reference Desk, Monday through Thursday, from 3:30 to 5:00 pm. At a subsequent
appointment, each will be given an individual research outline and one of the Sedgewick
librarians will explain the search strategy and the reference sources included in it. For more
information on the program, call Joan Whitney at 3096.
HELP FOR ANYONE ELSE
As well as services such as "Intensive Term Paper Help" for beginning students, the Library
offers a variety of orientation and instruction programs appropriate to all the groups it serves.
Faculty members can arrange specialized instruction for class groups by contacting the branch
library or reference division responsible for their disciplines. Orientation sessions for new
faculty, staff, research assistants, departmental secretaries, or off-campus groups can be
arranged by calling Joan Sandilands at 2076.
EARLY RETIREMENTS: FAMILIAR FACES WE'LL MISS
Four UBC librarians have arranged for early retirement. Rita Butterfield, Head of the
Circulation Division since 1967, will retire as of March 31st. Mary Banham will serve as Acting
Head of Circulation from April 1st. Retiring as of June 30th are Mary Macaree, Head of the
MacMillan Library since 1968; Margaret Pahr, who has worked in the Catalogue Records
Division since 1965; and Marilyn Dutton, Reference Librarian in the Humanities and Social
Sciences Division since 1963. Adjustments required for the replacement of essential time lost
through the early retirements will proceed as soon as authorization has been obtained from the
President's Office.
HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY NETWORK
Although UBC's four health sciences libraries are widely separated, students and faculty have
almost immediate access to materials in all of them through the services offered by the
Health Sciences Library Network. The Network, established in 1982 with special funding
allocated through the Faculty of Medicine, includes the libraries at the UBC-af filiated
teaching hospitals (Hamber Library at Children's/Grace/Shaughnessy Hospitals, the Biomedical
Branch Library at Vancouver General Hospital, St. Paul's Hospital Library) and the Woodward
Biomedical Library on campus. The Network Services Office serves as the co-ordinating
agency. The collection in each of the hospital libraries is concentrated on the clinical
specialties of that hospital while Woodward Library maintains a more extensive biomedical
collection.
Through the Network services, material which is not available in one of the libraries may be requested from another. Requests are transmitted via electronic mail and the material,
usually in photocopy form, is sent out on the Faculty of Medicine courier van which makes
daily deliveries between the hospital libraries and the Network Office at Woodward. Most
requests are filled within 24 hours.  Over 37,000 requests were processed in 1984.
In addition to document delivery, the Network Services Office processes hospital interlibrary
loan requests for material not helo at UBC and provides supplementary reference support to
the hospital libraries.
Network delivery services are available to anyone on campus or at the affiliated hospitals.
On-campus requests for material held in the hospital libraries may be placed at the Woodward
Library Circulation Desk. Off-campus requests for material held on campus or at another
Network hospital may be placed at the Circulation Desk at any of the hospital libraries.
GIFTS AND EXCHANGES RELOCATES
The Gifts and Exchanges Division has moved from its lofty location in the Main Library's north
wing to a more spacious and accessible spot on the ground level of the south wing. Use the
entrance to the Map Division and turn left. Graham Elliston, in his capacity as Head of Gifts
and Exchanges, will reside there; in his role as Serials Bibliographer he will remain in his office
off the catalogue concourse.  Telephone numbers are unchanged.
IN CASE YOU'VE ALWAYS WONDERED...
The world's largest library is the Library of Congress. It occupies the third largest building in
Washington, D.C. (after the Pentagon and the FBI Building), has 535 miles of shelves, 20 million
books, 400,000 newspapers, materials in 478 languages, 300,000 reels of movies, 10 million
prints and photographs, and in 1984 a budget of $249,026,000. And it subscribes to the Georgia
Straight.
Editor: Joan Sandilands
Illustrator:  Merry Meredith
Information & Orientation Division
University of British Columbia Library
issn 0382-0661

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