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UBC Library News Nov 30, 1987

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Array ubc library news
new series no. 18/November 1987
IN THIS ISSUE
COLLECTIONS BUDGET  1
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE 1
CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SUPPORTS
LIBRARY  2
MAIN LIBRARY FIRE PROTECTION 2
COMPUTER-READABLE PRODUCTS
FROM STATISTICS CANADA:
AVAILABLE BUT NOT AFFORDABLE  2
COMPUTER SEARCHING WORKSHOPS AT
WOODWARD  3
SEDGEWICK RANKS HIGH  3
GIFTS  3
Gifts and Exchanges Division  3
ASIA/PACIFIC RIM  4
TAIRIKU NIPPO-THE CONTINENTAL
DAILY NEWS 4
AROUND THE LIBRARIES 4
LIBRARY PEOPLE  5
DISPLAYS  5
NEW LIBRARY PUBLICATIONS 6
NOTE FROM THE EDITOR  6
COLLECTIONS BUDGET
For the 1987/88 fiscal year, the Library has
received a 5% increase in the collections budget on
the condition that we transfer an equal amount
from other areas of the library budget to
collections.   We were able to transfer $25,000 from
endowment fund income to serial subscriptions.
We are now in the process of identifying a further
$200,000 from the Library's continuing salary
budget to be reallocated to collections.  This money
will be used to meet^anticipated serial cost
increases and allow us to provide for up to a 12%
increase in the cost of our existing subscriptions.
In the last fiscal year, inflation and devaluation
increased serial costs about 17%.  Because we had
allowed for only a 12% increase, the amount spent
exceeded the budget allocation for serials by
$121,000.
For 1987/88, book fund allocations will remain
very tight, except in a few areas where we have
trust or special funds.   We are very pleased to
report that the Library received a special allocation
of $150,000 per year through the "Excellence"
program for materials in Asian/Pacific Rim studies.
Our application for this funding was made through
the Faculty of Arts.  We are grateful for the
cooperation of Associate Dean Jonathan Wisenthal
and Dean Robert Will.   The Library urgently
needed improved funding for this growing area.
The new funding will be used to support the
purchase of both vernacular material for the Asian
Library and western language Pacific Rim material
for the Main Library.
The 1987/88 collections budget was approved by
the Senate Library Committee on October 1.  At
one of its future meetings, the Committee plans to
review the outlook for collections funding for the
next few years.  This topic will be the subject of a
future article in the Library News.
Tony Jeffreys
SENATE LIBRARY COMMITTEE
Members of the Senate Library Committee
advise and assist the Librarian in
developing policies on resources and
services and in allocating the collections
budget.   They also advise the Library on
user needs and report to Senate on matters
under discussion.  The new members of the
Library Senate Committee are:
Dr. S. E. Grace, Dr. S. C. Lindstrom, Dean
P. A. Lusztig, Dr. G. G. E. Scudder, Dean
P. Suedfeld, Ms. N. E. Woo, Mr. B. Dumka,
Mr. J. Ringwald, Mr. J. A. Williamson and
Chancellor Dr. L. R. Peterson, Q. C.
Continuing on the Committee are Dean
P. T. Burns, DeanR. C. Miller Jr.,
Professor Anne Piternick, Vice-President
Dr. K. D. Srivastava and
Dr. J. L. Wisenthal.   Dr. Wisenthal has
been re-elected Chairman.
ubc  library news
November  1987 CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SUPPORTS
LIBRARY
At its 1987 annual general meeting, the B.C.
Chamber of Commerce recommended that the
Government of British Columbia provide
special financial assistance to UBC Library, in
order to provide more space, resource
materials, added qualified personnel and
technological advancement.  Referring to
President Strangway's Report on the UBC Library,
the resolution pointed out that the Library is a
unique and vital resource for all residents of the
province, from university researchers and senior
professionals to private industry and consultants;
and that it needs increased financial support to
maintain collections, to provide space for
collections, and to implement new technologies
which will improve access to resources and the
efficiency of operations.   The Chamber of
Commerce forwarded the recommendation to the
Ministry of Advanced Education and Job Training.
MAIN LIBRARY FIRE PROTECTION
The noises heard reverberating through the Main
Library, and the piles of steel pipes here and there,
are part of the installation of a complete new fire
protection system.  The Main Library is being
equipped with a fire detection and alarm system
and with sprinklers.  The job began in May and is
scheduled to be completed by Christmas.  The
stacks from level 3 to 7, the Special Collections
area, and odd places here and there remain to be
done.   The sprinklers are most conspicuous in the
stacks and other low-ceilinged areas.   The metal
grills covering the sprinklers are to protect both the
sprinkler heads and yours.
Librarians regard the installation with mixed
feelings.   On the one hand, the sprinklers should
prevent any large scale fire disaster.   Fires should
be detected early, confined, and extinguished
without widespread loss or damage.   On the other
hand, water can be as dangerous to library
collections as fire.   The literature is rich in accounts
of water damage and destruction.
Two factors make the sprinkler installation less
threatening.  Each sprinkler head is called into
action independently.  No sprinkler comes on
unless immediate local conditions call for it.  Each
head shuts off when it is no longer required.  In the
Special Collections Division, where rare and costly
materials are kept, there is another safety feature.
The branch lines that supply the sprinkler heads
are dry until the fire alarm sounds and one or more
heads call for water.  The Library has been
assured repeatedly that this system minimizes the
chance of accidental wetting of collections.
Bill Watson
COMPUTER-READABLE PRODUCTS FROM
STATISTICS CANADA: AVAILABLE BUT
NOT AFFORDABLE
Compared to the 1981 census products, the number
of computer-readable products from the 1986
census of population has been reduced by almost
75% in the case of census tract level data, and by
52% overall.  The cost of 1986 computer-readable
census products has increased between 1567% and
9900% in 3 years.   Canadian census products at
some small-area levels will cost $2500 per file;
comparable American census of population
products cost US$175 per tape.  The prices of other
government data products have increased by 100%
to 500% in the same period of time.
The cost of doing business in Canada for large
corporations as well as small entrepreneurs will be
affected severely by these changes.  Academic
researchers and teachers will no longer be able to
afford to use current Canadian data for the study of
Canadian society but have to use out-of-date
Canadian data or American data.   The principle of
government-collected information as a public good
is explicitly stated in federal legislation and policy
statements.   Current changes in availability and
affordability of information run counter to existing
policy.
A report explaining the implications of these
changes has been prepared.   Copies have been sent
to Members of Parliament, Canadian university
presidents and the major Canadian social science
associations.   If you would like a copy of the report,
please contact Laine Ruus, UBC Data Library
(228-5587).
How does this affect UBC Library?
UBC Data Library purchased, from the 1981
census, most of the data files required by the UBC
academic community for approximately $15,000;
to purchase half of that amount of data from the
1986 census (as only about half of that amount will
be produced) would cost approximately $130,000.
With the Library's current budget, we may not be
able to purchase 1986 census data in
computer-readable form.
Thus, 1986 census information for geographic
areas smaller than census tract will not be
available through the UBC Library system.
Anyone requiring information at the enumeration
area level will have to purchase the service from a
private company.  Anyone needing information at
the census tract level or above will have to
November 1987
ubc library news keypunch it from printed sources.   Currently, the
government has no plans to produce microdata
Public Use Sample Tape files from the 1986 census
data.  Anyone needing information on combinations
of variables that Statistics Canada is not producing
as a standard product will have to contract with
Statistics Canada to produce them.  For example,
Statistics Canada does not intend to produce files
showing income by education.  If microdata files
from the 1986 census were to be available, as they
have been from the 1971, 1976 and 1981 censuses,
it would be possible for anyone needing such a table
to produce it themselves.  For the 1986 census, the
only recourse will be to contract with Statistics
Canada to have the table custom produced.
Laine Ruus
COMPUTER SEARCHING WORKSHOPS AT
WOODWARD
Interested in doing your own computer searches
and don't know where to start?  The Woodward
Biomedical Library will be hosting a series of fall
workshops for faculty, staff and students in the
medical and biological sciences.   The workshops are
designed to introduce you to the major online search
systems - BRS, DIALOG, CAN/OLE, MEDLARS,
etc., and will include information on the new user
friendly or end-user systems now available - BRS
COLLEAGUE, KNOWLEDGE INDEX, DIALOG
MEDICAL CONNECTION, GRATEFUL MED,
etc.  Equipment and telecommunications
requirements will also be reviewed.
The follow-up sessions will focus on the Medline
database, including the structure and
idiosyncracies of the database.   You will find out
how to search Medline using BRS COLLEAGUE or
the GRATEFUL MED software.
WHERE: SHERRINGTON ROOM, WOODWARD
LIBRARY
INTRODUCTION
Tuesday, November 17, 3-5pm
SEARCHING MEDLINE WITH BRS
COLLEAGUE
Wednesday, November 18, 3-5pm
SEARCHING MEDLINE USING GRATEFUL
MED
Tuesday, November 24, 3-5pm
To register, call Pat Lysyk (228-4440) or Margaret
Price (228-4970).
SEDGEWICK RANKS HIGH
Out of 25 North American undergraduate libraries
reporting statistics for 1985/86, Sedgewick Library
is:
Margaret Price
6th in size of collection (192,943 bound
volumes), preceded by Toronto, UCLA,
Maryland, Michigan, and Illinois.
5th in number of volumes per undergraduate
(9.31), preceded by Stanford, Chicago, Cornell,
and UCLA.
5th in number of loans per undergraduate
(15.31), preceded by Stanford, Chicago,
Berkeley, and Southern Illinois.
And we do all this efficiently-we're down to
11th in size of operating expenditure
($715,874) and 12th in number of
undergraduates per staff member (1,167).
Joan Sandilands
§§§§§§§§§§§§§   GIFTS   §§§§§§§§§§§§
GIFTS AND EXCHANGES DIVISION
The Gifts and Exchanges Division in the Main
Library coordinates and oversees gifts-in-kind (not
cash donations) and exchange agreements for the
library system.   Gifts-in-kind are library materials
of all sorts: books, manuscripts, archival papers,
periodicals, records, and tapes.   It is the Library's
policy to accept gifts with the understanding that,
upon receipt, they are owned by the Library.  The
Library assumes the right to determine their
retention, location, cataloguing treatment, and
other considerations related to their use or
disposition.   We ordinarily do not accept gifts with
special conditions or restrictions attached to them.
If, however, the University Librarian decides it is
in the best interests of the collection, the Library
may agree to accept a gift subject to certain
specified restrictions or conditions.
Guidelines for Acceptance and Appraisal of
Gifts
Gifts must have sufficient potential value to the
Library to justify their consideration.
All gifts are acknowledged, either by form or
personal letter, depending on the
circumstances.  Each acknowledgement letter,
where appropriate, is accompanied by a release
form in duplicate, one copy of which is to be
completed and returned by the donor.  These
ubc library news
November 1987 forms are not normally sent to institutional
donors.
Most gifts are appraised, on request, and
official receipts issued to the donors for income
tax purposes.  The exceptions are gifts from
departments of the University, other
institutions, and unsolicited materials.
If requested by the donor, bookplates are
inserted into all gifts and special wording may
be used.   In some circumstances, special plates
may be printed.   If gift books are rebound, new
plates are affixed.
If you have materials you think may be of use to
the Library, please write or phone the Gifts and
Exchanges Division, Main Library ( 228-2607)
before sending the materials.  We would appreciate
receiving donations requiring 1987 tax receipts by
early December.
Exchanges
The term "gifts" is fairly clear, but "exchanges"
often causes confusion.   The Library used to send
other libraries "exchange lists" of surplus books
and periodicals.  The materials on these lists were
offered for the cost of shipping.   The exchange was
achieved by requesting materials from other
libraries' lists.  There was never any attempt to
balance these exchanges.   In fact, UBC Library
always gave more than it received.  This is only
right, given that it is one of the larger libraries.
This type of exchange stopped about five years ago
when staff was reduced.  However, the Library
still conducts a more formal kind of exchange with
about 250 institutions world-wide.  Almost all
these arrangements involve the regular exchange
of periodical subscriptions.   Exchange has never
meant that we swap books with faculty or students
on a casual basis.
Graham Elliston
§§§§§§§   ASIA/PACIFIC RIM    §§§§§§
search for qualified candidates with knowledge of
these languages is underway.
The Social Sciences and Humanities Research
Council of Canada (SSHRCC) awarded the
Library $50,000 to improve the Japanese history
and contemporary literature collections.  The
acquisitions will be spread over three years.  The
application was supported strongly by Asian
scholars at UBC, the University of Victoria and the
University of Alberta.
TAIRIKU NIPPO-THE CONTINENTAL DAILY
NEWS
Founded in Vancouver by Mr.  Yasushi Yamazaki
in 1907 the newspaper, Tairiku Nippo, vividly
records the social and political conditions of
Japanese-Canadians before World War II.   For
most of its life it was entirely in Japanese but from
November, 1935 until December, 1941 it included a
section in English.   Special Collections Division has
the only set in existence, with issues from 1908 to
1941 and missing only 1907.
Tairiku Nippo is an indispensable news source for
researchers and others needing information about
the Japanese-Canadian community.  Many people
have wanted the newspaper filmed but we lacked
the funds.  Now, thanks to a generous donation
from Mr. Naomichi Nishimura, former Director of
the Hikone Public Library in Japan, and Mrs.
Nishimura, the Library is able to produce a
microfilm master of the file.   Filming is being done
to preservation standards and is expected to be
completed by November.
To date twenty-two institutions from Canada,
Japan and the United States have indicated an
interest in ordering the microfilm.   For further
information, please phone Suzanne Dodson,
Government Publications and Microforms Division
(228-3858).
Suzanne Dodson
The Library has received an annual grant through
the Faculty of Arts submission for "excellence"
funds to strengthen UBC's Asia/Pacific Rim
programmes. $150,000 will be used each year for
purchasing vernacular and Western language
materials.  The allocation of funds will primarily
follow the priorities in the Faculty of Arts proposal
and the recommendations of the Asian Library
Advisory Committee.   The grant also provides for
increased staff support for existing programmes
such as South Asian and Japanese studies and new
ones such as Korean and Indonesian studies.  A
§§§     AROUND THE LIBRARIES   §§§
September-library cards, tours, orientation...
Main Library Circulation issued or renewed
more than 20,000 student library cards... 585
students took advantage of tours of Main and
Sedgewick libraries...  In Woodward Library,
reference librarians were kept busy with
orientation sessions for 600 students and another
800 biology undergraduates doing an assignment
November 1987
ubc library news using indexes and abstracts...  Woodward
librarians urge new research assistants to phone
and arrange a brief orientation to the library...  In
addition to the regular legal research seminars
given to UBC law students, the reference librarians
in Law Library also held seminars for Capilano
College students in the paralegal course, for SFU
graduate students interested in environmental and
administrative law, and for UBC MBA students
interested in labour law...  Faculty may arrange
subject oriented bibliographic instruction or tours
for classes with the reference librarians in each
library... or phone Julie Stevens (228-2076) for
general information about tours and library
instruction...  As a result of a letter Laine Ruus,
Head of the Data Library, sent to William
L. Parish, editor of the American Journal of
Sociology, all manuscripts submitted to thejournal
after September 1, 1987 must cite
machine-readable data files.  Mr. Parish also wrote
to William Form, editor of the American
Sociological Review, and soon all journals published
by the American Sociological Association will
require citation for machine-readable files...   Data
Library's acquisitions are listed each month in the
Computing Centre's newsletter Campus
Computing...  Sedgewick is shopping for
paperbacks for its uncatalogued leisure reading
collection.  Please deposit donations in the shopping
cart inside the entrance to Sedgewick...   Crane
Library needs volunteer readers with a
background in computer science to record books
for blind and print handicapped students.
Volunteers should be good readers with clear
diction.  It is hoped they could devote a minimum of
two hours a week.  A short audition, a take home
study kit and a brief training session precede
recording.  For more information, please phone
Paul or Judy Thiele (228-6111).
§§§§§§§    LIBRARY PEOPLE    §§§§§§
Linda Joe, acting Head of the Asian Library since
January, has been appointed the new Head.  Linda
Joe replaces Miss Tung King Ng, who retired in
December 1986, after 25 years as Head of the
Asian Library.   Jocelyn Foster has been
appointed Head of the Humanities and Social
Sciences Division, Main Library.   Chuck Forbes,
formerly Head of the Humanities and Social
Sciences Division, is now the Colbeck librarian in
Special Collections Division.  He replaces Joan
Selby who retired this summer after 28 years with
the library.   Brenda Peterson has been appointed
to Jocelyn Foster's position in Information and
Orientation Division, Main Library.  Brenda was
temporarily replacing Pia Christensen in the
Humanities and Social Sciences Division.  Pia
Christensen is the acting Head of Social Work
Library, replacing Judith Frye who is on leave.
Beverley Scott has been appointed to replace Pia
Christensen until next May.  Martha Whitehead,
formerly the Extension/Circulation librarian, has
been appointed Circulation/Reference librarian in
Sedgewick Library.  Leonora Crema has been
appointed to Martha Whitehead's former position.
Lee Ann Bryant, currently half-time in
Information and Orientation, is replacing Susan
Mathew half-time in Government Publications.
Susan Mathew is on leave.
A revised Library People listing public service staff,
their areas of responsibility and phone numbers, is
available from the Information and Orientation
Division (228-2076).
Doug Mclnnes, the University Librarian, has
been elected President of the Canadian Association
of Research Libraries (CARL) for a two year term
which began in June.   CARL is an association of
twenty-nine academic and research libraries,
including the National Library of Canada and the
Canadian Institute for Scientific and Technical
Information (CISTI).  Its programs are directed at
strengthening the provision of effective library
support for research and scholarship at the
national, regional and local levels.
§§§§§
DISPLAYS
Main Library
The gift of literacy
Orpheum Theatre turns 60
UBC's Research Forests
Special Collections, Main Library
Liberty and libertinage/liberte et libertinage
Woodward Library
History of medicine students' displays
ubc library news
November 1987 §§§§§§§§§
NEW LIBRARY
PUBLICATIONS
§§§§§§§§
Start Here 132, Economic & Financial Data Files,
revised
Start Here 138, Patent Information
Start Here 141, Greek and Roman Art
How to find articles, revised (Sedgewick)
Reference material at Woodward
Library People, revised
If you would like a copy of any of these information
sheets, please phone the Information and
Orientation Division (228-2076).
NOTE FROM THE EDITOR
Thanks to Jon Nightingale at the Computing
Centre for our new textform layout.  During the
test runs, Jon contributed the following "library
news" item.
RATS
A family of white rats has taken up
residence in the lower section of Sedgewick
Library.   All attempts to discover their nest
have failed.   Students are encouraged to
feed them since, when they get hungry,
they start eating reference books.  They
have now eaten their way through the
World Book Encyclopedia and have started
in on a large atlas.
I welcome comments on the Library News and
suggestions for future articles.   Please phone
228-2076, send a note to Information and
Orientation, Main Library or a message to
Information and OrientationUBCL.
Julie Stevens
Editor: Julie Stevens
Illustrator: Merry Meredith
Information and Orientation Division
University of British Columbia Library
issn 0382-0661

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