UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Publications

UBC Library News Sep 30, 1970

Item Metadata

Download

Media
ubclibnews-1.0213287.pdf
Metadata
JSON: ubclibnews-1.0213287.json
JSON-LD: ubclibnews-1.0213287-ld.json
RDF/XML (Pretty): ubclibnews-1.0213287-rdf.xml
RDF/JSON: ubclibnews-1.0213287-rdf.json
Turtle: ubclibnews-1.0213287-turtle.txt
N-Triples: ubclibnews-1.0213287-rdf-ntriples.txt
Original Record: ubclibnews-1.0213287-source.json
Full Text
ubclibnews-1.0213287-fulltext.txt
Citation
ubclibnews-1.0213287.ris

Full Text

 Hi.B.C. LIBRARY NEWS
Volume III, No. 7
August - September, 1970
Vancouver, B.C.
This newsletter is published as an information service for UBC faculty, students and other readers outside the Library. It
contains feature articles and news about developments in the Library system which we feel will be of interest or concern to the
larger community. The News welcomes all comments, criticisms, and suggestions for future articles.
-
.m;q DC-
CAMPUS LIBRARY HOURS - WINTER SESSION, 1970-71
Main Library and
Sedgewick Undergraduate
Library
Woodward Library
Animal Resource Ecology
(Fisheries) Library
Crane Library
Curriculum Laboratory
Monday — Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday — Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday — Friday
Saturday — Sunday
Monday — Friday
Saturday - Sunday
Monday — Friday
Saturday
Sunday
8:00 a.m. - midnight
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
12:00 noon — midnight
8:00 a.m. — midnight
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
12:00 noon - midnight
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
8:00 a.m.- 10:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
Law Library
■ t
AacMillan
Agriculture) Library
.
•        ;:•■
MacMillan (Forestry/
■
Mathematics Library
■ ■ •
Music Library
_
Recordings Collection
Marjorie Smith (Social
Work) Library
'
8:00 a.m. - midnight
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
10:00 a.m.- 10:00 p.m:
Monday - Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday — Friday
Saturday
Sunday
i'r I"   -:•  .
Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
Saturday
Sunday
Monday — Friday
Saturday
. Sunday
Monday — Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday — Friday
Saturday
Sunday
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
8:00 a.m.- 11:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
12:00 noon-6:00 p.m.
8:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
Brock Hall Study Areas Monday - Sunday . 8:00 a.m.-midnight
Holiday hours for Thanksgiving, Remembrance Day, Christmas and Easter will be listed in later issues of the News. v:\
:
If. '
MAIN UBRARY HOURS - WINTER SESSION, 1970-71
_   \ i 'l    I        *• -      .
Building Open
Asian Studies Division
■
Monday — Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday — Friday
8:00 a.m. - midnight
9:00 a.m.-5:00 pjn,
12:00 noon — midnight
-
Fine Arts Division
■
Government Publications Division
Map Division and Special
Collections Division
Main Concourse Information Desk
.
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
7:00 p.m.- 10:00 p.m.
Saturday 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Sunday CLOSED
„
Monday - Friday 8:00 a.m. - midnight
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
12:00 noon-6:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. -10:00 pirn.
8:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
CLOSED
8:00 a.m.-10:00 p.m.
9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m.
12:00 noon- 10:00 p.m.
Members of the Circulation staff will be on duty at the turnstiles and the Main Loan Desk as long as the building is
open.
Saturday
Sunday
Monday - Thursday
Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday - Friday
Saturday
Sunday
Monday - Friday
Saturday
Sunday
LIBRARY ORIENTATION *70: SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
.'
Until recently, library orientation at UBC was available in only two forms: brief printed guides and conducted tours.
Unfortunately these were usually offered at a time when new students were already swamped with handouts, and when many
were too busy to spend even half an hour on a tour.
1
Last year a number of changes were made. A 12-minute colour slide show introduced students to the Library and its holdings,
so that the regular tours could be shortened. These shows and tours were offered at least once every weekday for over two
months. In this way, students found the maximum amount of help available at the time they needed it (usually just before the
first big assignment fell due). Special tours were also offered for classes and study groups, showing how to find library materials
in particular subject areas. Those who missed the slides and/or tours could get much of the same information from the new
illustrated handbook, Know Your Library.
.  ,.'
This fall, students will be offered all these and more. There is only one major change: library orientation programs will now
be reaching out to include the noon-hour crowds in the Student Union Building. Every weekday from September 14th to 25th
(and longer, if necessary) the Library's colour slide show will be held at 12:40 in the SUB Auditorium. This will be followed by
a brief tour of the Main Library, beginning at 1:00 p.m. beside the Main Card Catalogue. Those who wish to take the tour
separately can do so any weekday at 1:00 until September 25. If there is still a demand, tours will continue into October.
Students who cannot come at 1:00 will be able to sign up for specially-scheduled tours; a list will be posted at the Information
Desk near the Main Card Catalogue.
•
:
As before, faculty members are also invited to bring their classes for more specialized programs and tours. These cover library
materials which students will find useful for particular courses or assignments. They are especially valuable for groups beginning
term papers and other projects requiring library use. Over 2,000 students attended last fall, and even more are expected this
year. To arrange a special subject tour, please see the Information Desk staff or call them at locals 2076 and 2077.
H ■
■
'
I Finally, the Library has a number of new guides and handouts which will be useful to both students and faculty. Know Your
Library has been revised and expanded, and is available at most public service desks in the Main Library. Thirty of the
most-asked questions about the Main Library and its use are answered on a sheet entitled "PROBLEMS?", which can be picked
up in the Main Concourse. The Circulation Division is also distributing a quick-reference sheet with information on borrowing,
returning and renewing books, payment of fines, Library copying facilities, lockers and study carrells.
At the Main Concourse Information Desk students may pick up a guide to the locations and holdings of all Main Library
reference divisions and branch libraries. (A campus map is included.) Many of these divisions, collections and branches will also
be issuing their own guides. A complete list follows:
MAIN LIBRARY COLLECTIONS
AND REFERENCE DIVISIONS BRANCH LIBRARIES
Asian Studies Division MacMillan (Forestry/Agriculture) Library
Colbeck Collection , Marjorie Smith (Social Work) Library
Map Division Mathematics Library
Reserve Book Collection Recordings Collection
Special Collections Division Sedgewick Undergraduate Library
For more information about library orientation programs and materials, please call the Information and Orientation Division
at local 2076.
NEW DEAL IN THE CARD GAME
This month all UBC borrowers' cards are being replaced by new ones, which have two more digits added to the previous
eight-digit number. One indicates which university the borrower is from, and the other will tell the Library whether or not the
card has been made up to replace an earlier one which was lost or stolen. Borrower codes are also being changed, so that the
same card can now be used for several years. Previously only faculty members could keep cards indefinitely; all student and staff
cards had to be reissued every year.
Students are being issued their new cards' during registration. Faculty and staff will receive theirs in the mail for signatures.
(Identification photographs are optional.) The signed cards must then go back to Circulation for laminating and punching before
being returned to borrowers. After that they may be kept for up to five years. A date stamp will be added at the start of each
new academic year.
REFERENCE PUBLICATIONS MAKE LIBRARY RESEARCH EASIER
Students beginning flew courses this fall may not realize how helpful the Library's reference publications can be. These
booklists give call numbers, locations, and often brief evaluations of the most useful works in a wide range of subject fields.
_ Some of the guides available from the various reference divisions and branch libraries are listed below. Most are useful for
students at any level, but those marked with an asterisk are more suitable for upper-year or graduate students.
FINE ARTS DIVISION
* 1. Guide to the Literature of Planning
* 2. Theses Relating to Planning
GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS DIVISION
'   ' ' -
Selected lists of current government publications dealing with:.
1. The Arctic and Antarctic
2. Indians of North America
3. Pollution
4. Poverty in Canada
5. Status of Women
i
HUMANITIES DIVISION
1. Classical Studies   An Undergraduate's Guide
2. Guide to Reference Materials in French Language and Literature ■
3. Guide to Reference Materials in German Language and Literature
4. Guide to Reference Materials in Hispanic Studies   .
5. Reference Guide to Reviews (covers book, film and theatre reviews)
SCIENCE DIVISION
* I. Brief Guide to Reference Materials in Chemical Engineering
* 2. Scientific and Technical Translations and Translation Bibliographies
SOCIAL SCIENCES DIVISION
.
* 1. Guide to Reference Materials in Geography
:
2. Library Guide for Commerce Students
3. Reference Guide to Educational Literature
WOODWARD BIOMEDICAL LIBRARY
1. Guide to Dental Hygiene Literature
2. Literature Guide: Pharmacy
3. Literature Guide: Physiology
NEW UNDERGROUND MICROFILM SUBSCRIPTION
Just what are underground newspapers?
An underground newspaper is, by definition, radical in politics, partial toward sex and pot, hostile
toward the establishment media, and staffed by young people who run the paper democratically.
F.X. Boyle, "The gang-bang on the underground press,"
Avant Garde, No. 12 (May, 1970), 45.
On the whole, their objectives do not vary much. They claim to present a voice in opposition to the
mass media, a voice of the free, the hip, the anarchist and of youth in general. A voice for those who
have no voice. They claim to be a forum for free expression, and as such call themselves an opposition
press. They claim to offer an alternative to the society in which we live.
A rough count of the number of obscenity trials facing these papers would convince anyone that they
do indeed permit free expression. Language usage aside, most of them are mini dailies in format. They
have their book, music and theatre reviews, advertisements, fashion notes, recipes and medical advice
columns. That the fashions are mod, the music rock, the advertisements sexually uninhibited, the recipes i;
for macrobiotic foods and the stock quotations for bid and ask prices on drugs, does show a difference
in readership. Most of their content is in the nature of poetry, philosophical prose, and editorial
comments on the injustices of the world and suggestions for rectifying them. There is little "hard news".
Anne Leibl, "Canada's underground press," Canadian
Library Journal, XXVII, No. 1 (Jan.-Feb., 1970), 17.
The newest and certainly the most interesting newspaper set to be added to the Library's microfilm collection is a joint effort
of the Bell and Howell Company and the Underground Press Syndicate. It is a collection, beginning in 1965, of over 200
underground papers, some 125 of which are now extinct. Five Canadian newspapers are included among the current titles:
Vancouver's Georgia Straight, Winnipeg's Black Cat, Ottawa's Octopus, Toronto's Harbinger, and Montreal's Logos.
This set has been advertised as "a deliberately biased report of America's sixties". It will be a most valuable and interesting
aid to historians of the future as they look back upon this era. Many libraries feel it necessary to preserve the alternate point of
view being aired in the underground press. Up till now, however, they have been faced with sometimes insurmountable problems
in trying to locate and maintain such a collection in printed form. The advent of a comprehensive set of these newspapers on
microfilm should certainly be of advantage to the academic community.
Like all microforms held in the Main Library, the underground newspaper collection will be found on stack level 6. The staff
at the Government Publications reference desk will help users locate films and put them on the readers. Black-and-white prints
may be made from any microfilm at a cost of 10 cents for a 10" x 14" page. LATEST AND LAST FACULTY PUBLICATIONS LIST
As we noted in an earlier newsletter, UBC's annual listing of faculty publications is being discontinued after 1970. The final
edition will be distributed to department heads, deans and other members of the University administration.
All remaining copies will be given out, free of charge, at the Main Library's Information Desk. Faculty members who have not
received a copy in the mail by September 21st may pick one up in person or call local 2077 to arrange for delivery. The supply is
limited, so don't delay too long!
MUCH ACCOMPLISHED, MUCH AHEAD FOR CRANE
This summer's A for Achievement award goes to the Crane Library for the Blind. Early in July its staff organized an
ambitious short-term reading project aimed at getting the entire book list for English 100 and 200 on tape by the start of the fall
term. Two months later all 70 required and recommended books had been recorded. Our thanks to the many volunteer readers
who kept Crane's recording studios busy seven days a week.
Any faculty members, staff or students who enjoy reading will still be welcome this fall. With the English project completed,
volunteers are recording texts in other subject areas, such as education, history, sociology and psychology. At the same time,
taping continues on fiction and popular nonfiction for the general collection. Please call Crane at 228-2373 if you would like to
volunteer one hour a week as a reader.
A new catalogue listing the tapes available at the branch has just been issued, and already inter-library loan requests are
coming in on behalf of blind students at other Canadian universities. Thanks to a gift from the 1970 graduating class, Crane is
able to make these loans without handicapping its own patrons. A new high-speed duplicator can run off up to four copies of a
six-hour tape in seven minutes. The duplicates go to other libraries; the original stays with Crane.
This machine is one of several resources in the Crane Library which may be used by anyone at UBC. Others include the
collection of journals and pamphlets on blindness and the education of the blind; catalogues listing materials for the blind or
about blindness; and a collection of books in large print for readers with vision problems. Faculty members or students
interested in these areas should make a point of visiting Crane soon. The library's main office is in Room 254 of the Brock Hall
Extension.
A HOUSE DIVIDED
The start of construction on the new Sedgewick Undergraduate Library has been delayed for at least another month. It now
seems likely that the building will not be ready for use until the summer of 1972. However, an unbuilt library is one degree less
frustrating to staff and patrons than a library that is built but can't be used. Dalhousie University is coping with that problem
now.
As the new Killam Memorial Library neared completion, most of the books in the Macdonald Library were moved into it.
Then, late in the summer, construction strikes held up work on the building. By the start of the fall term it was still not ready
for public use.
In the meantime, all reserve books, stack books, documents and microforms are in the new library, but only a few authorized
staff are allowed in. The rest of the staff and all of the patrons must work in the old building. All material required from Killam
has to be ordered, sight unseen, through a library delivery service. At last report, no one at Dalhousie could predict how long this
might go on.
So cheer up, UBC. We may be short of space for a while longer, but it's better than that kind of expansion!
Editor: Mrs. E. de Bruijn Information & Orientation Division ■
■ "
■
■
.
■
■   ■ ■ ■
■
.1
'■
■
r\ ■ ■
■ ■ ' ;
■
i
■
"
I i
.   ■ -; ■"
' ' ' ■ ■ ■■ ■      '
'
■
!
. . .
■
■

Cite

Citation Scheme:

        

Citations by CSL (citeproc-js)

Usage Statistics

Share

Embed

Customize your widget with the following options, then copy and paste the code below into the HTML of your page to embed this item in your website.
                        
                            <div id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidgetDisplay">
                            <script id="ubcOpenCollectionsWidget"
                            src="{[{embed.src}]}"
                            data-item="{[{embed.item}]}"
                            data-collection="{[{embed.collection}]}"
                            data-metadata="{[{embed.showMetadata}]}"
                            data-width="{[{embed.width}]}"
                            async >
                            </script>
                            </div>
                        
                    
IIIF logo Our image viewer uses the IIIF 2.0 standard. To load this item in other compatible viewers, use this url:
https://iiif.library.ubc.ca/presentation/cdm.ubclibnews.1-0213287/manifest

Comment

Related Items